October 14 - 20, 2018: Issue 379

The Great Anti-Fracking Bus Trip 2018

The NT Govt has released half of the Territory for CSG - it's a toxic disaster! 

We are helping to get pastoralists and indigenous owners on a bus trip to SE Qld. and the Pilliga to see first hand what fracking does to farmland, water and country, and to hear from land owners and farmers there what a disaster it is. 

This Chuffed fundraiser is to help cover the cost of fuel and cabin accommodation for the 10 days they will be on the road. You can donate directly, and you can bid on stuff in some Facebook Auctions coming up. Any amount helps.

AND can you please invite your friends to the Facebook page HERE too. It's as much about raising awareness as it is about raising money. Tell everyone - NO FRACKING OUR LAND OR WATER!

Thanks, 
Dick & Bron Clarke

Donate at this Chuffed secure link:

The results are in: Narrabri wants renewable energy, not CSG

October 11, 2018: Media Release
The North West Alliance and Lock the Gate have released the results of door-to-door surveys in Narrabri showing an overwhelming majority of people in favour of renewable energy compared to less than a third that want CSG.

The door-knocking took place from July to September, knocking on 2,300 doors and collecting survey responses from 840 people.

The results of the survey show overwhelming positivity in Narrabri towards renewable energy and considerable concern about coal seam gas:
  • Asked if they support renewable energy as a way to provide long-term jobs for Narrabri 97% of people answered “yes!”
  • Asked if they were in favour of the proposed 850 well coal seam gasfield in the Pilliga, only 28% of people said they were in favour
  • More than half, 52%, of people surveyed were opposed to the gasfield and 20% were unsure
  • 55% of the people surveyed said they were very or somewhat concerned about the gasfield and only 24% said they were not concerned
Sally Hunter, Narrabri farmer and member of People for the Plains said:

“It was so worthwhile to speak to the people of Narrabri about their attitudes to renewable energy and coal seam gas and discover the town is far more excited by renewables than CSG.

“We’re excited too: we want the jobs and prosperity that renewable energy can bring Narrabri without the pollution and water depletion that CSG will bring."

Jane Judd, Lock the Gate North West regional coordinator said:

“A report commissioned by Lock the Gate earlier this year revealed that the huge renewable energy potential of Narrabri Shire can create more numerous and more lasting jobs than CSG offers, without sucking up huge volumes of water and risking serious environmental harm.

“Though this is just a snapshot, we think our survey results indicate that Narrabri people want jobs, but not at the expense of the water that is the lifeblood of our region. Luckily for all of us, we don’t have to choose between one or the other: we can stop the Narrabri gasfield and embrace the jobs that renewable energy can bring.”

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change releases report

8 October 2018: Media release - The Hon. Melissa Price MP, Minister for the Environment
The Australian Government will consider the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s report as part of our ongoing review of our country’s contribution to global action on climate change.

The Morrison Government is committed to the Paris Agreement and takes its international obligations seriously.

While Australia contributes only around one per cent of global emissions, we will deliver on our commitment to reduce emissions by 26 to 28 per cent of 2005 levels by 2030.

Australia’s emissions intensity is at its lowest level for 28 years.

The report was requested by parties to the Paris Agreement, including Australia, to provide the IPCC’s assessment of the latest available science on impacts of a 1.5°C global warming scenario (on pre-industrial levels) compared with a 2°C scenario.

The 600 page report covers all aspects of climate change policy, including the science, impacts and mitigation and we will consider its detail carefully.

We’re particularly concerned about the implications for coral reefs, with the report finding climate change will impact reefs across the world, including Australia.

More than ever this report shows the necessity of the Morrison Government’s $444 million investment in the Great Barrier Reef’s management.

Our investment will specifically address key areas for action identified by the Reef 2050 Plan.

I want to reassure Australians that, in the International Year of the Reef, the Morrison Government prioritises action over words. International efforts to reduce global climate change, combined with action at national and local levels to build the resilience of the Reef by reducing impacts, is the best insurance for protecting the Reef.

IPCC Reports are designed to inform policy makers, but without being policy prescriptive. The Australian Delegation at the meeting in Korea consisted of officials from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Department of the Environment and Energy.

Butler and Price show major parties are addicted to coal and can’t tackle the climate emergency: Greens

October 9, 2018: Media Release
Greens Co-Deputy Leader and spokesperson on climate change and energy Adam Bandt MP today said that the response of Labor and Liberal to the IPCC’s Special Report on 1.5 degrees demonstrates that they are incapable of implementing policies that will bring about the ‘rapid and far reaching’ transition required to decarbonise the economy. Their reluctance to commit to clear policy action demonstrates that business as usual under Liberal and Labor is a death sentence for the planet.

This morning on Radio National, Labor’s shadow climate change minister, Mark Butler, refused to commit Labor to a coal phase out, instead discussing trends in the domestic and international thermal coal market. When interviewed on AM the Coalition’s Environment Minister, Melissa Price, admitted she had not read the whole IPCC report and stated she was “very comfortable we’re going to meet the 2030 [Paris] target”, despite running a defence for coal-fired power, having no policies to reduce emissions and with advice from her own department indicating we are set to miss our target by between 868-934 MtCO₂e.

Labor and Liberal are ignoring the science. If we don’t end their addiction to coal, we’re stuffed,” said Mr Bandt.

“Instead of moving to a war-footing on climate change, their prescription is for more of the same.

“The political leadership of our country is paralysed.

Melissa Price’s interview was a trainwreck because the Liberals don’t accept the science. It shows what happens when you install a former mining executive as Environment Minister.

“She hasn’t had her new job for very long, and she won’t hold onto it for much longer if she continues to ignore the science and mislead the Australian public.

Labor tries to talk big on renewables but they won’t phase out coal exports, which cause more global warming pollution than the rest of the economy.

“The Greens are the only party with the policies capable of implementing the rapid and far reaching transitions required to limit global warming.

“Even after the scientists have given us our final warning, Labor and Liberal still refuse to quit coal.”

Greens environment spokesperson Sarah Hanson-Young said Australia needs an environment minister who puts the environment first.

“It is a disgrace that Melissa Price is spruiking coal when we know what lasting, irreversible damage it does to the environment. She must be the most anti-environment environment minister Australia has had,” Senator Sarah Hanson-Young said.  

“Our Environment Minister can plant all the trees she likes, but it won’t offset the damage to the planet of digging up and burning more coal.

“If Melissa Price is our advocate for the environment in the Morrison Government, there is little hope protecting and sustaining our environment will ever be a priority.

“Rather than looking for excuses we need an Environment Minister and Government that takes the warning of the IPCC seriously and is committed to reducing carbon pollution.”

IPCC Report: 45% by 2030 - Zero by 2050

The report finds that limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require "rapid and far-reaching" transitions in land, energy, industry, buildings, transport, and cities. Global net human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) would need to fall by about 45 percent from 2010 levels by 2030, reaching 'net zero' around 2050.

More and link to report below.

Adani Fails to Pay for 12.5 Billion Litres of Queensland Water

October 10, 2018
Lock the Gate says Adani’s failure to pay $18.5 million owed for water license should trigger the Queensland Government to cancel the licence.

In response to a question on notice in parliament Natural Resource Minister Anthony Lynham confirmed Adani did not pay for its license to take 12.5 billion litres of water from the Suttor River by the 1st July 2018 due date, and has in fact been granted a 12-month extension.

“Despite drought conditions the Queensland Government are continuing to give preferential treatment to Adani, essentially giving them an option on the water even though they haven’t paid for the licence” said Mackay Conservation Group Spokesperson, Maggie McKeown.

“The Queensland Government have always said they would hold Adani to the highest standards and strictest conditions, yet they seem unable to hold Adani to account when it comes to paying its way” said Lock the Gate spokesperson Ellie Smith.

“Adani continues to claim they are on track to start this mine and blame others for their delays and yet they are unwilling to invest $18.5m to sure up the water needed for the mine.

“The Queensland government should never have granted our water to Adani and now it has this chance to cancel the licence, it must act swiftly to do so.” said Ellie Smith.

Question on Notice detailing the Queensland Government giving Adani a 12-month extension to pay here.

Long Reef Guided Reef Walks

Please find below the 2017 – 2018 timetable for guided walks of Long Reef Aquatic Reserve.

If you’d like to join us on a walk please contact me a couple of weeks before the walk date to make a booking. FREE GUIDED WALKS of Long Reef Aquatic Reserve with NSW Department of Industry & Investment Fishcare Volunteers will be held on the following date:

Dates for 2018
Sunday 9 September 2018     12:30pm – 2:30pm
Sunday 7 October 2018          12:30pm – 2:30pm
Sunday 4 November 2018      11:30am – 1:30pm
Sunday 9 December 2018        4:00pm – 6:00pm

Dates for 2019
Sunday 6 January 2019         3:00pm – 5:00pm
Sunday 20 January 2019       2:00pm – 4:00pm
Sunday 17 February 2019     1:00pm – 3:00pm
Sunday 17 March 2019          11:30am – 1:30pm
Sunday 7 April 2019               2:30pm  – 4:30pm

Walks are held subject to weather conditions

Bookings are preferred.
Please email Wendy to book:

Green Team Beach Cleans 2018!

Hosted by The Green Team
The Green Team is back for 2018! 
It has been estimated that we will have more plastic than fish in the ocean by 2050...These beach cleans are aimed at reducing the vast amounts of plastic from entering our oceans before they harm marine life. 

Anyone and everyone is welcome! If you would like to come along, please bring a bucket, gloves and hat. Kids of all ages are also welcome! 

The Green Team is a Youth-run, volunteer-based environment initiative from Avalon, Sydney. Keeping our area green and clean.

Create a Habitat Stepping Stone!

Over 50 Pittwater households have already pledged to make a difference for our local wildlife, and you can too! Create a habitat stepping stone to help our wildlife out. It’s easy - just add a few beautiful habitat elements to your backyard or balcony to create a valuable wildlife-friendly stopover.

How it works

1) Discover: Visit the website below to find dozens of beautiful plants, nest boxes and water elements you can add to your backyard or balcony to help our local wildlife.

2) Pledge: Select three or more elements to add to your place. You can even show you care by choosing to have a bird appear on our online map.

3) Share: Join the Habitat Stepping Stones Facebook community to find out what’s happening in the natural world, and share your pics, tips and stories.

What you get                                  

• Enjoy the wonders of nature, right outside your window. • Free and discounted plants for your garden. • A Habitat Stepping Stone plaque for your front fence. • Local wildlife news and tips. • Become part of the Pittwater Habitat Stepping Stones community.

Get the kids involved and excited about helping out! www.HabitatSteppingStones.org.au

No computer? No problem -Just write to the address below and we’ll mail you everything you need. Habitat Stepping Stones, Department of Environmental Sciences, Macquarie University NSW 2109. This project is assisted by the NSW Government through its Environmental Trust

Living Ocean


Living Ocean was born in Whale Beach, on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, surrounded by water and set in an area of incredible beauty.
Living Ocean is a charity that promotes the awareness of human impact on the ocean, through research, education, creative activity in the community, and support of others who sustain ocean health and integrity.

And always celebrating and honouring the natural environment and the lifestyle that the ocean offers us.

Our whale research program builds on research that has been conducted off our coastline by our experts over many years and our Centre for Marine Studies enables students and others to become directly involved.

Through partnerships with individuals and organizations, we conceive, create and coordinate campaigns that educate all layers of our community – from our ‘No Plastic Please’ campaign, which is delivered in partnership with local schools, to film nights and lectures, aimed at the wider community.

Additionally, we raise funds for ocean-oriented conservation groups such as Sea Shepherd.

Donations are tax-deductable 

Newport Community Gardens

Anyone interested in joining our community garden group please feel free to come and visit us on Sunday at 10am at the Woolcott Reserve in Newport!


Keep in Touch with what's happening on Newport Garden's Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/newportcg/

Avalon Preservation Association


The Avalon Preservation Association, also known as Avalon Preservation Trust. We are a not for profit volunteer community group incorporated under the NSW Associations Act, established 50 years ago. We are committed to protecting your interests – to keeping guard over our natural and built environment throughout the Avalon area.

Membership of the association is open to all those residents and/or ratepayers of Avalon Beach and adjacent areas who support the aims and objectives of our Association.

What Does PNHA do?

PROFILE

About Pittwater Natural Heritage Association (PNHA)
With urbanisation, there are continuing pressures that threaten the beautiful natural environment of the Pittwater area. Some impacts are immediate and apparent, others are more gradual and less obvious. The Pittwater Natural Heritage Association has been formed to act to protect and preserve the Pittwater areas major and most valuable asset - its natural heritage. PNHA is an incorporated association seeking broad based community membership and support to enable it to have an effective and authoritative voice speaking out for the preservation of Pittwater's natural heritage. Please contact us for further information.

Our Aims
  • To raise public awareness of the conservation value of the natural heritage of the Pittwater area: its landforms, watercourses, soils and local native vegetation and fauna.
  • To raise public awareness of the threats to the long-term sustainability of Pittwater's natural heritage.
  • To foster individual and community responsibility for caring for this natural heritage.
  • To encourage Council and the NSW Government to adopt and implement policies and works which will conserve, sustain and enhance the natural heritage of Pittwater.
Act to Preserve and Protect!
If you would like to join us, please fill out the Membership Application Form ($20.00 annually - $10 concession)

Email: pnhainfo@gmail.com Or click on Logo to visit website.

Permaculture Northern Beaches 

Manly • Warringah • Pittwater | Sydney
Permaculture Northern Beaches (PNB) is an active local group based on Sydney's Northern Beaches.  Our parent body is  Permaculture Sydney North.

PNB hold monthly permaculture related events on the 4th Thursday of each month at 7:15pm at the  Nelson Heather Community Centre,  Banksia Room, 5 Jacksons Rd, Warriewood

Australian Native Foods website: http://www.anfil.org.au/

Avalon Community Garden

Community Gardens bring people together and enrich communities. They build a sense of place and shared connection.

Profile

Avalon Community Garden is a community led initiative to create accessible food gardens in public places throughout the Pittwater area. Our aim is to share skills and knowledge in creating fabulous local, organic food. But it's not just about great food. We also aim to foster community connection, stimulate creative ideas for community resilience and celebrate our abundance. Open to all ages and skills, our first garden is on the grounds of Barrenjoey High School (off Tasman Road)Become part of this exciting initiative to change the world locally. 

Avalon Community Garden
2 Tasman Road
North Avalon
The Green Team

Profile
This Youth-run, volunteer-based environment initiative has been attracting high praise from the founders of Living Ocean as much as other local environment groups recently. 
Creating Beach Cleans events, starting their own, sustainability days - ‘action speaks louder than words’ ethos is at the core of this group. 

Pittwater's Environmental Foundation

Pittwater Environmental Foundation was established in 2006 to conserve and enhance the natural environment of the Pittwater local government area through the application of tax deductible donations, gifts and bequests. The Directors were appointed by Pittwater Council. 

 Profile

About 33% (about 1600 ha excluding National Parks) of the original pre-European bushland in Pittwater remains in a reasonably natural or undisturbed condition. Of this, only about 400ha remains in public ownership. All remaining natural bushland is subject to encroachment, illegal clearing, weed invasion, feral animals, altered drainage, bushfire hazard reduction requirements and other edge effects. Within Pittwater 38 species of plants or animals are listed as endangered or threatened under the Threatened Species Act. There are two endangered populations (Koala and Squirrel Glider) and eight endangered ecological communities or types of bushland. To visit their site please click on logo above.

Report illegal dumping

NSW Government

The RIDonline website lets you report the types of waste being dumped and its GPS location. Photos of the waste can also be added to the report.

The Environment Protection Authority (EPA), councils and Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) squads will use this information to investigate and, if appropriate, issue a fine or clean-up notice. Penalties for illegal dumping can be up to $15,000 and potential jail time for anybody caught illegally dumping within five years of a prior illegal dumping conviction.

Permaculture Northern Beaches

Want to know where your food is coming from? 

Do you like to enrich the earth as much as benefit from it?

Find out more here:

Profile

"I bind myself today to the power of Heaven, the light of the sun, the brightness of the moon, the splendour of fire, the flashing of lightning, the swiftness of wind, the depth of the sea, the stability of the earth, the compactness of rocks." -  from the Prayer of Saint Patrick

Katandra Season 2018

Open Days at Katandra Bushland Sanctuary are open again. 
Visit Katandra's Profile for more details and pop up and visit.

More than 21,000 submissions supported Sydney Marine Park with sanctuary zones

October 4, 2018: Media Release
At least 21,000 submissions to the Berejiklian government’s Sydney Marine Park consultation support the original plan to protect at least 2.4% of coastal waters between Newcastle and Wollongong in sanctuary zones. [1]

“We now know the full scale of the Berejiklian government’s betrayal,” Sydney Marine Park Campaigner Sharnie Connell said.

“The voices of at least 21,000 marine park supporters were effectively silenced when Gladys Berejiklian’s government ruled out sanctuary zones in the park.

“The government backflipped on its own proposal before the public had a say and the official community consultation had run its course.

“With the final announcement expected soon, the government has a last chance to listen to the community and include sanctuary zones in the park.

“If the final design lacks sanctuary zones, it can’t be called a marine park and the consultation process will have been a sham.”

Ms Connell said the backflip on marine sanctuaries ignored the science, the community consultation process, and the wishes of coastal locals.

“With less than 1% of the region’s coasts and oceans protected, our marine wildlife desperately needs these sanctuaries, just like we have national parks on land,” she said.

“NSW has successful marine parks with sanctuaries along other parts of the coast that have brought fish populations back to life and attracted tourists from around the world.”

The 21,000 submissions in support of a Sydney Marine Park with sanctuary zones is consistent with polling conducted in August that showed overwhelming support for increased protections for marine life in the waters from Newcastle to Wollongong.

A ReachTEL poll found public support for a Sydney Marine Park ranged between 83% in Manly, 76% in Coogee, and 75% Gosford and Terrigal.

The poll also found people were more likely to vote for candidates who supported increased marine protections and vote against the government if it backflipped on the Sydney Marine Park proposal.

[1] The figure was collated by conservation groups who monitored submissions made by marine park supporters during the six-week consultation process, which ended September 27.

Aussie backyard bird count: 22-28 October 2018 

Save the date — the Aussie Backyard Bird Count is back from 22-28 October 2018.

The #AussieBirdCount is a great way to connect with the birds in your backyard, no matter where your backyard might be — a suburban backyard, a local park, a patch of forest, a farm, down by the beach, or the main street of town.

To take part all you need is 20 minutes and your favourite outdoor space. Not only will you be contributing to BirdLife Australia's knowledge of Aussie birds, but there are also some great prizes on offer. Head to the website and register as a Counter today!
 
If you’ve taken part before and are registered for this year why not introduce someone else to the wonderful world of birding through this easy, fun, all-ages event? And if you're a teacher, check out our Bird Count curriculum-based lesson plans to get your students (or the whole school!) involved.

If you have questions about the Aussie Backyard Bird Count, please head to our FAQ page, where you’ll find more information about registering, participating, and troubleshooting.

28 days to go — and counting!


Restoration And Rehabilitation Grants  Now Open 

October 11, 2018: Media Release
Member for Manly James Griffin announced today that applications for grants under the NSW Environment Trust’s Restoration and Rehabilitation Program are open for community and government organisations to create more sustainable management of environmental assets and services. 

“I am passionate about our environment and this is a huge opportunity for local community organisations to secure funding to improve our local environment. This historic program has run for more than 25 years and will deliver long term outcomes for our local environment here on the Northern Beaches,” Mr Griffin said. 

“These grants enable community organisations and Council to further protect, conserve and restore our valuable natural environment by implementing local or regional on-ground projects.

“We want to enhance how this is done by facilitating the development of environmental expertise and partnerships between the community, government and industry. 

“Without these grants, the community would not have the ability to implement the volume of vital sustainability activities such as bush regeneration, weed management, revegetation, vertebrate pest management, fencing, erosion control, formalisation of tracks, and capacity building, to signage and educational resources.” 

Under the Program, $4,000,000 will be made available for grants across two funding streams, which include:
  • Community projects totalling $2,000,000; and
  • Government projects totalling $2,000,000.
Individual grants of up to $100,000 will be offered under the program.

Applications close on 3 December 2018. 

The program is a contestable grants program, therefore applications received will be assessed on merit by an independent technical committee. 

Merit is based on clear assessment criteria set out in the Program Guidelines. Successful applications will be approved by the Trust in May 2019. The Program is funded by the NSW Environment Trust within the Office of Environment and Heritage. 

For information on how to apply for a grant, visit: www.environment.nsw.gov.au/grants/restoration.htm

As experts warn about warming beyond 1.5 degrees, NSW Government pushes forward with Bylong coal mine

October 09, 2018: Media Release
Community groups have slammed the NSW Department of Planning and Environment (DoPE) for recommending a new thermal coal mine should proceed on the very same day that the IPCC warned the world needed to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees.

The department has recommended that the destructive, foreign-owned Bylong coal mine near Mudgee can proceed, despite a new assessment identifying state significant heritage values on the site where mining is proposed.

An independent expert report on the heritage values released yesterday by the department concluded that:
  1. The Bylong Valley generally had state significant heritage values as a scenic landscape on the western side of the World-heritage listed Blue Mountains
  2. The Tarwyn Park property in particular had state significant heritage values as the site of the first and longest running application of Natural Sequence Farming in Australia
Despite this report, the DoPE suggested only minor amendments to the mine plan rather than rejecting the mine outright.  The proposal will now go to the Independent Planning Commission for a final determination.

“The recommendation to proceed with the Bylong mine shows the NSW Government is completely missing in action on climate change just as the IPCC warns warming beyond 1.5 degrees risks catastrophic heat and disruption” said Lock the Gate spokesperson Carmel Flint.

“Not only will this mine put the climate at risk, but new research shows it will take South Korean mining giant KEPCO one step closer to destroying a magnificent valley with state significant heritage values.

“The Department of Planning and Environment has cherry-picked the expert heritage information and moved only to amend the mine plan slightly, when it’s clear the mine should have been rejected outright.

“Equally worrying is that there is no new information on Aboriginal cultural heritage impacts provided by the department, even though the Independent Planning Commission previously stated that further investigation was needed.  

“This mine will only proceed with the backing of the NSW Government, who at every step have allowed it to progress through the planning process despite the obvious and unacceptable risks it poses to farmland, water and heritage.

“We’re calling on the NSW Premier to come and meet local landholders and visit the site as a matter of urgency and then to take firm action to end this dangerous mining proposal” she said.

Quotes from the Hector Abrahams Architects independent report on heritage values:

“Tarwyn Park and its setting are substantial components in the Bylong Scenic Landscape, one of a group of scenic landscapes traversing the Great Dividing Range which are distinctive to the New South Wales landscape. The Bylong Valley is one of the many valleys of different sizes but consistent geology that together form the western side of the World Heritage-listed Blue Mountains, and contribute to its scenic values. (State level significance)

Tarwyn Park is the site of the first and longest running application of Natural Sequence Farming in Australia, and is the basis for all subsequent implementations of the technique. As one of a small number of prominent experimental agricultural practices to gain scientific interest and popular appeal since 1938, Tarwyn Park is significant in the history of Australia's technological advancements in agriculture. (State level significance).

Nature Writing Prize 2019

Calling all nature writers!
The Nature Conservancy Australia is delighted to open the fifth biennial Nature Writing Prize.

The winner of the best essay (3,000 – 5,000 words) in the genre of ‘Writing of Place’ will receive a $5,000 award and will be published as an online multimedia essay by Griffith Review – Australia’s leading literary quarterly publication.

The prize will go to an Australian writer whose entry is judged to be of the highest literary merit and which best explores their relationship and interaction with some aspect of the Australian landscape.

Entry costs $30.00. The deadline for submissions is 1 February 2019 and the winner will be announced in May 2019. The prize is open to Australian citizens and permanent residents. 

Koalas in NSW are losing their homes

They’re losing their homes to excessive tree-clearing and if we don’t act soon, koalas could be extinct in NSW as early as 2050. Due to weakened laws, tree-clearing has tripled in the past two years, resulting in the destruction of the homes of more than 240 native species. 

Sign the petition: https://wwfau.org/2NUAaLP

Newport Community Garden: Working Bee Second Sunday of the month

Newport Community Gardens Inc. is a not for profit incorporated association. The garden is in Woolcott Reserve.

Objectives
Local Northern Beaches residents creating sustainable gardens in public spaces
Strengthening the local community, improving health and reconnecting with nature
To establish ecologically sustainable gardens for the production of vegetables, herbs, fruit and companion plants within Pittwater area 
To enjoy and forge friendships through shared gardening.
Membership is open to all Community members willing to participate in establishing gardens and growing sustainable food.
Subscription based paid membership.
We meet at the garden between 9am – 12 noon
New members welcome

For enquiries contact newportcommunitygardenau@gmail.com
4 Pines Brewery Newport will be providing up-cycled malt bags from the brewery to store the trash and keep it from our shores. 

Do you get a beer? 
Absolutely! 4 Pines will hand out tokens to participants which will be redeemable for a fresh cold beer back at Public House. 

PNHA Newsletter 76 


Read about wild life in the 'Burbs - How to identify local owl calls, the Wing Tag project and PNHA's latest campaign news.


Wildlife Carers and Organisations in Pittwater:

Sydney Wildlife rescues, rehabilitates and releases sick, injured and orphaned native wildlife. From penguins, to possums and parrots, native wildlife of all descriptions passes through the caring hands of Sydney Wildlife rescuers and carers on a daily basis. We provide a genuine 24 hour, 7 day per week emergency advice, rescue and care service.

As well as caring for sick, injured and orphaned native wildlife, Sydney Wildlife is also involved in educating the community about native wildlife and its habitat. We provide educational talks to a wide range of groups and audiences including kindergartens, scouts, guides, a wide range of special interest groups and retirement villages. Talks are tailored to meet the needs and requirements of each group. 

Profile

Found an injured native animal? We're here to help.

Keep the animal contained, warm, quiet and undisturbed. Do not offer any food or water. Call Sydney Wildlife immediately on 9413 4300, or take the animal to your nearest vet. Generally there is no charge. Find out more at: www.sydneywildlife.org.au

Southern Cross Wildlife Care was launched over 6 years ago. It is the brainchild of Dr Howard Ralph, the founder and chief veterinarian. SCWC was established solely for the purpose of treating injured, sick and orphaned wildlife. No wild creature in need that passes through our doors is ever rejected. 

Profile

People can assist SCWC by volunteering their skills ie: veterinary; medical; experienced wildlife carers; fundraising; "IT" skills; media; admin; website etc. We are always having to address the issue of finances as we are a non commercial veterinary service for wildlife in need, who obviously don't have cheque books in their pouches. It is a constant concern and struggle of ours when we are pre-occupied with the care and treatment of the escalating amount of wildlife that we have to deal with. Just becoming a member of SCWC for $45 a year would be a great help. Regular monthly donations however small, would be a wonderful gift and we could plan ahead knowing that we had x amount of funds that we could count on. Our small team of volunteers are all unpaid even our amazing vet Howard, so all funds raised go directly towards our precious wildlife. SCWC is TAX DEDUCTIBLE.

Find out more at: southerncrosswildlifecare.org.au/wp/

Friends Of Narrabeen Lagoon Catchment Activities

Bush Regeneration - Narrabeen Lagoon Catchment  
This is a wonderful way to become connected to nature and contribute to the health of the environment.  Over the weeks and months you can see positive changes as you give native species a better chance to thrive.  Wildlife appreciate the improvement in their habitat.

Belrose area - Thursday mornings 
Belrose area - Weekend mornings by arrangement
Contact: Phone or text Conny Harris on 0432 643 295

Wheeler Creek - Wednesday mornings 9-11am
Contact: Phone or text Judith Bennett on 0402 974 105
Or email: Friends of Narrabeen Lagoon Catchment : email@narrabeenlagoon.org.au

Bushcare in Pittwater 

For further information or to confirm the meeting details for below groups, please contact Council's Bushcare Officer on 9970 1367

BUSHCARE SCHEDULES 
Where we work                      Which day                              What time 

Avalon     
Angophora Reserve             3rd Sunday                         8:30 - 11:30am 
Avalon Dunes                        1st Sunday                         8:30 - 11:30am 
Avalon Golf Course              2nd Wednesday                 3 - 5:30pm 
Careel Creek                         4th Saturday                      8:30 - 11:30am 
Toongari Reserve                 3rd Saturday                      9 - 12noon (8 - 11am in summer) 
Bangalley Headland            2nd Sunday                         9 to 12noon 

Bayview     
Winnererremy Bay                 4th Sunday                        9 to 12noon 

Bilgola     
North Bilgola Beach              3rd Monday                        9 - 12noon 
Algona Reserve                     1st Saturday                       9 - 12noon 
Plateau Park                          1st Friday                            8:30 - 11:30am 

Church Point     
Browns Bay Reserve             1st Tuesday                        9 - 12noon 
McCarrs Creek Reserve       Contact Bushcare Officer     To be confirmed 

Clareville     
Old Wharf Reserve                 3rd Saturday                      8 - 11am 

Elanora     
Kundibah Reserve                   4th Sunday                       8:30 - 11:30am 

Mona Vale     
Mona Vale Beach Basin          1st Saturday                    8 - 11am 
Mona Vale Dunes                     2nd Saturday+3rd Thursday     8:30 - 11:30am 

Newport     
Bungan Beach                          4th Sunday                      9 - 12noon 
Crescent Reserve                    3rd Sunday                      9 - 12noon 
North Newport Beach              4th Saturday                    8:30 - 11:30am 
Porter Reserve                          2nd Saturday                  8 - 11am 

North Narrabeen     
Irrawong Reserve                     2nd Saturday                   2 - 5pm 

Palm Beach     
North Palm Beach Dunes      3rd Saturday                    9 - 12noon 

Scotland Island     
Catherine Park                          2nd Sunday                     10 - 12:30pm 
Elizabeth Park                           1st Saturday                      9 - 12noon 
Pathilda Reserve                      3rd Saturday                      9 - 12noon 

Warriewood     
Warriewood Wetlands             1st Sunday                         8:30 - 11:30am 

Whale Beach     
Norma Park                               1st Friday                            9 - 12noon 

Western Foreshores     
Coopers Point, Elvina Bay      2nd Sunday                        10 - 1pm 
Rocky Point, Elvina Bay           1st Monday                          9 - 12noon

Myna Action Group 

Pittwater Natural Heritage Association (PNHA)
Indian Mynas - what a pest - like flying rats. 
Contact us on pnhainfo@gmail.com for more information and have a look at https://www.facebook.com/MynaProblems/

Indian Mynas are displacing our native birds. They often nest in and around shops where their food source is. I took this one down this morning in Avalon (no chicks or eggs but I disturbed the female). There were literally hundreds of tiny bits of plastic in the nest which makes you think that all this plastic would be swilling down the stormwater drains into the sea.

Avalon Boomerang Bags


Avalon Boomerang Bags was introduced to us by Surfrider Foundation and Living Ocean, they both helped organise with the support of Pittwater Council the Recreational room at Avalon Community Centre which we worked from each Tuesday. This is the Hub of what is a Community initiative to help free Avalon of single use plastic bags and to generally spread the word of the overuse of plastic. 

Find out more and get involved.

Think before you print ; A kilo of recycled paper creates around 1.8 kilograms of carbon emissions, without taking into account the emissions produced from transporting the paper. So, before you send a document to print, think about how many kilograms of carbon emissions you could save by reading it on screen.

Summary for Policymakers of IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C  approved by governments

Incheon, Republic of Korea, October 8 – IPCC
Limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society, the IPCC said in a new assessment. With clear benefits to people and natural ecosystems, limiting global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2°C could go hand in hand with ensuring a more sustainable and equitable society, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said on Monday. 
 
The Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C was approved by the IPCC on Saturday in Incheon, Republic of Korea. It will be a key scientific input into the Katowice Climate Change Conference in Poland in December, when governments review the Paris Agreement to tackle climate change. 
 
"With more than 6,000 scientific references cited and the dedicated contribution of thousands of expert and government reviewers worldwide, this important report testifies to the breadth and policy relevance of the IPCC," said Hoesung Lee, Chair of the IPCC. 
 
Ninety-one authors and review editors from 40 countries prepared the IPCC report in response to an invitation from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) when it adopted the Paris Agreement in 2015. 
 
The report's full name is Global Warming of 1.5°C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty. 
 
"One of the key messages that comes out very strongly from this report is that we are already seeing the consequences of 1°C of global warming through more extreme weather, rising sea levels and diminishing Arctic sea ice, among other changes," said Panmao Zhai, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group I. 
 
The report highlights a number of climate change impacts that could be avoided by limiting global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2°C, or more. For instance, by 2100, global sea level rise would be 10 cm lower with global warming of 1.5°C compared with 2°C. The likelihood of an Arctic Ocean free of sea ice in summer would be once per century with global warming of 1.5°C, compared with at least once per decade with 2°C. Coral reefs would decline by 70-90 percent with global warming of 1.5°C, whereas virtually all (> 99 percent) would be lost with 2°C. 
 
"Every extra bit of warming matters, especially since warming of 1.5°C or higher increases the risk associated with long-lasting or irreversible changes, such as the loss of some ecosystems," said Hans-Otto Pörtner, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group II. 
 
Limiting global warming would also give people and ecosystems more room to adapt and remain below relevant risk thresholds, added Pörtner. The report also examines pathways available to limit warming to 1.5°C, what it would take to achieve them and what the consequences could be. "The good news is that some of the kinds of actions that would be needed to limit global warming to 1.5°C are already underway around the world, but they would need to accelerate," said Valerie Masson-Delmotte, Co-Chair of Working Group I. 
 
The report finds that limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require "rapid and far-reaching" transitions in land, energy, industry, buildings, transport, and cities. Global net human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) would need to fall by about 45 percent from 2010 levels by 2030, reaching 'net zero' around 2050. This means that any remaining emissions would need to be balanced by removing CO2 from the air. 
 
"Limiting warming to 1.5°C is possible within the laws of chemistry and physics but doing so would require unprecedented changes," said Jim Skea, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group III. 
 
Allowing the global temperature to temporarily exceed or 'overshoot' 1.5°C would mean a greater reliance on techniques that remove CO2 from the air to return global temperature to below 1.5°C by 2100. The effectiveness of such techniques are unproven at large scale and some may carry significant risks for sustainable development, the report notes. 
 
"Limiting global warming to 1.5°C compared with 2°C would reduce challenging impacts on ecosystems, human health and well-being, making it easier to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals," said Priyardarshi Shukla, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group III. 
 
"The decisions we make today are critical in ensuring a safe and sustainable world for everyone, both now and in the future", said Debra Roberts, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group II. 
 
"This report gives policymakers and practitioners the information they need to make decisions that tackle climate change while considering local context and people's needs. The next few years are probably the most important in our history," she said. 
 
The IPCC is the leading world body for assessing the science related to climate change, its impacts and potential future risks, and possible response options. 
 
The report was prepared under the scientific leadership of all three IPCC working groups. Working Group I assesses the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II addresses impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III deals with the mitigation of climate change. 
 
The Paris Agreement adopted by 195 nations at the 21st Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC in December 2015 included the aim of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change by "holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels." 
 
As part of the decision to adopt the Paris Agreement, the IPCC was invited to produce, in 2018, a Special Report on global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways. The IPCC accepted the invitation, adding that the Special Report would look at these issues in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty. 
 
Global Warming of 1.5°C is the first in a series of Special Reports to be produced in the IPCC's Sixth Assessment Cycle. Next year the IPCC will release the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate, and Climate Change and Land, which looks at how climate change affects land use. 
 
The Summary for Policymakers (SPM) presents the key findings of the Special Report, based on the assessment of the available scientific, technical and socio-economic literature relevant to global warming of 1.5°C. 
 
The Summary for Policymakers of the Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C (SR15) is available at https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15 or www.ipcc.ch
 
Key statistics of the Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C 
 
91 authors from 44 citizenships and 40 countries of residence
- 14 Coordinating Lead Authors (CLAs)
- 60 Lead authors (LAs)
- 17 Review Editors (REs) 
 
133 Contributing authors (CAs)
Over 6,000 cited references
A total of 42,001 expert and government review comments
(First Order Draft 12,895; Second Order Draft 25,476; Final Government Draft: 3,630) 
 
Background
The Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C, known as SR15, is being prepared in response to an invitation from the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in December 2015, when they reached the Paris Agreement, and will inform the Talanoa Dialogue at the 24th Conference of the Parties (COP24). The Talanoa Dialogue will take stock of the collective efforts of Parties in relation to progress towards the long-term goal of the Paris Agreement, and to inform the preparation of nationally determined contributions. Details of the report, including the approved outline, can be found on the report page. The report was prepared under the joint scientific leadership of all three IPCC Working Groups, with support from the Working Group I Technical Support Unit. 
 
What is the IPCC? 
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide policymakers with regular scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and potential future risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. It has 195 member states. 
 
IPCC assessments provide governments, at all levels, with scientific information that they can use to develop climate policies. IPCC assessments are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change. IPCC reports are drafted and reviewed in several stages, thus guaranteeing objectivity and transparency. 
 
The IPCC assesses the thousands of scientific papers published each year to tell policymakers what we know and don't know about the risks related to climate change. The IPCC identifies where there is agreement in the scientific community, where there are differences of opinion, and where further research is needed. It does not conduct its own research. 
 
To produce its reports, the IPCC mobilizes hundreds of scientists. These scientists and officials are drawn from diverse backgrounds. Only a dozen permanent staff work in the IPCC's Secretariat. 
 
The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for measuring emissions and removals. 
 
IPCC Assessment Reports consist of contributions from each of the three working groups and a Synthesis Report. Special Reports undertake an assessment of cross-disciplinary issues that span more than one working group and are shorter and more focused than the main assessments. 
 
Sixth Assessment Cycle 
At its 41st Session in February 2015, the IPCC decided to produce a Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). At its 42nd Session in October 2015 it elected a new Bureau that would oversee the work on this report and Special Reports to be produced in the assessment cycle. At its 43rd Session in April 2016, it decided to produce three Special Reports, a Methodology Report and AR6. 
 
The Methodology Report to refine the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories will be delivered in 2019. Besides Global Warming of 1.5°C, the IPCC will finalize two further special reports in 2019: the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate and Climate Change and Land: an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems. The AR6 Synthesis Report will be finalized in the first half of 2022, following the three working group contributions to AR6 in 2021. 

Urban Tree Canopy Plan Now On Public Exhibition: 100 Thousand Trees Planned

Plan To Protect And Enhance Northern Beaches’ Precious Urban Tree Canopy

Friday September 28, 2018: From Northern Beaches Council

Over 100,000 new trees planted on Council land, an iconic tree register and tools to encourage more trees on private property are key actions in Council’s first draft Urban Tree Canopy Plan now on public exhibition.

The draft Plan outlines the strategic directions and guiding principles for the management of trees across the Northern Beaches over the next five years.

Northern Beaches Mayor, Michael Regan said the four strategic directions of the draft Plan provide a comprehensive and cohesive approach to sustaining the future of our urban trees over the next five years by:

  • protecting existing urban trees;
  • maintaining the Northern Beaches’ existing urban tree canopy cover;
  • improving tree diversity and health; and 
  • by motivating, inspiring and supporting the community to protect and enhance our urban trees.

“It’s very exciting to have this plan fast tracked and ready for community comment. Similar strategies had been in development under the former Councils but what a great outcome of amalgamation that our tree canopy can now be managed in a coordinated way across the whole of the Northern Beaches area,” said Mayor Regan.

“We are in an enviable position of being one of the few areas within the Sydney Metropolitan area with canopy coverage greater than 50 percent, at 64.2 percent. Many council areas in Sydney have less than 20 percent urban canopy.

“There are, however, increased demands upon the Northern Beaches environment as more residents and businesses seek to call the Northern Beaches home.

“The plan details how we will implement an aggressive tree planting program on council owned land of at least 5,000 new trees annually, which would mean 100,000 over the next twenty years. 

“We’ll introduce an iconic tree register and ensure that any mature tree that has to be removed due to poor health or for unavoidable operation reasons will be offset by planting at least two more.

“The immediate focus will be on collating accurate baseline data to allow us to monitor the actions of the plan and ultimately measure how successful we are in protecting and maintaining a healthy and diverse canopy cover.

“Engaging our community in protecting and enhancing our urban trees will also be a critical factor in achieving the objectives of the Urban Tree Canopy Plan. 

“I encourage community feedback on the draft Plan and look forward to more ideas from the community,” Mayor Regan said. 

The success and progress of the all the actions listed in the plan will be reviewed annually.

The draft Northern Beaches Urban Tree Canopy Plan is available at northernbeaches.nsw.gov.au

How Can You Be Involved?

We have developed an Urban Tree Canopy Plan (draft) as part of our commitment to greening the Northern Beaches.

Have Your Say

Make an online submission

Attend a drop in session

  • Manly Town Hall forecourt - Wed 24 Oct - 12pm - 1pm
  • Glen Street Theatre - Thu 1 Nov - 12pm - 1pm
  • Mona Vale Library lane - Thu 8 Nov - 12pm - 1pm
  • Dee Why Beach, The Strand - Wed 14 Nov - 12pm - 1pm

Make a written submission: CEO, Northern Beaches Council, PO Box 1655, Manly, NSW 2099, marked “Urban Tree Canopy Plan 2018”

Submissions close Thursday 15 November 2018

Powerful Owl Release

March 18, 2018: Avalon Preservation Association
PNHA's Jacqui Marlow has advised that a Powerful Owl chick has been released in Plateau Park following its recuperation in Taronga Park. 

If you see it there being harassed, or even if you see it at all, can you please phone her on 0458 194 127.


Powerful owl family - photo courtesy PNHA


International Year of the Reef (IYOR)
The Third International Year of the Reef (IYOR 2018) @IYOR2018 / #IYOR2018

At the 31st General Meeting (November 2016 in Paris, France), the International Coral Reef Initiative declared 2018 as the third International Year of the Reef and encourages to:
  • strengthen awareness globally about the value of, and threats to, coral reefs and associated ecosystems;
  • promote partnerships between governments, the private sector, academia and civil society on the management of coral reefs;
  • identify and implement effective management strategies for conservation, increased resiliency and sustainable use of these ecosystems and promoting best practices; and
  • share information on best practices in relation to sustainable coral reef management.
History
1997 was declared the first International Year of the Reef (IYOR), in response to the increasing threats on coral reefs and associated ecosystems, such as mangroves and sea grasses around the world. IYOR was a global effort to increase awareness and understanding on the values and threats to coral reefs, and to support related conservation, research and management efforts. Over 225 organizations in 50 countries and territories participated, and over 700 articles in papers and magazines were generated, and hundreds of scientific surveys were undertaken.

Recognising that, ten years later, there continued to be an urgent need to increase awareness and understanding of coral reefs, and to further conserve and manage valuable coral reefs and associated ecosystems, the International Coral Reef Initiative designated 2008 as the second International Year of the Reef, IYOR 2008 (Resolution to Designate 2008 as the International Year of the Reef).

IYOR 2008 was a year-long campaign of events and initiatives hosted by governments and non-governmental organizations around the world, to promote conservation action and strengthen long-term collaborations for coral reef conservation.

IYOR 2008 Goals were the following:
  • Strengthen awareness about ecological, economic, social and cultural value of coral reefs and associated ecosystems
  • Improve understanding of the critical threats to reefs and generate both practical and innovative solutions to reduce these threats
  • Generate urgent action to develop and implement effective management strategies for conservation and sustainable use of these ecosystems.
Nations, organizations, and individuals around the world celebrated the International Year of the Reef 2008 (IYOR 2008): from international organizations to village children, to raise awareness about the value and importance of coral reefs and to motivate people to take action to protect them. A tremendous amount of material was produced in several languages during that year, including educational DVDs, posters, children's books, and much more. More than 630 events were organized in over 65 countries and territories around the world. IYOR 2008 has now come to an end, but the spirit lives on... To learn more about the IYOR 2008 accomplishment, download the IYOR Report.

Recognizing that public awareness is an essential element of coral reef conservation and is necessary to ensure that the value of and the threats to coral reefs are understood by the general public, and that sufficient resources are devoted to conservation and sustainable use of coral reefs and associated ecosystems; noting the importance of developing relevant public awareness initiatives that reflect national and regional priorities as well as local culture and knowledge concerning coral reefs and to facilitate public involvement in coral reef conservation related activities in all countries; and acknowledging the success of the International Year of the Reef 2008 in raising awareness of the importance of coral reefs and associated ecosystems; ICRI members adopted a recommendation on continuing coral reef awareness efforts.

The International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) is an informal partnership between Nations and organizations which strives to preserve coral reefs and related ecosystems around the world.

Although the Initiative is an informal group whose decisions are not binding on its members, its actions have been pivotal in continuing to highlight globally the importance of coral reefs and related ecosystems to environmental sustainability, food security and social and cultural wellbeing. The work of ICRI is regularly acknowledged in United Nations documents, highlighting the Initiative’s important cooperation, collaboration and advocacy role within the international arena.

Brief history
The Initiative was founded in 1994 by eight governments: Australia, France, Japan, Jamaica, the Philippines, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. It was announced at the First Conference of the Parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity in December 1994, and at the high level segment of the Intersessional Meeting of the U.N. Commission on Sustainable Development in April 1995. ICRI now counts more than 60 members.

Objectives
ICRI emerged out of the recognition that coral reefs and related ecosystems found in tropical and sub-tropical regions are facing serious degradation, primarily due to anthropogenic stresses. Many nations face similar threats to coral reefs and related ecosystems as well as similar management problems. Recognising this, ICRI’s objectives are to:
  • Encourage the adoption of best practice in sustainable management of coral reefs and associated ecosystems
  • Build capacity
  • Raise awareness at all levels on the plight of coral reefs around the world.
ICRI adopted a ‘Call to Action’ and a ‘Framework for Action’ as its foundational documents. Both documents set the four cornerstones of ICRI: Integrated Management; Science; Capacity Building and Review.
Find out more at: https://www.icriforum.org/

________________________________________

Locally:
Operation Crayweed Update: Success As North Bondi Restoration Works Produce Next Generation Of Crayweed Also: Green Globe Award For UNSW SIMs Operation Crayweed Project - Issue 334, 2017
Crosswaves - Newport Reef