December 13, 2020 - January 16, 2021: Issue 478

 

Pittwater Roads II: Where the Streets Have your Name - Narrabeen

View from Collaroy of Narrabeen, circa 1880, courtesy State Library of Victoria

The Pittwater, Where the Streets Have Your Name series ending in Narrabeen presents a return to the commencement of the Roads TO Pittwater. Narrabeen returns to the initial 'gateway' roads-wise to Pittwater as it was along the original aboriginal paths that European colonises came, expanding these into tracks, with the first one then being named 'Jenkins' Road' as outlined in 'Roads To Pittwater: The Pittwater Road' and also seen in The Wild Coachmen Of Pittwater - A Long and Sometimes Bumpy Ride On Tracks Instead Of Roads and the commencement of a Mail Route that needed to include steamers that would call at Barrenjoey's Broken Bay Customs' Station and Lighthouse before continuing on to connect to the current day Central Coast. Our area of Pittwater was a place of coasters sailing down the seaboard to take goods to Sydney Town or, from the later 1860's, steamers that would bring excursionists in their thousands to visit and disembark at jetties for a few hours recreation in the country - Newport Wharf and Careel Bay Wharf being good early examples of these being built for those purposes. These jetties were also used as places to load produce, and later, as tons of produce was grown, or fish caught that needed transportation at Bayview, Church Point, the need for steamers to transport these, or later subdivisions at Coasters Retreat, Great Mackeral and Currawong, and schools for offshore children, resulted in jetties and dedicated local ferries for transport at these locations too. From earliest times, local fishermen mostly transported their catches to town themselves, as instanced in them being absent from one of the early Basin Regattas, and unable to win the £ that would have added vaubale income during those races, that Pittwater was alike a mini-Venice in that water transport was better than moving butter, fruit and grains along the Jenkins Road to the punt at The Spit.

What we today call the 'Mona Vale Road' came after the Jenkins Road- Pittwater Road as woodcutters in Warriewood, Church  Point, Bayview, Lovett Bay, needing to transport whole trees via waggon tracks to places where they could be taken into town, did not eventuate until the early 1800's (1815-1820 on), while what we today call the Wakehurst Parkway was expanded from its original as a track to Oxford Falls during the later 1920's and 1930's for Soldiers Settlements or work connections and not completed until the 1940's and after World War II rationing of building materials eased, while the building of a bridge across The Spit did allow more access, this was essentially to fulfil public transport aspirations and connections, and funnelled more along the Pittwater Road.

Pittwater Road [a view through the trees] circa 1860 by William Andrews (1840-1887) from album 'Sketches of Sydney and environs, 18-- ' Image No.; c12837 0021 c - courtesy State Library of NSW

The roads and street developments record a shift from naming streets to honour the then ruling Monarchs and their children, as occurred at Careel Bay to streets named to honour the efforts of local people who built the community or worked to ensure it had what it needed. Roche avenue in Bayview, for example, honours a family who worked with other residents to ensure there was a wharf at Bayview, that worked to see a series of The Basin and then Pittwater Regattas bring people to the area so an existence that survived on farming and fishing could be extended to becoming a place to holiday, and were also among the many who gave sections of their land to be invested for the public good as places to permanently access the estuary or beaches and have a place to play – for recreation.

What the largest initial Narrabeen subdivision, that of John Wetherill's in October 1881, and Careel Bay in 1871, have in common is a core of stemming from 'co-operative communities' ideals, reflecting the places, circumstances, experiences and expressed beliefs of those behind the subdivisions and what had been happening in the United Kingdom. At Avalon Beach and Careel Bay Archpriest John Joseph Therry (1790 - 1864) wished to install one of these communities, a 'new town'. 

'Josephton' was to be established on the shores of Careel Bay for his workers, those who sought coal at current day Avalon Golf Course, farmed or collected shells for the manufacture of lime. One of many wills he wrote illustrates his plans for his farm here:

"I desire that my farm of eighty acres, formerly known as Peter Petitta’s farm at Pitt Water, which is beautifully and most advantageously situated, should be divided into four equal parts of twenty acres each which are intended as the sites for educational establishments for the Benedictines, Jesuits, Franciscans, and the French Mission of the Propaganda respectively.”

Also; to the land property with which I have been blessed, namely to establish five villages which are likely to become respectable towns the principal one at Pitt Water to be called Josephton . 

Other documents state he planned to call the whole district Josephton and Avalon was to be named 'Brighton' - while the first jetty at Careel Bay was named 'Clareville' and this name was extended to Avalon Beach for a while too. St Joseph is the Catholic patron saint for workers.

Lincolnshire born draper John Wetherill held similar beliefs and when the large Mount Ramsay Estate was drawn up for subdivisions in 1879, then released in 1881, the names he chose reflect, at least in choosing 'Octavia', a sympathetic connection to the expressed ideals and succesful models of social housing reformer Octavia Hill, and herknowledge, through her fathers' beliefs, of Lincolnshires' Robert Owen, a draper, textile manufacturer, philanthropist and social reformer, who was one founder of utopian socialism and the cooperative movement. 

These ideas and structures developed the replacement of the 'tenant for life' with the owner of their own home and property, even if in 1/4 and 1/2 acre blocks,as the farms of acreage became places to live, surrounded by fresh air on healthy grounbds where 'beauty would meet the eye' and 'gladden the spirit' - 'lift up the soul'. This is where that Australian Dream of owning your own home commenced, along with schemes for green open spaces as suburbia, all initiated and supported by men who came here as paupers, or were born here and thus outside of the class system that excluded them from 'polite' society, and worked hard, worked in public office too, and began here what could never occur in the landed gentry system of the still ruling them from afar Great Britian.

That larger first Mount Ramsay estate subdivision, advertised as one of these 'new towns' being formed, in looking at the names chosen for those streets, and the stories behind their stories, presents a wonderful; example of this. This was a huge shift; to go from constantly being subject to eviction and starvation to being able to house and feed your children would lead to greater 'indulgences' such as education, having the right to vote, being able to purchase or create Art.

These people, as those in public office or those working in their own shops, fields and trades, worked together to create this shift - to draw up the architecture of it as a plan, to fund it through their own £ and pennies, to make it possible through the way payments could be met or giving the then expensive deeds for free. In some ways, although these street names were chosen to honour those presenting these ideals and making them happen during the times these lithographs were drawn, those who travel to their own little block along 'such and such' street were and are actually still are travelling there via and because of the work done by those inspired and practical people.

There is another Australian-first element that preceded this and allowed or encouraged this to occur; The Real Property Act 1858, 21 Vict. c. 15, or, in long title "An Act to simplify the Laws relating to the transfer and encumbrance of freehold and other interests in Land". 

Robert Richard Torrens, son of Robert Torrens (economist and chairman of the South Australian Colonisation Commission), had previously worked in the civil service in customs roles in London and Adelaide, before being appointed Colonial Treasurer and Registrar-General from 1852 to 1857. He was elected as a member of the House of Assembly for the City of Adelaide in the new parliament in 1857. For years prior to his election, he had vigorously promoted the need for land titles reform, with the current system of transfer of land by deed ineffective, slow, expensive and insecure. It relied on verbose and complicated documents that had to be retained at least a century in order to validate new transactions and lawyers were needed to effect the transactions.

The Real Property Act 1858, was assented to on January 27th 1858 and came into effect on July 2nd 1858 in that state. It was well-received, apart from some lawyers who noted that the ease and clarity of the process would mean less in earnings for them. The Act transferred property by registration of title, instead of by deeds. It radically altered the method of recording and registering land under freehold title. Instead, government certificates were issued and a central register established. This system provided an indisputable record, thus almost eliminating litigation involving land disputes, got rid of difficulties created by lost certificates, and reduced the cost of land sales and transfers. The legislation was refined in the following few years, with Torrens overseeing major amendments to the Act in 1859 and 1862, which included allowing the licensing of registered land brokers instead of lawyers in land transactions, further reducing the cost.

Four main principles underlie the Act:

  1. Title to land is passed from one owner to another by registration on a public register.
  2. Title is evidenced by a government-issued and -guaranteed certificate issued.
  3. Once registered, the purchase is indefeasible; it cannot be set aside unless fraud is proven on the part of the purchaser.
  4. Land dealers who have been dispossessed of their land unfairly or accidentally are guaranteed compensation.

The first sale of land registered under the system was to pastoralist William Ransom Mortlock on August 25th 1858. So successful was the outcome that it was adopted in the rest of Australia and in many countries throughout the world. The system became known as the 'Torrens Title system', and the Act often referred to as the "Torrens Title Act 1858".

Torrens visited Victoria in 1860 and assisted in bringing in the new system in that colony. He also helped the other colonies to introduce their own variations of the system: Queensland adopted the 1859 version, while New South Wales, Tasmania and Victoria based their legislation on 1861 reforms. The Torrens Title system was introduced to NSW with the commencement of the NSW Real Property Act 1863


The 1871 'Josephton' Lithograph - Item e30116_0001_c

A further change towards naming streets using indigenous descriptive words as occurred during the 1930’s, 1940’s and 1950’s, particularly at Avalon, Clareville and Bayview, celebrate and honour a connection to the land is a further development of a uniquely Australian culture. Naming streets for Australian trees and flowers once found on those blocks also predominates some suburbs. 

There are among these are the names of land owners' children and family members or those who passed away while the paddocks were being divided into blocks, but overall, love, not ego, and love of Australia is revealed at the core.

The series also highlights the commencement of a Town Planning vision for then and for the future that sought to ensure green connections through a series of pathways as well as park dedications and beach fronts being resumed through the efforts and policies of the then Warringah Shire Council. 

Although some sections of the naming of streets in the Narrabeen surrounds have been collated in Pittwater Roads II: Where the Streets Have Your Name - Warriewood and Pittwater Roads II: Where the Streets Have Your Name - Elanora Heights, Green Hills and Ingleside, as a gateway to Pittwater itself in road terms, there were still a fair amount of larger and smaller developments, and even changing the landscape to facilitate some of these (Wimbledon Avenue) or creating a thoroughfare in the Wakehurst Parkway to provide access, that make starting where we commenced important.

Pittwater road, as an original 'Road To Pittwater', and the word ''Narrabeen'' itself as the gateway to all on the other side of the lagoon, is first recorded as 'Narrowbine' in February 1801 in the journal of Lieutenant James Grant.

In THE NARRATIVE OF A VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY, PERFORMED IN HIS MAJESTY'S VESSEL THE LADY NELSON, OF SIXTY TONS BURTHEN, WITH SLIDING KEELS, IN THE YEARS 1800, 1801, AND 1802, TO NEW SOUTH WALES. BY JAMES GRANT, LIEUTENANT IN THE ROYAL NAVY, [CHAPTER IV. Occurrences and Transactions in New Holland and New South Wales] his entry for February 1801 reads; 

Governor King having appointed Garden Island for the purpose of raising vegetables for the crew of the Lady Nelson, I accordingly took possession of it. There was the shell of a tolerable house on it, which required much repair to make it habitable. I sent Dr. Brandt, who had volunteered with me at the Cape, with his dog and baboon to the island, as he had no inclination to go again to sea, having been much incommoded with sea sickness during the voyage hither. I therefore judged it would be a good place for him to reside at in my absence, and take charge of my property; a very necessary precaution against nocturnal visitors, who laid hold on and carried off every thing that was portable. As the poor Doctor was obliged to part with every article of provisions I had given him to some of these depredators, who paid him a visit, I applied to the Governor, who very readily issued an order that no person should attempt to land on the Island without his or my leave. This put a stop, in a great measure, to such practices. There not being any fresh water on it, I was obliged to lend the Doctor a small boat, which one person could pull about with a pair of sculls, till I could purchase one for the use of the Island; but, unfortunately the Doctor lost this. One of the young men who came out with me, and who had entered on board another vessel in the harbour, borrowed it from him for the purpose of fishing, leaving the vessel's boat that he came in with his companion till his return. Three days elapsed, and not hearing any tidings of them, the Doctor became very uneasy. I set on foot every enquiry, but without effect; and what vexed me much, was, that the young man was one of those who had run off with the same boat at Port Praya. I offered a reward to any one who would give me information of the boat; and though the weather was very bad, I was under the necessity of sending my first-mate round to Hawkesbury River with another in search of it. I also formed the resolution of walking to Pittwater, which joins the Hawkesbury, and branches inland a considerable way, affording many little Creeks and Coves, where the natives assemble at times to fish.

On the 25th of February I set out, the weather thick and cloudy, accompanied by a soldier of the New South Wales Corps, one of my own people, a native and his wife, as guides. Ensign Bareillier, of the same Corps, volunteered going in the boat with the mate. The path I took was intricate, but very romantic. As it rained hard towards evening, my guide halted near a wood, taking us to a place where two old men were sitting by a fire, and which had the appearance of several others having been there very recently. This temporary habitation was formed by a rock overhanging the place they were seated on, and called by them Gablegunnie, being the term for the hut, or the House of the Rock. The two men did not seem to receive us with any particular marks either of friendship or indifference; and from what I afterwards learned they were both doctors, which probably induced my guide to visit them, as his back had been much hurt, and he was troubled with a difficulty of breathing. They gave us from a bag-net a few fish they had gathered off the rocks; but on removing the skin, (which is used by them as bait in fishing,) they smelt so offensive that we could not eat them. I gave them some bread in return, and we parted well pleased with each other. They told us that a little farther on there was a party of natives employed in fishing, who had two huts built near a long sandy beach. As the night was likely to be very dark with heavy rain, I intended, if possible, to shelter ourselves with them. Our guide was so ill, that he appeared incapable of going on with us, and promised to get one of them to accompany us to Pittwater. ....

I found the huts larger and better constructed than I had as yet seen or heard of: they were built of timber procured from the wreck of a small vessel, which lay stranded on the shore at no great distance. In one but there were three men, four women and two children; and in the other, which was very small, a a man and his wife. The natives very kindly took from their hiding places some large and excellent fish, such as snappers, and salmon, so called in this country, I presume, from their scales. These they laid whole on the fire, which was placed in the middle of the hut. As soon as one side of the fish was done they placed it on the other, opposite to where I sat, beginning to eat while that was broiling, inviting me by signs to follow their example; which I and my companions readily did, being both hungry and wet, it having rained very hard, and we found ourselves very comfortable. Situated as we were, I could not avoid remarking to myself how easily nature was satisfied; the only thing I wanted being salt. The curiosity of these poor people with respect to many things about us was very great; particularly in observing a head raised in silver on the butt-end of the pistol stuck in my waist-belt; and also in the ticking-noise of my watch, which the women and children wondered much at, mimicking its sound as they held it up to their ears.

Having sent my guide and his wife with the seaman to the small hut, I and the soldier lay down to sleep with our feet to the fire. One of the women was very ill during the night, and groaned much, being seized with spasms in her stomach, as I afterwards understood. In the night-time the soldier was wakened by one of the men, who requested he would go with him to fetch some water. On the former (who understood the language) asking him why he could not go alone, he was answered, "You know me murrey jarrin, that is, much afraid. The soldier being unwilling to stir, asked, "What he was afraid of? The native said, "of the Bogle;" the term for the Evil Spirit, or Devil; which shews that superstition is very predominant amongst them. As I wished for some water, I desired the man to get up and bring me some, which he did in a small vessel shaped like a canoe, made of bark, the native accompanying him.

We got up before day-light, and having taken one of our hospitable friends for a guide, who was both more robust, and stronger than the natives are in general in this part of New Holland, he armed himself with a spear, and moved onwards with us till we came near to the banks of a stream, which the natives call Narrowbine. It was but barely peep of day, and objects were not easily distinguishable, yet the native informed me he saw somebody on the opposite side. As we proceeded on we soon perceived a person walking by the river side, but could not ascertain whether he was a native or not. Our guide, however, on enquiry said, that is, "no black fellow", and that he had a musket with him. Some of the Convicts having about this time absconded and taken with them the Norfolk sloop, with an intention of leaving the country, were cast ashore, but a short distance to the northward. They had been daring enough to attack and seize a settler's boat going to the Coal River; and as many of these people were still out, I made no doubt but he was one of them. The stream from the rain which had fallen during the night, and the tide of flood being in, as it was in the vicinity of the sea, was become deeper and more rapid than common, and had obstructed the fellow's progress. I called to him, and asked who he was, and where he was going? He answered, that he had been Kangarooing, had lost his way, and was almost starved. From the latter circumstance I was certain he was one of the Convicts, and therefore I desired him to stop, as I was going over, and would shew him the best place to cross at, which he had enquired for. While we were stripping, I desired the native, who was in a state of nature, that, if he saw the fellow attempt to get way, he would stop him, and should he offer any resistance, to spear him. The river was so deep that it came up to his chin; and as he was taller than any of us, we were under the necessity of leaving our clothes behind, and making two trips, in order to keep our fire-arms from the wet, which was not an easy matter, being obliged to carry them over our heads. The bottom of the river was very rugged with sharp-pointed rocks, which made us stumble and cut our feet; however we got over. 

The poor creature gave himself up to me without condition, confessing he was one of the party who ran away with the Norfolk. At this moment he presented a most pitiable sight, being literally almost starved, and had he got across the Narrowbine, he never would have been able to reach Sydney. As to the musket, instead of being of any service to him, it was rather an incumbrance, as it was totally unfit for use. His comrades and he had endured the greatest misery and distress through hunger and fatigue. On being informed that some of them were taken and executed, he burst into tears, and said he was sure nothing could save him. He had a wound in his leg, which he got from a species of scate called a Sting Ray. In attempting to kill it in a shallow stream it had found its way into, it threw the sting, (which in large ones is sometimes eight or nine inches in length, indented like a saw,) through the calf of his leg. The fatigue of walking, and the scratching of the bushes had inflamed it to a great degree: his feet were also wounded and ulcerated from rocks and stumps of trees. In short, he was so wretched and helpless, that I directed my two companions to support him between them to Pittwater, where my boat was to meet me. The little bread I had remaining, bad as it was from the wet it had met with, was devoured by him with avidity; and this, with a little spirits I had left, recruited him. He shewed me the place where he had lain all night, on a few branches spread under a tree, without fire, and exposed to the heavy rain. On being asked where he had left his companions, he said, that himself and two others of the party, had left the remainder near Port Stephens, which is some considerable distance to the northward of the Hawkesbury; that they had some intention of forming a settlement there, until something should turn up favourable for them; that they had planted a few pumpkin and melon-seeds, and some Indian corn, which had come up, but was insufficient for the support of seven or eight persons. The ring-leader, who was there, had determined not to return. This man had been very ill with an intermitting fever, which indeed had been experienced more or less by all of them; and it was his intention, and that of two others, who left the place, to return and give themselves up; but one of them being very ill, he quitted him and his companion, who chose to remain with the sick man, on the other side of Pittwater. They had suffered much from hunger, living principally on the cabbage-tree; and he affirmed, that when they fell in with the natives, they behaved very ill to them; that indeed from some they got a fish or two; but that others, instead of assisting them, took away what rags of clothing they had left. This last circumstance is, in my opinion, rather improbable, for unless it be a blanket, I have never known any of the natives express even a wish for any article of clothing. On being asked how he got over Pittwater, he informed me that meeting with one of the natives, then on the banks, whom he knew, he partly through that acquaintance, and partly through the offer of a shirt, prevailed with him to put him across in his canoe; but that he had much ado afterwards to prevent some of them from spearing him, as they all asked him for bread, which they supposed he must have. Whether this was true or not with respect to his adventures, it is a fact that all the natives about the Settlement, or at a distance, who have tasted bread, are very fond of it, and always ask for it. No doubt the general keen state of their appetites may be a powerful incentive at the time they desire it; and it is not improbable that some of those he met with, being hungry, and encouraged by his helpless appearance, might endeavour to terrify him with the spear. The gun he had in his hand, he believed, prevented them from putting their threats in execution. 

After experiencing much difficulty in getting this unfortunate wretch along, we soon discovered our boat by the help of a bugle-horn, two of which I had brought from England with me. These instruments are of the utmost service to all who have to travel through pathless woods, where the sight is intercepted, as they can always be used when a musket cannot. If they are made of different sizes, or of metal and horn, the sound will vary so much as to make it easily known which party they belong to: besides, ammunition will be saved by their use, which is often of the utmost importance. If made of a large size they will serve to carry water in occasionally; and this is often a very acceptable service in woods at a distance from a river. In short, in all business of discovery, these and a few watchmens' rattles, (some of which I also had with me,) will be found very useful. I had agreed to meet the boat at a certain part of Pittwater, but as neither my mate nor I had ever seen it, and our guides being little acquainted with the spot, I had recourse to the bugle. I was answered from the boat with the same instrument about a mile and an half distance from us. I hope this will fully illustrate the superior usefulness of the bugle-horn in respect to the musket (a signal which might have misled us as being used on other occasions); besides which the former, not only from the sound itself, but from the long continuance of it, has the best chance of being heard. My officer had made very diligent search for the boat taken from Garden Island, but without success. The poor runaway Convict was put into the boat, and supplied with food, which from the manner he began to devour it, I was obliged to give him very sparingly. The boat party had suffered much from the rain during the night, as well as from the heavy sea they were exposed to in their passage. We kindled a fire on the bank of the river, where we breakfasted. Pittwater is very broad at this place, dividing itself into several branches, which made a strict search for the boat very troublesome. I ordered the mate up to a small island, named Mullet Island, (perhaps from the great plenty of fish of that name in its vicinity,) giving him orders to examine the shore carefully on each side, and make enquiry of the natives or settlers that he might meet with. I concluded any farther search after this would be unnecessary, as above the island the boat would be discovered and secured. Ensign Bareillier preferred walking back with me and my party. We made an excursion to the top of Pitt-water, which ends in a mud flat of considerable extent. In the course of our walk we were much annoyed by a small aquatic plant of a conical form growing in clusters, with sharp points peeping through the mud. These, and innumerable small oyster-shells, washed from their native beds by the tide, fatigued and pained us in an uncommon degree. The before-mentioned plant, from its insignificant appearance, seems to have been but little noticed. It hardly ever exceeds five inches in length, and its thickness differs according to its age, seldom exceeding that of a man's finger. It is of a pale yellow colour on the top, very hard and tapering to a point: the nearest resemblance it has to any plant I know, is the asparagus when peeping through the earth. After searching the banks of the river without success, we proceeded on our return to Sydney; to which we were the rather induced from the small supply of provisions, particularly of bread, which we had procured from the boat. We were also in hopes of again seeing the natives we had met with the night before near the Narrowbine, who would supply us with some fish. The native we had as a guide had been probably induced to accompany us for the sake of getting plenty of biscuit, of which, as already has been mentioned, his countrymen are remarkably fond. As it was not full tide he led us along the sea shore under the heights we had travelled in the morning, and very near a gunnie, or house, which he made us understand was the place of his birth. The flood-tide set in very rapidly, which, with our having to travel over a large range of rocks, much retarded our progress, and from the dashing of the waves against the base I was apprehensive we should not be able to accomplish our intentions, but our guide pushed on, and wherever the passage was difficult or dangerous, he either pointed out the steps we were to take with his spear, or held out his hand to assist us. He always carried some of our things, particularly my boat-cloak. It is but proper for me to observe, that the care and attention of this rude and uncivilized Savage was highly exemplary, and merited our best regards.

Upon our arrival at the spot where we left the natives, to our great disappointment we found they had removed themselves. It was now about three o'clock, P.M. and it was dark about seven. From Rose Bay, where I had ordered the boat to meet us in the morning of the following day, it was nearly five miles to Sydney Cove. The guide, who now became very hungry, seemed as desirous as ourselves of finding the natives. He endeavoured by looking at the paths to find out which they had pursued; accordingly he pitched on that which led to the place where we had before seen the two canoes on the sand; but on reaching the spot they too were gone. As the canoes were not large enough to hold all the people we had seen, he informed us he knew the path the remainder had taken. We accordingly, at his request, walked at a round pace in quest of them, and on our way along the shore he picked up a lump of what appeared to me to be the Epidermis which adheres to rocks, and which the force of the tide had thrown up. It was composed of a glutinous substance and very fetid, yet in this disagreeable state he sucked and eat it. I have seen the Dutch fishermen at the Cape of Good Hope make use of it as bait. In following the track he led us, we penetrated a short distance into the woods. By the time we reached the place to which I had ordered the boat it was nearly dark; but as the natives the guide was searching for could not be a great way off, we were anxious to get to them. In the accomplishment of our purpose he led us through various thickets to places likely to be their haunts; and occasionally set up a kind of howl, at the same time listening if any answer was given. After he had howled thus for some time, we discovered a fire kindled on a height close to the shore, and soon after our guide's howling was answered by similar outcries, and the fire was seen to blaze forth. Here a kind of conversation took place betwixt them; when he informed me that he had told them he was very hungry, and their answer was, that at a short distance from where we then were, another party was to be found which had plenty of fish. Accordingly he conducted us to the spot where the boat was ordered to rendezvous, and giving me my cloak and the other articles, said he would find out his companions: he ascended a height and was soon out of sight. The moon now shewed a little light, having been obscured by clouds, and as a good many showers of rain had fallen during the day, the ground was wet; however, being very tired, we laid ourselves down on the sand, intending to wait till morning, for as to our hungry guide we did not expect his return. In about three quarters of an hour after his leaving us, to my great surprise, we heard the sound of voices approaching us, and it proved to be my first guide and his wife, already mentioned, coming towards us, dispatched by the others to our assistance. They brought with them a fish of about four pounds weight. Here was another trait of the friendly disposition of these poor people worthy of being noticed. Our quondam guide told us, that there had been a boat seen with two white men fishing in it a little before it grew dark, a short distance from where we then were. One of my people instantly set off with him in search of the boat, and soon after we heard the noise of oars in the water. In this boat were a man and boy going to the southward a fishing; but from the unsettled state of the weather, they chose to remain for the night near the harbour's mouth, that they might be ready to push out in the morning. They readily undertook, for a small gratuity, to pull us up to my house on Garden Island; and having taken leave of the friendly natives, we pushed off; and I got home about eleven o'clock at night.

CONRAD MARTENS (1801-1878) Entrance to Narrabeen Lake - watercolour signed, titled and inscribed verso: Entrance to Narrabeen Lake by Conrad Martens 39.5 x 44.5 cm courtesy The Alan & Margaret Hickinbotham Collection


The spelling 'Narrowbine', without any indication of how this was actually pronounced, is one of a few spellings of what is currently spelt 'Narrabeen'. There have been 'Narrowbean' with one report stating the name refers to a type of bean that grew beside the lagoon, 'Narrabang' when describing John Ramsay's 410 Land Grant in 1818, 'Narrabene' as used by a member of the Jenkins family when offloading their 'inheritence' in 1877, as well as 'Narrabeen' and stating this was the name of an indigenous girl who, legend would have it, saved a settler from bushrangers. The February 1801 record in the journal of Lieutenant James Grant as a name given to the body of water is the only direct to those already present word or name on record - and how it was pronounced does not form part of that record.

Narrabeen was the name originally given to the stretch of beach and land between Narrabeen Lagoon and Long Reef - the name 'Collaroy' dates from a street named for the steamship of the same name in 1881.

Within a few decades of this hike from the Sydney harbour to the Pittwater estuary a series of land grants had been made:


Section from: New South Wales. Department of Lands. (1886). Parish of Narrabeen, County of Cumberland Metropolitan Land District, Eastern Division N.S.W Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-233833505

Narrabeen [a view, possibly of the lagoon and beach] by William Andrews, 1840-1887. Watercolour, 16.2 × 34 cm (6 3/8" × 13 3/8"), Unsigned Item: c12838_0017_c, courtesy Dixson Library, State Library of New South Wales

On the banks of the Narrabeen Lagoon, a pretty extensive and romantic sheet of water situated about nine miles from Manly Cove, and communicating with the ocean in high floods there is a small extent of superior land for cultivation with a considerable tract of very fair pasture land belonging to the family of the late Mr. Jenkins, of Sydney ; and about three miles farther on, towards the head of Pitt Water, there is a very fair cultivation farm leased to a small settler of the name of Foley. Colonial Statistics. (1838, February 28).The Colonist (Sydney, NSW : 1835 - 1840), , p. 2. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31720524 

The journey is an interesting one. On the road there is some pretty scenery; and in several places there are splendid views of the ocean. Two lakes (or lagoons, as they are here called) are passed on the road; the largest of which, Narrabeen, is several square miles in extent, and has many small islands on its surface. It is for the most part shallow, and abounds with fish, which might be taken with the greatest ease, as a net could be hauled through any part of it. At present it is separated from the ocean by a barren sandy neck; but after floods this is covered, and the traveller is obliged to wade through the water for a considerable distance. METEOROLOGY. (1850, January 30). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), , p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12915324


The first block of land offered for sale after the earliest Land Grants at Narrabeen was by John William Alexander White, who died at Inverell, intestate, in 1873:

NEW ENGLAND.
(from the Inverell Despatch, August 30 )

We have this week to record the death of Mr John William White, late Clerk of Petty Sessions of Inverell. The melancholy event took place at his residence in this township last Wednesday night, at 12 o'clock. From the time of his resigning his appointment as C P.S (some twelve months back) he had been gradually wasting away, and died at length from sheer exhaustion. NEW ENGLAND. (1873, September 4). The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18777072


Item c050370107 plan of 50 acres on Narrabeen lagoon 1870 - courtesy State Library of NSW, Narrabeen Subdivisions folder

WITHOUT ANY RESERVE.
MANLY COVE. 
50 ACRES of LAND, on NARRABEEN LAGOON, about SIX MILES from the Pier at MANLY BEACH, and adjoining the property of Mr. J. WHEELER
RICHARDSON and WRENCH have received instructions to sell by public auction, at the Rooms, Pitt-street, on FRIDAY, 24th June, at 11 o'clock, The above described 50 acres of land, NARRABEEN LAGOON, MANLY COVE.
LITHOGRAPHS showing the position of the land may be obtained on application at the Rooms.  Terms at sale. Advertising (1870, June 18). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13207024

It was still for sale in December 1870, but a later Notice where land was resumed for recreation shows Josiah Taylor had purchased it. Another land sale recorded in 1874 shows the price given for acreage at Narrabeen then:

PROPERTY CIRCULARS.

RICHARDSON AND WRENCH,-The election, together with the near approach of Christmas, has interfered somewhat with this market, sales consequently have not been for the last month so numerous as usual. We report the market quiet without alteration in value, the demand being principally for interest paying city investment and well situated building- allotments. There is considerable inquiry for suburban homesteads of moderate value. These are difficult to obtain, and if brought into the market would command attention. Medium-sized farms with good market access would also find ready purchasers at full rates. Among our sales for the past four weeks we notice .... 43½ acres land, parish of Narrabeen, at 20s per acre ; ....PROPERTY CIRCULARS. (1874, December 21). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13345364

Although this reads like £1 could buy you an acre, when calculated against and in modern terms this would equal around $13,552.00 per acre in 2019 - still cheap, but not as cheap as the 1874 £1 or a $2 coin per acre for beautiful Narrabeen.

At the same time this parcel of land was advertised James Wheeler and a friend were in court over a complaint brought by others - some indication there were more than farmers and hikers now passing through or visiting the area:

CARRYING FIREARMS IN SYDNEY.—At the Water Police Court, Sydney, on Thursday, a decision of an important character was given with reference to the carrying of firearms on Sunday. The case arose out of the following circumstances :—A number of young men are in the habit of spending Sunday at Manly Beach, in pursuit of sport. Complaints were made to the police, and constable Carton, with commendable ardour to do his duty, determined to put a stop to it. He went out as far as Narrabeen, and succeeded in bringing two persons before the Water Police Court. Mr. W. Hellyer, for the defence, contended that the Act 5 Vict., No. 6, section 1, was very indistinct in its terms. And as one of the party was carrying his gun on his own land, he urged that he could do so for his own defence. The Bench ordered one defendant to pay a fine of 40s., costs of court, 5s. 6d., or levy and dis-tress, in default fourteen days' gaol. Mr. Hellyer gave notice of appeal to the Quarter Sessions, and the case against the other defendant was adjourned to the 16th of September. GREAT FLOODS AT THE JUNCTION OF THE DARLING AND THE MURRAY. (1870, August 23). The Newcastle Chronicle (NSW : 1866 - 1876), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111140650

Charles Bransby, on remand for carrying firearms at Narrabeen, Pittwater, on Sunday, the 31st July last, was ordered to pay a penalty of £2, and 5s 6d costs of Court, with the alternative of fourteen days in gaol. WATER POLICE COURT. (1870, September 17). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13218265

QUARTER SESSIONS. — FRIDAY.

(Before his Honor Judge Dowling.)

APPEAL CASE. This was an appeal instituted by Mr. James Wheeler, the elder, of Narrabeen (for whom Mr. Hellyer appeared), against a decision of Mr. Cowper, W.P.M., and Mr. Evans, J.P. The appellant had, by the magistrates in question, been tried upon an information laid against him for having been found, on the 31st July last, unlawfully carrying fire-arms ; and he was sentenced to pay a fine of 40s. This judgment was now appealed against, and exceptions were taken to various portions of the evidence upon the trial in the police court. The substantial questions raised, however, were, whether the arresting constable had been entitled to enter upon the appellant's property, where the latter had been detected committing the offence with which he had been charged ; and whether the appellant had not been entitled to carry a gun for the purpose of protecting his crop from the wallabies. His HONOR sustained the conviction, holding that upon the face of the evidence before them the magistrates had been justified in fining Mr. Wheeler, and that it appeared that the latter had been using the firearm for sport merely. QUARTER SESSIONS.-FRIDAY. (1870, October 8). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107129032

James Wheeler considered himself to be the owner of Narrabeen Lagoon as well as much of its surrounds, as he once stated and as shown in the previous history page,  Pittwater Fishermen: The Sly Family Narrabeen Exploits and Manly Community Contributors: The First Surfboat at Manly Beach. The area was popular with hunters who shot everything that moved, sometimes for food, but more often for sport, as shown in what was donated to the earliest version of the Sydney Museum and as recorded in Charles de Boos record as 'My Holiday', and in the absence of birds where they once were, as shown in the Black Necked Stork that once frequented local lagoons and creeks. Wallabies along with 'gill birds', honeyeaters in modern terms, were pursued as fair game during this eras and the mindsets that predominated among some. Narrabeen was also a place where people would come to fish, to camp, to picnic - so much so that within a few decades land holders would be charginmg for people to picnic on the grounds they owned further north at Bayview.

James Wheeler, named among those mixed up in the Murder of David Foley, may not have been the pleasant happy to help his neighbours resident one would need or want in this then isolated rural area:

MANLY.—Impounded at Manly, on the 18th day of March, 1884, from Mount Brown Estate, Narrabean, by James Wheeler; sum due at date of notice, 10s. each :—
Bay mare, white stripe down face, white near hind foot, J G over D near shoulder, 14 hands.
Bay entire colt, white spot on forehead, unbranded, 18months, 14 hands.
If not released, will be sold at this Pound at noon on the 27th March, 1884.
2095—2b. J. BUNN, Poundkeeper.
MANLY.—Impounded at Manly, on the 18th day of March, 1884, from Mount Brown Estate, Narrabean, by James (1884, March 18). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 1890. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223768456

First advertised in August for a September 10th auction date, after a dispute with a J.J Dargan which he lost, in court, James Wheeler almost lost all his land holdings as a requirement to pay fines and court costs levied. This Advertisement lists all of what he then owned:

Auction Sales.
NEXT TUESDAY, at 11.50 A.M.
Under instructions from FRANCIS MACNAB, Esq., OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE in the Estate of JAMES WHEELER, of NARRABEEN.

BATT, RODD, and PDRVES have received instructions to sell by public auction, at their ROOMS, 88, PITT-STREET, NEXT TUESDAY, 16th September, at 11.30 a.m.,
All the Official Assignee's
RIGHT, TITLE, and INTREST In and to the following Properties,
viz:
Lot. 1.-All that piece of Land situate at ST. LEONARDS, parish of  WILLOUGHBY, county of Cumberland, containing 1 acre, 3 roods, 16 perches, or thereabouts, commencing at the Intersection of WILLIAM and MOUNT STREETS, and bounded on the south by MOUNT STREET, hearing westerly 7 CHAINS 88 LINKS to a RESERVED ROAD. 33 feet wide ; on the west by that road bearing northerly 8O LINKS to BERRY'S LAND ; on the north-west by part of the south-eastern boundary of that land, bearing-north-easterly 8 CHAINS 85 LINKS to WILLIAM-STREET aforesaid, and on the east by that street, bearing sotherly 8 chains 90 links to the point of commencement.
Lot 2. 90 ACRES, county of Cumberland, parish of MANLY, near DEE WHY LAGOON, bounded on the east by a line dividing it from JOHN HARPUR'S 40  acres bearing north 18 chains on the north by a line dividing It from W. Cossar's 200 acres, bearing West 49 chains 20 links to the ROAD from PITTWATER; on the west by that road, and on the south by a line bearing east 83 chains 80 links to the south-west corner of JOHN HARPUR'S 40 acres aforesaid. (Lot 20.)
Lot 3.-50 ACRES, at NARRABEEN LAGOON, bounded on the north by a line bearing east 22 chains, on the east by a line bearing south 20 chains, on the south by a line bearing west 29 chains 77 links, and on the west by NARRABEEN LAGOON. (Lot 16.)
Lot 4.-50 ACRES, at NARRABEEN LAGOON, bounded on the east by a line dividing it from a measured portion of 20 acres, bearing south 26 chains; on the south by a line bearing west 20 chains; on the west by a line bearing north 28 chains to a creek, and on the north by that creek to the north-west corner of 20 acres aforesaid. (Lot 15.)
Lot 5.-100 ACRES at NARRABEEN LAGOON, commencing at marked oak tree on a creek running into Narrabeen Lagoon, and bounded on the north by a line bearing east 35 chains, on the east by a line bearing south 58 chains 50 links, on the south by a line bearing west 24 chains 50 links to the north- east corner of a measured portion of 100 acres at the head of a small creek, and on the west by that creek, dividing it from part of that 100 acres and part of R. M'INTOSH'S 100 acres to the commencing north-west corner. (Lot 14.)
Lot 6.-20 ACRES, County of Cumberland, parish of MANLY COVE, at NARRABEEN LAGOON, bounded on the south by a line- from the north-west corner of ROBERT M'INTOSH'S 100 acres, bearing west l8 chains 50 links ; on the west by a line dividing it from a measured portion of 50 acres bearing north 16 chains and 88 links to a CREEK, on the north by that CREEK to Its mouth, and on the east by NARRABEEN LAGOON to the north-west corner of R. M'Intosh's 100 acres aforesaid.(Lot 9.)
Lot 7.-30 ACRES, parish of NARRABEEN, at Narrabeen Lagoon, commencing on NARRABEEN CREEK at the north-east corner at a unnamed portion of 50 acres, and bounded on the south by part of the northern boundary of that land bearing west 25 chains and 50 links, on the west by a line boating north 19 chains to NARRABEEN CREEK, and thence- by that creek to the north-east comer aforesaid. 
Lot 8.-86 ACRES, parish NARRABEEN, at Narrabeen Lagoon, commencing at an IRONBARK TREE, being the south-west corner of E. Schaffer's 50 acres, and bounded on the north by that land, being a line bearing east to NARRABEEN LAGOON; on the east by NARRABEEN LAGOON, measuring 20 chains along the bank on the south by a line bearing west 35 chains 77 links, and on the west by a line bearing north 28 chains 75 links to the couth-west corner of E. Schaffer’s 50 acres aforesaid.
Lot 9.-14 ACRES, parish of MANLY COVE, at DEE WHY LAGOON, commencing at the south-cast corner, being 4 chains 60 links northerly from the south-west corner of JAMES JENKINS'S 500 acres, and bounded on the east by part of that land, being a line bearing north 17 chains; on the north by Crown land, being a line bearing west 12 chains ; on the west by Crown land, being a line bearing south 8 chains, and on the south-east by a line bearing south 58 degrees east 13 chains 60 link's to a creek, and thence by that creek to the south-east comer 4 chains 60 links northerly from the south-west corner of JAMES JENKIN'S 500 acres aforesaid.
Lot 10.-15 ACRES, county of Cumberland, parish of MANLY COVE, at NARRABEEN LAGOON, commencing at the north-vest corner of James Wheeler's 100 acres, and bounded on the east by a line bearing north 22 chains 50 links ; on the north by part of J. Wheeler's 50 acres, being a line bearing west 7 chains 50 links to NARRABEEN LAGOON and a creek, to the north-west comer of J. Wheeler's 100 acres aforesaid. (Lot 17.)
Lot 11-20 ACRES, MANLY COVE, near DEE WHY LAGOON, commencing at the north-east corner distant 6 chains north from north-west corner at a measured portion of 30 acres, und bounded on the north by a line bearing west 16 chains ; on the wept by a line bearing south 12 chains 50 links : on the south by a line bearing east 16 chains, and partly on the east by part of the western boundary of a measured portion of 30 acres, being a line bearing north 12 chains 60 links to the north-east comer aforesaid.
Lot 12.-2 ACRES 2 ROODS 32 PERCHES, parish of MANLY COVE, village of BALGOWLAH. Suburban portion No. 22, commencing on the north side of WHITE STREET at its intersection with the east side of CONDAMINE-STREET, and bounded on the west by the east side of that street northerly 6 chains; on the north by a line easterly at right angles to CONDAMINE-STREET 4 chains 50' links ; on the east by a line southerly 6 chains parallel to CONDAMINE-STREET, and on the south by 4 chains 50 links of the north side of WHITE-STREET westerly to the point of commencement.
Lot 13.-2 ACRES 1 ROOD, suburban portion No. 26 of section,-commencing at the north-east corner 1 chain west from the north-west commencing at James Jenkins's allotment, and bounded on the ….by WHITE-STREET, being a line bearing west ? chains 50 links; on the west by a line bearing south 4 chains 65 links dividing it from allotment No. 21 ; on the south by the shore of NORTH HARBOUR, and on the east by Boyle-street, being a line bearing north 6 chains 10 links to the north-east corner aforesaid.
Lot 14.-2 ACRES 2 ROODS 32 PERCHES, suburban portion. No. 16 of section-commencing at the north-east corner, and bounded on the north by WHITE-STREET, being a line bearing west 4 chains 50 links ; on the west by allotment No. 10, being a line bearing south 6 chains; on the south by allotment No. 15, being a line bearing east 4 chains 60 links ; and on the east by Condamine-street, being a line bearing north 6 chains to the north east corner aforesaid.
Lot 15.-5 ACRES 1 ROOD 24 PERCHES, suburban portion No. 80, commencing on the north side of White-street, at its intersection with the east side of BOYLE-STREET, and bounded on the west by the east side of that street, northerly 6 chains.; on the north by a line easterly at right angles to BOYLE-STREET, 9 chains to the east boundary of the village of Balgowlah; on the east by that boundary, southerly 6 chains parallel to BOYLE-STREET, divining it from JOHN WHEELER'S 20 acres to White-street and on the south by 9 chains of the north side of WHITE-STREET westerly to the point of commencement.
Lot 16.-15 ACRES, commencing at the south-east corner of the township of BALGOWLAH, on NORTH HARBOUR, and bounded on the west by part of the eastern boundary of the said township, bearing northerly 10 chains; on the north by it line bearing easterly 13 chains; on the east, by a line bearing southerly 17 chains 60 links to the North Harbour, and on the south-west by a line bearing westerly to the point of commencement.
Lot 17-All that PARCEL OF LAND at ST. LEONARDS, at NORTH SHORE, being part of lot 27 of BERRY'S SUBDIVISION, commencing at the corner of Henry Bourne's allotment, and with a frontage to the LANE COVE-ROAD of 40 feet, thence by a line parallel to Bourne's boundary to a watercourse ; thence by that watercourse to Bourne's land, and thence by that land to the point of commencement.
Subject to a lease, as under :
JAMES WHEELER, A. REYNOLDS, and G. H. FRENCH, to Anthony Ebert.
Lease 14 years, at £14 8s
.
Lot 18.-Part of Lot 27, BERRY'S SUBDIVISION, commencing at ANTHON Y EBERT'S allotment, and having a frontage to-the LANE COVE-ROAD of 40 feet ; thence by a line parallel to a natural watercourse ; thence by that watercourse at right angles, to Anthony Ebert's boundary, and thence by that boundary to the point of commencement.
Subject to a lease as under :
J. WHEELER, REYNOLDS, and French to JOHN THOMPSON.
Lease, 14 years, £18,

Lot 19.-All the OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE'S RIGHT, TITLE, and INTEREST In and to all the INSOLVENT'S INTEREST under the will of the late GEORGE WHEELER.
Solicitors for the Estate.
Messrs. STEPHEN, LAURENCE, and JAQUES,
81, Pitt-street, ,
from whom all particulars as to TITLE may be obtained.
BATT, RODD, and PURVES, Auctioneers.
Advertising (1884, September 13). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 20. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13571386 

He then discharged the debt:

In the Supreme Court of New South Wales.
IN INSOLVENCY.
In the Insolvent; Estate of James Wheeler, of Narrabeen, near Manly, farmer.

TAKE NOTICE that on the twenty-eighth day of May instant, at 11 o'clock in the forenoon, or as soon thereafter as the course of business will permit, this Honorable Court will be moved that the estate of the abovenamed insolvent be released from sequestration, upon the grounds that the whole of the debts proved in the estate and all claims made by or on behalf of the Official Assignee have been paid and satisfied in full, and on the further grounds disclosed by the affidavit of the insolvent filed herein.—Dated this 13th day of May, 1885.
A. H. M'CULLOCH,
Attorney for Insolvent. 
3475 6s. 6d. IN INSOLVENCY. (1885, May 15). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 3200. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221692340


Wheeler's Homestead rear view - circa 1899-1913, courtesy State Library of NSW. Note the Boater hat - these became popular men's wear from 1894 on, reaching their peak in popularity during 1920's. The lady standing to right wears a Victorian era circa 1899 - 1913 wide brimmed hat that remained popular into 1910's.


The Old Homestead, Lake Narrabeen, circa 1900-1927 from the Album 'Broadhurst Scenes of Narrabeen', Image no.: a116483, courtesy State Library of NSW.

Concerned about educating his children, James Wheeler returned to live in Sydney for the next few years and then moved to North Sydney where he built a row of terraced houses adjoining the post office. James was 80 when he died in 1890. His son James Jnr, unable returned to live permanently at Narrabeen in 1878. Today the area still has Wheeler Street and Wheeler Park, named after the family, and Wheeler, Delmar and Sturdee Parades are all part of James seniors' original land grants and estate.

MRS. HANNAH WHEELER. Mrs. Hannah Wheeler, wife of Mr. George Wheeler, one of the older residents of Manly and district, died recently at her home Delmar, Pittwater-road, Deewhy. The Wheeler family have been landholders in the Manly, Deewhy, and Narrabeen districts since 1836, where the late Mr. James Wheeler made extensive purchases, the family being established at The Homestead, at the top of Narrabeen Lake. Mrs. Wheeler went to reside at Deewhy many years ago, when the coach was still the principal means of communication in the Warringah district. She leaves six sons and four daughters. The interment took place in the Manly Cemetery. MRS. HANNAH WHEELER. (1930, August 2). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 20. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1669265

Although there were a series of smaller land grants and land purchasers in the Narrabeen Lagoon area the main land holders from Long Reef to Narrabeen and beyond were the Jenkins Family in James I and his daughter Elizabeth and James Wheeler Senior. For instance James Macdonald's 30 acres is among the first to be subdivided for sale where smaller block and streets to access them were made. Shelagh and George Champion OAM's 'Profiles of the Pioneers' (2013) states -

James Macdonald of Bedlam Point (Gladesville) was ordered a grant of 30 acres on 31 March 1821. Meehan measured 40 acres for him “on the bank of the Narrabang Lagoon” (Pipeclay Point) on 16 April 1821. On 10 May 1822 John Oxley certified that “James Macdonnell was in actual possession and occupation of 30 acres of land in the district of Broken Bay.” [AO Fiche 3049; 4/1830, No. 226] On 11 May 1822 William Harper, Assistant Surveyor, stated that Macdonald had an order for 30 acres of land in the district of Broken Bay, “and the greater part thereof is cleared and in cultivation.” [AO Reel 6055; 4/1760, p.71] On 17 May James Macdonald, settler, and a convict servant were to be victualled from Stores at Sydney for six months [AO Reel 6009; 4/3505, p.308], and convicts were assigned to him in June 1822 and February 1823. [AO Fiche 3290; 4/4570D, p.43] The September 1822 Land and Stock Muster showed him as resident on his 30 acre grant. 20 acres had been cleared, with 8 acres of wheat, 4 of maize and 2 of potatoes in cultivation. He had 10 horned cattle and 6 hogs. It is probable that James Macdonald was the son of Alexander Macdonald, born in 1789 and raised by his convict mother on Norfolk Island.

In a petition to Governor Darling dated 15 July 1829, Constable Robert Melville stated that Macdonald had sold his Narrabeen Lagoon land to Matthew Bacon, “and afterwards sold by Execution and Purchased by Mr James Jenkins who still holds the same.” (The land was officially granted to James Jenkins on 15 August 1834. [LTO SN33/114]) Melville asserted that Macdonald “obtained money from each and on that account was dismissed from the Masonic Society.” Melville also alleged that James Macdonald “by false representations to your Excellency has obtained a double portion of Land.” By this second grant, Melville asserted, “the said James McDonald has pitched and settled on part of Petitioner’s Land.”

Robert Hoddle, surveyor, investigated the matter and reported on 25 July 1829:

“James McDonald has lately received a grant of 30 acres adjoining Melville on the North and bounded on the West by Pitt Water. Mr. McDonald has not yet been measured, but Melville was measured by Meehan. It would appear from the applicant’s representations that on inspecting the Maps in this Office, he found McDonald’s grant intruding on his; which is not the case, McDonald’s name being merely in pencil adjoining.

“With respect to Petitioner’s charge against McDonald; there is no memorandum on the maps to show that James McDonald has received any grant in the neighbourhood. Jenkins is said to have possession of most of the small farms there. There are two grants of 60 acres and one of 80 acres to an A. McDonald.” [AO Reel 1162]

Hoddle should have asked Jenkins about the matter, for Surveyor Larmer wrote to Surveyor General Mitchell on 2 September 1832:

“Mr. Jenkins claims a farm of 200 acres given to William Cossar at Deewy Lagoon, and another of 30 acres at Narrabeen Lagoon given to James Macdonald which appears (by papers I have seen) were sold by the then Sheriff John Mackaness Esquire on the 18th August 1825. Darcy Wentworth Esq. became the purchaser who afterwards sold them to Mr. Jenkins. I have no doubt the farms were originally measured by Meehan as the Trees are well marked and agree with the descriptions produced by Mr. Jenkins. Signed by the Sheriff and Meehan.”

Mr. Wentworth also owned William Cossar’s grants of 500 and 200 acre. These were all bought by James Jenkins on 29 September 1825. 

John Ramsay, a former sailor, was convicted for highway assault and theft, and arrived in Port Jackson in the First Fleet, on the Scarborough. He married Mary Leary at Parramatta in December 1790 and settled at The Ponds, where Watkin Tench observed their great industry and likelihood of success. Whilst living at The Ponds, Ramsay in 1795, together with Matthew Everingham and William Reid set out to cross the Blue Mountains but failed and only reached to about Mt Tomah. [Everingham Letterbook]

By 1800 they had moved to Field of Mars, where Ramsay purchased 60 acres, and again they farmed successfully. John Ramsay was granted 410 acres in the District of North Harbour by Governor Macquarie, on 21 August 1818. It was to be known as “Mount Ramsay”. 

However, he was already established just south of Narrabeen Lagoon in September 1815, when Meehan described his residence there as a house, rather than a hut, in his field book. With his residence given as Long Reef, he contracted to supply fresh meat for the use of His Majesty’s Stores in March 1817 and January 1818.  - Sydney Gazette of December 27th 1817

On September 23rd 1818 Ramsay mortgaged his land to the Bank of New South Wales. In January 1822 the Sydney Gazette advised that 30 bushels of wheat would be received from Ramsay at Long Reef into His Majesty’s Magazines, and 30 bushels were required from Long Reef in April 1822. (It may have been the same 30 bushels.)

In August 1822 there were signs that John Ramsay was in trouble. His neighbour on Cossar’s land, Matthew Bacon, took action against him, the Provost Marshall giving notice that twenty-seven head of horned cattle belonging to Ramsay would be sold by public auction. [Syd Gaz 23 Aug 1822] The Land and Stock Muster held in September 1822 showed that Ramsay had 10 acres in wheat, 20 in maize, ½ acre in pease/beans, and 3 in potatoes. He had 6 horses, 20 horned cattle, and 16 hogs.

To recover the sum of £300, the President and Company of the Bank of New South Wales sold up the “Mount Ramsay” grant of approximately four hundred acres in January 1823, the purchaser being D’Arcy Wentworth, on 14th of February 1823. In March 1823 a crop of corn and potatoes growing on the farm, and Ramsay’s other effects were sold. [Syd Gaz 23 Jan & 6 March 1823]. This seems to have been the end of Ramsay’s presence in our area, as by 1828 he was working as a gardener at Kissing Point. He died in 1836 at the Sydney Benevolent Asylum. His burial was registered on 21 January 1836 at St Philip’s Church, Sydney. His age was given as 85 years but if he were born c1762 he would have only been about 73 or 74 years of age.

When John Ramsay’s Narrabeen farm was sold in February 1823, the purchaser was D’Arcy Wentworth, who in turn sold it to James Jenkins.

Jenkins also purchased Daniel Rowan’s 50 acre grant, and applied for and received his own grants of 250 and 100 acres from his ticket of occupation land, north of Narrabeen Lagoon. Overall, Jenkins’ land totalled 1540 acres, while his daughter Elizabeth owned a further 200 acres.

James Jenkins II reached the age of 21 in 1843, and applied to his mother, who had remarried and was now Elizabeth Burnicle, for his share of his father’s estate. He and the other interested parties agreed to the conveyance of the Mount Ramsay estate to James Junior. He had married Ann West in 1842 and they took up residence at Mount Ramsay, while James’ older, unmarried brother, William Jenkins, took over the Long Reef farm. James and William were both listed in Low’s 1847 directory as landholders, Pitt Water.

Both James and William Jenkins were on the road between their farms and North Harbour on the day David Foley was murdered, 8 November 1849. Both gave evidence at the murder trial, as also did James’ wife Ann, who, except for the murderer, was the last person to see Foley alive.

Philip died in 1851, aged 23, and William died in 1853, aged 33. Both were unmarried. After this date Miss Elizabeth Jenkins was regarded as head of the family at the Jenkins’ homestead at Long Reef. Also in the household were her unmarried sister Martha, and a much younger brother, John. Another sister, Ann, married William Hendren in 1854.

At the Mount Ramsay estate, Ann, the wife of James Jenkins II, died in 1852, aged 30.  James remarried and then he died, on 31 October 1855, aged 33. Apparently it was James’ second wife, Eliza Louisa Jenkins (née Noble), with up to seven children, who were living at Mount Ramsay in 1861 when Charles de Boos and his friends stopped nearby to camp for the night:

“Tom was despatched to a station we saw ahead of us with instructions to purchase a piece of meat, that being an article which we, by some singular mischance had neglected to bring with us.” Tom, however, returned from Mount Ramsay station half an hour later empty-handed. “Poor Tom gave us a rueful account of the barrenness of the land into which our spirit of discovery had led us. The farm house ahead, which perched on a prominent rise, had a most imposing appearance, he described as little better than a heap of ruins inhabited by a varied assortment of women, children and fowls, the first of whom he summed up as being big, bony,  and not too young; the second as being brown, chubby and ragged; and the last as being longlegged and rough-feathered. He had opened negotiations for the purchase of flesh of any kind, but his overtures were listened to with astonishment. ... ‘No,’ she said, she hadn’t got any meat. They didn’t use much of it; it was too hard to get. ‘Any eggs?’ ‘No, no eggs - the fowls weren’t laying.’ ‘Any butter?’ ‘No – didn’t make no butter.’ ‘What do you think of that?’ said Tom, ‘What do you think they live on?’ I could not say, of course, but suggested, ‘Corn cobs.’ Nat thought for a minute and then ventured, ‘Potatoes.’ ‘You’re nearest,’ said Tom, ‘They live on bread, pumpkins, potatoes, and honey, - except when they catch fish, and then they live on that as long as it lasts.’”

The Champions state that Philip Jenkins, the only son of James Jenkins Junior, finally came to a settlement with his stepmother and five sisters. Trustees of his father’s will had been appointed, and on 14 April 1877 Philip paid £600 to them; he then became the sole owner of the Mount Ramsay estate. He lost very little time in putting it up for sale, Mount Ramsay being advertised for sale in the Sydney Morning Herald on May 12th 1877:

MOUNT RAMSAY, NARRABENE
FOUR HUNDRED AND TEN ACRES - TWO MILES FRONTAGE TO THE SEA
OVER A MILE FRONTAGE TO LAKE NARRABENE
~ One of the most beautiful Estates in the Colony.

GILCHRIST, STUBBS, and WESTON will sell by auction, at the Rooms, 273 George-street, on WEDNESDAY, the 23rd of May, at 11 o’clock ALL THAT FOUR HUNDRED AND TEN ACRES of land known as MOUNT RAMSAY, six miles by excellent road from Manly Beach pier.

This very excellent and picturesque estate possesses perhaps more advantages than any other property of like area in the colony. SOME 250 TO 300 ACRES are cleared and laid down in grass, the plentifulness of which even at this season is amply verified by the condition of the cattle depasturing on the property.

About 150 ACRES are still clothed with the beauties which nature has so bountifully lavished on this district, and more particularly on the portion now offered for sale. Combining real intrinsic value with all its charms of position, scenery, and climate, it is unsurpassed, and, either as a whole or cut up into farms, would form at once a substantial and paying investment, as well as a delight to the purchaser; in fact, words fail to convey any adequate idea of its merits, and it is seldom such an estate can be secured.

TITLE, indefeasible, may be inspected at the office of Messrs. Heron and Thompson, Solicitors, Pitt-street.” Advertising (1877, May 12). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 13. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13391991

The Mount Ramsay estate was purchased by draper and Australian Mutual Fire Society (insurance) director John Wetherill for £2000 on July 4th 1877 and subsequently subdivided and put up for sale in Lots in 1881. So many people bought an acre or two that those then bringing these under the Real Property Act as the roads and transport means developed became a very long list - those that could be found, and there may be others, are listed below. In 1886 John Wetherill brought the 100 acres granted to David Moore under the Real Property Act, showing his Narrabeen-Collaroy purchase was not his only acquisition of acreage in our area:

No. 6,571. Narrabeen, 107 acres, parish Manly Cove, comprises the land granted as 100 acres to D. Moores. Applicant: John Wetherill, Sydney. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1886, April 2). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2418. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227667518

An article from the same year this was sold:

Narrabean and Mona Vale.


SCENE ON NARRABEAN LAGOON.

THERE are few spots about Sydney more picturesque and interesting than Narrabean and Mona Vale, Pitt Water, and the wonder is that more visitors from the noisy and dusty metropolis do not find their way to these peaceful sylvan scenes, to rusticate and recruit their flagging energies. Fish abound in the lagoon, and at the present season there is no lack of game in the underbrush near the shore, and the ridges that extend towards the higher country at the back. In addition to this, the character of the whole place is different from anything that is met with in any other part of the metropolitan districts ; and as the eye takes in the prospect afforded, particularly particularly at Narrabeen, one who knows the history of the locality can hardly help being impressed with the idea that it is a picture full of sad memories and mournful recollections. Right before the visitor, as he stands upon the piece of elevated land overlooking the lagoon, extends a fine stretch of grassy country, almost as level as a race-course Though within a few yards of the ocean, not a rock or sign of such proximity is visible, and the whole reach is protected from the violence of storms by a belt of thick forest which margins the ocean throughout. At the back rugged ridges rise precipitously, and these being clad with foliage to their very crown, add much to the sense of beauty and security, as it were, of the whole place. Hereabout are evidences of a once busy time ; but desolation now presents itself on every hand. The houses are in ruins, and the fences dilapidated, and one sees nothing now but what indicates a marvellous chance from the past ; remnants of once comfortable homesteads show themselves, and time indeed seems here to have destroyed all that the energy and industry of man once sought to produce or rear up. Turning round, and looking in a north-easterly direction, an enchanting view meets the eye. Our artist has endeavoured, in the accompanying engraving, to depict some of its beauty. Almost at one's foot the placid waters lie like a mirror, over an area of several miles, till the ridges push in their rugged outlines on either side, and thus intercept the view ; but then, farther on, the eye catches a glimpse of a piece of cultivated country, where, one would think, a man might dwell in peace and quiet all his days. 

To the right the lagoon extends towards the ocean, from which it is separated by a sandy bar, which, however, allows of overflow one way and the other according to the circumstances of the hour. Cranes and aquatic birds abound, but there is very little sign of human life during the greater part of the year. At certain seasons, however, a few fishermen come to the place for a few weeks' stay, and with the aid of their boat and net are able to make the visit profitable. 

Our view shows their boat upon the lake, moving silently along as a thing of life. No more enchanting sight presents itself than this when observed at an early hour- as day breaks, and the gloom disappears, and each headland and bay is lit up, and the whole whole scene which lies before the eye presents a magnificent panorama of undisturbed nature. Turning again to the ruins, one wonders why such a spot should be I deserted, and the mind is by degrees induced to picture the past, and ask where are those busy hands that first broke in upon this silent scene-that in old times toiled and toiled from day to day beneath the burning sun, to gather about them the comforts of civilisation - all scattered or fallen into disrepair and ruin. Each stone has its history, and the decayed and tottering posts erected by industrious hands tell of the men who have long since passed over to the majority.

But all must be left to the imagination ; there is no one about to reveal the past; nothing seems to live or flourish, save a gigantic cabbage-tree, which rears its head fifty or sixty feet, and, defiant of both time and  tempest, looks complacently down on the surrounding scene of desolation. 

Of late years the place has been in the possession of the Jenkins family, whose members have won for themselves the esteem of all the residents of the district, and whose generous hospitality is spoken of by every one who visits Narrabean. Their homestead is situated a short distance in from the coast, at Long Reef, and its unobtrusive yet comfortable appearance reminds one of an English country home. The land at Narrabean is not now cultivated ; the soil has been worked out long ago, but a few sheep and cattle are frequently depastured there. Wherever one looks in this district, the scenery presents an aspect totally different from what is usually met with on the coast, as here is found a long stretch of land within a stone throw of the ever-rolling ocean, originally of great fertility, but exhausted by long cropping and careless cultivation. It is much the same with the Mona Vale estate, which is situated about three miles on the opposite side of Narrabean, and usually reached by crossing the lagoon in its shallowest part, which is about the centre. As one wends his way along through the bush, and Mona Vale opens out before him, he stands to behold and enjoy the novel view that presents itself ; it is so secluded and quiet, and yet so grand, with the rugged ridges on the one hand, and the turbulent ocean on the other, that it singularly impresses the visitor, who becomes eager to learn its history, and feels sure there must be many pleasant reminiscences to tell of past occupants. What a sad mistake ! What fearful trials and losses and disappointments have been experienced here. Its history should be written in blood, for if ever red-handed crime flourished in any country, it flourished and triumphed here, till it brought ruin and death to honest people ; and justice, outraged beyond bearing, rushed in and brought the delinquents to punishment. The description of these places has already taken up all the space that can be afforded, so we must defer till a future opportunity a brief outline of the leading incidents in their history. Narrabean and Mona Vale. (1877, January 6). Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 20. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70598057

And, as stated in this article, Philip Jenkins did not do too well out of the transaction. This also contains another spelling of current day 'Narrabeen' and why is was named thus:

MIGHT HAVE HAD £250,000, BUT GETS £2/10/- A WEEK 
Sydney- Man Who Fought Salvation Army for Ancestral Estate
THE ARMY'S "NO BEER" COVENANT.

SO passes the glory of the world — in a mist of Blood and Fire.  It is as well for Phillip Jenkins that he is a philosopher. The Jenkinses are gone — save for him, and he is 72, and childlessThe homestead, built a century ago to nurse a proud line of colonial barons, has crumbled under the hands of the demolisher. The erstwhile forest lands are bare grassy hills scarred with new roads, and the old farm fields sprout a harvest of houses. Flivvers buzz over the landscape, trippers, weekenders, outer-suburbanites and market-gardeners throng the fertile valleys, and the estate agent is everywhere. And only yesterday all was silence, all was solitude. 

The Jenkins held sway over a thousand acres, another settler ran cows back in the hills, a former assigned servant of James Jenkins tilled his land a little way up the coast, and between there and Brook-vale there was no one else to trouble the sea, and the sky, and the sand, and the scrub. As Phillip Jenkins grew up, fishing off Long Reef, hunting in the hills, riding over the estate that passed to his aunt Elizabeth, who had adopted him when his father died, others came to the district. It was still a wild region, the newcomers were wild folk, and wild deeds followed. They will still show you the place in the bush behind Narrabeen where murder stalked one night, and tell you that a convict came there to find a brutal master of earlier times, and strike him down. They will tell you how many a man was "put away" in those dark times by neighbors ill-disposed, and hint at wild orgies in the "Narrer Bean Camp" of the blacks — so called from the long slender native beans that grew beside the lake there. This was Phil. Jenkins' environment, but he was not of it. Up in the old homestead he lived under the care of an eccentric maiden lady who saw sin in almost all things, but who husbanded carefully the estate her father had left to her care. Phillip never thought hut that he would be heir to the lands his grandfather had pioneered. It was early in last century when James Jenkins came from England and started a shop in Sydney. Later a land grant of 200 acres at Deewhy was made to him and to one, William Cossar, a grant was made of 600 acres situated to the north of Jenkins' land. Jenkins later bought Cossar's land as well as 188 acres known as Sheep Station Hill on the northern side of Narrabeen lagoon. On re-measurement in after years this land is shown to be 259 acres. When Jenkins died, over 900 acres passed to his three surviving children— Elizabeth, Martha, and John. The other son, James, had died, leaving his son, Phillip, another part of the original holding-, which he later lost.

In 1885 Elizabeth, the leading spirit of the three, became interested in the work of the Salvation Army and from time to time she made gifts of money and land to the institution. Finally, in 1894 she was instrumental in having the whole of the land transferred to the Army in return for an annuity of £175, and an undertaking to take over her liability in connection with certain bank shares which she held. Miss Elizabeth Jenkins died in 1900 and her will under which she left all her remaining estate, amounting to £120, to the Army also, was attacked by Phillip Jenkins on the ground of incapacity and undue Influence.

Evidence in the Equity Court showed that she was an eccentric woman. The Judge refused probate, which had been asked for by Brigadier John Hendy of the Army, who, with Thomas Coombs, had been appointed executors. On appeal to the Full Court in 1901 this decision was reversed, Hendy and Coombs being granted probate. If the will could have been proved invalid, an attack would have been made on the deeds of settlement. At the time the deeds were executed an understanding was reached between members of the Jenkins family and the Army that although the latter was legally entitled to assume possession of the property, nothing would be done to disturb Its condition during the lifetime  of any member or the family. This agreement was observed by the Army. Nothing was done until John's death about 1911 — Martha had died many years before. The tramway to Narrabeen was built in 1911-12 and opened for traffic on Eight Hours' Day, 1912. On that day the Salvation Army held its first sub-divisional sale, when land adjoining Collaroy Beach averaged over £5 a foot. Conditions of that sale — and of all subsequent subdivisional sales— were that all fences erected must be approved by General William Bramwell Booth, and that the purchasers and the registered proprietors for the time being must not sell, permit to be sold, or connive at or be parties to the sale of any intoxicating liquors on the land. In addition, there was a condition in respect of the first sale prohibiting the carrying of liquor In the land.

Subsequently the Army applied to bring one part of the land, the area of which was 824 acres, under the Real Property Act, but the Crown claimed that Deewhy Lagoon of 62 acres, which was included in the application, was not a part either of the Jenkins or the Cossar grant. The present Chief Justice, sir Philip Street, sitting in Equity, held that the lagoon waters were not tidal, waters, and that they, were included in one or other or both grants, Followed an appeal, about 1910, to the High Court, which decided that the Crown was entitled to all the area from time to time covered by water. As Deewhy lagoon was continually being drained, the judgement that the ownership of the land would shift from the Crown to the Army, and vice versa, with the covering and uncovering of the land by water. The obvious difficulty of interpreting the ownership based on this unusual judgement resulted in a compromise being reached. 

The estate, for the most part a narrow strip skirting the coast from Deewhy to Mona Vale, comprised originally about a thousand acres. The Salvation Army authorities have shown careful discrimination in in the manner of their throwing the estate open for sale, having regard to its value in the coming years as an aid to the Army's work. Large sums of money have been laid out in the developmental work— — in the construction of roads, bridges, etc. To date about two-thirds of the total area has been disposed of, and further sales are planned for the early future. On the estate the Salvation Army has established a colony for aged men, about 85 being in residence there: also a large Home for Boys. A section, at Collaroy, is set apart for the purposes of a seaside holiday ground — used, among, other things, as a fresh-air camp for poor mothers and children from the city and suburbs, also for children from various metropolitan Institutions. In addition It provides a summer camping ground for the Army's Life Saving Scouts and Guards and other young people. Then there are erected on the estate two Salvation Army halls —one at Deewhy and one at Collaroy. The Army has been generous in its gifts from the property for public purposes, such as recreation grounds at Dee-why, Collaroy, Narrabeen, and Mona Vale. In addition to the usual statutory area for reserves, it set apart for similar purposes - a strip, of foreshore extending from Narrabeen to Mona Vale. The popular Griffiths Park, comprising at 177 acres, probably the most attractive section in the whole district, was included in the original estate. Proceeds of land sales are credited to a central fund at headquarters, for the purpose of assisting in the erection of Institutions for the care of the friendless and needy, also halls in localities where it is not possible locally to raise sufficient funds. ' Further, one-third of the net proceeds of sales is devoted to the missionary operations of the Army, which are now well established in India, Burma, China, the Dutch Indies, Korea, Zululand, Nigeria, and Kenya, From Australia many Salvation Army officers have gone forth to these lands in connection with missionary service. In all this, the Salvation Army claims that the intentions of Mr. and Miss Jenkins, from whom the Army derived this property, are being observed both in spirit and In deed. Not one penny of the proceeds of the estate, Army officials make clear, is used for the personal benefit of any, but those for whose aid the Army 

During the past two years (owing to expenditures required for development purposes) the Army has not benefited at all from the estate. But prior to that period, for some twelve years the proceeds of the estate have assisted the funds of the organisation to the extent of about £9000 a year. Meanwhile, Phillip Jenkins . is philosophical. He has a roof over his head, a few shillings to keep the wolf from the door, a few old friends, and a good wife. He has farmed his little block in the past, but now, getting on in years, and in poor health he sits on his verandah watching the golden lemons dropping off his trees for want of a payable market, rather like golden coins slipping from a man's hand. He is philosophical. If ever he does cry out against Fate, rate's answer, it seems, is a lemon.


Phillip Jenkins' Cottage in the Narrabeen Bush 

IN a weatherboard cottage in the bush at Warriewood, a few miles from Narrabeen, lives a man who, but for an old woman's whim, might today be worth, anything up to a quarter, of a million pounds. He is Phillip Jenkins, sole survivor of a family that settled in the district 100 years ago, and to-wards the end of last century owned, land from Narrabeen to Deewhy

THAT land was transferred to the Salvation Army by Phillip Jenkins' aunt, Miss Elizabeth, and approximately £108,000 has already accrued to the Institution from the sale of a portion of the property. Jenkins fought the Army at law and lost. Now, he receives from the Salvationists an annuity panning out at £2/10/- a week. 


PHILLIP JENKINS

MIGHT HAVE HAD £250,000, BUT GETS £210- A WEEK (1928, November 3). Smith's Weekly (Sydney, NSW : 1919 - 1950), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article234382625 

The Wheeler family and the McIntosh, along with Thomas Collins and the Macphersons held onto large land holdings longest, gradually selling these off to larger subdividers in Friedrich Caesar Hedemann, Henry Halloran and the groups such as a few banks and the NSW Realty company, who also took over and sold off lots at Mona Vale and Newport, or those who formed a company to subdivide the Green Hills - Elanora Heights estates.

The first big shift in making the area more attractive to those who wanted a smaller block for camping or a residence, or even just a holiday place, came with the installation of a bridge across the lagoon.

Narrabeen Lagoon Crossing Place, from album Collection: Pittwater scenes, 1880 / Harold Brees - item: c13730_0001_c, courtesy State Library of New South Wales.

PITT-WATER ROAD.
The same Minister was waited upon on Friday by the Mayor of Manly (Mr. Hilder), with Messrs. Hayes and Barker, who asked the Government to put in repair that portion of Pitt-water-road, running through the municipality of Manly, before the management of the road was taken over by the municipal council. Mr. Lackey informed the deputation that the Government had already made provision for the work being performed. PITT-WATER ROAD. (1880, March 13).Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 27. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70941827 

A Bridge over the lagoon - Finally:

NARRABEEN BRIDGE. 
Mr. LACKEY, in reply to Mr. Furnell, stated that a sum had been noted for consideration of the Cabinet for the erection of a bridge across the Narrabeen lagoon. 
LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY. (1881, January 15). Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 12. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70951884

That sum was:
519. Bridge and Bank Narrabeen Lagoon Road Manly to Pittwater ... ... ... ... ... £2,000 - No. XXVII. An Act to appropriate and apply out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund of New South Wales certain Sums to make good the Supplies granted for the Service of the Year 1881 and for the Year 1880 and previous Years. [Assented to, 6th April, 1881.] (1881, April 8). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2081. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224294033

Mr LACKEY in answer to Mr Teece, said that tenders for a bridge over Narrabeen Lagoon, close to the present road, would be invited in two weeks. PARLIAMENT OF NEW SOUTH WALES. (1882, September 9). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13526176

By June 1883 the first bridge over Narrabeen lagoon was being built - this appears to be what is later described as a 'road bridge' - quite flat and possibly prone to flooding and without a walkway for pedestrians;

DEPUTATIONS.
PITTWATER-ROAD..
A deputation waited upon the Colonial Secretary yesterday in reference to the road between Manly Beach and Newport, Pittwater. The deputation consisted of Dr Tibbets and Messrs M'Ewan, F. Smith, R. Crawford and R. Innes. It was represented that the Government expenditure on the road under notice had been made on the Manly Beach end, leaving the other end in a disgraceful state. A large coach traffic passed over the road in the shape of visitors to the Hawkesbury, and the bad condition of the road caused them great inconvenience. 
Mr STUART said he was aware that the road was very bad, but it was being gradually improved, and as soon as the bridge over the Narrabeen was finished, work could go on at the end of the road which now required to be put into a proper condition. DEPUTATIONS. (1883, June 2). The Sydney Daily Telegraph (NSW : 1879 -1883), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article238491545 

Twenty years later:
filling-in of four spans, construction of embanked bridge, approach and renewal of superstructure in connection with No. 1 Narrabeen Bridge, on road Manly to Barrenjoey (contract No. 37/04-05), J. H. .Sadden, Islington, £515; TENDERS ACCEPTED TO-DAY. (1904, December 28). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113302022 


Narrabeen 'road bridge' - postcard, from the collection of Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1, courtesy National Museum of Australia - circa 1901 to 1907.  The Bridges Narrabeen Pittwater N.S.W., courtesy National Museum of Australia; At the bottom of the postcard is the gold coloured text that reads "The Bridges Narrabeen Pittwater N.S.W." On the back the address reads ''Mrs Y Dwyer, Marlborough Club, Blenheim New Zealand". The message starts "Doing good Bus (iness), all the Generals are to be here next Friday. Wishing you and George a very Happy and Prosperous New Year... Flo & Stan."

The other big attraction in drawing people to the area was a little further south. On Thursday January 20th 1881, at just after 4.15 am on a foggy morning, the steamer Collaroy beached itself inside the northern reach of Long Reef on what was then called 'Jenkin's Cove', named after early settler James Jenkins, and the family farm then at Long Reef. The 'SS Collaroy' remained there for almost 3 years, giving her name to the stretch of sand and ocean we today call by that same name and attracting thousands of tourists who came to gawk at the beached vessel as well as picnic and see the surrounding area, including Narrabeen. When refloated she went back into service plying between Sydney and the Hunter River but was withdrawn from duty in 1886, converted to a schooner, sailed to San Francisco, where she again ran ashore and broke her back on the Californian Coast in 1889.


Wreck of the S.S. Collaroy, 1881 / photographer unknown. State Library of NSW Image No: a1528938


This image version shows the landscape and 'road' of Collaroy behind the stranded steamer of then.


Collaroy Beach in earley [ie. early] days ca. 1900-1927; Sydney & Ashfield : Broadhurst Post Card Publishers, by  William Henry Broadhurst, 1855-1927, courtesy State Library of New South Wales

The SS Collaroy was preceded by others coming unstuck along this section of coast and followed by many. One example from a few years earlier (others are listed in Dad's Fishing Shack at Long Reef by Ken 'Sava' Lloyd):

STRANDING OF THE SWANSEA, STEAMER.-The excursion steamer Swansea, belonging to Mr. Harmer, of Watson's Bay, left Sydney on Monday morning early with a fishing party.  She is ashore at Narrabeen, a small indent on the coast, situated about six miles from Sydney North Head. Captain Hixson, on learning the particulars, at once dispatched the pilot steamer Captain Cook to her assistance. The steamer returned last night, and reports the vessel on the rocks with a hole, through her bottom. SHIPS' MAILS. (1877, December 5). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28394828

While in April 1881 previous discussions and announcements to reserve land from present day Gordon and Pymble to Mona Vale and Narrabeen for a railway and other purposes was proclaimed, possibly adding to 'good reasons to sell now':

Department of Lands,
Sydney, 20th April, 1881.
RESERVES FROM SALE FOR RAILWAY AND OTHER PUBLIC PURPOSES.

HIS Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, directs it to be notified that in pursuance of the provisions of the 4th section of the Crown Lands Alienation Act of 1861, the land specified in the Schedule appended hereto shall be reserved from sale for railway and other public purposes.

JAMES HOSKINS.

No. 63. County of Cumberland, parishes of Broken Bay, Narrabeen, and Gordon, area about 20,000 acres. The Crown Lands within the following boundaries: Commencing on the right bank of Cowan Creek, at a point where the north extremity of the west boundary of reserve No. 51, notified 21st June, 1880, meets that creek; thence bounded by the west boundary of that reserve south to its south-west corner thence by the south and east boundaries of that reserve east and north to the south boundary of reserve No. 55, notified 21st June, 1880; thence by part of that south boundary east to the west boundary of John Clark's 100 acres thence by part of the west and south boundaries of that portion south and east to Pittwater; thence by Pittwater southerly to the north-east corner of Robert M'Intosh's 50 acres; thence by the north boundary of that portion and the north boundary of the reserve for public recreation, dedicated 7th January, 1879, west, to the north-west corner of that reserve; thence by the west boundary of that reserve south to its south-west corner, and by the south boundary of that reserve and the south boundary of James M'Cauley's 50 acres east to the south-east corner of that portion; thence by part of the east boundary of that portion north to the south boundary of John Andrews' 50 acres, and by that south boundary east to Pittwater; thence by Pittwater southerly to M'Carr's Creek, and by that creek upwards to its head; thence a line southerly, forming a west boundary of the parish of Narrabeen, to the road from Lane Cove to Bulgola Head; thence by that road south-westerly to the north boundary of the reserve on account of population for City of Sydney, as per Census of 1871; thence by part of that north boundary westerly to the east boundary of reserve No. 62, notified 23rd March, 1881, on Cowan Creek ; and thence by that creek downwards following its right bank, to the point of commencement. [Ms. 81-6,401]

No. 64. County of Cumberland, parishes of Marra Marra and Berowra, area about 26,000 acres. The Crown Lands within the following boundaries: Commencing on the road from Wiseman's Ferry to Parramatta, at a point where the northern boundary of George Acre's 1,500 acres, situated in the parishes of North Colah, Nelson, and Berowra, meets the north-eastern side of that road; thence bounded by that road in a north-westerly direction about 6£ miles in a direct line to the top of the 'range forming the boundaries between the parishes of Frederick and Marra Marra; thence bounded by that range and a small gully forming that parish boundary in a north-easterly direction to the right bank of the Hawkesbury River; and thence by that bank of that river downwards to the junction of Berowra Creek with that river at Fisherman's Point; and by the left bank of Berowra Creek upwards to a small gully which forms part of the boundary dividing the parishes of Berowra and North Colah; thence by that gully upwards to a point east from the point of commencement; thence by a line partly forming part of the north boundary of George Acre's 1,500 acres aforesaid westerly, to the point of commencement. [Ms. 81-6,401]RESERVES FROM SALE FOR RAILWAY AND OTHER PUBLIC PURPOSES. (1881, April 20). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2275. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224294826

Also, on April 3rd, 1881 the first simultaneous census of Australia and the rest of the British Empire took place. The population of Australia then was 2,250,194 with New South Wales was the second most populous state behind Victoria, with a population of 749,825. Sydney had 224,939 inhabitants. None of those census records for 1881 have survived that record individual names as they were destroyed in the Garden Palace Fire of 1882.

In 1881 the Governor of New South Wales was Lord Augustus Loftus, Sir Henry Parkes was the Premier. On June 18th the Art Gallery of South Australia was opened by Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence, the eldest child of the Prince and Princess of Wales (later King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra) and grandson of the reigning British monarch, Queen Victoria. Princes Albert and George (later King George), were sent as naval cadets on HMS Bacchante for a three year world tour of the then British Empire. They visited Newport in 1881 and an excursion they were taken on up the Hawkesbury River departed from the then quite new Newport wharf, built by Charles Jeannerett and then named 'Victoria' wharf:

On the 1st August a party from Government House and the Detached Squadron made an excursion up the Hawkesbury and fortunately the weather was so fine that every lovely scene on the river appeared to the best advantage. The Royal Princes were of the party. 

At an early hour those engaging in the excursion left Man-of war Stairs, and proceeded in the steam launch Nea to Manly, whence they were conveyed by Mr Boulton's coaches to Newport. There they were received by Mr Jeannerett on board the steam launch Pelican

Barrenjuey was passed about 11 o'clock, the boat then proceeded up the river. The day being beautifully clear, the scenery of the Hawkesbury was seen to the best advantage and was very much admired. Wiseman's Ferry was reached about 3 o'clock in the afternoon. 

The Pelican stopped at the wharf for a few minutes, and on-the Princes appearing the residents assembled, and an address of loyal welcome was read and presented to them by the master of the Public school, on behalf of the inhabitants of the village. 

The school children sang the National Anthem and those assembled then gave three hearty cheers for the Queen and the Princes. Prince Edward acknowledged the compliment in a few appropriate words. 

The Pelican resumed her journey, and went up the river as far as Sackville Reach, at which spot the party disembarked and drove thence to Windsor, returning from Windsor to Sydney by special train at night. 

The Princes slept at Government House on August 1, and on Tuesday took part in tho ceremony of laying the foundation stone of the pedestal for the statue of her Majesty the Queen which will be placed in the circular reserve at the top of King street, near St James s Church. THE ROYAL PRINCES IN SYDNEY. (1881, August 11). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13492318

Lord Augustus William Frederick Spencer Loftus, GCB, PC (4 October 1817 – 7 March 1904) was the 15th Governor of New South Wales and in office from August 4th 1879 to November 9th 1885. He was associated with the Ingleside Powder Works and his visit to Newport in August 1881 when hosting the princes, and where Mount Loftus was named to honour him, was not the only excursion to our area:

At the invitation of the Government the Earl and Countess of Rosebery paid a visit to the Hawkesbury. They were accompanied by His Excellency the Governor and Lady Loftus, Sir William and Lady De Voux, Mr. Eustace Smith (member of the House of Commons for Tynemouth), Mrs. and Miss Smith, the Hon. A. Stuart and Mrs. Stuart, the Hon. W. B. Dalley, the Hon. J. P. Abbott and Mrs, Abbott, the Hon. G. B. Dibbs, the Hon. E. Barton, Professor and Mrs. Badham, Mr. McQuade, M.L.A., and several others. The party left Sydney at an early hour by steam launch for Manly. They drove from Manly to Pittwater, where they embarked on board Mr.Thomas Dibb's steam yacht Ena, and proceeded up the river to Wiseman's Ferry. To the Editor. ". (1883, December 1). Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 21. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71006207

The Ramsay Estate went from John Wetherill's hands into than hands of many buyers of larger tracts who then subdivided these, including those alike Cyrus Fuller, born July 14, 1846 to Edward and Elizabeth Sarah (nee Moore). His father died in 1853 and his mother remarried, this time to John Black (1806-1866) who already had 8 sons and 3 daughters with his wife Jessie Dodds Moffit (1813-1856) including James Edward Black (1841–1907) and Joseph Ebenezer Black (1846-1919) who ran the coaches out to Pittwater from Manly after winning the mail contract in 1884. Joseph's first marriage ended in divorce after his wife, Emma Jane Bonfield, 'eloped' with another man with whom she had already had two children. On November 23rd, 1886 Joseph Black married Martha Frances Baker (December 9, 1861–September 30, 1950), born in Pittwater to William Richard Joseph Baker (1828–1898), Orchardist of Pitt Water (Church Point - 'Bakers Orchard') and Marianne (nee Turnbull 1834–1905).  

Cyrus Edward Fuller, newspaper proprietor, stationer and developer, married Sarah Mason in 1871. 

MARRIAGES. On the 6th July. at St. John's Church. Parramatta, by the Rev. W. J. Gunther, M.A.. Cyrus Edgar Fuller, Bringelly, youngest son of the late Edward Fuller, Castle Hill, to Sarah, eldest daughter of Edmund Mason, Esq., Broadview, near Parramatta. Family Notices (1871, August 16). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129968194

Children of the union:

FULLER CLAUDE 15628/1872 CYRUS E SARAH PARRAMATTA
FULLER ELSIE SARAH16995/1874 CYRUS EDGAR SARAH PARRAMATTA
FULLER STELLA MARY 17985/1876 CYRUS EDGAR SARAH PARRAMATTA
FULLER HARRY B19713/1878 CYRUS E SARAH PARRAMATTA
FULLER AUBREY EDGAR 21065/1879 CYRUS EDGAR SARAH PARRAMATTA
FULLER IDA EMILY 13878/1881 CYRUS EDGAR SARAH PARRAMATTA
FULLER HILMA EVA 17324/1884 CYRUS EDGAR SARAH PARRAMATTA
FULLER VICTOR E M 13047/1886 CYRUS E SARAH MANLY
FULLER CYRUS R13669/1888 CYRUS E SARAH MANLY

Richardson and Wrench commenced selling Lots of the Mount Ramsay estate. The Lithograph plan for this October 24th,1881 Mount Ramsay Estate Auction lists, importantly, Collaroy Street, as well as Frazer, Fielding and Stuart streets, Robertson, Devitt, Mactier, Goodwin, Loftus, Albemarle, Malcolm St, Emerald St, Tourmaline St, Octavia St, Loftus St, Albemarle St, Wellington St, Waterloo St, Victoria St, Albert St, King St, Pittwater Rd Bridge, Lagoon St, Ocean St - in fact most of those which still exist with the same names today.

UNRESERVED SALE Victoria St, 
IN ALLOTMENTS. IN ALLOTMENTS
THE MOUNT RAMSAY ESTATE

having frontages to LONG REEF BEACH, NARRABEEN LAGOON, and PITT-WATER-ROAD.
only SIX Miles from MANLY BEACH PIER, is for AUCTION SALE, at the ROOMS, Pitt-street on MONDAY, 24th OCTOBER, at 11 o clock.
NOTE THE VERY LIBERAL TERMS - £2 DEPOSIT PER LOT AND THE RESIDUE IN MONTHLY INSTALMENTS OF £1 WITHOUT INTEREST.
FREE DEEDS. FREE DEEDS.
LITHOS now ready.
RICHARDSON and WRENCH. 
UNRESERVED SALE. (1881, October 21). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13497343


Mount Ramsay Estate, Parish of Manly Cove - Collaroy street, Malcolm St, Alexander etc. - 1881 - Auction Monday October 24th. Richardson and Wrench. Item: c050370117 - and parts from to show Section/Lot Numbers, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales.



The Saturday paper, just before the Auction:

NEXT MONDAY. 
UNRESERVED SALE.
MOUNT RAMSAY ESTATE, 
having TWO MILES' FRONTAGE to LONG REEF BEACH,
. . . and
EXTENSIVE FRONTAGES 
to
NARRABEEN LAGOON
...... and ... ... PITT WATER-ROAD,

only SIX MILES from MANLY BEACH PIER. NOTE THE VERY LIBERAL TERMS:
£2 DEPOSIT PER LOT, and the RESIDUE in MONTHLY INSTALMENTS of £1.
FREE DEEDS. FREE DEEDS.

RICHARDSON and WRENCH have received instructions to sell by public auction, at the Rooms, Pitt-street, on
MONDAY, 24th OCTOBER, at 11 o'clock.
THE NEW TOWNSHIP
on
LONG REACH BEACH,
and
NARRABEEN LAGOONS,
at the
CROSSING PLACE. 
The subdivision is so arranged that purchasers, by taking a number of lots, can thereby secure a large area of land, even to the extent of a WHOLE SECTION.
There are in this portion of the MOUNT RAMSAY ESTATE, SIXTY-FIVE SECTIONS,
Comprising in all about 925 ALLOTMENTS,
with Frontages to the MAIN PITT WATER-ROAD, and other streets, all ONE CHAIN WIDE, also to the BEACH known as LONG REACH, and the waters of NARRABEEN LAGOON.
This new township is in the prettiest and most beautiful position in this healthful and really attractive locality, known as the PARISH of MANLY, and is approached by a good, well-formed road from Manly Beach, distant only 6 miles.
PUBLIC CONVEYANCES run through this township daily in their trips to and from MANLY and PITTWATER
The scenery along the road is acknowledged by all to be the most pleasing and enlivening out of the city.
An inspection of the new township subdivision will convince those in search of safe investments that a few pounds judiciously laid out in the purchase of some of the Building Allotments here must turn out a good speculation and return to the investors handsome profit in a very short time.
NOTE THE VERY LIBERAL TERMS
£2 DEPOSIT PER LOT AND THE RESIDUE IN MONTHLY INSTALMENTS Of £1, WITHOUT INTEREST.
FREE DEEDS. FREE DEEDS.
LITHOS. now ready. Large Auction Plan on view at the rooms.
MOUNT RAMSAY ESTATE.
THE NEW WATERING PLACE
and TOWNSHIP

on the BEAUTIFUL and EXTENSIVE  SANDY BEACH, 
north of MANLY COVE, and extending to the SITE on which the . . 
NEW BRIDGE 
ls About to be erected across
NARRABEEN LAGOON. 
This township is in one of the MOST ROMANTIC and extremely attractive positions on the coast, taking in and having frontages to
THE GRANDEST SEA BEACH 
north of Sydney, that will be long remembered by many as the spot upon which the
STEAMSHIP COLLAROY
now lies high and dry
.
The drive by road to Mount Ramsay is acknowledged by all who have enjoyed it to be the most attractive and enlivening one along our charming coast.
LIBERAL TERMS. LIBERAL TERMS.
£2 deposit per lot, and the residue in monthly instalments of £1 without interest.
Lithos. are now ready for distribution, and the Auction Plan is on view at the Rooms.
DAY OF SALE,
MONDAY, 21th OCTOBER, at the Rooms, Pitt-street, at 11 o'clock.
FREE DEEDS. FREE DEEDS.
RICHARDSON and WRENCH, Auctioneers.
Advertising (1881, October 22). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28382743

NSW Archives holds the following records for lands held by John Wetherill in our area:

  • NRS-17513-38-31-PA 4536 | Primary Application - John Wetherill 410 acres on Narrabeen Lagoon in Parish Manly Cove County Cumberland; 01-01-1863 to 18-09-1877
  • NRS-13012-3-[6/10080]-PA 4536 | Primary Application -John Wetherill, County of Cumberland; 18-09-1877 to 24-06-1879 - the Mount Ramsay and Collaroy to Narrabeen lands
  • NRS-13012-3-[6/10100]-PA 6571 | Primary Application -John Wetherill, Parish of Manly County of Cumberland; 16-12-1885 to 21-07-1886
  • NRS-17513-38-198-PA 6571 | Primary Application - John Wetherill 107 acres in Parish Manly Cove County Cumberland Volume 798 Folio 188; 01-01-1863 to 21-07-1886

In the names chosen for these streets is seen a mix of honouring local early land grantees, his own family surname, royalty and governorship and politicians who started simply, as he did, in trades works, and excelled in their chosen fields. John Wetherills' name choices reflect those who held similar ideals to his, and history - Wellington at Waterloo in 1815 standing out as one example. 

John Wetherill was elected Mayor of Leichardt in 1874 and 1875, a Council he had served on since its formation in December 1871 and subsequent election of Aldermen in 1872. The published receipts of the first few years of this council show he contributed £ to the building of their first Town Hall and would 'loan' £ when there was a deficit. He was also a founding member in 1872 of the Australian Mutual Fire Insurance Society, modelled on then evolving cooperative movements, which not only generated big profits but also reinvested these in Australians and building Australia. The register of companies investing in mining show him to be a larger shareholder and Director of companies that sought gold and tin. John Wetherill was also a founding Director of the Land Company of Australasia Limited



Advertising (1886, July 22). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13634655

Then soon after:

In the matter of the Land Company of Australasia (Limited).

AT an Extraordinary General Meeting p| the above-named Company, duly convened and held at the Head Office of the Company, 54, Pitt-street, Sydney, on Monday, the 27th day of February, 1893, at the hour of two o'clock in the afternoon, the following Extraordinary Resolution was duly passed:—

" That it has been proved to the satisfaction of the meeting that the Company cannot, by reason of its liabilities, continue its business; and that it is advisable to wind up the same, and accordingly that the Company be wound up voluntarily."

And Robert Fisher, of Sydney, licensed surveyor, was appointed one of the Liquidators of the Company for the purpose of winding up the same in conjunction with such other person or persons (if any), not exceeding two in number, as should thereafter be appointed as Liquidators by the shareholders. And the meeting having been duly adjourned to Friday, the 3rd day of March, 1893, at the hour of 4 o'clock in the afternoon, a resolution was at such adjourned meeting duly passed, whereby James Robertson, of Sydney, public accountant, was appointed one of the Liquidators of the Company, for the purpose of winding up the same in conjunction with the said Robert Fisher and such other person (if any) as should thereafter be appointed as Liquidator by the shareholders.—Dated this 7th day of March, 1893.

WM. HARRIS, Chairman.  In the matter of the Land Company of Australasia (Limited). (1893, March 10). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 1976. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221707579

Finally completely Liquidated in 1912: THE LAND COMPANY OF AUSTRALASIA LIMITED. (1912, February 28). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1519. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226771572

Although clearly a hard worker, who amassed a fortune, John Wetherill had a soft spot for anything or anyone connected to his birthplace and moved many of his larger land holdings across Sydney under the Real Property Act that were then made into smaller lots to create 'new towns' and opportunities for others. There were numerous forms of co-operative societies forming in Sydney during these decades many of them stating their object and aims were  "the purchase of land on such terms as would enable working men and others of limited means to become possessors of their own freeholds on which to build their own homes". Mr. Wetherill, although he would be tough on defaulters of mortgages he covered, appears to have been a subscriber to providing such opportunities. There are more connections hinting of his old home and beliefs that may have been held from his youth under the naming of 'Octavia' street for this 1881 subdivision.

Born in Caythorpe, Lincolnshire, England on 1830 (some state 1836) to William Singleton Wetherill and Anne Hancock (married 27th of March 1821), he arrived in Sydney in the ship Bank of England about 1850. By 1854 he had gone into partnership with James Hancock at Brick Hill in town and later they were selling blankets, bonnets and tartan at 409 George Street, Sydney (opposite the Cathedral). The partnership was dissolved in 1857 and he continued in the drapers business by himself with news reports during the 1850's and 1860's showing he would not hesitate to have any thieves in his shop prosecuted. By 1867 he was installed in 'Waterloo House' in Pitt street, which would be the offices of the Australian Mutual Fire Insurance Society until the new building erected for that purpose would be completed in the mid 1880'son the corner of Pitt and King Streets.

John Wetherill named streets for his children and his second wife Elizabeth Australia Wetherill in his western Sydney subdivisions, as well as one for long-term friend and business partner, John Sutherland MLC, while those at Narrabeen reflect a belief of anything being achievable through hard work. His choices, and where they appear to stem from based on the few threads about his own nature that can be garnered, are a great contrast to those names chosen for the 1870 Therry subdivisions at Careel Bay. At Careel Bay there was an adherence to naming streets after royalty and honouring the memory of Rev. Therry rather than an embracing of this place and its peoples. Wetherill did this too, but his selections are predominated by people who had left a place where they were poor and succeeded in the opportunities offered them here, attained through hard work, integrity and honesty, who almost all served in public office in one form or another.

He died in January 1909 with his assets, showing a penchant for books, art and history, in what was sold off by his relatives and in the names given to some streets for the 1881 Mount Ramsay subdivisions. Even in one article that appears years after he passed away his love for history, particularly local history, is apparent:

WETHERILL, JOHN. -At his late residence, Aloha, Ada-street, Randwick, aged 79. Family Notices (1909, January 5). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15024997

WETHERILL -The Friends of the late Mr JOHN WETHERILL are invited to attend his Funeral which will leave his late residence, Aloha, Ada-street, Randwick, THIS (Tuesday) AFTERNOON at 1 o'clock for Church of England Cemetery, Necropolis. WOOD and COMPANY, Funeral Directors, Tel, 726 etc. Sydney and Suburbs. Family Notices (1909, January 5). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15024875

ART TREASURES. There is now on view at Messrs James Lawson and Little's galleries In Pitt-street a collection of art-treasures originally formed by the late James Wetherill. In addition to graceful examples of furniture by Sheraton and other great makers of the past, there are a collection of rare coins, a number of old English and French clocks, some excellent bronzes, marble statuary, and modern sideboards carved with fruit and flowers. The china section embraces Sevres, Japanese, Worcester, Crown Derby, and other makes, and there are oil and water colour paintings of value, by Franthini, Tully Latt, and other artists. Visitors should not fail to examine the old etchings and engravings, several of which, as "Landing of Charles II," by Woollett West (1789), and "Cromwell and the Long Parliament " by Hall West (1780), are of historic interest. These art-treasures will be sold at the rooms to-morrow and Friday. ART TREASURES. (1909, May 5). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15055843


King Charles II landing on the Beach at Dover, 5 April 1789. Engraved by William Sharp (1749 - 1824). Etched by William Woollett (1735 - 1785). Published by Benjamin West PRA (1738 - 1820) and John Hall (1739 - 1797) and E. Woollett


Oliver Cromwell dissolving the Long Parliament, 5 April 1789. Engraved by John Hall (1739 - 1797). Published by Benjamin West PRA (1738 - 1820) and John Hall (1739 - 1797) and E. Woollett. 

SECOND DAY'S SALE.
THIS DAY, FRIDAY, 7th MAY, AT ELEVEN O'CLOCK A.M. AT THE AUCTION ROOMS AND GALLERIES JAMES R. LAWSON AND LITTLE, 128 and 130 PITT-STREET. NEAR KING-STREET.
Under instructions from the Family of THE LATE JOHN WETHERILL, and ON ACCOUNT OF NUMEROUS PRIVATE INTERESTS.
SUPERIOR FURNITURE and GENERAL HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS, including COMPLETE FURNISHINGS FOR DINING AND DRAWING ROOMS, ENTRANCE HALL, LIBRARY, AND SEVERAL WELL-APPOINTED BEDROOMS.
Also, SEVERAL PIANOFORTES
JAMES R. LAWSON AND LITTLE, FINE ART AUCTIONEERS.
Advertising (1909, May 7). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15056382

If the Ghost of Wentworth could return!
-MAKING HIS HOME AS HE LEFT IT.

IF William Charles Wentworth could cross the valley from the hillside where he rests, to Vaucluse House, he could now enter some of the rooms hardly knowing that half a century had intervened since he was last there. When he left, the atmosphere of the old home went with him; the furniture disappeared; the house lost its character. But now its old glory is coming back; the lost furniture is being recovered and restored to its right setting; the "atmosphere" is being built up again.

Already many of the familiar things which he loved so well have come back to the old mansion, and they have been disposed as they were when Vaucluse House was tenanted by a flesh-and-blood Wentworth instead of by his ghost. These are not mere inanimate things. They have character as well as charm. You can read into them, the old house and its contents, the concentrated, essence of our early political history.

The commanding figure of Wentworth walks in and out the doors, and where Wentworth walked history went with him. A century falls away as you enter. You are surrounded by yesterday, and you feel something of a parvenu.

The eight gentlemen who are charged with its preservation for the nation are seeking to furnish Vaucluse House with the things that grew up with it. They would, reappoint the lovely old home exactly as it was in Wentworth's day.

Most of the original furniture was sold by auction in 1883, and became scattered far and wide throughout Australia and even beyond.  .... 

Most complete of all the rooms is the family dining-room. The massive table, its 15 feet of surface like a still, oblong pool; the ten sturdy leather chairs, the century-old sideboard carved out of good English oak, the tall dinner waggon — they all are there, just as the butler might have left them after he had cleared away.


For 40 years before they came back to their rightful setting, these handsome old pieces reposed on the third-stoey floor of the Randwick house of Mr. Wetherill, formerly a Pitt-street draper, and a collector of old and beautiful things... If the Ghost of Wentworth could return! (1928, April 1). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 27. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222012552

Also of interest regarding this October 1881 subdivision into allotments is his purchase of land in May of 1881 which may have led to selling off the Mount Ramsay estate:

SALE OF AN ESTATE.-Messrs. Richardson and Wrench report to the Herald having sold, by private contract, an improved estate at Prospect, County of Cumberland, near Veteran Hall Estate, in area 500 acres, more or less, for the sum of £15,000, to Mr. John Wetherill. Destruction of Casamicciola, Ischia. (1881, May 21). The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), p. 6 (Second Sheet to The Maitland Mercury). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article817384

Caythorpe is a large village and civil parish in the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. Notable people include Edmund Weaver, 18th-century astronomer and land agent, who lived at Frieston, and George Hussey Packe (1796–1874), MP, who was an army officer present at the Battle of Waterloo. George Hussey Packe was a scion of the family of Sir Christopher Packe, a 17th-century Lord Mayor of London. He was born at Hanthorpe House, Morton and Hanthorpe, Lincolnshire in 1796, the second son to Charles James Packe (1758–1837), of Prestwold Hall, Leicestershire, and his first wife Penelope, of Blythe Hall, Warwickshire. He married in 1824 Maryanne-Lidia (1796–1876), daughter of John Heathcote – of Connington Castle, Huntingdonshire, and MP for Ripon – and Mary Anne (née Thornhill). They had two children: Marianne Penelope Packe (1832–1921) and Hussey Packe (1846–1908). Packe inherited Prestwold Hall and its estates. Caythorpe Hall at Caythorpe, Lincolnshire was a further residence, built for him in 1823, and a rebuild of a previous hall, the residence of Sir Giles Hussey. With Caythorpe Hall came 4,000 acres of estate. Packe was Lord of the Manor of Caythorpe, with the parish living and rectory under his patronage. He built and supported the village school connected to St Vincent's Church, and for the church provided a peal of eight bells and a clock.

As can be seen in the small threads found, John Wetherill had a love for history and art depciting this, as well as a fondness fopr books. The 1881 Mount Ramsay Estate Auction streets list and named for, running north to south, are:

Victoria St: named for the then Queen of the Commonwealth, Victoria. Although 'the road to Pittwater', the cart and horse track between Collaroy and Narrabeen Primary School, obviously already existed, it was called 'Ocean Street' from Long Reef to the present day school, and from there to Narrabeen Terminus it was known as 'Victoria street'

Malcolm st.: Possibly after Major-general Sir John Malcolm GCB, KLS (2 May 1769 – 30 May 1833) a Scottish soldier, diplomat, East India Company administrator, statesman, and historian. Born in 1769, one of seventeen children of George Malcolm, an impoverished tenant farmer in Eskdale in the Scottish Border country, and his wife Margaret (‘Bonnie Peggy’), née Pasley, the sister of Admiral Sir Thomas Pasley. His brothers included Sir James Malcolm, Admiral Sir Pulteney Malcolm and Sir Charles Malcolm. He left school, family and country at the age of thirteen, and achieved distinction in the East India Company over the next half century. A spirited character, he was nicknamed ‘Boy Malcolm’; for throughout his life he retained a youthful enthusiasm for field sports and fun and games. But behind this boisterous exterior lay serious intellectual ability and a considerable talent for government. In the Anglo-Maratha war of 1803-05, he accompanied Sir Arthur Wellesley (later Duke of Wellington) as the Governor-General’s representative and diplomatic agent; the two men forming a lifelong friendship.  The Second Anglo-Maratha War (1802–1805) was the second conflict between the British East India Company and the Maratha Empire in India. In September 1803, Scindia forces lost to Lord Gerard Lake at Delhi and to Arthur Wellesley at Assaye. From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Anglo-Maratha_War  The Battle of Assaye was a major battle of the Second Anglo-Maratha War fought between the Maratha Empire and the British East India Company. It occurred on 23 September 1803 near Assaye in western India where an outnumbered Indian and British force under the command of Major General Arthur Wellesley (who later became the Duke of Wellington) defeated a combined Maratha army of Daulat Scindia and the Raja of Berar. The battle was the Duke of Wellington's first major victory and the one he later described as his finest accomplishment on the battlefield, even more so than his more famous victories in the Peninsular War, and his defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo.  The Deccan plateau is very rich in minerals and precious stones. The plateau's mineral wealth led many lowland rulers, including those of the Mauryan (4th–2nd century BCE) and Gupta (4th–6th century CE) dynasties, to fight over it. Major minerals found here include coal, iron ore, asbestos, chromite, mica, and kyanite. 

Emerald St: named for the gem, and perhaps influenced by how green Narrabeen was then or by gifts given to his wife. His daughter 'Ruby' Louise was born June 3rd, 1879.

Tourmaline St: named for the gem/crystal, which can be a bluish-black, or in the crystal form, green at one end and pink at the other. One item found shows the tourmaline his wife may have possessed was pink: Stolen, about three weeks ago, from the residence of John Wetherill, draper, Petersham,—A lady’s heavy gold ring with five pink stones, claw setting; value, about £3. Identifiable. Burglaries, Stealing from the Premises, &c. (1877, February 28). New South Wales Police Gazette and Weekly Record of Crime (Sydney : 1860 - 1930), p. 64. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article252089767. There is also a link in this to the Battles of Wellington on the mineral rich Deccan Plateau in India. There is also Luxullianite (also Luxulyanite, Luxulianite) a rare type of granite, notable for the presence of clusters of radially-arranged acicular tourmaline crystals enclosed by phenocrysts of orthoclase and quartz in a matrix of quartz, tourmaline, alkali feldspar, brown mica, and cassiterite. The name originates from the village of Luxulyan in Cornwall, England, where this type of granite is found. An example of its use may be seen in the Duke of Wellington's monument at St Paul's Cathedral in London.


Luxullianite from Cornwall, showing dark patches of tourmaline and pink crystals of orthoclase - photo by and courtesy Kevin Walsh

Octavia St: Octavia, byname Octavia Minor, (born c. 69 BC—died 11 BC), full sister of Octavian (later the emperor Augustus) and wife of Mark Antony. Octavia was the faithful wife and mother who raised Mark Antony's children by Cleopatra along with her own children. Octavia was the daughter of Gaius Octavius and his second wife, Atia. Before 54 BC Octavia was married to Gaius Marcellus, by whom she had two daughters and a son. On the death of Marcellus in 40 she was married to Mark Antony, who at the time was ruling the Roman state with Octavian and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. At first this marriage helped to reduce tensions between Antony and Octavian, and when the two rulers quarrelled in 37, Octavia brought about peace between them, which resulted in the Treaty of Tarentum. In 36 Antony left Italy to command troops in Parthia and while in the East resumed his liaison with the Egyptian queen Cleopatra. Although Octavia brought troops and money to him (35), he refused to see her, and in 32 he obtained a divorce. The Porticus of Octavia in Rome is named for her.

Octavia, in Narrabeen, was possibly named to honour Octavia Hill, (3 December 1838 – 13 August 1912) and harking back to his birthplace and his own beliefs in setting up the Australian Mutual Fire Society along co-operative models. Octavia was an English social reformer, whose main concern was the welfare of the inhabitants of cities, especially London, in the second half of the nineteenth century. Born in Wisbech, Isle of Ely, Cambridgeshire, the daughter of James Hill, a corn merchant, former banker and a follower of Robert Owen(a Welsh textile manufacturer, philanthropist and social reformer, who was one founder of utopian socialism and the cooperative movement. He is known for efforts to improve factory working conditions for his workers and promote experimental socialistic communities. In the early 1800s, he became wealthy as an investor and eventual manager of a large textile mill at New Lanark, Scotland. He had initially trained as a draper in Stamford, Lincolnshire, and worked in London before relocating aged 18 to Manchester and becoming a textile manufacturer. He continued to champion the working class, led the development of cooperatives and the trade union movement, and supported the passage of child labour laws and free co-educational schools), and his third wife, Caroline Southwood Smith. James Hill had been widowed twice, and had six surviving children (five daughters and a son) from his two previous marriages; Octavia was her father's eighth daughter and tenth child. He had been impressed by the writings on education of his future wife, the daughter of Dr Thomas Southwood Smith, a pioneer of sanitary reform. He had engaged Caroline as a governess to his children in 1832, and they were married in 1835. The family's comfortably prosperous life was disrupted by James Hill's financial problems and his mental collapse. In 1840 he was declared bankrupt. Caroline Hill's father gave the family financial support, and took on some of Hill's paternal role.  Southwood Smith was a health and welfare reformer concerned with a range of social issues including child labour in mines and the housing of the urban poor. Caroline Hill held similar views on social reform, and her interest in progressive education, influenced by Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi, and Southwood Smith's daily experience in his work at the London Hospital in the East End inspired Octavia Hill's concern for the poorest in early Victorian London. She received no formal schooling: her mother educated the family at home. A co-operative guild providing employment for "distressed gentlewomen" accepted Hill for training in glass-painting when she was 13. When the work of the guild was expanded to provide work in toy-making for Ragged school children, she was invited, at the age of 14, to take charge of the workroom. The following year she began working in her spare time from the guild as a copyist for John Ruskin in Dulwich Art Gallery and the National Gallery. She was deeply aware of the dreadful living conditions of the children in her charge at the guild. Parliament and many concerned reformers had been attempting to improve the housing of the working classes since the early 1830s. When Hill began her work, the model dwelling movement had been in existence for twenty years, royal and select committees had sat to examine the problems of urban well-being, and the first of many tranches of legislation aimed at improving working class housing had been passed. 

Right: Octavia Hill in 1882

From Hill's point of view these had all failed the poorest members of the working class, the unskilled labourers. She found that their landlords routinely ignored their obligations towards their tenants, and that the tenants were too ignorant and oppressed to better themselves. She tried to find new homes for her charges, but there was a severe shortage of available property, and Hill decided that her only solution was to become a landlord herself. John Ruskin, who was interested in the co-operative guild, knew Hill from her work as his copyist and was impressed by her. As an aesthete and a humanitarian he was affronted by the brutal ugliness of the slums.In 1865, having inherited a substantial sum of money from his father, he acquired for £750 the leases of three cottages of six rooms each in Paradise Place, Marylebone.  Ruskin placed these houses, which were "in a dreadful state of dirt and neglect", under Hill's management. In 1866 Ruskin acquired the freehold of five more houses for Hill to manage in Freshwater Place, Marylebone. The Times recorded, "The houses faced a bit of desolate ground occupied by dilapidated cowsheds and manure heaps. The needful repairs and cleaning were carried out, the waste land was turned into a playground where Mr. Ruskin had some trees planted."  After being improved the properties were let to those on intermittent and low incomes. A return of five per cent on capital was obtained as promised to Ruskin; any excess over the five per cent was reinvested within the properties for the benefit of the tenants. Rent arrears were not tolerated, and bad debts were minimal. As Hill said, "Extreme punctuality, and diligence in collecting rents, and a strict determination that they shall be paid regularly, have accomplished this." In consequence of her prudent management, Hill was able to attract new backers, and by 1874 she had 15 housing schemes with around 3,000 tenants. Hill's principles were summed up in an article of 1869: "Where a man persistently refuses to exert himself, external help is worse than useless." She was an outspoken critic of the principles of "outdoor relief" or the Speenhamland system of poor relief as operated by various Poor Law Boards. Because these systems did not encourage recipients to work, she regarded them as "a profligate use of public funds." Under her methods, personal responsibility was encouraged. She insisted on dealing with arrears promptly; she appointed reliable caretakers; she took up on references of prospective tenants, and visited them in their homes; she paid careful attention to allocations and the placing of tenants, with regard to size of families and the size and location of the accommodation to be offered; and she made no rules that could not be properly enforced. 

Among Hill's concerns was that her tenants, and all urban workers, should have access to open spaces. She believed in "the life-enhancing virtues of pure earth, clean air and blue sky." In 1883 she wrote:

There is perhaps no need of the poor of London which more prominently forces itself on the notice of anyone working among them than that of space. ... How can it best be given? And what is it precisely which should be given? I think we want four things. Places to sit in, places to play in, places to stroll in, and places to spend a day in. The preservation of Wimbledon and Epping shows that the need is increasingly recognised. But a visit to Wimbledon, Epping, or Windsor means for the workman not only the cost of the journey but the loss of a whole day's wages; we want, besides, places where the long summer evenings or the Saturday afternoon may be enjoyed without effort or expense.

Octavia campaigned hard against building on existing suburban woodlands, and helped to save Hampstead Heath and Parliament Hill Fields from development. She was the first to use the term "Green Belt" for the protected rural areas surrounding London. Three hills in Kent (Mariners Hill, Toys Hill and Ide Hill) which she helped to protect from development form part of the belt.

In 1876 Hill became the treasurer of the Kyrle Society, founded in that year by her eldest sister, Miranda, as a "Society for the Diffusion of Beauty". Under the slogan "Bring Beauty Home to the Poor" it aimed to bring art, books, music and open spaces into the lives of the urban poor. For a short period it flourished and expanded, and although it declined after a few years, it was a template for the National Trust, 20 years later.

Women who had trained under Hill formed the Association of Women Housing Workers in 1916. This later changed its name to the Society of Housing Managers in 1948. After merging with the Institute of Housing Managers in 1965, the society became the present day Chartered Institute of Housing in 1994. The CIH is a professional body for those working in the housing profession in the UK and overseas. The training that Hill gave to Charity Organisation Society volunteers contributed to the development of modern social work, and COS continued to be instrumental in developing social work as a profession during the twentieth century. COS is still in operation today as the charity Family Action.

In 1907, Parliament passed the first National Trust Act, enshrining the trust's permanent purpose and giving it powers to protect property for the benefit of the nation. The trust now looks after a wide range of coast, countryside and historic buildings. According to the trust's website, "Staff, volunteers and tenants are engaged daily in providing access to open spaces for people's enjoyment, providing habitats for wildlife and in improving our environment – 'for ever, for everyone'."

Loftus: named for Sir Augustus Loftus, then Governor of NSW.

Albemarle: Possibly named for Montague Peregrine Albemarle or more likely, Albemarle Bertie, 9th Earl of Lindsey of Lincolnshire, and a hearkening back to the place of John Wetherill's birth as well as showing what will be done by a loyal Royalist - from the pages of then, an Australian link:

LORD AND LADY BERTIE.

(See portraits on page 33.)


Lord Bertie.  Lady Bertie (née Millicent Cox).
(See letterpress on page 35.)

Montague Peregrine Albemarle, Lord Bertie, is the only son and the heir of the Earl of Lindsey, in the peerage of England, and eleventh earl of that name. The family belongs to Lincolnshire, and must not be confounded with the Lindsay's of the Scottish peerage. The first Earl Lindsey (creation 1626) was Lord Great Chamberlain of England ; and he laid claim, though unsuccessfully, to the earldom of Oxford. In the time of Charles I. he was Lord High Admiral of England and he was killed at the decisive battle of Edgehill, when he fought in the Royalist cause. He left, however, a younger son, from whom the present earl's descent is traced. The fourth earl was created Dulce of Ancastor and Kest even in 1715 ; but the title became extinct in 1809 ; and the earldom reverted to the present poor's father. Lord Lindsey was born in December, 1815, and married in 1854 a daughter of the Rev. J. E. Welby, rector of Hurston, in Leicester shire, by whom he has issue one son (Lord Bertie), and three daughters. Lord Bertie was born in September 1861, and was educated at Eton and Magdalen College, Cambridge. In 1881 he was appointed lieutenant in the 4th battalion of the Northampton shire Regiment of Militia; and in our portrait he is represented in his lieutenant's uniform. He is also a Justice of the Peace for Lincolnshire. Lord Bertie came to Sydney as aide-de-camp to Lord Carrington, a position which he, of course, resigns upon his marriage. Our portrait is from a photograph by Messrs. Freeman and Co., of George-street, Sydney. It may, perhaps, be worth noting by those who take an interest in these matters that the coat of arms of the Lindseys is very similar to that of the Euria of Abingdon. Indeed the families are connected. But, though the earldom of Lindsey is nearly fifty years older than Abingdon, yet the barons of Norreya (the Abingdon second title) are fifty years older still the first Lord Nerreys having been ambassador to the Court of France in the time of Queen Elizabeth.

Lady Bertie is the daughter of Dr. James Charles Cox, who has for many years occupied a prominent position in Sydney, both as a medical practitioner and a scientist. He is the youngest son of the late Hon. Edward Cox, and grandson of Capt. William Cox, of the 28th regiment ; his mother being a daughter of the late Captain Brooks, of Denham Court. Dr. Cox was born in 1834, at Fernhill Cottage, Mulgoa, near Penrith, where his father had established one of the first sheep stations in the country. Up to the age of 11 years he was educated in the Parsonage School at Mulgoa, whence he was transferred to the famous King's School, in Parramatta (then in charge of the late Dr. Forrest). After two years' sojourn there he was apprenticed to Dr. H. G. Douglas, previously to his entering upon the study of medicine as a profession. In 1852 he went to the University of Edinburgh ; and there in 1857 he took his M.D. degree, passing in the same year as surgeon in the Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh, in which institution he also obtained a fellowship. After qualifying himself for the practice of his profession, he returned to Sydney, where he acquired a large and fashionable practice afterward. He was elected honorary physician of the old Sydney Hospital, which position he held for sixteen years. He has been a member of the Board of Inspectors for Lunatic Asylum a for many years; and he is lecturer on the Practice of Medicine in the Sydney University, and chief medical adviser to the Australian Mutual Provident Society, Dr, Cox has a strong love for natural history : and it was his taste in this direction which decided his adoption of the medical profession.  While a pupil of the late Dr. Douglas he made a splendid collection of the seaweeds of Port Jackson, which he presented, through Professor Balfour, to Dr. Bentham, who wrote a valuable illustrated monograph on Australian seaweeds. While in Edinburgh Dr. Cox entered on the study of conchology, under the late Professor Edward Forbes ; and he followed up this branch of natural science on his return to Sydney. In 1864 he published an illustrated monograph on Australian and shells, which were then but little known. This is still recognised aa a standard work. He devoted considerable time to the question of air-breathing molluscs, as well as to the marine and fresh water forms. From time to time he published the results of his observations in the proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, of which he was elected a corresponding member. He has contributed to other local and foreign scientific periodicals, and is recognised as an authority on oyster culture. As far back aa 1864 he wrote very fully on the oyster beds in our rivers and along the coast ; and in 1880 he was appointed a member of the Royal Commission for investigating the state of our fishing industries. He is a member of the Linnean Society, London, and a vice-president of the affiliated society of New South Wales, and a member of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington (U.S.A.), and of various other scientific bodies. Dunner four or five yeara he occupied the position of President of the Linnean Society of New South Wales ; and for many years he has acted as one of the trustees of the Australian Museum in Sydney. Dr. Cox married in 1858 Margaret Wharton Maclellan, daughter of Mr. John Maclellan, of Greenock (Scotland). Miss Millicent Emma Inglis Cox is the oldest daughter of that marriage, and was born in Sydney on September 30, 1862. At the age of 14 years Miss Cox was sent to Edinburgh, and was educated in that city for three years, finishing her studies in Stuttgart (Germany) and in Paris. Miss Cox is a highly accomplished young lady, and will, as the present Lady Bertie, and the future Countess of Lindsey, worthily represent the daughters of Australia. Our portrait is from a photograph taken by messrs. Kerry and Jones, of George-street, Sydney.  LORD AND LADY BERTIE. (1890, February 15). Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 33. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71107916

James Charles Cox (21 July 1834 – 29 September 1912) was a son of Jane Maria (née Brooks) Cox and Edward Cox of Fernhill in Mulgoa. Among his siblings was Edward King Cox, who was appointed to the New South Wales Legislative Council, and Richard William Cox, a prominent sheep grazer. His father was a non-elective member of the New South Wales Legislative Council. As a child, he played with Aboriginal children and learned from them about native birds and animals. He became an assistant to Professor John Smith, the foundation professor of chemistry and experimental physics at the University of Sydney at its original site near Hyde Park, now occupied by Sydney Grammar School and established what became the Sydney Museum next door. He earned an M.D. in 1857 presenting the thesis "On the icterus neonatorum" and F.R.C.S. in 1858 at the University of Edinburgh. He was registered as a medical practitioner in New South Wales in February 1859 and developed a lucrative private practice in Sydney.

Dr. Cox retained an interest in nature all his life. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of New South Wales (then the Philosophical Society) in 1859. He was first president of the New South Wales Board of Fisheries and first secretary of the Entomological Society (later the Linnean Society of New South Wales), both in 1862. He was elected a fellow of the Linnean Society of London in 1868. He was a trustee of the Sydney Museum and left it his collection of land shells. His wrote extensively in the journals of these societies on the conchology of Australia and Melanesia. Dre. Cox died on September 29th 1912 in the Sydney suburb of Mosman.

Possible context for Albemarle too: The Battle of Albemarle Sound was an inconclusive naval battle fought in May 1864 along the coast of North Carolina during the American Civil War. Three Confederate warships, including an ironclad, engaged eight Union gunboats. The action ended indecisively due to the sunset. James W. Cooke, commander of Albemarle sailed out of Plymouth in early May 1864, along with the captured steamer CSS Bombshell and the transport CSS Cotton Plant. Steaming south toward New Bern, Cooke ran into a Union fleet at the mouth of Albemarle Sound, commanded by Captain Melancton Smith. This fleet consisted of the double-ender gunboats USS Mattabasett, USS Sassacus, USS Wyalusing and USS Miami, the converted ferryboat USS Commodore Hull, USS Ceres, USS Whitehead and USS Isaac N. Seymour.[3] When the Confederate ships were spotted, Mattabasett, Sassucus, Whitehead and Wyalusing immediately formed a line of battle supported by Miami, Commodore Hull and Ceres. Albemarle opened fire first, wounding six men working one of Mattabesett's two 100-pounder Parrott rifles. Mattabesset, Whitehead and Wyalusing opened fire almost simultaneously. Albemarle then attempted to ram Mattabesett, but the sidewheeler managed to round the ironclad's armored bow. She was closely followed by Sassacus, which then fired a broadside of solid 9 in (229 mm) and 100-pound shot, all of which bounced off Albemarle's casemate armor. However, Bombshell, being a softer target, was hulled by each heavy shot from Sassucus's broadside and surrendered. Cotton Plant withdrew back up the Roanoke, and Albemarle continued the fight alone.The battle itself was a standoff, but the events that followed had more decisive results. Albemarle had held its own against greater numbers but the damages caused the during the battle had forced the ship into port for the next several months, preventing it from being used in General Hoke's planned assault on New Bern. Hoke went ahead with his campaign even without Albemarle. He achieved nothing before being recalled to Virginia to help defend Petersburg and Richmond. The events in October had a greater impact on the situation when William B. Cushing led a naval raid and detonated a torpedo beneath the Albermarle's hull. The removal of Hoke's force and the destruction of Albemarle allowed both Plymouth and Washington, North Carolina, to fall back into Union hands

Wellington St: named for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852).

Waterloo St: named for the battle the 1st Duke of Wellington fought on June 18, 1815, defeating Napoleon - and remembering John Wetherill was a 20 year old man by the time he came who must have grown up hearing these legends and histories. Waterloo in Belgium was part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands at the time. An exchange with Clausewitz( Prussian political-military theorist Carl von Clausewitz, Feldzug von 1815: Strategische Uebersicht des Feldzugs von 1815, English title: The Campaign of 1815: Strategic Overview of the Campaign, was Clausewitz's last study and is widely considered to be the best example of Clausewitz's mature theories concerning such analyses. It attracted the attention of Wellington's staff, who prompted the Duke to write his only published essay on the campaign [other than his immediate, official after-action report, "The Waterloo Dispatch"], his 1842 "Memorandum on the Battle of Waterloo". While Wellington disputed Clausewitz on several points, the Prussian writer largely absolved Wellington of accusations levelled against him by nationalistic German axe-grinders ) was quite famous in Britain in the 19th century - it was heavily discussed in, for example, Chesney's Waterloo Lectures (1868). 

The other vital fact in the naming of 'Waterloo' is his premises for his drapery business was in 'Waterloo House, 233 and 235 Pitt street, Sydney from 1870.

Waterloo House 233-235 Pitt-Street

Drapers, tailors and outfitters were well established along Pitt Street, Sydney between King and Market Streets from the 1840s to the 1880s in a city block that included the popular Royal Victoria Theatre at No’s. 243-247  Pitt Street. Their stock-in-trade was primarily fine fabrics imported from England on board merchant barques.


227 to 267 Pitt Street, Sydney, circa 1870 to 1875. Photo Digital order no: a089579, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales. Showing Wetherill drapery business and Mutual Fire Office. Records indicate John Wetherill owned this property too and this is just a short distance from his original 'Brick Hill' premises.


Advertising (1870, October 24). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13222725

Waterloo is an inner-city suburb of Sydney, located 3 kilometres (1.87 mi) south of the Sydney central business district and is part of the local government area of the City of Sydney. Waterloo is surrounded by the suburbs of Redfern and Darlington to the north, Eveleigh and Alexandria to the west, Rosebery to the south, and Moore Park, Zetland, and Kensington to the east. Waterloo took its name from the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, when Allied and Prussian forces under the Duke of Wellington and Blücher defeated the French forces under Napoleon Bonaparte. In the 1820s Waterloo began supporting industrial operations including the Fisher and Duncan Paper Mill and the Waterloo Flour Mills owned by William Hutchinson and Daniel Cooper. William Hutchinson, superintendent of convicts and public works, had been granted 1,400 acres (5.7 km2) of land in 1823. He sold Waterloo Farm to Daniel Cooper (1785–1853) and Solomon Levey (1794–1833). Cooper later bought out Levey's share and on his death the Waterloo Estate passed onto his nephew, also named Daniel Cooper, who was the first Speaker of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly. Sir Daniel Cooper, 1st Baronet GCMG (1 July 1821 – 5 June 1902) was a nineteenth-century politician, merchant and philanthropist in the Colony of New South Wales. He served as the first speaker of the Legislative Assembly of the colony and was a noted philatelist. Cooper was conferred the hereditary title of Cooper baronet of Woollahra in 1863, the second of four baronetcy conferred to British expatriates in the Australian colonies. There are threads interwoven through the Clareville Streets Have Your Name page of that places association with New South Wales first Speaker. He was born at Bolton, Lancashire, England, the son of Thomas Cooper, merchant, and his wife Jane Ramsden. He was the nephew of the emancipated convict and extraordinarily successful businessman, Daniel Cooper, who took an interest in the education of his nephew. Bolton is a large town in Greater Manchester in North West England, historically and traditionally a part of Lancashire and, as a former mill town, Bolton has been a production centre for textiles since Flemish weavers settled in the area in the 14th century, introducing a wool and cotton-weaving tradition.In 1849 at the age of 28, Cooper was made a member of the legislative council, and in 1856 he was elected as a member for Legislative Assembly seat of Sydney Hamlets [an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in then British colony of New South Wales from 1856 to 1859, including what were then outer suburbs of Sydney and are now the inner suburbs of Paddington, Surry Hills, Redfern, Chippendale, Glebe, Camperdown, O'Connell Town (north Newtown), Balmain, North Sydney, Kirribilli and McMahons Point] of the first Parliament of New South Wales. He represented Paddington from 1859 to 1860. At its first meeting, Cooper was elected Speaker by a majority of one vote over Henry Watson Parker. Although his election was not popular, Cooper held office with dignity and impartiality and set a standard for future speakers. He successfully established rules of procedure and parliamentary conventions, which influenced the Parliament in the following years. In politics, he was close to Charles Cowper and Henry Parkes and supported Parkes' The Empire, financially. In return it described his political principles as being 'of so liberal a cast that, were he less identified with the great interests of property, he would be set down as a dangerous democrat'. He acquired an interest in a mercantile firm, afterwards known as D. Cooper and Company, and bought much property in Sydney and its suburbs. This afterwards appreciated in value and Cooper became a wealthy man. In 1853 he inherited the bulk of the enormous fortune of his uncle, Daniel, who had no children. 

Albert St: possibly named for his son christened Albert, born in 1878, birth registered at Balmain, with second wife Elizabeth Australia Wetherill. May have also been influenced by the Prince Consort of Queen Victoria or the Royal Albert, currently visiting Australia at that time and had just been 'coached' through the area to Newport wharf (then named 'Victoria' wharf) in August 1881. Albert's birth: WETHERILL.—May 27, at Elswick House, Petersham, the wife of J. Wetherill, of a son. Family Notices (1878, June 15). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 833. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162693525  

In 1831-32 Captain Piper sold four large portions of his estate to James Forster (Elswick Estate), Abraham Hearn, Prosper de Mestre (Helsarmel Estate), and David Ramsay. In 1834 James Norton purchased Elswick Estate (which included Elswick House built by Forster) and 100 acres where he developed an 'old world' garden complete with pond. James Norton was the founder of Messrs Norton, Smith & Co., and a member of the first Legislative Council. Marion Street was named after his second wife. He passed away at Elswick in 1862. At this time what would become Leichhardt was still part of Petersham. The Trustees of his estate converted some of the acreage to Torrens Title while a parcel of 52.5 acres, including Elswick House, was sold to John Wetherill on October 14 1868 with the title deed changing hands on the 20th of that month. 


'Elswick House' Leichhardt, in January 1863, by Henry Lloyd Grant, courtesy State Library of NSW

In 1880 John Wetherill sold 'Elswick', to according to the Liechardt Historical Journal (no. 21), to the Excelsior Building Society, which reads very 'Octavia Hill' inspired. The Historical society states:

''John Wetherill, had sold his Elswick House estate of 52 acres to a group of speculators, who formed the Excelsior Land Investment & Building Company to subdivide and sell the estate. Among the directors were the Mayor of Glebe, William Cary, the temperance advocate, John Roseby, MLA, the architect, Ambrose Thornley junior, and George Renwick, political supporter of Henry Parkes. The company planned to manage the occupation of the subdivision in the way that had been proved at Annandale. Ambrose Thornley and his partner John Smedley were asked to build a range of one-storey cottages and two-storey villas in Norton and Renwick Streets to tempt the buyers.

Members may choose their allotments and a plan of building - the merchant his mansion, the mechanic his cottage - and if approved of by the Board, the Company will er~ct the building and place him m possession on payment of 19 per cent of the value of the property. The balance of the purchase money may be spread over a period of twelve years in the shape of rent.

The property was then subdivided, selling for £3-£8 per foot. In 1888 St Martha's Industrial Girls Home opened in Elswick House. Domestic skills were taught to poor and orphaned girls. 


The opening of St Martha's Industrial Home, Leichhardt - copy of an image reproduced in K.E. Burford's Unfurrowed Fields, image is dated 1890. 

Leichhardt began its existence as a number of land grants. In particular two brothers Hugh and John Piper had a number of large grants between them. Hugh Piper established "Piperston". This estate was bought in 1846 by Walter Beames who was a friend of Ludwig Leichhardt. Beames assisted Leichhardt with provisions for his explorations and he also changed the name of "Piperston" to Leichhardt after his friend. One of the largest estates in Leichhardt was the Elswick estate which was owned by James Norton, solicitor and MLC. This was eventually subdivided into hundreds of blocks of land. There were also dairies in Leichhardt but these too, eventually fell victim to residential development. Leichhardt was incorporated as a municipality in December 1871. There is a Wetherill street in the suburb too, along with streets named for these early developers, such as Norton and the first Mayor, Walter Beames. Wetherill was the second Mayor.

King

Narrabeen: named for the place

Robertson: possibly named for Sir John Robertson, KCMG (15 October 1816 – 8 May 1891) Premier of New South Wales on five occasions. Sir Robertson is best remembered for land reform and in particular the Robertson Land Acts of 1861, which sought to open up the selection of Crown land and break the monopoly of the squatters. Visit: Pittwater Reserves: The Green Ways; Mona Vale's Village Greens A Map Of The Historic Crown Lands Ethos Realised - Robertson was renowned as ''the most representative New South Wales colonist of the 1850s, moulded by his personal and perceptive experience of the main forces that had shaped colonial society and politics: the competing claims of convict and non-convict elements, as moderated by the role of the native-born; the complex movement for representative government; and the demands of the squatters for security of tenure with the help of the British government and at the expense of the majority of colonists. No other politician had such sympathetic insight into the texture and subtleties of the radical needs of the times: some belonged to the past order of social snobbery and imperial control, such as (Sir) Stuart Donaldson, (Sir) Edward Deas Thomson, and (Sir) Henry Watson Parker; others were hindered in their understanding by their family connexions, such as Cowper; or by their English formation, such as (Sir) Henry Parkes; or by their social ambitions, such as (Sir) James Martin. Only Wentworth might have rivalled Robertson, but his day was over, his radicalism dimmed by age and wealth. Above all, none, with the minor exception of William Forster, had anything like Robertson's familiarity with the Australian outback, and land dominated the politics of the late 1850s and remained a major question for the rest of the century. But if he led enlightened social and political opinion he was not acceptable to polite society. By 1850 his peculiar voice gave authority to a comprehensive repertoire of profanity and he had an enviable capacity to take and hold his liquor; his bushman's clothes were crumpled by constant riding; but he was handsome, with reddish-brown hair and beard, sparkling blue eyes'' of His Land Act; ''Some historians have seen Robertson's great land reforms as necessary for the triumph of the 'middle classes', including owners of freehold land and urban liberals, over the squatters, with no sincere intention of concentrated land settlement. But colonial society did not lend itself to this over-simplification. Many urban residents, of diverse occupations and financial and political interests, were squatters; many rural residents were neither freeholders nor squatters, and many were liberals. Robertson himself reflected the social and political complexity: he was a country freeholder, but held squatting leases and leased land to tenant farmers, and he was the most radical of the liberals. He certainly saw his gruelling campaign as an honest and balanced attempt to compose the long-standing land problem for the benefit of all colonists, not least the landless country people. He was the great apostle of social equilibrium through land justice and he tapped city and country resentment, built up over a generation, to become one of the great land reformers of the nineteenth century: a result of his individuality and integrated colonial formation. Only he could have responded to the deeply-rooted levelling cry for easy access to land for all who wanted it, and he saw in agriculture a dual opportunity for land settlement and economic differentiation. Virtually none of his parliamentary supporters understood the complexities of his proposals; all of them were dragged along by the force of his personality and his relentless energy to accept the propositions that unsurveyed land could now be selected and bought freehold in 320-acre (130 ha) lots at £1 per acre, on a deposit of 5s. per acre, the balance to be paid within three years, an interest-free loan of three-quarters of the price; and that wealthy people would find it hard to speculate because bona fide residence was stipulated. He had formulated the greatest social theme in nineteenth century Australian history.'' - Bede Nairn, 'Robertson, Sir John (1816–1891)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. 1976.

Devitt: possibly named for Edward O'Donnell M'Devitt (1845-1898), barrister and politician, at one time Attorney-General of Queensland, appointed one of three Queensland commissioners to the Paris Exhibition in 1878, settled in Dublin to practise in land cases and after the Land Act was passed in 1881 published two technical pamphlets explaining it. In 1864-65 M'Devitt was active in the campaign against secular education and in 1866-67 practised in Sydney. He died on February 4th, 1909 while riding a bicycle in Malvern, Victoria, during a heatwave. 

Goodwin: possibly named, in keeping with the 'Wellington' and 'Waterloo' themes, for the naval Battle of Goodwin Sands (also known as the Battle of Dover), fought on 19 May 1652 (29 May 1652 Gregorian calendar),[a] was the first engagement of the First Anglo-Dutch War between the navies of the Commonwealth of England and the United Provinces of the Netherlands. The English Parliament had passed the first of the Navigation Acts in October 1651, aimed at hampering the shipping of the highly trade-dependent Dutch. Agitation among the Dutch merchants had been further increased by George Ayscue's capture in early 1652 of 27 Dutch ships trading with the royalist colony of Barbados in contravention of an embargo. Both sides had begun to prepare for war, but conflict might have been delayed if not for an unfortunate encounter on 29 May 1652 (19 May in the Julian calendar then in use in England) near the Straits of Dover between a Dutch convoy escorted by 40 ships under Lieutenant-Admiral Maarten Tromp and an English fleet of 25 ships under General-at-Sea Robert Blake. An ordinance of Cromwell required all foreign fleets in the North Sea or the Channel to dip their flag in salute, but when Tromp did not comply because he saw no reason to lower his flag for the English, Blake fired three warning shots. When the third hit his ship, wounding some sailors, Tromp replied with a warning broadside from his flagship Brederode. Blake then fired a broadside in anger and a five-hour battle ensued. Both fleets were damaged, but as darkness fell the Dutch fleet withdrew in a defensive line to protect the convoy, and the English captured two Dutch stragglers: Sint Laurens, which was taken back by them but not used, and Sint Maria, which was abandoned in a sinking condition and later made its way to the Netherlands. Tromp then offered his excuses to Blake and asked for the return of the prize, but this was refused by Blake. War was declared by the Commonwealth on 10 July 1652.

Also possibly named, in keeping with John Wetherill's support of all those who did well in life and public office and his involvement with lands, for Thomas Henry Hall Goodwin (11 December 1848 – 1 July 1921) Australian politician. He was born at Scone to medical practitioner John Goodwin and Elizabeth Russell. He worked as a pastoralist and surveyor, and was involved in the discovery and settlement of Broken Hill with William Jamieson selected the site of the town and made investments there. Owned Booloocooroo Station, Curlewis. In 1887 he was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as the Protectionist member for Gunnedah, but he resigned in 1888. Sat on Crown Lands Purchases Validation Bill Committee No.9; 28 Sep 1887 23 May 1888, 7 months 26 days. He returned to the Assembly in 1895, winning re-election in 1898 before retiring for good in 1901. He died in Sydney in 1921. The Late Mr. T.H. H. Goodwin AN OLD SCONEITE. The very large and representative attendance at the funeral of the late Ijr. Thomas Henry Hall Goodwin, in spite of the difficult conditions of travel was a testimony to the regard in which he was held by a very large circle of friends and the public in general (says the 'Gunnedah Advertiser and Independent* ') The deceased, who was 73 years of age, was born at Scone, where his father, Dr. Goodwin, was practising his profession. Mr. Goodwin as a youth came into this district with an elder brother and often spoke of the great change in the aspect of the country since he first saw it.  He afterwards became a surveyor, and in the days of free selection never spared himself in his efforts to secure holdings for selectors, a fact which stood him in good stead when he afterwards sought election to Parliament. After being in Parliament for a short period- he resigned and went into the survey department, being appointed to Silverton district. 'While there the Broken Hill mining boom came along, and it became part of his duty to survey what is now the city of Broken Hill. It was due to his recommendations that the streets of Broken Hill now have names associated with the mining Industry, instead of the names of then prominent politicians. Mr. Goodwin's first suggestion was that the streets should be numbered according to the American practise, but he suggested as an alternative metaliferous - names, and the latter suggestion .was adopted by the Department'. While in Broken Hill he was a successful mining Investor, and returning to this district he purchased Hartfell Station which was afterwards known as Booloocooroo. A few years ago he sold the Booloocooroo portion and retained; the Ruvigne portion, on which he resided until his death.' While residing there-he was again elected to the State Parliament prior to Federation on the retirement of the late Mr. E., W . Turner, and sat for two Parliaments. He could not be regarded as a prominent politician, and losing sympathy with party politics as they presented themselves to him he retired from Parliament, Mr. D. R. Hall being elected In his place, but as a Labor man. Mr. Goodwin often spoke to the writer of his reason for retiring from Parliament, a reason that was creditable' to himself, if it reflected on the Apolitical methods of the party with which he had been associated. He was a man whose word was as good as his bond;  quite fearless in the expression of his views. A man of strong character, his faults were the excess of his good qualities, for once having made up his mind rightly or wrongly, he was very determined In the stand he took. As a employer of labor at a time when wages were not so high as they are now, he was always regarded as a-generous employer and the loyalty and good feeling towards him of those who had worked for him was well known. He leaves a widow and a family of two sons asd three daughters, for whom, together with his widowed sister, Mrs. Russell, the greatest sympathy is oxpressed in their tragic bereavement. We understand an inquest will be held Into the circumstances surrounding Mr. Goodwin's death. The Late Mr. T.H.H. Goodwin (1921, July 8). The Scone Advocate (NSW : 1887 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article157127330

Mactier: possibly named, in keeping with John Wetherill's love of history and historic battles, and being part of what was happening while he was growing tall, for Brigadier W. Mactier’s Brigade under Field Marshal Hugh Gough, 1st Viscount Gough, KP, GCB, GCSI, PC (3 November 1779 – 2 March 1869) - a British Army officer, during the 1st Sikh War, also called the First Anglo-Sikh War or the Sutlej Campaign (1845-1846). After the death of Ranjit Singh in 1839, there was a period of internal strife as the succession to Sikh leadership was contested. Sikh forces were increased as were those of the British in the newly acquired territory adjoining the Punjab. Tension built up with demand and counter-demand until the British moved forces toward Firozpur and the Sikh Khalsa crossed the Sutlej. Four major actions were fought and all were won by the British. Large areas of territory were ceded to the British and a British Resident placed in Lahore effectively controlled the Sikh government. From THE VICTORIES OF WELLINGTON AND THE BRITISH ARMIES ; “The army was in a state of great exhaustion, principally from the want of water, which was not procurable on the road, when about three P. M., information was received that the Sikh army was advancing; and the troops had scarcely time to get under arms and move to their positions, when that fact was ascertained. “I immediately,” says Lord Gough, “pushed forward the horse artillery and cavalry, directing the infantry, accompanied by the field batteries, to move forward in support. We had not proceeded beyond two miles, when we found the enemy in position. They were said to consist of from 15,000 to 20,000 infantry, about the same force of cavalry, and forty guns. They evidently had either just taken up this position, or were advancing in order of battle against us. “To resist their attack, and to cover the formation of the infantry, I advanced the cavalry under Brigadiers White, Gough, and Mactier, rapidly to the front, in columns of squadrons, and occupied the plain. They were speedily followed by the five troops of horse artillery, under Brigadier Brooke, who took up a forward position, having the cavalry then on his flanks. “The country is a dead flat, covered at short intervals with a low, but in some places, thick jhow jungle and dotted with sandy hillocks. The enemy screened their infantry and artillery behind this jungle and such undulations as the ground afforded; and, whilst our twelve battalions formed from echellon of brigade into line, opened a very severe cannonade upon our advancing troops, which was vigorously replied to by the battery of horse artillery under Brigadier Brooke, which was soon joined by the two light field batteries. The rapid and well-directed fire of our artillery appeared soon to paralyze that of the enemy; and, as it was necessary to complete our infantry dispositions without advancing the artillery too near to the jungle, I directed the cavalry under Brigadiers White and Gough to make a flank movement on the enemy’s left, with a view of threatening and turning that flank, if possible. With praiseworthy gallantry, the 3rd light dragoons, with the 2nd brigade of cavalry, consisting of the body-guard and fifth light cavalry, with a portion of the 4th lancers, turned the left of the Sikh army, and, sweeping along the whole rear of its infantry and guns, silenced for a time the latter, and put their numerous cavalry to flight. Whilst this movement was taking place on the enemy’s left, I directed the remainder of the 4th lancers, the 9th irregular cavalry, under Brigadier Mactier, with a light field battery, to threaten their right. This manœuvre was also successful. Had not the infantry and guns of the enemy been screened by the jungle, these brilliant charges of the cavalry would have been productive of greater effect. “When the infantry advanced to the attack. Brigadier Brooke rapidly pushed on his horse artillery close to the jungle, and the cannonade was resumed on both sides. The infantry, under Major-Generals Sir Harry Smith, Gilbert, and Sir John M’Caskill, attacked in echellon of lines the enemy’s infantry, almost invisible amongst the wood and the approaching darkness of night. The opposition of the enemy was such as might have been expected from troops who had every thing at stake, and who had long vaunted of being irresistible. Their ample and extended line, from their great superiority of numbers, far outflanked ours; but this was counteracted by the flank movements of our cavalry. The attack of the infantry now commenced; and the roll of fire from this powerful arm soon convinced the Sikh army that they had met with a foe they little expected; and their whole force was driven from position after position with great slaughter, and the loss of seventeen pieces of artillery, some of them of heavy calibre; our infantry using that never-failing weapon, the bayonet, whenever the enemy stood. Night only saved them from worse disaster, for this stout conflict was maintained during an hour and a half of dim starlight, amidst a cloud of dust from the sandy plain, which yet more obscured every object. “I regret to say, this gallant and successful attack was attended with considerable loss; the force bivouacked upon the field for some hours, and only returned to its encampment after ascertaining that it had no enemy before it, and that night prevented the possibility of a regular advance in pursuit.”  In this brilliant and sanguinary battle, the British loss was necessarily heavy. Sir Robert Sale, and Sir John M’Caskill were killed—and Brigadiers Bolton and Mactier, with Colonels Byrne and Bunbury, wounded. The total casualties amounted to 872 of all arms. Also reported here in: India. (1846, March 28). Morning Chronicle (Sydney, NSW : 1843 - 1846), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31747667 Also noted in The London Gazette: Downing-Street, April 3, 1846- Her Majesty has also been pleased to appoint the under-mentioned Officers in the Service of the East India Company; viz;  Brevet Lieutenant Colonel William Mactier, 4th; Bengal Light Cavalry.  William Mactier (16th of July 1793 - 16th of September 1855) - Scottish. Son of Alexander Mactier and his wife Rosanna. Brother of Anthony Mactier, Head Commissioner, Court of Bequests, Bengal and of Durris House, co. Kincardine. Married Miss Harriet Armstrong in Muttra, 10.06.1821. Full Epitaph on gravetsone:  Sacred/ To the memory of/ Lieut Col WILLIAM MACTIER/ of the Bengal Light Cavalry/ Colonel of the Indian Army/ Companion of the Order of the Bath/ Who died at Indore/ 16 September 1855/ Aged 62 years/ His mortal remains were brought down to Calcutta/ And interred 9 April 1856. Occupation:  Officer of the British Army (Lieut. Col.), Deputy Judge Advocate General, Member of the Military Board. Brevet Colonel CB, Second Light Cavalry Brigadier Commanding Benares Division. Attained the ranks of Cadet (1809), Cornet (28.03.1810), Lieutenant (1.09.1818), Captain (1.05.1824), Major (13.01.1842), Lieutenant Colonel (2.02.1851), Brevet Colonel (20.06.1854). Attended Barasat Cadet College for eight and a half months; admitted to the military 17.11.1810; Cadet in 4th Northern Command 1811; Cornet in 4th Northern Command 1813; took leave for six months to sea (with sick certificate) in July 1817; Third Mahratta War 1813 as Cornet in 4th Northern Command; Interpreter and Quartermaster in 4th Light Cavalry 10.04.1819 till 29.06.1824; operations in Kotah 1821; Mangrol (?w); Lieutenant 4th Light Cavalry leave (urgent private affairs) to Calcutta 19.04 till 14.12.1822; leave (sick certificate) 12 months to New South Wales 3.05.1823 till 16.04.1826; furlough (sick certificate) 4.06.1826 till 14.05.1831. Was active in Shekhawat expedition 1834 as Captain in 4th Light Cavalry. Acted as Officiating Deputy Judge Advocate General in Sirhind Division (23.02.1838), D.J.A.G. for Dinapore and Benares 6.03.1839, and for Presidency Division 25.06.1839 till 21.12.1842. In the Gwalior campaign of 1843, he served as Major commanding the 4th Light Cavalry (Lancers) under Brig. Scott CB. He was active in the Battle of Maharajpur (29.12.1843) which was reported in the London Gazette of 8th March and 30th April 1844. For his feats in this battle he won the Bronze Star. He then served as Brigadier in the First Sikh War, leading the 3rd Cavalry in the Battle of Mudki (18.12.1845) in Maj. Gen. Sir Joseph Thackwell's Cavalry Division. The cavalry, under Brigadiers White, Gough, and Mactier, played a crucial role in this battle, advancing to the front in columns of squadrons and occupying the plains to allow the passage of five troops of horse artillery under Brigadier Brooke. Mactier was severely wounded. In the Battle of Ferozeshah he was Brevet Lieut. Col. commanding the 4th Light Cavalry, and won a "medal with clasp" for his services. He was officiating Member of the Military Board from 1849-50 and stipendiary M.M.B. from 8.11.1850. Posted as Lieut. Col. to 1st Light Cavalry December 1851; to 2nd Light Cavalry November 1852; Brigadier 2nd Class in Delhi 22.09.1854 and in Benaras January 1855 until his death. CB 3.04.1846. His grave seems to be in need of repair and the tablet is supposed to have been moved to South Park Street Cemetery. A plaque dedicated to his memory can be found in St. Andrew's Church, Calcutta. The image of the latter is displayed here. Source: V. C. P. Hodson, List of the Officers of the Bengal Army 1758-1834 Vol. 3, p. 202-203

Clarke: There was an early Land Grantee with the surname of 'Clarke' worth noting, although confirming exactly which 'Clarke' is referred to here, without access to any Wetherill notes/journals, is circumspect. Worth noting is, in view of his honouring in street names the earlier land grantees here, is John Clarke - one of the original grantees [notes under 'Extras'] - although his grant was further north and closer to the lagoon. Other options are:

Possibly named for Sir Alured Clarke GCB (24 November 1744 – 16 September 1832) a British army officer. He took charge of all British troops in Georgia in May 1780 and was then deployed to Philadelphia to supervise the evacuation of British prisoners of war at the closing stages of the American Revolutionary War. He went on to be Governor of Jamaica and then lieutenant-governor of Lower Canada in which role he had responsibility for implementing the Constitutional Act 1791. He was then sent to India where he became Commander-in-Chief of the Madras Army, then briefly Governor-General of India and finally Commander-in-Chief of India during the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War.

Also possibly named, in view of John Wetherill's love of etchings depicting historical events and a passion for the Life of the Duke of Wellington for Francis L. Clarke author of The life of the most noble Arthur Marquis and Earl of Wellington : with copious details and delineations, historical, political and military ... by  Francis L. Clarke ; Arthur Wellesley Wellington Duke of, 1769-1852. Published in London : J. and J. Cundee, 1813. [With Etchings]

Also possibly named for a City Surveyor or a few politicians of then, although Francis; Francis, Henry, Thomas and William Clarke. Those most well-known for associations with land or 'uprightness'.

HENRY CLARKEA fine old figure in the public life of this State has disappeared in the death of Mr. Henry Clarke, for many years the legislative choice of the Bega district. Long before ''is retirement, three years ago, Mr. Clarke was the acknowledged 'Father of the Legislative Assembly' ; but he had put in a much higher claim to public respect. As a party man, whether in office or in opposition, he was loyal to his political principles in the broadest sense, and to his party in every sense. His unselfishness in the latter respect amounted almost to quixotism. When the Bega electorate returned two men, he and the late James Garvan were colleagues in presentation. On the advent of the single-member electorate system, Mr. Clarke, with a chivalry rare in politics, chose to contest the more difficult division, with the result that both colleagues were defeated. But politics were not Mr. Clarke's whole world. In Sussex-street, as in Macquarie-street, he was a well-known figure, and the name of Henry Clarke stood in commercial circles for a probity as perfect as that which it meant an the rough-and-tumble of parliamentary life. It also stood for a sweetness and tolerance in his ordinary relations with men worthy of general emulation. Up to a few weeks ago this fine old Ulsterman carried his 85 years with a figure as erect as a pike-staff. The straightness extended to his whole personality.'   HENRY CLARKE. (1907, November 28). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 21. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108037887

Henry Clarke (1822-1907), merchant and politician, was born on 22 June 1822 in Maghera, Londonderry, Ireland, son of William Clarke, cotton-printer, and his wife, née Johnston. He was educated in Maghera. To improve his position he emigrated and reached New South Wales in September 1841. Unable to find urban work he went to Broulee (Moruya) on the South Coast, where he ran a farm. He found produce hard to export and 'the blacks pretty bad'. In 1845 he returned to Sydney and set up as a produce agent. In 1847 he married Jane Rayner; they had six sons and five daughters. In 1848 Clarke started a shipping agency in partnership with Robert Gee. In the gold rush of the early 1850s they had three ships running to Melbourne. By 1861 Clarke had 'amassed a fair fortune', and took his family to Ireland for a year. They returned in the George Marshall, which struck a reef in Bass Strait. The captain beached the ship on Flinders Island, went to Launceston in an open boat and sent a steamer to rescue the passengers who were living in tents with sealers and mutton-bird hunters. After the family reached Sydney Clarke took up Bergalia station near Moruya. In 1865 he returned to Sydney for his children's education and resumed his produce agency, Clarke & Co., in Sussex Street. He remained in business until 1894 when he handed it over to his son. He was a justice of the peace for forty-five years, and a trustee of the Savings Bank. Clarke first tried to enter parliament in 1860 when he contested Eden; believing survey should precede selection he was opposed to John Robertson's land reform and lost to Daniel Egan. Clarke did not nominate again until 1869, when he defeated Egan. Clarke was an exemplary parliamentarian: he was usually present at divisions, created no disorder and preferred work to talk. He was a protectionist and well fitted to care for his constituents, who returned him, often unopposed, until 1904, except in 1894 when he lost his seat to a free trader for a year. In his thirty-four years in the Legislative Assembly Clarke introduced only one bill which became the Illawarra Steam Navigation Act of 1887. Clarke twice refused office but served as postmaster-general in the short Dibbs ministry of 1889. In the assembly he 'commanded the respect of all parties, and although he had not powers of oratory he was listened to with attention'. In his last years Clarke was known as 'father of the House': he was its oldest member and had sat far longer than anyone else. Predeceased by his wife he died after a stroke on 22 November 1907 at his home in Randwick; although Presbyterian he was buried in the Anglican section of the Long Bay cemetery. His boyhood hopes had been fulfilled: he had not only improved his position by emigrating, but had served his country well.

Or Francis Clarke - city Surveyor:  

Letter: November 20, 1854: Francis Clarke, former City Surveyor, answering a Commissioners' letter of 20th inst. says ays he has never heard of any public fees in the City Surveyor's Office for giving Levels and in consequence can have neither demanded nor received any. However, he has always supplied private applications as Mr Rae well knows and was not aware that the Office was opposed to it- even had he been officially appointed as proposed from 1st January last. From City of Sydney (Council) archives.


Francis Clarke (1857 - 1939) - Place of Death: Manly, New South Wales - Mayor of North Sydney in 1898  Surveyor. Educated at St Stanislaus' College at Bathurst. Was a surveyor when he was elected to the Legislative Assembly. Between 1883 and 1930, was a licensed, practising surveyor. He lived for some time at West Kempsey in New South Wales, moving to North Sydney around 1893. Membership of other Parliaments & Offices Held : Member of the Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia. Member of the House of Representatives for Cowper 1901 - 1903. Personal; Son of Thomas, a farmer, and Ellen, nee Welsh, Irish immigrants. Married Mary McCarthy on 21 October 1885 and had issue, 3 sons and 3 daughters. Roman Catholic. Date of Birth: 25/03/1857. MARRIAGES. CLARK — McCARTHY. — October 21, 1885, by special license, at St. Patrick's, Sydney, by the Very Rev. Dean Hanly, assisted by the Rev. P. Le Rennetel, S.M., and Very Rev. J. Dalton, S.J., Francis, youngest son of the late Thomas Clark, Esq., of Sherwood, Macleay River, to Mary (May), only daughter of James McCarthy, Esq., of Kelverdale, Dawes Point, Sydney. Family Notices (1885, November 14). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115464652 Former M.P's. Death. MR. FRANCIS CLARKE NATIVE OF STROUDMr. Francis Clarke, who held a seat in the first Federal Parliament, died at his home at Manly on Tuesday, after a brief illness. He was 82. Born at Stroud on March 25, 1857, Mr. Clarke was educated at St. Stanislaus' College, Bathurst. He was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for the Macleay (later the Hastings and the Macleay) in 1893, but he resigned in 1898 to provide a seat for Mr. Edmund Barton, afterwards Sir Edmund Barton, who in those pre-Federal days was needed in Parliament to assist the passage of the Enabling Bill. Mr. Clarke was one of Mr. G. H. Reid's appointees to the Legislative Council in 1899. He resigned the next year to successfully contest the Cowper Federal seat, which he held only until the following election. In the early days of the Commonwealth he served on two Royal Commissions. He was a member of the Royal Commission which inquired into the tariff in 1904-7, and he was chairman of a Commission which investigated the ports and railways possibilities of the Northern Territory in 1913, with a view to its early development. The Commission's report was never implemented. Mr. Clarke, who passed the examination for licensed surveyors in 1883, carried on his profession until 1930. In 1898, he was Mayor of North Sydney. He is survived by six children. The funeral left Manly on Wednesday for Gore Hill cemetery. It was preceded by Requiem Mass at Mary Immaculate Church, Manly. Former M.P's. Death (1939, April 21). Dungog Chronicle : Durham and Gloucester Advertiser (NSW : 1894 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article140925129

Wetherill: surname of John Wetherill

Stuart: possibly named for Sir Alexander Stuart, NSW politician from 1874 to 1885 and Premier of New South Wales from 5 January 1883 to 7 October 1885. See Alexander.

Ramsay: named for original land grantee.

Frazer: possibly named for John Frazer MLC, (1827-1884), merchant, company director and philanthropist, and business partner of John Sutherland, who was a business partner of John Wetherill. He arrived at Sydney as a bounty immigrant in the Margaret on 23 January 1842, with a brother and two sisters. He first went up country 'to learn something of squatting', on 'a very modest salary indeed', and then worked as a clerk in Sydney. In 1847 he opened his own wholesale grocery business and in 1853 he married Elizabeth, daughter of James Ewan. Her two sisters married William Manson and James Watson who with her brother James, became Frazer's closest friends and business partners. In 1858 he moved into larger premises in York Street and next year took Manson as a partner. By hard work, 'integrity, prudence and punctuality' Frazer made John Frazer & Co. into one of the most influential mercantile houses in Sydney. The York Street stores were burnt down in 1865 and rebuilt for £15,000 in massive stone and with modern fire-fighting equipment. From the mid-1860s Frazer speculated in land in Queensland and by 1871 had four runs of his own and eighteen in partnership. In Sydney he had built two large new stores, a bonded warehouse and the impressive Frazer House. He had also sold his home, Ranelagh at Darling Point, and about 1874 bought Quiraing at Edgecliff. His directorships included the Australian Joint Stock Bank, the Mutual Life Association of Australasia and the Sydney Exchange Co. in addition to three other insurance companies, a shipping line, an ironworks and several mining companies. Later he was also a director of the Commercial Banking Co. of Sydney and the Australian Gaslight Co. Apart from a brief return in 1878 to retain his seat in the Legislative Council, he stayed in England until 1880, although homesick for Sydney. He was a representative commissioner at the Melbourne International Exhibition, as he had been at the Paris Universal Exhibition in 1878. Frazer died aged 57 at Quiraing on 25 October 1884, survived by his wife, two sons and two daughters, and left a personal estate worth £405,000. His business success was matched by his philanthropy. He had assisted the Sabbath school at the Scots Church for years, wrote 'a hymn to the Creator' and became an elder of the Presbyterian Church, supporting it liberally in his lifetime and in his will. Long active in the Lord's Day Observance Society he left £2000 for an annual prize essay in 'Defence of the Christian Faith'. He served on numerous charitable committees, all of them benefiting under his will. Other gifts included £2500 for drinking fountains, one near Hyde Park and another in the Domain. With an insatiable appetite for culture and mental improvement he denied himself sleep in his youth for literature, history and philosophy. He also collected water colours on his travels and in 1875 he became a member of the Royal Society of New South Wales. In 1876 he joined the Council of St Andrew's College and became vice-president of the Young Men's Christian Association, giving it a library. In that year he also gave £2500 for two bursaries to enable 'poor lads from the bush' to go to the University of Sydney and, at a large farewell banquet in his honour, called for the foundation of a chair of history and conditionally gave £2000 for it. In 1890 his family donated this sum to the university where it was used to found the Frazer scholarship in history. - Martha Rutledge, 'Frazer, John (1827–1884)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University. 1972.

Jenkins: named for the Jenkins family and near the site of their Long Reef homestead and farm.

Fielding: possibly named for Theodore Henry Adolphus Fielding (1781 – 11 July 1851) an English painter, engraver, and author. In addition to his watercolours, Fielding also worked in stipple and aquatint, and published numerous sets of engravings in the latter technique, including illustrations to Excursion sur les côtes et dans les ports de Normandie, after Bonington and others; Cumberland, Westmoreland, and Lancashire Illustrated (44 plates, 1822); A Series of Views in the West Indies (1827); Ten Aquatint Coloured Engravings from a work containing 48 Subjects of Landscape Scenery, principally Views in or near Bath, painted by Benjamin Barker (1824); British Castles; or, a Compendious History of the Ancient Military Structures of Great Britain (1825); A Picturesque Tour of the River Wye, from its Source to its Junction with the Severn, from Drawings by Copley Fielding. Fielding published several works on the technical aspects of art: On Painting in Oil and Water-colours for Landscape or Portraits (1830); Index of Colours and Mixed Tints (1830); On the Theory of Painting (1836); Synopsis of Practical Perspective, lineal and aerial, with Remarks on Sketching from Nature (1829); The Knowledge and Restoration of Oil-paintings, the Modes of Judging between Copies and Originals, and a brief Life of the principal Masters in the different Schools of Painting (1847) and The Art of Engraving, with the various Modes of Operation (1844); this was mostly reprinted in Robert Hoe's edition of Joseph Maberly's Print Collector (1880).  Among his works are a connection to John Wetherill's collection of Westhall engravings; ''Victories of the Duke of Wellington (Harley-Mason. Date of Publication: 1819). Among the purposes of this set of 12 plates of battle scenes from the Peninsular War and Waterloo was ‘to recal[l] the exultations which each triumph produced, by a representation of the decisive moment that occasioned it’. Westall’s drawings were engraved by Theodore Henry Fielding.''


Depiction of the Grosmont Castle in 1823, by Theodore Fielding

Collaroy: named for the steamer that was then adjacent to this street and on the beach.

Alexander: named for Sir Alexander Stuart, NSW politician from 1874 to 1885 and Premier of New South Wales from 5 January 1883 to 7 October 1885. Stuart succeeded in passing a land act in 1884 after much opposition( Crown Lands Act of 1884 - NSW legislation. XVIII. An Act to regulate the Alienation Occupation and Management of Crown Lands and for other purposes. [17th October, 1884].), and other acts dealt with the civil service, fire brigades, the university, and licensing.

Lagoon St: named for the Narrabeen lagoon.

Ocean St: named because it runs beside the ocean - would later be renamed as a section of the Pittwater Road and also retain 'Ocean Street' on its section to North Narrabeen on the ocean side.

This lithograph from the National Library of Australia appears to show which Sections and Lots sold first:


Richardson & Wrench & Gibbs, Shallard & Co. ([1881]). Mount Ramsay Estate, Parish of Manly Cove for auction sale at the rooms Pitt Street on Monday 24th October at 11 o'clock Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-230276359

The Crown Land Acts 1884 (NSW), which commenced on January 1st, 1885, replaced the Sir John Robertson led Crown Lands Alienation Act of 1861 and Crown Lands Occupation Act of 1861, and created a new structure, introducing new tenures including grazing licences, homestead leases, conditional leases, pastoral leases and permits for wharves and jetties. This Act led to the division of land in NSW into eastern, central and western divisions. Local land boards were introduced in the three divisions in 1886, effectively decentralising Crown land administration. However the changes led to a rush to buy land under Robertson's old system in 1884.

In 1886 the lots on the Collaroy Plateau were advertised:

THE PLATEAU. THE PLATEAU.
MOUNT RAMSAY, NARRABEEN LAKES.
Many have been the inquiries respecting the time of the Sale of this beautiful Estate. FEBRUARY IS THE MONTH FIXED UPON. The lots will be sold privately, at nominal prices per lot, and the terms will be excessively liberal, WITHOUT INTEREST.
Thus all classes of the community will have an opportunity of securing an allotment for a summer residence in this most charming locality.
Narrabeen is fast becoming popular; It is the sporting ground of the colony, and must become a second Manly.
The rapidity with which it is progressing is told in a very few words. Three years ago allotments were sold UPON THE FLAT at from £5 to £10 per lot. Last week ONE Allotment was sold for £60. It will be just the same on THE PLATEAU ; allotments will be obtainable on and after MONDAY, the 1st February, from £5 per lot and upwards. Think what they will be worth in 12 months hence.
Lithographs now ready.
Arrangements have been made with Messrs. Black and Co., of Manly, to meet the 9 o'clock steamer from Sydney daily, and convoy intending buyers to and from the estate for the nominal charge of 1s 6d. Tickets for Mondny mornbig will be issued up to 1 o'clock to-day, at our office, 1s 6d return.
CAMPBELL, MITCHELL, and COMPANY,
The City Property Exchange, 418 George Street.
Advertising (1886, January 30). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28360280


Rough sketch plan , Plateau Estate] - Mason St, Fuller St, Claudare St, Essilia St, Stella St, Blandford St, Aubreen St, Idaline St, Hilma St, Boulevarde, Collaroy St, Jenkins St, Ramsay St - circa 1905-1906. For the Union Bank of Australia (see below). Item: c050370064, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales.

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATIONS having been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the real Property Act( Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in accordance with, the Third Schedule to the said Act, on or before the date named opposite each case respectively.

No. 13,759. County of Cumberland, parish of Manly Cove, 1 acre 2 roods 374 perches, 1 acre 2 roods 29 1/2 perches, 1 acre 2 roods 34 perches, 1 acre 2 roods 38 1/2 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 3 1/2 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 8 perches, 1 acre 2 roods 22 perches, 2 acres 2 roods 17 perches, 1 rood 1 perch, 4 acres 1 rood 22\ perches, 3 acres 3 roods 1 1/2 perches, 3 acres 2 1/2 perches, 4 acres 1 rood 22 1/2 perches, 4 acres 12 1/2 perches, 4 acres 1 rood 22 1/2 perches, 4 acres 1 rood 33 perches, 4 acres 18 1/2 perches, 4 acres2 roods 34 1/2 perches, 4 acres 2 roods 34 1/2 perches, 4 acres 3 roods 34^ perches, 4 acres 1 rood 21 1/2 perches, 4 acres 3 1/2 perches, 3 acres 3 roods 35 perches, 3 acres 2 roods 39 1/2 perches, 4 acres 3 roods 23 perches, 4 acres 2 roods 32 1/2 perches. 3 acres 36 1/2 perches, 3 acres 2 roods 6 1/2 perches, 2 acres 1 rood £2 perches, 1 acre 35 1/2 perches, 2 roods 15 perches, 2 acres 3 rood, 2 acres 3 roods 16 1/2 perches, 2 acres 3 roods 11 perches 2 roods 30 perches, 3 roods 20| perches, 2 roods 25 1/2 perches 2 acres 2 roods 7 1/2 perches, 1 acre 32 perches, 1 acre 1 rood 20 1/2 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 13 1/2 perches, 361 perches, 3 acres 2 roods 25 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 32 perches, 2 acres 4 perches, 3 acres 2 roods 24 1/2 perches, 2 acres 17 1/2 perches, 1 acre 1 rood 25 1/2 perches, 1 acre 13 perches, 1 rood 6 1/2 perches, 2 acres 2 1/2 perches 3 acres 2 roods 25 1/2 perches, 2 acres 1 1/2 perches, 2 acres 173 perches. 3 acres 2 roods 24 1/2 perches,—comprising lots Nos. 1 to 16, section A; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section B; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section C; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section D; lots Nos. 1 to 16. section .E; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section F; lots Nos. 1 to 7 and 9 to 16, section 6; lots Nos. 1 ti 16, section J; lot No. J, section K; lots Nos. 1 to 42, section L; lots Nos. 4 to 21 and Nos. 25 to 42, section M; lots Nos. 7 to 35, section O; lot? Nos. 1 to 42, section P; lots Nos. 1 to 21 and Nos. 25 to 42, section Q,; lots Nos. 1 to 42, section K; lots Nos. 1 to 36, section S ; lots Nos. 3 to 22 and Nos. 25 to 44, section T; lots Nos. 1 to 44, section U; lots Nos. 1 to 44, section V; lots Nos. 1 to 44, section W; lots Nos. 1 to 21 and Nos. 23 to 42, section X; lots Nos. 1 to 36, section Y; lots Nos. 2 to 21 and Nos. 26 to 43, section Z; lots Nos. 4 to 20 and Nob. 24 to 40, section A1; lots Nob. 1 to 40, section Bl; lots Nos. 1 to 38, section C1; lots Nos. 1 to 14 and Nos. 16 to 27, section D1; lots Nos. 1 to 29, section E1; lots Nos. 7 to 16 and Nos. 22 to 31, section F1; lots Nos. 6 to 9 and Nos. 11 to 14, section G1; lots Nos. 1 to 4, section H1 lots Nos. 7 to 21, section H1; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section K1; lots Nos. 1 to 18, section L1; lots Nos. 1, 2, and 3, section M1; lots Nos. 3, 4, 5, and reserve section Nl; lots Nos. 8 to 11, section M1, and Plateau Park of The Plateau; lots Nos. 2,3,4,7,8, and 9, section No. 33 of Fuller's subdivision; lots Nos. 9 to 14, section No. 41; lots Nos. 9 to 16, section No. 44; lot No. 3, section No. 47; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section No. 50; lots Nos. 1 to 8, section No. 51; lots Nos. 1 to 8, section No. 52 lots Nos. 1 to 16, section No. 53 ; lots Nos. 1 to 20, section No. 54 of Mount Ramsay Estate; lots Nos. I to 10, section No. 54,  lots Nos. 1 to 5, section No. 55a ; lot No. 10, section 55a ; lots Nos. 2 to 20, section No. 55 of Fuller's subdivision; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section No. 56; lots Nos. 1 to 8, section No. 57; lots Nos. 1 to 8, section No. 58 ; lots No. 1 to 16, section No. 59 of Mount Ramsay Estate, situated at Narrabeen, in Victoria, Sturt, Lagoon, Ocean, Wellington, Albemarle, Loftus, Octavia, Tourmaline, Emerald, Malcolm, Collaroy, Jenkins, Ramsay, Wetherill, Mason, Fuller, Claudare, Essilia, Stella, Bland ford, Aubreen, Idaline, Hilma, and Alexander Streets, Park Road and Edgecliffe Boulevarde,— being parts of 410 acres (portion No. 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining the properties of F. B. Bays, Miss Alice M. Neal, E. J. Black, A. E. C. K. Lindfield, A. Porter, J, Berry, Isabella E. J. Shortland, Sarah Morris and G. Morris, Maude M. Rowson, Elizabeth Campbell, S. J. Fowler, C. Shepherd, G. E. Litchfield, Emily Mason, Amy F. Barton, T. W. Willans, A. Smithson, The Bank of New South Whales, The Salvation Army, Mrs. Mary Ann Osborne, Maria E. Mitchell, Dowling and Sullivan, D, McNab, A. Amos, — Harlow, Christina Beel, The Commercial Banking Company of Australia (Limited), J, Wheeler (junior) and J. Wetherill. Applicant. The Union Bank of Australia (Limited). NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1905, November 17). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 7654. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220985744


Narrabeen Lagoon, 1890/ C. S. Wheeler/Wheelan or S. Wheeler(note lady to left, dark hat, is actually drawing the view). Item: c11295_0001_c, courtesy Dixson Library, State Library of New South Wales




THE NARRABEEN LAKES-A PICTURESQUE HEALTH RESORT NEAR MANLY. (See letterpress on page 19.) Manly to Broken Bay. (1893, November 11). Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 30. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71191632

Some of those who purchased land during this 1881 subdivision and in the years that followed including were:

Mount Ramsay Estate subdivision, near Narrabeen, L88— Mr Obed West, sen, ; lot 8, section G, ... SALES OF PROPERTY. (1883, December 22). The Sydney Daily Telegraph (NSW : 1879 -1883), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article239272826

Mount Ramsay estate subdivision, Narrabeen, section 48, lots 2 to 8, £85 : section 11, lots 15, and 20, section 48, lot 1, £16— Mr W. A. Lipscombe ; section 8, lots 14, 16, and 10, £16— Mr W. H. Tibbitts. PROPERTY SALES. (1884, May 10). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article237138983

lots 28, 27, and 28, section 8 ; and lots 9 to 11, section 12, of Mount Ramsay Estate subdivision, Narrabeen,L40— Mr George Wheeler ; ... PROPERTY SALES. (1884, June 28). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article237136731

Messrs. Richardson and Wrench sold by auction and private contract, at their rooms, Pitt-street, during the week, the following properties : ...10 allotments of land, portion of Mount Ramsay Estate subdivision, Narrabeen, £200. PROPERTY SALES. (1884, July 5). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13561688

lot 3, Sec 47 and lots 6 to 28 section 32a, of Mount Ramsay Estate subdivision, Narrabeen, £70-Mr John Davison ...PROPERTY SALES (1884, August 2). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13571025

Among our sales since the departure of the last mail we notice the following  .... 50 allotments of land, portion of Mount Ramsay Estate subdivision. Narrabeen, £250;   PROPERTY CIRCULAR. (1884, July 23). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28370678

sec. 60 of Mount Ramsay Estate subdivision, Narrabeen, £226-Mr. C, E. Fuller; PROPERTY SALES. (1884, November 15). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13575025

lots 1 to 6, sec 16, of Mount Ramsay estate subdivision Narrabeen, £63-Mr S B Bailey ... PROPERTY SALES. (1886, January 16). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13609220

Around the time his son Victor was born Cyrus Fuller obtained some of the larger sections of the Mount Ramsay estate, as did his relations. This first one would be him too, just with his initials reversed (typo?) - these sections were towards Narrabeen Lagoon and around where the present day Narrabeen hotel is:

Mount Ramsay Estate subdivision, Narrabeen, near Manly, section 36, lots 12 to 19; section 41, lots 9 to 11; section 44, lots 9 to 16; section 47, lot 3, £345 — Mr. E. C. Fuller;  ... PROPERTY SALES. (1886, February 15). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article237235612

Fuller's subdivision, Mount Ramsay Estate, Narrabeen, £50-Mr. George A. Moore. ... Miller's subdivision, Mount Ramsay Estate. Narrabeen, sec. 87, lots 3 to 10 and 12 to 15, £247 ; sec. 33, lots 1 and 6, with cottage thereon, £215-Mr. Oliver Osborne. PROPERTY SALES. (1886, May 15). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 16. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13631015

Obeli's Subdivision, Mount Ramsay Estate, Narrabeen, section 37, lots 8 to 10 and 12 to 15, £247 ; section 88. lots 1 and 6, with cottage thereon, £215 — Mr. Oliver Osborne. PROPERTY SALES. (1886, May 15). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article237300316

Fuller's Subdivision, Mount Ramsay Estate, Narrabeen, sec, 83, lots 2 and 7, £50 - Mr. William Ashley; sec. 33, lots 3 and 8, £50-Mr. Joseph Black ; sec. 33, lots 4 and 9, £30-Mrs. Martha F. Black; PROPERTY SALES. (1886, May 29). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13632592

It should also be noted that those who had purchased lands around the Ingleside 'Narrabeen Powder Works', with that venture attracting visitors in August 1885, and then failed as 'Baron Von Bieran' fled the country, also sought to at first buy large tracts of land and then offload their acreage and that some sales listed for there may be mixed among those that were part of the Mount Ramsay estate. There also appear other advertisements for sale of acreage at Narrabeen and advise to apply for them under a variety of other land dealers/land agents - one of these later took one of the Macpherson clan members, from whom we get the name 'Wharriewood', to court to get payments due for acting as an agent - there is more on the Macphersons below, but it is worth noting among these larger land sales that big lots of acreage were already beginning to fetch higher prices:

PROPERTY SALES. Messrs Hardie and Gorman report the sale of the following properties by public auction and by private sale during the week:  ... Large subdivision blok, between Manly and Narrabeen, £2250  PROPERTY SALES. (1885, January 24). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13583412

A GRAND OPPORTUNITY.-100 ACRES, the pick of the foreshore of Narrabeen Lake, well adapted for sub-division, possesing some of the grandest views in Australia; price £5000. Apply W. DUNN, Punchbowl-road, Druitt Town. Advertising (1885, February 21). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13577986

SUBDIVISION BLOCK-.
To Speculators, Building Societies, and others.
BOYD and KING are instructed by the owners to sell the following properties, suitable for immediate subdivsion:
NARRABEEN-350 acres, with water and main road frontage.
PITTWATER-Commanding 50 acres, with bold frontage to Broken Bay.
Particulars can be obtained at the Auctioneers' Rooms, 96, Pitt-street. 
Advertising (1886, January 13). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13608940

NARRABEEN.-Quarter-acre Lots for £10, 10s deposit, 10s month, no interest; Torrens'. .... For Particulars and cards apply to HENRY M. DEAKIN, 126, Pitt Street. Advertising (1886, December 6). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13622226

A Claim for Commission.
In the District Court Monday Woodin and Robberds, auctioneers, &c, of Pitt-street, proceeded against Edward Augustus Macpherson, of Edgecliffe-road, Woollahra, for the recovery of a sum of £200, as commission on the sale of certain lands. Plaintiffs purchased several lots of land for the defendant in the neighborhood of Narrabeen, the price of one property being £8000. Plaintiffs' claims in respect of some of the transactions were complied with, but with regard to others the present suit was brought. A verdict was given for £150. A Claim for Commission. (1892, September 20). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112594293 

The lots continued to be advertised under Richardson and Wrench as well - with 300 allotments of the original 925 still available:


Advertising (1886, May 3). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13641167

During the later 1880's and into the 1900's a Depression-Recession hit Australia. In 1889 property prices collapsed and many people lost everything. Some of the earliest roads or tracks built around Narrabeen were done so through a work relief scheme, first noted in Roads To Pittwater: The Pittwater Road, which Mr. Cyrus Fuller bore witness to:

THE UNEMPLOYED QUESTION.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.

Sir,—Very frequently during the past year or two have correspondents to your columns had something to say on the above subject, and at various times have you dealt with the subject very ably in your leading articles. As the question of the " unemployed " is still unsettled and as the State is still burdened with providing food and, I was about to say, clothing, for such as seek the " relief works," a few words at this time may be opportune. The attitude which Sir Henry Parkes expresses as the right one for the State to take is emphatically the right one, from a State policy point of view, and with your permission I want to show that from a practical labour point of view it is also correct. During the past year or two I have had many opportunities of watching and making notes of the actual camp life of the unemployed engaged on the relief works at or near Narrabeen Lake, in the Manly Cove parish. I have lived a great part of the time within 20 minutes' walk of the ' main camp," have been many times through it, and had many conversations with the men. I lived near the Narrabeen Inn, and travelled very often between Manly and the camp. I have also carefully examined the manner in which the work has been carried out, and am thoroughly acquainted with most of the visible things transpiring, and I am sorry to say my knowledge thus practically acquired has led me to pronounce the utmost disapprobation of any continuance of this pernicious institution. As it may be interesting to some of your readers to know some of the facts and details which have thus influenced me, with your permission I will briefly note a few. 

As is generally known, alternate Fridays were paydays, when each man drew according to the average earnings of his gang, some less, some more. Immediately upon the receipt of their money, from 75 per cent. of the men upwards made a general stampede from the camp—some towards Manly, some to Narrabeen, and some to the Rock Lily Hotel, near Pittwater, some few finding their way to Sydney. After that, from dark on the same evening up till early on Monday morning, scores of men in all stages of intoxication, from the funny to the beastly drunk stage, were to be met with from Manly nine miles outward, and it was positively dangerous to travel the road after nightfall. Many and many times have I narrowly escaped running over drunken bodies and drunken parties of men between Manly and Narrabeen, at night, and both their and my escapes can only be traced to my horse, which was spirited and skittish, jumping promptly from danger. These men were not staggering along the road, but lying across the very wheel-tracks, too drunk to get up or crawl off the road. 

At Narrabeen I came more closely into contact with the habits of these men, for prior to my location in the neighbourhood numbers of them had been in the habit of sleeping off and bringing on their booziness from day to day and night to night under the shelter of the shady trees which surrounded the residence, and it was with great determination and continued effort that I taught them that they were trespassers—and trespassers of an insufferable class. As a further proof and evidence of my verdict, the path between the main camp and the Narrabeen-road led for a considerable distance through my lands, and the track for the whole distance was strewn with empty bottles— bottles white and bottles red, bottles green and bottles black, bottles big and bottles little, and these bottles had been drained of their contents in meandering back to the main camp. Here let me mention one little happy faculty all heavy imbibers appear to possess—that is, the ability to tie four pint bottles in a bundle handkerchief in such a manner as they will bear considerable knocking about. In a fashion peculiar to them they gathered the tops of the four bottles into the four loose folds of the handkerchief, and the knots acted as buffers. It was, seldom, how- ever, that the camp saw this compactness, as thirst on the way generally necessitated disturbing their order. The men who carried bottles were generally of the more provident class. They feared to stay at the " pub." to knock down their last few shillings, lest they should be too late at the camp for " Rations, O," which were served out at stated hours upon given days; hence they carried their store of grog, and thus conserved their fortnightly spree, and were home in time for supper. Apart from the beastliness of the sight of a number of drunken men lying promiscuously about, it was simply comical to note the manner in which each appeared to hug his black companion, even in sleep, the said black companion being a pint bottle containing the sleep-producing element. There is just one other mention I should like to make on the moral aspect of this subject, and that is that, while these men spent their fortnightly earnings, with a religious punctuality, at the grog shops, they just as religiously neglected to clothe their bodies decently; generally they were half bootless, and otherwise ragged and untidy. So much for the moral and social aspect of the question. 

And now a word or two about the material State benefit they have accomplished. As a man trained and experienced in the labour question, I maintain that unless the benefit of the work carried out be speedily availed of it will be almost, if not entirely, lost to the State. Some of the land they have scrubbed, and other of it they are supposed to have cleared, or, in other words, rooted out rump and stump. From my knowledge of this class of scrub-bearing country, and from my observation of the manner in which the work was done, I positively assert that in less than three years a crop of suckers (already fast appearing) will re-clothe the thousands of acres gone over with a density of bush and brush tenfold that just consumed. The men worked by piece, and the greater area they covered the larger the money they drew ; hence quantity was more than quality, and to get over the ground was the main desideratum. Of practical workmen there were a few—say a fifth of the crowd—but these were handicapped by being linked in gangs with the off-scum of society-men, who knew not a mattock from a spade nor a shovel from a broad axe. 

There are many other details of fact concerning the Narrabeen Camp I could give you ; but I trust the two principal ones abovementioned may influence some-body's mind—perhaps our practical barrister, Hon. Bruce Smith—and induce him to insist on an extinction of this obnoxious system—a system fraught with injury alike to the individuals for whose benefit it is intended, to the State which inaugurated it, and to the honest industrious colonists whose labours have to bear its burden. I am, &c.,

CYRUS E. FULLER.

P.S.—I ought to say that the roads formed through-out the district under consideration are splendidly and substantially made—such, indeed, as would be a credit to any town or city in Australia. They are likely to re-main good inasmuch as there is no likelihood of their being used for the next half-century.—C. E. F.  THE UNEMPLOYED QUESTION. (1889, March 21). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13718186

The 'camp' for the unemployed who did so much work around the Narrabeen area was, according to other newspaper reports, in a 'valley opposite Dee Why Lagoon'. Other reports details what was done and what was sold as a result of their works to create access to these plots of land:

At Narrabeen 822 acres have been cleared and underscrubbed, 10 miles 42 chains of road have been cleared, 3 miles 32 chains formed, 24½ chains of drainage have been cut, and one culvert is in course of construction. Tenders are being received for culverts, stonebreaking, and pipe culverts. 2500 acres of Crown lands will be available for sale here, and land is likely to realise high prices.  THE WORK OF THE "UNEMPLOYED." (1887, November 11). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13675663

Among the papers laid on the table of the Legislative Assembly yesterday was a return of works carried out under the control of the Casual Labour Board. It appears from this return that the "unemployed" did the following work since they were under the management of the board:—They cleared and under-scrubbed 31,706 acres; roads cleared, 358½ miles; roads cleared and formed, 222 miles ; roads cleared, formed, and made, 86¾ miles ; bridges, 26, side drains cut, 18 miles; culverts, 185. 

Crown lands upon which these men had been employed had been sold as follows:—Berowra, 100 acres, for £600; Como, 100 acres, £2000; Heathcote, 203 acres, £8285; Dobroyd, 30 acres, £4500; Field of Mars, 697 acres. £70,000; Gordon, 430 acres, £34,000; Hornsby, 100 acres, £3856; Narrabeen, 1818 acres, £29,000 ; Rookwood, 79 acres, £9000. 

There was still available for sale—At Peakhurst, 90 acres, valued at £55 per acre, total £5050; Rookwood, 613 acres, £150 an acre total £91,950 ; Garie, 200 acres, £50 an acre, total £10,000 ; Dobroyd, 50 acres, £150 an aura, total £7500; French's Forest, 10,000 acres, £50 an acre, total £500,000; Gordon, 4000 acres, £100 an acre, total £400,000; Hornsby, 2500 acres, £50 an acre, total £125,000; Holdsworthy, 10,500 acres, £15 an acre, total £157,500 ; Manly Cove parish, 10,000 acres, £80 an acre, total £300,000 ; Bankstown Common; 66 acres, £75 an acre, total £4950; Berowra, 3000 acres, £10 an acre, total £30,000 ; Bulgo, 200 acres, £100 an acre, total £20,000 ; Camp Creek, 8840 acres, £100 an acre, total £884,000: Echersley, 10,500 acres, £15 an acre, total £157,500; Field of Mars, 5903 acres, £75 an acre, total £442,725; Heathcote, 227 acres, £50 an acre, total £11,350. This made a total area of 61,689 acres, estimated at £2,647,525. NEWS OF THE DAY. (1889, January 9). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13709680

And then the Recession hit Mr. Fuller too, with his brother James Edward Black becoming official assignee:

[Notice under Section 11 of the Bankruptcy Act, 1887-3]
In the Supreme Court of New South Wales. (3,602)
IN BANKRUPTCY.
Re Cyrus E. Fuller, of Narrabeen, near Sydney, stationer.

NOTICE is hereby given that a Sequestration Order has this day been made against the abovenamed bankrupt, on the petition of George Coates, of Parramatta, builder.—Dated at Sydney, this 21st day of May, A.D. 1891.
ARTHUR HENRY,
Registrar in Bankruptcy
. IN BANKRUPTCY. (1891, May 29). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 4033. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222095610

Cyrus Edgar Fuller's Bankruptcy. The Narrabeen and Sherwood Land.
In Bankruptcy. — (Before his Honor Mr. Justice Manning.)

MOTION UNDER SECTION 130.

Re: Cyrus Edgar Fuller (bankrupt), ex parte the official assignee, Emily Mason (respondent). Mr. Gordon, instructed by Mr. W. Lindsay, appeared for the official assignee, and Mr. Minter for the respondent. This was a motion for an order declaring that the official assignee is entitled as against Emily Mason (respondent) to the share and interest of the respondent in certain lands (some forming part of the Mount Ramsay Estate, and others being situated within the municipality of Prospect and Sherwood), and at Narrabeen standing in the name of Emily Mason, and for an order directing her to transfer, hand over, and assign to the official assignee such lands and her share and interest therein, upon the grounds that the lands were in truth and in fact portion of the estate of the bankrupt, and as such passed to the official- assignee for the purpose of paying the creditors of the bankrupt ; that the lands, or certain portions thereof, were lands belonging to the bankrupt, and were transferred by him to Emily Mason with intent to defeat and delay his creditors within the meaning of the statue 13 Elizabeth, chapter 5, and within the meaning of the 4th section, of the Bankruptcy Act of 1887 ; that the purchase of the lands was a fraudulent and collusive arrangement between the bankrupt and Emily Mason with intent to defeat and delay the creditors of the bankrupt, and although bought in the name of Emily Mason, the lands were in fact purchased by the bankrupt; that the purchase of the lands in the name of Emily Mason by the bankrupt constituted a settlement void as against the official assignee within the meaning of the 55th section of the Bankruptcy Act of 1887. Or in the alternative for an order declaring that the official assignee is entitled to a charge upon the lands for all moneys of the bankrupt expended in the purchase thereof, upon the grounds that the expenditure of those moneys or a part thereof constituted a preference within the meaning of the 56th section of the Act ; and the expenditure of those moneys was void within the 58th section of the Bankruptcy Act of 1887. And for an order restraining Emily Mason from charging, alienating, or otherwise dealing with the lands in defraud of the rights of the official assignee therein. And for such further or other order as might be necessary in the premises. 

Negotiations had taken place between the parties with a view to settlement and terms had actually been agreed upon, but afterwards a difference of opinion arose in regard to details. It seemed that mortgages had been given over the properties to the extent of £1440, including a mortgage to the Bank of New South Wales for £850. The terms of settlement which had been agreed upon were that the official assignee should give Miss Mason releases from the persons holding mortgages over the lands claimed, and that thereupon Miss Mason should convey her equities of redemption to the official assignee. Of the £850 borrowed from the bank £400 was said to be money borrowed for J. E. Black. Miss Mason asked that her rights as against Black in relation to this sum should not be interfered with. His Honor asked whether there was any possibility of a compromise

Mr. Minter : No your Honor.

His Honor decided that he could not make any such stipulation in favour of Miss Mason; but at the same time said that of course the official assignee would not be entitled to recover the same amount twice from Black. He was sorry that he had to put any more on Black's shoulders, which, had enough to bear already. It seemed that he was a very kind-hearted man. That was why he suggested the compromise.

An order was made that the official assignee obtain and deliver to Miss Mason within four weeks releases from the persons holding mortgages over the lands claimed in the notice of motion, and that thereupon Miss Mason should convey her equities of redemption to the official assignee. Cyrus Edgar Fuller's Bankruptcy. (1892, March 26). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86274402

Cyrus Edgar Fuller.
Death at Berowra.
Our Hornsby representative writes: —

A message reached Hornsby on Monday afternoon that a murder, or attempted murder, had taken place in the bush district known as Beautiful Berowra. It was alleged that a woman had been nearly killed, and that a man had had his throat cut. 

Senior-constable Wade, Dr. Ramsden, and an "Argus" reporter proceeded to the scene to investigate. Berowra presented its usual somnolent appearance, but on getting closer to the scene of the tragedy, there was some excitement noticeable among the scattered house-holders. Inquiries located the house concerned, but the woman who was alleged to have been nearly killed was found in Mrs. Ryan's house, suffering from shock caused by fright. She had gone to a "humpy" at the back of Mrs. Ryan's domicile, and, looking in the doorway, had seen a man lying on the floor with blood coming; from his mouth. She didn't stop to take in further details, but made up for the house at once. Nobody seemed to know much about the affair, and, though curiosity was not dormant by any means, it didn't lead anyone to enter the hut, and see if he or she could render the man any assistance.

The police entered the room, and there, by the light of a lantern, they saw the body of an elderly man named Cyrus Edgar Fuller lying on its back. Some blood had issued from the mouth of deceased, and this had caked on his face, giving it, with its staring eyes and wide open mouth a sufficiently terrifying appearance. Dr. Ramsden examined the body, and, as far as he could judge, death had apparently resulted without external violence, save such as might have been caused by deceased being overcome by an attack of giddiness, and, falling backwards on the hard floor of the hut. There was a slight fracture of the base of the skull, which would account for the hemorrhage.

Deceased was, apparently, a man of about 65 or 60 years of age, strong and sturdy for his years. He was well known and respected locally, and seemed to be in easy circumstances. The humpy in which he lived was on the same land as a comfortable cottage, of which he is said to be the owner. The hut is very clean and comfortable, and deceased, who is known as a bachelor, seemed to live there in very happily.

He was last seen alive by Mrs. Ryan, the occupier of the cottage, about 10 o'clock on Sunday morning. He was then in his usual, health and spirits. The baker had called on Monday morning, and left the old man's bread and mail, which remained in his box at the gate. Mrs. Ryan had commented on his non-appearance, on Monday, and it was on this account that another woman went along to his hut to see if he were all right.

From what we have been able to gather, the deceased was identical with Mr. Cyrus Edgar Fuller, who conducted the "Cumberland Mercury"' in Parramatta for years before it was incorporated in "The Argus."

A lady who had regular transactions with the deceased stated that he had informed her of his newspaper enterprises in Parramatta many years ago. The impression "the old gentleman," as she called him, left in the district was that he owned considerable property. His manner was said to be haughty and pompous, and, as he spoke little of his private affairs, he was understood to be a bachelor. As a matter of fact, Mr. Fuller had been living apart from Mrs. Fuller and the family for years.

It has  since transpired that he was in very poor circumstances, and was only renting the property on which he lived. Mr. Cyrus Edgar Fuller played a prominent part in Parramatta and Central Cumberland affairs thirty years ago. He aspired for Parliamentary honors once or twice, and would have gone in with a great majority on one occasion had the polling taken place a fortnight earlier. But the attitude of the "Mercury'' (of which he was then proprietor) and his own inconsistences set a strong tide in against him, just when he was certain of winning the prize.  Cyrus Edgar Fuller. (1911, November 8). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85991085

PERSONAL. 

The late Cyrus Edgar Fuller was perhaps the most enterprising business mam that Parramatta ever possessed He paid £60 a foot for land in Church-street thirty years ago, and lie built that fine row of shops ,dh the corner, of Church and Macquarie streets, extending for some distance down each street. He also built some shops at Parramatta North, as well as 'The Argus' printing works and the house, on the corner of Marsden and Macquarie streets. Probably at one time he was easily worth £20,000. He owned paddocks of the best land at Narrabeen, but he lost all when he was forced into bankruptcy. Had he retained the Narrabeen land alone, he would have been a very wealthy man. At one time Mr. Fuller was going against 'The Argus' for some pungent comments on his manipulation of the affairs of the old show council. In fact, he went that far that eminent counsel (Sir Julian Salomons and Mr; C. H. Stephen) were waiting in the Supreme Court to act on behalf of the newspaper, but neither Mr. Fuller nor his counsel turned up. ' The taxed costs amounted to over £100, but the newspaper had to part up, as Mr. Fuller, being an uncertificated bankrupt, could not be recovered against. PERSONAL. (1911, November 11). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85987347

With the opening of a bridge across Narrabeen Lagoon in 1883, and those visiting to see the SS Collaroy, 'villa sites' were soon offered on Narrabeen Lagoon - Readers should also bear in mind the Ingleside Powder Works were failing in this year and around this time too with some of those lots being offered for sale:

On WEDNESDAY, February 27, 1884.
IN THE PARISH OF NARRABEEN, between MANLY and PITTWATER.
THE PICK OF THE DISTRICT, about 7 miles from Manly Beach, and only a short distance on the other side Of the newly-erected bridge across the Narrabeen Lagoon.
281 ACRES of RICH ARABLE LAND, situate at the junction of the main PITT WATER-ROAD with the LANE COVE ROAD.
THE PROPERTY will first be offered In ONE LOT, and, If not so sold,- then in THREE LOTS as per plan, comprising blocks of of 114a. 1r. 89p, 84a. 1r. 21p., and 80a. respectively.
THE LAND itself is of the richest possible soil, and most eminently adapted for fruit-growing, vine culture, market gardens, or equally well suited for subdivision into small  farms of from 10 to 20 acres, the whole of the Land, with exception of about 20 acres (on which are good stones for building purposes), is capable of being ploughed. The property is bounded on almost all sides by  good roads, and several Creeks run through the land, which, if regulated by a small outlay, would ensure a permanent water supply.
TITLE-CROWN GRANT. 
Plans are ready and can be had on application at the Rooms, 133, Pitt-street.
HARDIE and GORIIAN have received instructions to sell by public auction, at their Rooms, 133, Pitt-street, at-11.30 a.m., on WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 27, 1884.
The above-described block of RICH ARABLE LAND containing 281 ACRES, situate in the Parish of NARRABEEN, between MANLY and PITTWATER.
Advertising (1884, February 20). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 14. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28373191

NARRABEEN, beyond MANLY BEACH.
MINERAL SELECTION of 40 acres, between the road to Pitt Water and Stony Creek-road.
RICHARDSON and WRENCH have received instructions to sell by public- auction, at the Rooms, Pitt-street, on FRIDAY, 21st November, at 11 o'clock,
The above mineral selection, without reserve, it is near the powder works.
Advertising (1884, November 12). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28366266

NARRABEEN LAGOON, MANLY
WATER FRONTAGE BUILDING SITES.

This Property, only a few miles from Manly, on the main road to Pittwater and new Government Bridge, beautifully situated on the shores of the Narrabeen Lagoon, is now liberally sub-divided In Villa Sites Allotments, from 1/2 to 1 1/4 acre each. The scenery is grand and cannot be surpassed, and as most of the allotments have extensive water frontage, this Sale offers a splendid opportunity for those wishing to secure really good and large sites for residences In this healthy and favoured suburb. Exceptionally good opportunities offers this sale also for Investors and Speculators, as without doubt the value will more than double itself In less than 12 months, as nowhere so near to the city equal advantages for fishing, boating, salt water bathing, and pure air can be found.

TITLE, CROWN GRANT.

Plans will be ready at the Rooms In a few days, Terms-25 per cent, deposit, balance in 12 equal monthly payments, without interest, MESSRS. HARDIE and GORMAN have been instructed to sell at their Rooms, 133, Pitt-street, This splendid property, in 74 large allotments, varying from 1 to 1 1/4 acre each, on WEDNESDAY, 22nd OCTOBER, 1884,  at 11. 30 am. 

Inspection of the property, the allotments of which are all pegged and numbered, is Invited, as the beautiful situation on the well-known, romantic, and pretty Narrabeen Lagoon will recommend itself favourably to the public. Advertising (1884, September 27). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 20. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13564282 

The above description and lithograph below shows the 55 acres granted to Thomas Collins which was conveyed to F. C. Hedemann on November 26th 1883 for £460. Mr. Hedemann may be read about in the Warriewood Street names history page. Frederick Caesar Hedemann traded between Europe and the South Seas with his younger brother Ferdinand Hugo Hedemann - who was based at Fiji. 


Narrabeen Lagoon 1884 land sales, Clifton Road, Giles road, Bridge Road Point road - sold by Hardie and Gorman  Item c050370092, courtesy State Library of NSW


Hardie & Gorman Pty. Ltd & Thompson, Herbert S & John Sands (Firm). (1884). Narrabeen Lagoon Manly water frontage, building sites, 76 beautiful allotments : from 1/2 to 1 1/4 acres each, for auction sale at the rooms, Wednesday 22nd Octr 1884 Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-230340087

Worth noting is the government's bringing the below under their jurisdiction during 1885, 1886, 1888 and 1889:

Department of Lands,
Sydney, 18th November. 1885.
RESERVES FROM SALE FOR CAMPING AND PUBLIC RECREATION.

HIS Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, directs it to be notified that in pursuance of the provisions of the 101st section of the Crown Lands Act of 1884, the land specified in the Schedule appended hereto shall be reserved from sale for camping and public recreation, and is hereby reserved accordingly.

JOSEPH P. ABBOTT.

No. 126. County of Cumberland, parish of Manly Cove, area about 50 acres. The Crown Lands within the following boundaries: Commencing at the water's edge, on the eastern side of Narrabeen Lagoon, at a point west of the north-west corner of James Wheelers 60 acres; thence by a line east to the north-west corner of that portion and its north boundary and its prolongation east to the west boundary of John Ramsay's 410 acres grant; thence north by part of that boundary to the waters of Narrabeen Lagoon ; thence by the water's edge of that lagoon westerly to the south-eastern corner of James McDonald's 80-acre grant; thence by the south boundary of that portion and its prolongation west to the water's edge of the aforesaid lagoon; thence by the water's edge of that lagoon, to the point of commencement, [Ms* 85-17,154]

No. 125 of the county of Cumberland, parish of Narrabeen, area 12 acres. The Crown Lands within the following boundaries: Commencing at the south-east corner of J. W. A. White's, now Josiah Taylor's 60-acre grant, at high-water mark of Narrabeen Lagoon; and bounded on the north by the south boundary of that grant, being a line bearing west about 9 chains 33 links; thence on the west by a line bearing south to the left bank of Wheeler's Creek; thence on the south by the left bank of that creek downwards to the Narrabeen Lagoon, thence on the east by high-water mark of Narrabeen Lagoon to the point of commencement. [Ms. 85-18,909] RESERVES FROM SALE FOR CAMPING AND PUBLIC RECREATION. (1885, November 18). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 7445. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223763666 

Department of Lands,
Sydney, 6th November, 1886.
RESERVE FROM SALE FOR TRIGONOMETRICAL PURPOSES.

HIS Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, directs it to be notified that, in pursuance of the provisions of the 101st section of the Crown Lands Act of 1884, the land specified in the Schedule appended hereto shall be reserved from sale for trigonometrical purposes, and is hereby reserved accordingly.

HENRY COPELAND.
EASTERN DIVISION.
Land District of Sydney,

No. 2,650. County of Cumberland, parish of Narrabeen, area 1 acre 2 roods. The Crown Lands within the following boundaries : Commencing on the south-western side of a road forming the north-eastern boundary of portions 67 and 69, at a stake marked broad-arrow, bearing south 59 degrees 21 minutes east, and distant 1 chain 76 links from the north-east corner of portion 67 ; and bounded thence on the north-west by a line bearing south 9 degrees 30 minutes west 4 chains 62 links; thence on the south-west by a line bearing south 80 degrees 30 minutes east 4 chains 5 links ; thence on the southeast by a line bearing north 9 degrees 30 minutes east 3 chains and 5 links to the south-western side of the aforementioned road ; and thence on the north-east by that side of that road bearing north 59 degrees 21 minutes west 4 chains 34 1/2 links, to the point of commencement,—shown on plan catalogued C. 903-2,030. RESERVE FROM SALE FOR TRIGONOMETRICAL PURPOSES. (1886, November 6). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 7743. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223778833

Department of Lands,
Sydney, 6th October, 1888.
RESERVES FROM SALE FOR PUBLIC RECREATION

HIS Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, directs it to be notified that, in pursuance of the provisions of the 101st section of the Crown Lands Act of 1884, the land specified in the Schedule appended hereto shall be reserved from sale for public recreation, and is hereby reserved accordingly.

JAMES N. BRUNKER.

Metropolitan Land District.

No. 7,498. County of Cumberland, parish of Manly Cove, containing an area of about 44 acres. The Crown Lands within the following boundaries : Commencing on the shore of Narrabeen lagoon, at the western extremity of the northern boundary of James Wheeler's 50 acres; and bounded thence by that shore north-easterly to the south-west corner of J. M'Donald's 30 acres; thence on the north by the southern boundary of that land east to the shore of Narrabeen lagoon aforesaid, and by that shore easterly to the western side of a road 1 chain wide along the western boundary of John Ramsay's 410 acres, thence on the east by that side of that road south to the northern side of a road 1 chain wide along the northern boundaries of portions 568,570,571, and 572; thence on the south and south-west by that side of that road west and north-westerly to a point north of the north-east corner of James Wheeler's 50 acres aforesaid; again on the east by a line south to that corner; and thence on the remainder of the south by the northern boundary of that land west to the point of commencement.

The above is partly in lieu of reserve 126, revoked this day. Plan catalogued C. 1,209-2,030. [Ms. 88-10,355]

No. 7,499. County of Cumberland, parish of Manly Cove, containing an area of about 44 acres. The Crown Lands within the following boundaries: Commencing on the southern boundary of portion 77, parish of Narrabeen, at the north-east corner of portion 96, parish of Manly Cove; and bounded thence on the west by the eastern boundary of the, latter portion south to the left bank of Middle Creek; thence on the south by that bank of that creek downwards and easterly to- the shore of Narrabeen lagoon; thence on the north-east by that shore generally north-westerly to the south-east corner of J. W. A. White's 50 acres; thence on the north and east by the southern boundary of that land west and by part of its western boundary north to a southeast corner of portion 77, parish of Narrabeen aforesaid ; and thence again on the north by part of the southern boundary of that portion west to the point of commencement.

The above includes surveyed portion 95, shown on plan catalogued C, 1,208-2,030, and is partly in lieu of reserve 125, notified 18th November, 1885, revoked this day, [Ms. 88-10,355] RESERVES FROM SALE FOR PUBLIC RECREATION. (1888, October 6). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 7056. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219883641

The above is what is today's Jamieson Park that would be reduced by 11 acres in 1937 as the state government excised some for the war Veterans home:

GIFT OF PARK LAND
Legacy Club's Home At Narrabeen
Eleven acres, portion of Jamieson Park, Narrabeen, will shortly be made available to the Legacy Club for the erection of a war veterans' home. The area is Crown land, under the control of the Warringah shire Council. The Minister for Lands (Mr. Buttenshaw) to-day discussed the matter with the president of the R.S.L. (Mr. L. A. Robb), the president of the Legacy Club (Mr. Church), and Councillors A. H. Hughes and W. R. Batho, of Warringah Shire. It was indicated that the Government would provide the council with eleven acres elsewhere to compensate for the land taken from Jamieson Park
GIFT OF PARK LAND (1937, May 18). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 8 (LATE FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229409980

NOTIFICATION OF RESUMPTION OF LAND UNDER 44 VICTORIA No. 16. 

New South Wales, to wit.

(L.S.) Carrington, Governor.

By His Excellency, The Right Honourable Charles Robert, Baron Carrington, a Member of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of New South Wales and its Dependencies. 

WHEREAS the parcel of land hereinafter described is required for the purpose of the erection thereon of a Public School and of buildings to be used in connection therewith : And whereas I, as such Governor as aforesaid, with the advice of the Executive Council of the said Colony, have sanctioned the acquisition of the said land for a site for a Public School: Now, therefore, I, Charles Robert, Baron Carrington, the Governor aforesaid, with the advice of the said Executive Council, in pursuance of the power and authority given to or vested in me by "The Lands for Public Purposes Acquisition Act," by this notification, published in the Gazette and a newspaper circulated in the Police District wherein the said land is situated, that is to say, in the " Sydney Morning Herald " newspaper, declare that the parcel of land hereinafter particularly described has been resumed for the purpose of the erection thereon of a Public School and of buildings in connection therewith : And that the said land hereinafter described is resumed with the intent that by the publication in the Government Gazette, and in a newspaper circulated in the Metropolitan Police District, of this notification of the said land being so resumed, the said land shall forthwith become and be vested in the Minister of Public Instruction of the said Colony and his successors, on behalf of Her Majesty, for the purposes of the said Act, for an estate of inheritance in fee simple in possession, freed and discharged from all trusts, obligations, estates, interests, contracts, charges, rights-of-way, or other easements whatsoever, and that the legal estate therein, together with all powers incident thereto or conferred by the said Act, shall be vested in the Minister of Public Instruction as a Trustee, as in the said Act is provided : And I declare that the following is the parcel of land hereinbefore referred to as resumed by this notification, that is to say:—

All that piece or parcel of land situated at Narrabeen, containing 1 acre 3 roods 4 perches, being allotments 1 to 4 and 12 to 15 inclusive, of section 25 of the Mount Ramsay Estate, being part of John Ramsay's 410 acres, in the parish of Manly Cove, county of Cumberland: Commencing at the intersection of the north side of Goodwin-street with the south-west side of Victoria-street;  and bounded thence on the north-east by the south-west side of the last-mentioned street bearing north 17 degrees 2 minutes west 3 chains 3 links ; thence on the north by the south boundary of allotments 5, 9, 10, and 11, bearing west 5 chains 70links ; thence on the west by the east side of Park-street bearing south 2 chains 89 1/2 links to the north side of Goodwin-street aforesaid; and thence on the south by that side of that street bearing east 6 chains 59 links, to the point of commencement.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my Hand, and caused the Great Seal of the Colony to be hereto affixed, at Government House, Sydney, this eighteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine, and in the fifty-second year of Her Majesty's Reign.

By His Excellency's Command,

J. H. CARRUTHERS.

[2237] GOD SAVE THE QUEEN! NOTIFICATION OF RESUMPTION OF LAND UNDER 44 VICTORIA No. 16. (1889, March 22). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2228. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223991513

Work commenced on the school building when the Department of Public Instruction received a letter on behalf of James Edward Black. The letter read in part:

"I have the honor to draw your attention to the fact that carpenters and builders acting upon the authority of your department, have entered upon, taken possession of, and proceeded to erect a structure upon land belonging to me, near Narrabeen Lake, Parish of Manly Cove - more particularly known as the Mount Ramsay Estate Subdivision.

I hereby give you notice to yield up possession, and withdraw the aforesaid workmen forthwith. Failing to comply with this notice I shall instruct my solicitor to issue a Writ of Ejectment of Wednesday next, and to further proceed at law for the recovery of damages for this trepass."

The Department had not known the identity of the former owner of the resumed land. A formal 'Notice of Claim and Abstract' was submitted on March 28th 1890 and Mr Black was paid £803 pounds, one shilling and seven pence in compensation for his land.

And also in 1886 part of the land advertised for sale in 1884 is advertised as 2 acres and in 1887 'railings' for the approaches to the road bridge are called for:

NARRABEEN LAKE, beyond MANLY.

2 ACRES 10 PERCHES, having 330 foot frontage to BRIDGE ROAD, and about 335 feet frontage to the famous lake. It is Lots 6 and 7 of subdivision of Thomas Collins's 55-acre grant. This district is rapidly coming into favour, and Improvement!, are being manifested around. RICHARDSON and WRENCH will sell by public auction, at the Rooms, Pitt-street, on FRIDAY, 30th APRIL, at 11 o'clock, The above block of land, NARRABEEN LAKES, near Manly. Terms at sale. Advertising (1886, April 24). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 14. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13641544

Several accidents at Jenkins's Bridge, Narrabeen, on Prince of Wales's Birthday. Brevities. (1886, November 11). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved from  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107315131

NARRABEEN.

The new bridge at Jenkins' Creek is to be commenced. The approaches on either side of this creek are in a fearful state. As there has been such an enormous increase of traffic on this road, the authorities should allow a special grant to have the road properly made. The amount allowed per mile would then be sufficient to keep same in repair. It is hoped that the promise made by the Commissioner of Roads, viz., to have a railing put upon the approaches to Narrabeen bridge will be fulfilled. The Hon. W. B. Dalley was on one occasion capsized into the lake. This district is looking beautiful; the rock lilies and wild flowers are commencing to bud, and flowers in great profusion will be displayed in full bloom by the end of August. Gillbirds have not been at all plentiful this season. Hundreds of disappointed shootists have had to return home without a brace. Many have taken revenge by shooting a few magpies or a stray parrot. NARRABEEN. (1887, July 29). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108007815

Although the 1897 Crown Land sale 'near Narrabeen Lagoon' is a bit out of the picture - this is worth listing here to show what was being sold and where, and to mark that something similar happened at Mona Vale around the same time. The system of unconditional sales was still continued under the Act of 1861, and remained in force until its abolition in 1884. With many benefits there was also considerable mischief as a result of the operation of Robertson's Act, chiefly for the reason that land, being held under pastoral leases not exempt from free selection, could be the subject of speculative selecting without bona fide intention of settlement. The Crown Lands Act of 1884 and the supplementary Act of 1889 were accordingly passed to remedy this state of things. These measures, while maintaining the principle of free selection before survey, were designed to give fixity of tenure to the pastoral lessees, and at the same time incidentally tended to restrict the area sold unconditionally. Pastoral leases were required to be surrendered to the Crown and divided into two equal parts. One of these parts was returned to the lessee under a lease with fixity of tenure for a certain term of years ; the other half, called the resumed area, the lessee was allowed to hold under an annual occupation license, but this half was always open to selection.

It was found after a few years that the Acts of 1884 and 1889 did not succeed attaining the objects for which they were designed; settlement proceeded very slowly and the accumulation of land into large estates continued. Parliament was led to introduce entirely new principles into the agrarian legislation of the State, embodied in the Crown Lands Acts 1895 to 1909, the Labour Settlements Act 1902, the Closer Settlement Acts 1904 to 1909, and the Closer Settlement Promotion Act 1910, which, while still giving fixity of tenure to pastoral lessees, retain the principle of free selection before survey, and to offer bona fide settlers special inducements by the introduction of new forms of tenure on easy terms and conditions.

It is also worth noting that the Public Roads Act of 1897 No 5 came into being at the same time. Long title; An Act to amend and consolidate the law relating to the opening, closing, and survey of roads; to make provision for the disposal of unnecessary roads and of lands resumed or withdrawn but not required for roads, and of certain other lands ; for the prevention of the obstruction and injury of roads ; for the alignment and the alteration of the alignment of streets in Municipalities; for granting leave to place public gates in certain cases ; and for other matters of the like nature ; and for that purpose to amend the Act 4 Wm, IV No. 11 ; the Public Gates Act of 1875 ; and the Crown Lands Acts of 1884 and 1889. [30th June, 1897.] 

It is worth noting that William Houston, a nephew of John Wetherill's first wifes' father Hugh Houston, was Under-Secretary for Lands and 'called on to assist with the Land Bill introduced by Mr. J. S. Farnell in 1883, which came into operation on January 1, 1885. 

Near here just a few years prior to this:

Died in the Bush.

THE NARRABEEN MYSTERY. THE CORONER'S INQUEST. AN OPEN VERDICT.

At the Croydon Hotel, .to-day, before Mr. J. C. Woore, City Coroner, an inquest was opened regarding the death of the man whose body was found in the bush at Narrabeen, on the 1st instant. Senior-sergeant M'lntosh watched the case on behalf of the police.

Alfred M'lntosh deposed that he was a boarding-house keeper at Narrabeen. On Monday morning at 7.30 he was in the bush at Long Reef with Ernest Yates and others. He found the remains of the body lying on its back.' The left arm was extended, and the right lay across the body. The boots were off, and a blanket covered the upper part of the body. There was some clothing under the shoulders and head, and other clothing was lying near. There was a billy near the feet, but no traces of a fire. Witness was present when the photograph produced was taken. It represented the position of the body. He could positively identify the clothing deceased wore as that of a man he spoke to about two months ago in the same locality. He did not know his name, and could not remember the exact date when he spoke to him. Witness was talking to 'him regarding mining at Long Reef. Deceased did not say anything regarding his name or where he lived. He told, witness he intended returning to Sydney in a day or two. Deceased had a billy, pannikin, tomahawk, and knife, and was within threequarters of a mile from where the body was found. A young man about 26 years of age was with deceased. Witness did not know him, and had not seen him since. They were cooking at the time. The body was about 20 yards from high water mark. About 60 or 70 head of cattle ran about there. After finding the remains they were photographed by a Mr.Vogan, and the police were sent for. 

Senior-Sergeant M'lntosh, took the remains in charge. Identified the book produced, having written in it at the request of deceased with a pencil handed him by the young man. He believed the knife produced to be one he saw with deceased. Deceased's companion was like a sea-faring man. He wore a complete suit of blue serge and a can, had no hair on his face, and was dark with close-cut hair. He was about 5ft 9in in height. Deceased showed witness some samples of clay. Similar clay was found in a bag near the remains. Deceased was a short, thick-set man of slovenly appearance, and had a strong foreign accent. He spoke to witness of j having been in Germany, where he was engaged in making cement. In appearance the man was like a German. The young man said he had been with deceased about a fortnight, and had been in the colony about seven months. He was an Englishman and spoke very accurately. Deceased said he had money, and showed -witness a bag saying he had enough there to get a miner's right and a pair of boots so as to go to work on the reef. 

Henry Cohen, dealer, living near Manly, said he identified the clothing at the Morgue as that worn by a man he saw near his camp some time in November. Witness saw him twice, and there was no one with him at first. He described the appearance of deceased and his clothes, and said he appeared to be about 50 years of age. Witness thought from his speech deceased was a Scotsman, and he spoke of Aberdeen. He showed witness some clay he got from Dee Why Lagoon, at Narrabeen, and said he was an old New Zealand miner. When witness saw deceased the second time a young man was with him. Deceased said he had been to the Lands Office three years ago regarding the working of the land at Dee Why. He also said he was going to get up a syndicate to work the clay, and that he had a gentleman behind him. The young man wore dark clothes and a black hard hat; he was about 30 years of age, clean shaved, and of dark complexion. 

Constable Clibbon, stationed at Manly, deposed to finding the memo book produced and also a circular from the Fisheries Department among the clothes of deceased. The latter was addressed to ' A. Hunter, Wellington, N.S.W.' A portion of a packet of sugar of lead, labelled, was in the inside breast pocket of the coat. A small bottle and 1d were found in the trousers pocket.

George E. Rennie, Government Pathologist, deposed that he had examined the remains of deceased. He had been a man of between 50 and 60 years, and had been dead about two months. There was scarcely anything but the skeleton left. The skull and breast bone were broken. In his opinion, this was done after death. Portion of the scalp adhered to the skull, and there was no trace of blood on it. Nothing whatever was found to indicate the cause of death. The breakage of the bones might have been caused by the trampling of cattle.- If the bones of the head had been broken during life, witness would have expected to have found blood on them.

Arthur James Vogan, of the Railway Estate Branch, gave evidence as to having been with the witness Mintosh when the body was found. Witness photographed the remains exactly as they found them. Deceased had evidently died in agony as his fingers were dug into the ground, and his feet and legs were contorted.

James Day, mariner, residing at Manly, deposed that he last saw the man he believed to be deceased about two months ago. That was when corning back from Manly in the steamer Fairlight. He was one of the passengers. Witness was one of the crew of the steamer, and often saw him before on board, and spoke to him. Did not know him by any other name than ' Scotty.' He told witness five or six times that he was after clay near Long Reef, which he said was good for paint or fireclay. The clothing on the remains resembled those worn by ' Scotty,' and so, too, did the hat he saw. The last time witness saw the man he remarked to him (witness) that he had not been very well.

Senior-sergeant M'Tntosh, of Manly, produced a memo book found in a bag near the remains. In the book was an entry in red ink. It was compared with letters sent by Archibald Hunter to the Fisheries Department, the address being 'Wellington Post Office.' The letters were regarding some persons fishing in the Macquarie. They corresponded with the entries in the book, were in the same handwriting, and had, apparently, been written on leaves torn from the book. One bore date October 13, and the other October 14, 1893.

Livingstone F. Mann, draftsman in the Fisheries Department, produced two letters written in red ink on paper like that in the memo, book, and signed 'Archibald Hunter, Wellington.'

The jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased, whose name they believed to be Archibald Hunter, came to his death on or about November 20, 1893, and that there was no evidence to show the cause of death. Died in the Bush. (1894, January 3). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114070421

Arthur James Vogan had land at Newport, near the hotel and then called 'Vogan's Point', and was an early photographer of Pittwater. He would later return to the Dee Why - Collaroy area, where he passed away, years later. Journals of his, held by the State Library of New South Wales, show he had a passion for aboriginal carving and sought these in the Narrabeen area. This may have been what he was doing with a camera in that area on the day this gentleman's body was found.

The 1897 Crown Land Sale:


Advertising (1897, April 24). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14119869:


Narrabeen Lagoon 1897 - Item c050370024

Also happening at Narrabeen during 1897:

N.S.W. Field Artillery. FIRING EXERCISES NEAR NARRABEEN. 

(See illustrations on this page.) 

The Field Artillery of New South Wales last month formed a camp near Narrabeen, on the road from Manly to Broken Bay, with the object of giving officers and men some practical work in the shape of range and competitive firing. The camp was formed on June 7, and three days later was occupied by the A battery of Permanent Artillery. This battery was in camp continuously for more than a week. The partially-paid batteries also took part in the exercises, but only to the extent of one whole-day parade. B battery (partially-paid) went into camp on June 12, when both gunners and .drivers were given a day'à sound work at drill and firing. C battery (partially-paid) were put through similar exercises on June 19. The A battery, (permanent), of course, had daily drills during the period they were camped.

The officers at the camp were as follow: A battery (permanent)-Lieutenant-Colonel H. P. Airey, D.S.O., in charge; Lieutenant E. A. Antill, adjutant, B.D.F.A. ; Lieutenant Christian, B.D.F.A.; Brigade Sergeant-major H. Coleman; Brigade Quartermaster-sergeant Rauchle. B battery, (partially-paid)-Major R. M. S. Wells, and Lieutenants J. H. Plunkett, J. H. Schwabe, V. Airey, and C. Griffiths. C battery (partially paid)- Captains Lenehan and Anderson, and Lieutenants E. A. Pearce, Flannery, and H. G. Shaw.

The chief umpire was Colonel S. C. TJ. Smith, R.A. (commanding N.S.W. Artillery Forces), and the assistant umpires were Lieutenant-Colonel H. V. Savage and Captain Le Mesurier. Major Bridges acted as instructor to the camp, and Lieutenant J. Mair as range officer. A detachment of the Medical Staff Corps, under Surgeon Lieutenant-Colonel Dansey, was also on duty.

Field Artillery Exercises-Long Range Firing by the N.S.W. Brigade Division.

* (FROM PHOTOGRAPHS BY 'IMHO CHOWN STUDIOS, SYDNEY.)

Ready for Action. 

"B" Battery Firing.

After the Firing.-The Umpires Comparing Notes. 

N.S.W. Field Artillery. (1897, July 3). Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 32. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71275301

NARRABEEN

We are just back from Narrabeen, after such a delightful week. We have been cycling, boating, swimming, fishing and picnicking. Really, Narrabeen is the most charming place I know, so easy to get at, and so cheap. What do you think it cost us for the trip ? — only 10s each, and what a lot we got for our money. I will give you all the details of our expenditure. 

First of course came the boat fare to Manly (6d). Arrived at Manly, the party divided, half patronising tho coach, which takes you down to Narrabeen for a shilling, and the other more fortunate half mounting our bicycles to enjoy the eight-mile spin over a capital road which lay between us and our destination. 

We had engaged the largest cottage to be had in the place, as our party was a large one, numbering some ten or twelve. It cost us £2, but I think it was well worth the money, as there was ample accommodation for us all, and everything that we could possibly want was provided, with the exception of knives and forks and house linen, which we brought with us. It was also most conveniently near the little store, where we bought all our provisions and ran up a bill for milk, bread, potatoes, groceries, &c., which amounted to some 30s when settling day arrived. From the store we also engaged a boat for the week, which cost us 10s. 

Perhaps you don't know that there is a very pretty lake at Narrabeen? To be sure it is not very deep, and we occasionally got stranded on sand banks at first, but the boys were always quite ready to get out and push us off, and we soon learnt to know the channels so well that their assis-tance in that line was no longer necessary. There is much deeper water in the three creeks which empty themselves into the lagoon, and if you want to bathe I advise you to choose the middle of the three, which is about 5ft deep, and has a delightfully sandy bottom. We also "spreckled by moonlight" on the ocean boach (if you don't know what that means ask a Scotchman), and enjoyed a ride to Newport on our bicycles, with a halt at Rock Lily for refreshments. — Cousin Kate. NARRABEEN. (1897, December 26). Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126247931



Ocean view store Narrabeen circa 1899-1910. Item c071860044, from Macpherson Family Albums, courtesy State Library of NSW. Narrabeen Post Office opened on march 1st 1898.

A post office will be established on the 1st proximo at Narrabeen (in lieu of the receiving office), between Manly and Newport. GOVERNMENT GAZETTE. (1898, February 21). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108772830

NEW COLONIAL WINE LICENSES.

At the Licensing Bench sitting at the Water Police Court yesterday the applications of the following persons for new colonial wine licenses were granted: John James Jones, Military-road, Mosman; Arthur Cowley, Lane Cove-road, Turramurra; William M'Farlane Logan, Trafalgar Square, Mosman; Robert Henry Lawrence, 180 Blue's Point-road, North Sydney; Daniel A. Casey, 163 Miller- street, North Sydney; Louis Charles Roberts, 122 Oxford-street, Sydney; Edward Hemmings, Bunnerong-road, Randwick; Edgar Charles Russom, 4 Elizabeth-street, Paddington; Mary Mooney, Ruthven-street, Waverley; Louis Becker, Yurong and Stanley streets; Edward Anglin, 153 Oxford-street, 'Waverley; Arthur Quinnell, 92 Oxford-street, Paddington; John S. M. Edwards, 111 Pitt-street, Sydney; Domenico Picone, Erskine-street, - Sydney; Adolph Stephan, 50 Kent-street; Henry Rodick, 98 Hunter-street; James Duggan, 73 and 75 Cumberland-street; William Layton, 60 Darling-street, Balmain; Donald M'Lean, Narrabeen; Charles Thorpe, 630 Darling-street, Balmain; Thomas Murphy, The Corso, Manly. NEW COLONIAL WINE LICENSES. (1899, January 12). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113702488 

A telephone was installed at Narrabeen Receiving Office in 1897. Mr Dugald Thompson, MP wrote on behalf of Narrabeen residents in January 1898, asking that the Receiving Office be made a Post Office.  Donald McLean was the Receiving Office Keeper and also the Telephone Operator, which increased his earnings by ten pounds per annum. He had numerous children and grandchildren, some of whom brought land under the Real Property Act from 1915 on, with a bigger one in 1944.

OBITUARY.
MR. DONALD McLEAN.
Mr. Donald McLean, who died at Narrabeen at the age of 75 years, had a varied career. He had been storekeeper and postmaster, a road contractor, and a bridge builder. The funeral took place at the Roman Catholic portion of Manly Cemetery.
Mr. McLean Is survived by 12 children. OBITUARY. (1932, June 21). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16900564 

The McLeans had 14 children. 


Narrabeen - Plan of Portions 94, 95 & 97, Parish of Narrabeen, County of Cumberland - No boundaries shown, 1902, Item No.: c050370036, courtesy State Library of NSW - Narrabeen Subdivision Plans - Note 'now E A Macpherson' lands owned. Enlarged sections from described as ' Mahogany and Apple' and 'Scrubby and Swampy'.

Edward Augustus Macpherson was the son of Joseph Wharrie and Catherine Macpherson. He took an assignment of land dated December 28, 1875 and house known as “Hawthornden” in Roslyndale Avenue, Woollahra, New South Wales. The Macpherson family resided there between 1876 and 1902 but remained associated with the site until 1918. He owned land at Bayview, Dee Why, on Narrabeen Lagoon and of course 'Wharriewood' as shown above.

DISTRICT COURT.
Monday, September 19.
(Before Judge Wilkinson.)

Claim for Commission.— J. E. Robberds and Thomas William Woodin v. Edward Augustus MacPherson. The plaintiffs sued the defendant for work, journeys, and attendances performed as agents for the defendant, and for commission in connection with the sale of land at Narrabeen, near Manly. The amount of claim was £200. Judgment was given for the plaintiffs for £150. DISTRICT COURT. (1892, September 20). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article235968204

In 1899 part of these lands were resumed for a road 100 links wide:

Department of Lands,

Sydney, 29th March, 1899.


NOTIFICATION OF PROPOSED RESUMPTION OF LAND UNDER THE PUBLIC ROADS ACT OF 1897.  NOTIFICATION OF PROPOSED RESUMPTION OF LAND UNDER THE PUBLIC ROADS ACT OF 1897. (1899, March 29). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2547. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220982847 


Roy or Jack (?) out with his dad on way to uncle's Narrabeen farm - Image No.: c071400009 and enlarged sections from - from Box 04, Glass negatives including images of the Sydney and Manly areas, ca 1890-1910, by William Joseph Macpherson, courtesy State Library of NSW

Land resumed confirmed:

Department of Lands,
Sydney, 28th June, 1899.
LANDS RESUMED FOR ROADS DECLARED TO BE PUBLIC ROADS.

NOTICE is hereby given that the lands which have been resumed by notification in the Government Gazette for Roads, under the Public Roads Act of 1897, are now declared to be Public Roads.

By His Excellency's Command,

J. H. CARRUTHERS.

Roads No.              Description of Roads.  Date of Gazette of last notice

99-88-9 R. 6,136    Road giving access to portions Nos. 94 and 95, from the road from Manly to Pittwater, parish of Narrabeen, county of Cumberland.  3rd of June 1899, folio 4398. LANDS RESUMED FOR ROADS DECLARED TO BE PUBLIC ROADS. (1899, June 28). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 4889. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220944536 

A letter from Mr. M'Pherson, secretary to the Narrabeen Progress Association was read at the last meeting of the Manly Council, which called the aldermen's attention to the fact that an application had been made to grant under the Real Property Act a title to certain lands at the mouth of the Narrabeen Lagoon, comprising the whole of the sand spit which forms the southern part of the entrance to the Lagoon, also asking the aldermen to co-operate in a united protest to the Department of Lands against any alienation from the Crown. The reading of the missive caused some discussion among the aldermen, some declaring that 'a land grab' was being attempted. It was pointed out what the consequences were when a religious body secured a similar piece of land at Deewhy Lagoon. Several petitions are going the rounds of Manly, and are being extensively signed. The spot required is much thought of as a camping ground for fishing parties from Manly and the city. The aldermen determined to be cautious, and resolved to ask for further particulars. MUNICIPAL MATTERS. (1901, April 22). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112568594

The tram to Collaroy and then further to Narrabeen would commence a whole slate of acreage being brought under the Real property Act in smaller suburban sized parcels. What's interesting about this news report, or the extract from it included, is that many of those listed held land and would do just that during the 1910's and later:

THE LAKE DISTRICTS OF PITT-WATER AND NARRABEEN.

A PROGRESSIVE MOVEMENT.

There are many parts of Sydney and its suburbs better known to most people than the charming district comprising Narrabeen, Pittwater, Newport. etc.. which stretches away to the north-west of Manly, skirting the ocean on one side, and extending on the other to the picturesque reaches of the Hawkesbury. Yet there is no more delightful and bracing spot among the many pleasure resorts of the metropolis. At a first glance it seems difficult to understand why there should be this ignorance, especially in view of the nearness of the district to Sydney. In all probability it is owing lo the fact that the harbor divides the district from Sydney proper, and that thousands who visit Manly each year regard that pleasant watering-place as being in that direction the ''Land's End" of the colony. But the residents are now bestirring themselves to impress the claims of their district for larger share of consideration In the expenditure of Government money on local improvements, and also for the construction of a tramway to open up the district from Manly, If not all the way from Sydney, via the Spit. The difficulty of taking the line the on the distance is the cost of a bridge across Middle Harbor, but it is believed that a line could be constructed from Manly which would pay well within a very short time of completion, as far as Narrabeen, if not even to Pittwater. 

On Saturday evening last the various Progress Committees of the district foregathered at a banquet held in the Narrabeen Hotel for the purpose of ventilating their views on the subject, and by way of Initiating a combined movement on the part of these districts to advance their common interests. There were over 40 gentlemen present, including Mr. T. J. West (Mayor of Paddington), who occupied the chair, the Rev. A. G. Stoddart, Mr. Passau (Mayor of Manly), Mr. D. C. M'Lachlan, Mr. J. Taylor, Mr. John Woods (of Manly), Mr. Iredale, and the chairmen of the Narrabeen, Newport, and Pittwater Progress Committees. An excellent spread was provided, and a lengthy list of toasts having been honored, the larger property-owners present, as well as several influential visitors, pledged themselves to do all in their power to secure improved means of communication with the district, and a working committee was formed to take the matter in hand. THE LAKE DISTRICTS OF PITTWATER AND NARRABEEN. (1898, March 30). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article238375681

THE MINISTER FOR WORKS AT MANLY.
INSPECTION OF THE TRAMWAY.
SPEECH AT NARRABEEN.

Mr. E. W. O'Sullivan paid a visit of inspection on Saturday to the Manly tramway and tram sheds, and then traversed the route, as far as Narrabeen, along which it is proposed at some future date to carry the extension. In the party accompanying him there were Mr W. Kennett, M L.A.,, Alderman E. W. Quirk, M.L A , Aldermen D. S Ogilvy and D. S. Passau (Manly). Alderman T. J. West (city), Mr. P. W. Shaw (engineer), Mr. D Hogan (council clerk), Messrs. E. Ridge, Maclean, D. Farrell, Fishbourne, Robey, Jamieson, Edwards, Skene, Parker (2), Collins, Read, Markham, Prowse, Bagnall, Symons, Marshall, Gibbons, and Kingsmill. 

A start was made from Manly wharf about 2.30 p.m, and a halt was made at the the sheds, which were inspected. After light refreshment the journey to Narrabeen was resumed. On arrival at Narrabeen the party sat down to dinner at the hotel. Mr, Quirk defended the Government over the recent vote of censure, and then called upon Alderman T. J. West to propose the toast of "The Ministry,"....  THE MINISTER FOR WORKS AT MANLY. (1903, July 6). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14566666

Photos taken by E H Macpherson, or William Macpherson - on their way to their Bayview - Church Point lands or those in the Narrabeen and Warriewood district:

MANLY TO BAY VIEW—A POPULAR EASTER RESORT BY ROAD



1. On the Narrabeen Lagoon. 2. View from Sheepstation Hill, looking south. 3. Bay View. 4. a dip in the surf at Narrabeen. 5. Near Long Reef. 6. Approaching Narrabeen. 7. One of the creeks.

The distance from Manly to Bay View is about 15 miles. The road is by the Narrabeen-road past Rocklily. A proposal to put down a tram line is now being considered, and a member of the ministry was recently driven over the country, which in many parts is remarkably picturesque.


1. On the Narrabeen Lagoon. 


2. View from Sheepstation Hill, looking south. 


3. Bay View. 


4. A dip in the surf at Narrabeen. 


5. Near Long Reef. 


6. Approaching Narrabeen. 


7. One of the creeks.

MANLY TO BAY VIEW—A POPULAR EASTER RESORT BY ROAD. (1900, April 14). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 878. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165297416

View - Narrabeen Lakes, ca. 1900-1910, a116483h, Star Photograph Co. courtesy State Library of New South Wales


The shire of Warringah commencement - access to & acquiring pubic spaces for then + future generations; narrabeen headlands, parks and beach access

The first local councils in New South Wales (NSW) were incorporated in 1842, with 29 District Councils established under the provisions of the Imperial Act of 1842, An Act for the Government of New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land. At the same time Sydney was declared a city. From mid 1843 individual councils, administered by a government-appointed warden, were established in most Police Districts.
Following the establishment of responsible government to NSW in 1856 and under the Municipalities Act, 1858 local councils gained wide responsibilities which included the provision of roads, bridges, ferries, wharves, cemeteries, water supply, sewerage, public hospitals, gardens and libraries. Revenue was to be obtained via rates and tolls and supplemented by loans. Voting rights were limited to ratepayers.

The Municipalities Act, 1867 provided for the subdivision of municipalities into boroughs and districts, each with designated area and population qualifications. The Municipalities Act consolidated all previous Acts and Amending Acts without altering their main features.

With the Local Government (Shires) Act, 1905 and Local Government Extension Act, 1906 local government finally gained a compulsory, state-wide system of incorporation. By 1908, 134 shires were created, joining the 190 previously incorporated municipalities. Local authorities gained delegation of extensive powers in relation to works and services of a local character, as well as a greater measure of financial independence. 

On the peninsula Manly was first incorporated on January 6th 1877 as the Municipal District of Manly, and met for the first time on 15 February 1877, when the first mayor was elected, Thomas Rowe. The council first met in temporary premises - the original Ivanhoe Hotel in Ivanhoe Park. The Shire of Warringah was Proclaimed on March 6th, 1906:

PROCLAMATION 
New South Wales,
to wit.
(L.S.)
Harry H. Rawson,
Governor.
By His Excellency Sir Harry Holdsworth Rawson, Admiral in the Royal Navy, Knight Commander of the Most Honorable Order of the Bath, Governor of the State of New South Wales and its Dependencies, in the Commonwealth of Australia.

WHEREAS the Local Government (Shires) Act, 1905, provides that the Governor by Proclamation shall, within six months after the passing of the said Act, divide the whole of the State, exclusive of the City of Sydney or of any existing Municipality, or of any area added in pursuance of the said Act to any such Municipality, or proposed to be so added, and exclusive of the Western Division, and exclusive of Lord Howe Island and the Islands in Port Jackson, and such other islands as the Governor may, in his discretion, consider should be excluded, and exclusive of the Quarantine Station on the North Head of Port Jackson, into shires, and shall constitute under the said Act, and define the boundaries of, each shire, and shall give names to shires: Now, therefore, I, Sir Harry Holdsworth Rawson, the Governor aforesaid, in pursuance of the provisions of the said Act, and with the advice of the Executive Council, do by this my Proclamation, make the division as aforesaid, and declare that the several areas the boundaries of which are defined in the Schedule hereto shall be and the same are hereby constituted Shires under the said Act, and shall bear the names by which they are each respectively preceded in the said Schedule, and that in such Schedule, wherever a road, creek, or river is named as a boundary in any description or in the description of any land district boundary therein mentioned, the centre of such road, creek, or river, shall be the boundary unless otherwise stated in such description.

Given under my Hand and the Seal of the State, this sixth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and six , and in the sixth year of His Majesty's Reign
CHARLES A. LEE.
GOD SAVE THE KING!

SCHEDULE.
BOUNDARIES AND NAMES OF SHIRES.  ....

Warringah. No. 131.
Commencing on the high-water mark of the South Pacific Ocean at its intersection with the northern boundary of the municipality of Manly; thence by that boundary and part of the western boundary of that municipality westerly and southerly to the high-water mark of Middle Harbour; by that high-water mark northerly to the north-west corner of portion 65, parish of Manly Cove, county of Cumberland ; by a line west to the eastern boundary of the municipality of Willoughby ; by that boundary generally westerly, the western shore of Middle Harbour northerly, Middle Harbour Creek upwards, part of the eastern boundary of the parish of Gordon northerly, and Cowan Creek downwards to its confluence with Cockle Creek ; by a line east to the right bank of Cowan Creek ; by that bank, the right bank of the Hawkesbury River downwards to West Head ; by a line easterly to Barranjoey ; and by the South Pacific Ocean generally southerly, to the point of commencement.  .... PROCLAMATION (1906, March 7). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1593. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226474400


Map shewing boundaries of shires under the Local Government [Shires] Act 1905 and the division into Ridings. Item: e30080_0001_c, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales.

Narrabeen.
From A Correspondent.
The annual meeting of the Narrabeen Progress Association was held on Saturday, December 9th, in the Association Room. The chair was occupied during the earlier part of the meeting by the President, Alderman T. J. West. The reports showed that the Association was still in active work, and the membership keeping up, for although the loss of three members had been sustained during the year three others had joined. The general finance was good, and after all expenses had been met a credit balance remained in the treasurer's hands of £3/12/11. The election of officers resulted as follows;—President, Alderman J. T. West ; Vice-Presidents, Messrs. Gordon and Larkin ; Secretary, Mr. George Powell; Treasurer, Mr. F. W. Loder; Executive Committee, J. Russell. A. O. West, Whiting, Hinchcliflf, and R. Marshall. 

The Association is fully alive to the fact that very shortly a momentous change will be taking place, viz;.. the creation of a Shire Council, and recognise the desiiability of closely watching the trend of events. 

On Saturday evening a very pleasing entertainment was given by the scholars in the Public School, Narrabeen, under the direction of the teacher, Mr. J. McDonald, assisted by friends, the programme consisted of part songs, duets, recitations, dumb bell exercise and wanddrill, all of which were performed in a very creditable manner. The president of the N. P. A., Alderman T. J. West, occupied the chair. The event was inaugurated for the purpose of raising funds to purchase prizes to be distributed amongst the pupils on breaking up for Christmas holidays. A very pleasant evening was concluded with a vote of thanks to the Chairman, and the singing of the National Anthem. Miss McDonald presided at the piano in a very efficient manner. Narrabeen. (1905, December 16). Mosman, Neutral and Middle Harbour Resident (NSW : 1904 - 1907, 1916 - 1919), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article252191375

As can be read in the names of some of these members of the Narrabeen Progress Association members, and those who visited the Narrabeen Powder Works 20 years earlier, there had always been a strong land-owner interest among Sydney Council and even State Government members in the Collaroy to Narrabeen to Mona Vale runs. Some historians even point to the tram to Collaroy and onwards to Narrabeen being speeded up to suit the subdivision and development interests of state politicians.

However, the Shire of Warringah was not vastly populated and the first few decades of this council's records show over and over a failure of funds coming in being able to meet the aspirations early councillors and those they were elected by held. Apart from decent roads, metalled, and local quarries required to produce this metal, for access to plots of land, and the development of a tram system that would bring money spending tourists or provide a means for those who would work in town to commute and thus live in the area, one of those aspirations of a small permanent population was access to beaches and headlands - all then still owned by private landholders.

As has been seen in subdivisions from 1912 on, and especially during those of the 1920's on at Scotland Island, Clareville, Palm Beach, Whale Beach, Bilgola, Careel Bay, Newport and Avalon Beach, this council enacted policies and requirements for those submitting subdivisions for approval, signifying yet another shift in the 'own your own land - have your own home' dream, to set aside parts or whole plots of land to provide access. Those right-of-way paths everyone now still has over hills, then part of ensuring people could walk to main roads and transport as much as being able to access foreshores along stretches where houses may 'build out the view' were foreseen as necessary for then and the future. Larger areas, set aside as parks for recreation, were also required, and this policy persisted as long as the gradual turning of paddocks into suburban plots continued, into the 1930's, 1940's and 1950's. 


The Bridge, Lakes Entrance. N. Narrabeen. N.S.W. (Ocean street bridge looking north to Warriewood, circa 1928)

There may not be much of a saving of distance in the new route to Palm Beach and Barranjoey, Via the bridge over the mouth of Narrabeen Lake, but fishermen and lovers of interesting scenery will appreciate it. The new road joins the old one on Sheep-station Hill. From this hill it is not a long walk to good fishing rocks near the Blow-hole. This is not a safe place in a sea with a rising tide. Black- fish, groper, and drummer are often caught in the gutter near the Blow hole.
SPORT WHERE THE TIDE RUNS FAST (1928, March 2). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 35. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245431083 

At Narrabeen the north headland and that which overlooks Turimetta Beach had been bequeathed to the Salvation Army. On the opposite side, where current Birdwood Park is, and where the Narrabeen Ocean Bridge would be built to open and provide access to lands on the North Narrabeen-Warriewood side, the Sections numbered 61, 62, and 63 were owned by private landholders, such as Charles Schultz - visit 'Billabong' and 'Ocean House', Ocean Street, North Narrabeen. Section 61 was that needed for beach access. Similarly at the Collaroy Beach end, and even though the state government resumed Long Reef headland and the acreage invested in Griffith Park, Collaroy Beach itself was held in private ownership.

As has been seen in the instance of Bungan street names, as well as elsewhere, small and larger developers were supportive of the ideal of providing permanent access to Bushrangers Hill or going over that hill, along green paths, to access the beach at Newport.  A 2020-2021 debate over the usurption of these public lands by private homeowners through encroachments into these pathways and parks to block access by installing hedges or fences has not diminished or reversed public ownership and will have to be acted on by the current Local Government. 

For a cash-strapped Warringah Shire Council securing these places was done through not only the requirements to gain approval for subdivisions but also through the paying off of loans to those land-holders themselves as the rates came in over successive years or doing land swaps - and appealing to the Lands Department for £ to help this along - usually refused as they seemed to be permanently cash-strapped too - also undertaking their own program of ensuring foreshores access for the people of then and into the future - as seen in the 1911 program for harbour resumptions (See Taronga Zoo 100th Birthday Parade: 1000 Reasons To Celebrate, October 2016 history and Clifton Gardens Mosman: An Eternal Green and Saltwater Space and Of Many Captains, April 2017 history). All of these machinations also had to be approved by the 'Governor' as well. 

The call for this to occur preceded the Proclamation of Warringah Shire Council. 


Buying Land for Parks & beach access

Records from the past via TROVE and Warringah Shire Council meetings, when these minutes were stiill handwritten, provide:


NARRABEEN LAGOON.
A few years ago the whole of the southern shore of Narrabeen Lagoon was available for access at all points by anglers and others, but certain portions of the foreshore have been built upon, and barbed wire fences have been erected at the water's edge so that the old paths have been blocked, and people desirous of getting to the entrance of the lagoon are required to make a long detour or wade through the water. The matter has aroused considerable attention at Manly and the village of Narrabeen, and it was brought before the Amateur Fishermen's Association on Tuesday evening by petition. The petition was to the effect that intervention was sought in the matter of preventing the alienation to any private persons of any part of the foreshore of the lagoon which lies between the main entrance of the lagoon on the north and the mainland on the south, such portion being part of the beach washed by the waters of the sea on its eastern side and by the waters of the lagoon on the western side. It was urged that the land was in reality nothing more than wind-swept and water-washed sea beach, unsuitable in character for building upon, ill-defined as to boundaries, and deemed to belong to the Crown. Further, it was claimed that it was a favourite resort of fishers, picnickers, and pleasure seekers, and the alienation of it would deprive the public of an advantage to which they had been accustomed and had come to reasonably regard as their right. The association decided to heartily endorse the petition, and represent the matter to the Minister for Lands. NARRABEEN LAGOON. (1901, April 18). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14341918

A letter from Mr. M'Pherson, secretary to the Narrabeen Progress Association was read at the last meeting of the Manly Council, which called the aldermen's attention to the fact that an application had been made to grant under the Real Property Act a title to certain lands at the mouth of the Narrabeen Lagoon, comprising the whole of the sand spit which forms the southern part of the entrance to the Lagoon, also asking the aldermen to co-operate in a united protest to the Department of Lands against any alienation from the Crown. The reading of the missive caused some discussion among the aldermen, some declaring that 'a land grab' was being attempted. It was pointed out what the consequences were when a religious body secured a similar piece of land at Deewhy Lagoon. Several petitions are going the rounds of Manly, and are being extensively signed. The spot required is much thought of as a camping ground for fishing parties from Manly and the city. The aldermen determined to be cautious, and resolved to ask for further particulars. MUNICIPAL MATTERS. (1901, April 22). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112568594

At the last meeting of the Manly Council a letter was read from the secretary of the Narrabeen Progress Association, thanking the aldermen for their promised assistance in the association's efforts in the matter of maintaining the public right to certain land at Narrabeen, and sending further particulars. The land, included in the application lies on the northern foreshore of the lagoon, near the mouth, and is a favorite fishing ground. There is much interest taken in the matter by residents of Manly and district, and every effort Is being made to get the Government to' let matters stand as at present, so as excursionists may have the use of the spot as a camping and fishing ground. MUNICIPAL MATTERS. (1901, April 29). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112564307 

Local Land Board Office,
Sydney, 13th July, 1910.
ATTENTION is invited to an application by William Booth to surrender in exchange for Crown Land. The area to be surrendered being about 10 1/2 acres fronting Narrabeen Lagoon and the land to be exchanged being about 29 acres of portion 40, both areas being in the parish of Narrabeen, county of Cumberland.
A heliograph illustrating the proposal is exhibited at the Offices of the Local Land Board, Sydney.
Objections (if any) should be in writing, and should be forwarded to the District Surveyor, Sydney, not later than 10th August, 1910.
The proposal will be considered by the Local Land Board at Sydney at its next sitting, on a date to be fixed.
T. W. CONOLLY,
Acting District Surveyor.  Government Gazette Notices (1910, July 20). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3898. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226764932

RESERVE FOR NARRABEEN.
The Metropolitan District Land Board held an inquiry into the proposed exchange of land on the northern head of Narrabeen Beach. The parties to the transfer were the Crown and William Booth. After exhaustive inquiry the board decided to recommend the exchange. The land includes the Narrabeen headland, and about six or seven acres of level ground, having a large frontage to the mouth of the Narrabeen Lake. RESERVE FOR NARRABEEN. (1910, September 22). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15173819


NSW Land Registry Services  - HLRV Turimetta Head portion Birdwood - Section from Map cancelled July 1924

Warringah Shire Council would require the Salvation Army to allocate more reserves along the beachfront towards Warriewood beach as part of its 1920's Narrabeen Park Estate subdivisions - which went on into the 1930's.

PARKS FOR THE PEOPLE. —  AT NARRABEEN, CRONULLA, AND VAUCLUSE. contemplated government resumptions.
Parks for the people would appear to be a policy which is being encouraged by the present Minister for Lands, Mr. G. S. Beeby. who yesterday outlined some new proposals in this respect. 
AN IDEAL PARK
The Government, the Minister stated, are resuming two pieces of land from the Salvation Army, portion of their property known as Long Reef Point, between Narraboen and Manly, comprising an area of 177 acres. Mr. Beeby considers the locality ideally situated for park purposes, there boing a frontage of nearly two miles to tho ocean; sheltered, and well timbered, nnd with these natural advantages it should prove a great boon to campers and picnickers. When the tramway to Collaroy Beach ia completed it would give the pcoplo easy access to tho park. Part of the land fronts the . main road, and a considerable portion of the expenditure on the purchase, the Minister states, could he recouped by the Government later on by a subdivision of these frontages. A subdivision of this kind cannot, however, bo made under the existing law, and the 'authority of Parliament will be necessary before any of the land can be disposed of. But, apart altogether' from the question of sale, the Minister- believes that at the price fixed it will be one of the most satisfactory resumptions for recreation purposes that could be made.  PARKS FOR THE PEOPLE. (1911, November 11). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 13. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article239203598

No. 14,164. APPLICANT:—William Booth, London, England. LAND:—Oounty Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, Shire Warringah, 259 acres, on Pacific Ocean and Narrabeen Lagoon; and on Manly to Pittwater-road,—lands granted as 60 acres (portion 13 of parish) 60 acres (portion 14 of parish), and 80 acres (portion 15 of parish) to Elizabeth Jenkins, exclusive of road 1 chain wide from Manly to Pitt water, and resumed road 1 chain wide near Narrabeen deducted from the total area, and adjoining properties of W. Booth, H. F. Hallorahan, trustees of E. H. Macpherson and Crown Land. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, June 5). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3564. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221608059

NARRABEEN BEACH.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
Sir, - I have noted correspondence in your paper in reference to reserves and resumptions at Narrabeen Beach, and I certainly think with your correspondents that the Councillors have been very lax in their dealings with these matters.
When it was proposed at the last shire meeting to approach a land company with the object of getting a piece of ground for a re-serve and lookout, Councilor McIntosh pro-duced an old map of Mount Ramsay, showing that a reserve was set apart, but this reserve will be of little use if it is allowed to be sold, as other marked reserves have been sold. One I can refer to in particular. This reserve has been known and used as a right-of-way to my knowledge for the past 22 years; yet the council allowed this to be sold some little time back without an effort; and if this is allowed in one case, what is the use of councillors drawing attention to reserves marked on plans, when the same thing is likely to be repeated.
Some years ago the land along the Narrabeen Beach could have been reserved for a nominal sum. Now it would mean the expenditure of a large amount of money. The chance has been allowed to slip through their fingers; and when it is noted that they will not enforce the keeping of reserves marked on plans, it seems to me that the methods of our councillors in matters of this sort could be improved on. I am. etc.
Sept. 2. HENRY J. ACKLAND. NARRABEEN BEACH. (1912, September 4). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28132323

NARRABEEN BEACH.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
Sir,-I notice through your columns of the 27th ultimo a letter signed by "H R M William," a country visitor, urging the resumption of the land that adjoins Narrabeen beach for recreation purposes A fellow-feeling makes us wondrous kind I might state that I wrote the local shire council on this matter when first formed, and told them that they should resume this land at all costs, as it would not only be history for themselves, but for their children that survived them, to do so The ground could have then been bought for about 10s per foot, but to day It is a consideration My recommendation to that body of gentlemen was the resumption of all that portion of land separated bj road and beach as far north as the Narrabeen Hotel, aud another step from thenco onward to the mouth of the lake It has been an obser-vant Government that has built this tram Uno well off tho main road but there are other matters that will need study to be In keeping with such good work and that Is re sumptions.
I am etc,
STANLEY C TWIGHT. NARRABEEN BEACH. (1912, September 3). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15332201

Warringah Shire Council handwritten minutes of meetings records:

Owner of land at Narrabeen dedicated for a park - to be sold for £2200.00 as per Warringah Shire Council Meeting of January 31, 1916 - became Birdwood Park - Mr Charles De Burgh Kirwan - confirmed in Minutes dated Feb. 14th, 1916. 
Next Meeting, (February 28th, 1916) an Item states Kershaw, Mathers & Lane stating that Mrs Ada Louise Gilder was prepared to purchase the land in the name of C De Burgh Kirwan at Narrabeen Lake (see councils application for Governor's Approval per last meeting of February 16th) for £2200.00 and sell same to council on terms set out in letter dated Feb, 1916. 
Meeting of March 16th Narrabeen Land - association be informed the an endeavor to get government to purchase the land had met with failure.

It was resolved that the terms be £250 cash down and £500 at the end of 1918 ; £500 at the 1st of March 1920; £500 at 1st of March 1922 and the balance on the 1st of March 1924. payable quarterly 6% interest 
March 27, 1916 Meeting; 
July 17, 1916 Meeting Governor approval to purchase land from A L Gilde.

Councils records show the loan was discharged towards the end of 1924 and that Ada was quite happy to allow them to postpone payments due in March when these could not be met. Warringah Shire Minutes of Meetings February 23, 1920 record, Re; Birdwood Park Purchase: "Birdwood Park", Narrabeen, c (Lot 9, Section 63, D. P. 6768) having an area of 4 ac. 1 r. 21 ½ per.) was purchased with weatherboard cottage out-buildings, and fencing, in 1916 for £2200 on terms, viz £250 on signing of Contract, £500 on 1st March, 1918, £500 on 1st March,1920, £500 on 1st March, 1922, and £450 on 1st March, 1923, and unpaid instalments to bear interest at rate of 6%. To date £750 has been paid off the purchase money, and £ 386/5/- In interest, making a total of £1136/5/-. £1450 of the purchase is still owing, of which £500 falls due for payment on 1st prox. 

BIRDWOOD PARK. The land purchased by the Warringah Shire Council to give the public a right of way to Narrabeen Beach has been christened Birdwood Park. BIRDWOOD PARK (1916, December 28). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 4 (FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223373938 


Narrabeen Head from Lagoon, circa 1928, from Album 'Samuel Wood - postcard photonegatives of Narrabeen,' - Item a1470094h, courtesy State Library of NSW

Field Marshal William Riddell Birdwood, 1st Baron Birdwood, GCB, GCSI, GCMG, GCVO, CIE, DSO (13 September 1865 – 17 May 1951) was a British Army officer. He saw active service in the Second Boer War on the staff of Lord Kitchener. He saw action again in the First World War as Commander of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps during the Gallipoli Campaign in 1915, leading the landings on the peninsula and then the evacuation later in the year, before becoming commander-in-chief of the Fifth Army on the Western Front during the closing stages of the war. He went on to be general officer commanding the Northern Army in India in 1920 and Commander-in-Chief, India, in 1925.

Birdwood was made Baronet of Anzac and of Totnes, in the County of Devon, on 29 December 1919. He toured Australia to great acclaim in 1920, visiting Narrabeen and the site named to honour him:

GENERAL BIRDWOOD.

ACTIVE TIME IN SYDNEY. 

Yesterday Sir William and Lady Birdwood enjoyed a launch trip in delightful weather on the waters of Kuring-gai Chase, and a motor Journey to Newport and Manly, thus gaining an excellent opportunity of seeing some of the beautiful scenery about Sydney. The party included Sir George Fuller and other Ministers. 0n the way from Newport to Manly a call was made at Furlough House, Narrabeen, where the guests were received by Lady Fuller and Mrs. Cooper Day, secretary of Furlough House, and entertained at afternoon tea. General Birdwood was very much interested in the scheme for enabling soldiers' wives and dependents to enjoy a holiday at this pleasant spot.

To-day, about 11.40 a.m., General Birdwood will inspect the Matraville Garden Village for soldiers. Originally this engagement was fixed for 3 p.m., and the change involves the cancellation of a large part of the programme arranged for the day. The Senior Cadets and Boy Scouts, who were notified to muster at Beauchamp-road at 2.30 p.m., will not be required. Many prominent citizens had accepted invitations to the village, and the board will welcome any who can attend the less picturesque event in the morning. After General Birdwood has inspected the village, which now consists of 50 fine cottages, he will motor to the city, and lunch, as arranged, with the Voluntary Workers' Association, at 189 Pitt-street.

In the evening he will be the guest of the Imperial Service Club, at dinner at the Town Hall.

Sir William and Lady Birdwood will visit the Bankstown Soldiers' Settlement Poultry Farms to-morrow afternoon, arriving at the settlement about 3 o'clock, and will be met by Mr. Ashford.

On Monday, Sir William Birdwood will be engaged all day with the Red Cross Society. Commencing at 10.45 a.m. there will be a re-view of V.A.D.'s on the grounds outside Government House, when General Birdwood will probably deliver a short address. He will then visit the weaving, toy-making, and basket-ware industries before going to Rose Hall for lunch. At 2.30 he will visit the Blinded Soldiers' Tearoom in Pitt-street, and then cross to North Sydney, where he will inspect the Graythwaite Convalescent Home.

On Monday evening Sir William Birdwood will dine at the Australian Club.

On Tuesday there will be a display by 10,000 Public School children at the Sydney Cricket Ground, in honour of General and Lady Bird-wood. A feature will be a tableau of welcome, and a general rehearsal for this event will be held at the Sydney Cricket Ground on Monday, commencing at 11.15 a.m., and lasting until about 3 p.m.GENERAL BIRDWOOD. (1920, April 10). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 13. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15870061 - Morer available in North Narrabeen Rock Pool: Some History

While visiting this subject its worth noting that this council also worked towards securing the Collaroy Beach as well. This was purchased from a Mr. Herbert Kaspar Bors. The meeting of August 26th, 1918 records; 

Mr. H. K. Bors: waited on the Council in regard to his application for permission to build on Lot 8, Section 2, Mount Ramsay Estate, Collaroy, and also in regard to the Council's proposal to purchase Lots 7/8 for public recreation purposes, and it was decided that the matter should be dealt with at next meeting

A few years later
September 19th, 1921 Collaroy Beach resumption H.K. Bors agreeing to Section 2, Mount Ramsay Estate  to the Council providing that the period for payment be .....as proposed .  -  Resumption by the Council. Resolved, ...Underwood) That the proviso, be accepted. Resolved, - (ers. Quirk,... ) That the Minister for Lands be now written to, to point out what the Council has done in acquiring these two allotments, and asking for a deputation to urge assistance in purchasing the retaining two or three adjoining lots. 

Minutes of Meeting of 4th October. 1921; That the Council endeavor to purchase from the owner, Mr.  H. Davis, a strip of land in Lot 2, Sec. 11 :access to Oaks Estate, with 11 ft. frontage to Oaks Avenue and 1 ft. to Deewhy the Reserve at the rear, for the purpose of widening the means of access between the two reserves. Resolved, - (Cr5. Parr, Corkery) That the Council offer Mr. Davis the sum of £85 for such strip of land, and agree to pay all costs of the transfer and of the issue of a fresh F Certificate of Title.
 3. Resolved, - (Cs's. Parr, Greenwood) That application be made for the Governor's Approval to the Council purchasing from H. K. Bors for the sum of £1500, Lots 7 and 8. Section  20 Mount Ramsay  Estee, Collaroy Beach, for public recreation. purposes, and that the Seal of the Council be affixed to such application. Resolved, - (Cr5. Greenwood, Corkery) That the draft Agreement drawn up..by Messrs. MacGregor & Palmer, Mr. Bors Solicitors, and revised by Messrs. Maund & Christie, the Council's Solicitors, be approved, provided that the interest on the unpaid purchase money date from 1st October, and that a proviso be inserted reserving to the Council the right to pay off the whole of the purchase money or to increase the amount of the instalments, at any time, should it desire to do so.

A few items under 'Extras' from research into Ada Louisa Gilder, Charles Freeman De-Burgh Kirwan and Herbert Kaspar Bors again takes us back to a colonial past. Charles did have other lands on which he lived in Ocean street, which he also sold off as smaller blocks, and turns up in Warringah Shire Council records again with an order against him to clean up his premises in the same street - although he must have been in his 70's when this occurred.

The Mount Ramsay Estate (1881 subdivisions lithograph)Sections 61-63 on Narrabeen Lagoon and at the North Narrabeen-Birdwood Park end. In 'The House at the End of the Road' by Robert Whitelaw we can read:

Emma Schultz (1876-1951) born in Queensland, was the wealthy wife of a prosperous and well-connected North Sydney Master Builder, Charles Schultz (1872-1945), who, though also born in Queensland, was of Prussian parentage. He regularly undertook large public and private building projects for some of the leading architects of the day. The Schultz family had a house in Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove, and Charles himself was a Justice of the Peace (when such things had particular community recognition), while the Schultz children were sent to elite private schools in Sydney.

In 1905 Emma purchased seven large sections of land on the then isolated northern end of the North Narrabeen peninsula, including a waterfrontage on to the lagoon and overlooking the sand dunes and nearby ocean (the holding comprised the suburban block bordered today by Lagoon, Ocean and Malcolm streets). To gain an idea of the size of the purchase, some 19 modern houses, apartments, and shops have been built on the original block. Today the block appears as a singularly unattractive jumble of utilitarian apartments and flashier housing situated on ill-shaped, battle-axe sites. But in 1905 it was an ideal, unspoilt holiday and weekend retreat for a growing family and the Schultz's wide circle of friends in the building and military/aviation sectors. The original location of Emma's house can still be readily identified today by the stand of high palms along the lagoon edge (originally planted at the front of the house) and by a single, high, pine tree at the back of the house.


Photographs of Billabong, circa 1920's, courtesy of Michael Schultz, grandson of Charles and Emma Schultz

The Schultz estate occupied the whole block bounded by the lagoon, Ocean, Malcolm and Lagoon streets (its actual address-frontage). On the Ocean street corner was “Tres Bon”, possibly owned by Emma’s sister Jessie (born 1880) and mentioned by D H Lawrence in Kangaroo. The house, a two storey premises, was the largest around at that time. Michael, grandson of Emma and Charles Schultz, described the house as having a large lounge-room with smaller rooms (6) and verandahs off it built as a weekender – that others flocked to. At the rear of the property there was another structure that could have been an extra cottage, and later there was a separate flat attached to the main house. Michael Schultz also had a photograph of Rosenthal and Taylor in the grounds of Billabong (with a Major McLeod) which dates from before WWI. The Schultzes were great friends with George Augustine and Florence Taylor, who made the first ever flights by Australian men and women on the land of this couple in 1909. Emma Schultz being the second Australian woman to fly.

One of the Schultz blocks was sold to:

STRUCK OFF
SOLICITOR L. C. ELLIOTT UNPROFESSIONAL CONDUCT
The Full Court to-day unanimously directed that the name of Leo Charles Elliott, a Sydney solicitor, should ' be removed from the roll of solicitors. Application was made to the Full Court, consisting of the Acting Chief Justice (Mr. Justice Ferguson), Mr. Justice James and Mr. Justice Halse Rogers, on behalf of the Incorporated Law Institute of N.S.W., to make absolute a rule nisi calling upon Elliott, to show cause why his name should not be removed from the roll for. as alleged, professional misconduct. 

Money for Land Deal 
Stewart Leslie Reid, of Mount-street, Coogee, teacher, in an affidavit, said that on January 30 last he purchased land at Narrabeen from Charles Schultz for £350, and on February 21 Elliott agreed to arrange the necessary details of transfer. On March 20 he paid to Elliott's clerk, Mr. Lenehain, who had had the matter In hand, a cheque for £333, being £330 balance of purchase money, and £3 stamp duty, and obtained a receipt. On March 25 and 28 he telephoned Elliott, asking for the deeds, as he wished to erect a building on the land. Elliott said the deeds were in order, and that he could proceed with the work. Early in May he wished to place the deeds as security against accommodation.

Elliott was iII, and his clerk said that the deeds had not yet been to the Land Titles Office, but that the matter would he completed on Elliott's return to the office. Later Elliott informed him that he had paid £150 to Schultz's solicitors, and had arranged with them to pay Schultz in full In the course of the next few days. Elliott said that, owing to his illness, his office routine had been disorganised, and his accounts were In a chaotic state. He asked Reid whether he would mind waiting. Reid had made several unsuccessful attempts to have the matter completed during June and July. In July Mr. Elliott promised to complete the matter without fail by August 1. He subsequently tried to get into touch with Mr. Elliott, but was unsuccessful. 

"Good Work for Country" 
Mr. Berne (for Elliott) Informed the court that Elliott had paid the amount in full, with interest, and he unreservedly placed himself in the hands of the court. The Acting Chief Justice said that this was not a case for suspension: the court must order that Elliott's name he removed from the roll of solicitors. Elliott had done good work for his country ns a soldier, and in the interests of returned soldiers, and the Acting Chief Justice trusted that in the future he would rehabilitate himself. Mr W. P. L Owen (instructed by Messrs. F. W. Walker and Sons appeared for the Law Institute, and Mr. Berne for Elliott. STRUCK OFF (1929, December 18). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 17 (LAST RACE EDITION). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225160633

Narrabeen.
From our Correspondent.
On Saturday evening last a meeting of the Narrabeen Progress Association took place, the chair being occupied by the President (Ald. J. T. West). The running of the motor buses being an actual fact it was recognised as a decided advance to the district. The Secretary was instructed to write to Messrs. Reid Bros, complimenting them upon the enterprising step they had taken, and assuring them of the determination of the Association to do all in its power to assist, them in their efforts. The past holiday season has, in this locality, been perhaps one of the most successful ever known, and given improved means of communication in the future it is reasonable to expect that this district will become even more popular as a holiday resort. Narrabeen. (1906, February 17). Mosman, Neutral and Middle Harbour Resident (NSW : 1904 - 1907, 1916 - 1919), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article252189581

The State Library of New South Wales holds over 200 Subdivision Lithographs associated with the Narrabeen to Collaroy stretch, once all known as 'Narrabeen'. 
Some of those, marking some of the changing 'eras', street names, and those associated with these runs below. 

Narrabeen Lakes Estate, 1906 / Arthur Rickard & Co. Ltd Auctioneers.  1906. MAP Folder 114, LFSP 1695 (Copy 1). Part 2. (sales brochure) Image No.: 22704748, courtesy National Library of Australia.


Other items from same folder:



Above: Narrabeen Lakes Estate, 1906 / Arthur Rickard & Co. Ltd Auctioneers, Sales Brochure. 1906. MAP Folder 114, LFSP 1695, courtesy National Library of Australia.


Narrabeen Lakes Estate 1906, Item c050370052, courtesy State Library of NSW, from Narrabeen Subdivisions folder - Street Names include Victoria, Albert, Waterloo, Wellington, Albemarle, Loftus, Octavia, Tourmaline, Emerald, Malcolm, Sturt, King as well as Ocean and Lagoon and Narrabeen streets. 


Waterloo street and Pittwater (Ocean) road looking south - Broadhurst Postcard, circa 1900, courtesy State Library of NSW

Sir Arthur Rickard (1868-1948), real estate developer, married Annie Eliza Addy, on February 28th, 1889 at Waverley. They had two daughters and a son, Ivy V M (born 1889), Edna E  J (born 1891) and Arthur L (born 1895). Edna passed away in 1892. He divorced Annie in December 1901, gaining custody of their son and daughter. On March 19th, 1902 he married Nellie Crudge, a daughter of architect Thomas Rowe, at St Mark's, Darling Point. They had four children Mona N (born 1903), Gordon C (born 1904), Gwendoline N (born 1906) and Douglas R (born 1915).

THE NARRABEEN LAKES.
Who does not know of the beauties of Narrabeen Lakes?— that charming 'village by the sea,' seven miles from Manly. On one side the ocean beach — three miles long— a magnificent stretch of clean, hard sand — an ideal spot for bathing. On the other side the picturesque lake, fringed with wattle, fern, and lilli pillys, swarming with fish, and the habitat of the swan and shy waterhen, etc. This fine spot is destined to take a big leap forward very soon, as its manifold charms, attractions, and 'get-at-ableness' are commanding the attention of all sorts of people — people who want a quiet place to loaf at, families who want a safe place to boat, fish, and bathe at; quiet folk who are satisfied to ramble 'midst the hills and dells, and gather the beautiful waratahs, native roses, and other wild flowers; and, last, but not least, 'the keen-eyed man, with his optic fixed. on 'the main chance.' On eight-hours Day, at 2 o'clock, on the ground, Arthur Rickard and Company, Limited, auctioneers, of 84B Pitt-street, will sell a fine estate In subdivision — the Narrabeen Lakes Estate, close. to hotel, -school, P.O., church, stores, etc., fronting both lake and ocean. Full particulars of this important sale and the arrangements to convey visitors to and from it are advertised. 
THE NARRABEEN LAKES. (1906, September 27). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114087901

PROPERTY SALES.
Arthur Rickard and Co., Limited, report that at the auction held yesterday, on the ground, of the Narrabeen Lakes Estate, Narrabeen, there -was a good attendance of buyers, and bidding was brisk. One hundred and fourteen lots were sold, totalling £2207 10s. Ocean beach lots fetched from £19 to £23, lake frontages from £30 to £40, main-road lots at £45 each, small interior lots from £9 10s to £15 each, and larger lots from £14 10s to £27. The balance is held for private sale
. PROPERTY SALES. (1906, October 2). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14827051

The next year acreage was brought under the Real Property Act by Florence, the wife of Manly Real Estate agent and developer Joseph William Hanson, who, with his brothers Walter and Frank, inherited land holdings across Sydney. 

Joseph W. Hanson was born at Paddington in 1867 to Alexander George (also spelled Alcander) and Elizabeth Esther (nee Peisley). His grandfather, Joseph Samuel Hanson, (1811–1852) was aged 18 in 1828 and came free aboard the ship 'Albion' in the same year. He was a clerk in Sydney and listed as a Trustee in some insolvent farmer's estates. In 1830 he married May Ann Board, 'born in the colony' to William, bricklayer of George street Sydney, granted a conditional pardon, transported per the ship Fortune 1805 life, and Elizabeth , conditional pardon, per the Willaim Pitt, 1805, life. The couple had two daughters and three sons, Juliaretta Mary (born 1831) Alexander George (born 1839) George T. (born 1841) , Eliza (born 1842) and Albert G. (born 1845). 

Joseph Samuel Hanson also seems to have speculated in Real Estate and although he is listed a few times as being a debtor, almost two decades after he passed away legal matters regarding his estate appear in the journals and newspapers of those ties and led, alike the Bassett-Darley Act, to one being written for this family as well, after his father passed away in 1873, in the ''Hanson's Trust Act 1876'', available at; ''An Act to enable the Trustees of the Will of Alcander Charles Hanson deceased to sell or join with the proper persons in selling certain Trust Real Estate. [26th May, 1876.]''

Some examples as trustee:

In the Insolvent Estate of John Rowley, of Burwood, near Sydney, Farmer, WILLIAM FORD and Joseph Samuel Hanson, of Sydney, having been confirmed Trustees to the above Estate, this is to give Notice, that all debts due to the same are to be paid to them, and that a third General Meeting will be held before me, at the Supreme Court House, Sydney, on Tuesday, the 7th day of February next, to commence at 10, a.m., and end at 10*30, a.m., then and there to receive further proof of Debts, and to receive the Report of the Trustees as to the condition of the said Estate, also to give directions as to its future management.— Sydney, 7th January, 1843.

WILLIAM H. KERR, Chief Commissioner. - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), Tuesday 10 January 1843 (No.4), page 56

In the Insolvent Estate of Peter Hill Rapsey, of Phoenix Park, near Morpeth, settler. JOHN ANLABY and Joseph Samuel Hanson having been confirmed Trustees to the above Estate, this is to give Notice, that all Debts, due to the same are to be paid to them, and that a third General Meeting will be held before the Commissioner of Insolvent Estates, at Maitland, on Thursday, the 28th day of December next, to commence at 10, a.m., and end at 10.30, a.m., then and there to receive further proof of Debts, and to receive the report of the Trustees as to the condition of the said Estate, also to give directions as to its future management.—Sydney, 26th November, 1843. WILLIAM H. KERR, Chief Commissioner. - New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), Tuesday 28 November 1843 (No.102), page 1570

Joseph Samuel Hanson passed away in June 1852, just 40 years of age:

On the evening of the 7th instant, at his residence, Elizabeth-street, Sydney, Joseph Samuel Hanson, Esq., aged 40 years. Family Notices (1852, June 12). The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article668307

In the Supreme Court of New South Wales.

In the will of Joseph Samuel Hanson, of Sydney, in the Colony of New South Wales, merchant, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given, that it is the intention of Mary Hanson, the Executrix named in and appointed by the last will and testament of the abovenamed Joseph Samuel Hanson, deceased, to apply to the Honorable the Supreme Court after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication of this Notice, that probate of the said will be granted to her .—Dated the 17 th day of June, A.D., 1852.

PARRY LONG, Proctor for the said Mary Hanson. NOTICE is hereby given, that it is the intention of Mary Hanson, the Executrix named (1852, June 18). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 968. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230659797

William Joseph's father had died when he was just 7 years of age. He married Elizabeth Peisley in 1866 and the couple had three children;  Joseph William Hanson, Walter George Hanson (born 1869) and Frank Hanson (born 1872). Walter George Hanson would marry Theresa Jane (Mildwater) Hanson at Manly in 1890 and they would have a son they named Alcander Charles Hanson, born 1892 in Manly, who would also have a Pittwater connection: 

Sydney, 27th August, 1943.
OBJECTION TO SPECIAL PURCHASE.

IT is hereby notified that an application has been lodged for the purchase of an area particularised below. Any objections should be accompanied by a deposit of £10 and lodged with the Acting Metropolitan District Surveyor, Sydney, on or before 20th September, 1943.

H. H. GUEST, Under Secretary for Lands. Land District—Metropolitan; Shire—Warringah.

Parish Narrabeen, county Cumberland; Special Purchase 42-32 of an area of 8 1/2 perches situated below high-water mark of Pittwater, comprising portion 153; applicant, Alcander Charles Hanson. S. 43-7,786. OBJECTION TO SPECIAL PURCHASE. (1943, September 3). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1559. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225081802

A few more family notes sourced from TROVE:

On Wednesday, the 21st instant, at St. James's Church, by the Rev. G. H. Moreton, ALCANDER CHARLES, second son of the late JOSEPH SAMUEL HANSON, Esq., to ELIZABETH, elder daughter of WILLIAM PEISLEY, Esq., Richmond House, Darlinghust RoadFamily Notices (1866, November 24). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13145702

William Peisley  was the third son of John and Elizabeth Peisley (nee Boswell - married march 11, 1799 at Southwark) of Parramatta and born December 1st 1817, christened June 8th 1820. John Peasley aged 28 was convicted and sentenced to be hung at the Surrey Summer Assizes at Croydon on August 3rd 1801. This was commuted to life imprisonment. He was transported aboard the ship 'Perseus' which departed Spithead, England on February 12th 1802 and arrived in the colony on August 4th 1802. John's wife Elizabeth and daughter Ann came with him. John Peasley was given a conditional pardon and became a Publican and later a Butcher at Parramatta. William married in 1843: 

MARRIAGE. On the 6th November, 1843, by Special License, by the Rev. Mr. Walsh, Esther, the eldest daughter of the late Mr. Charles Roberts, formerly of the Commissariat Department, and niece of the Rev. Frederick Roberts, of the Established Church, of Prince Edward's Island, to William Peisley, Esq , of Parramatta. Family Notices (1843, November 7). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12417430

The couple had the following children; Elizabeth Esther, Martha J, William Henry Peisley and Robert George Peisley.

William Henry Peisley is named in the  ''Hanson's Trust Act 1876'', as Elizabeth Esther Hanson was ''desirous of appointing the said William Henry Peisley the younger to be a trustee of the said will in the place and stead of the said Albert George Hanson The said Elizabeth Esther Hanson in exercise of the power given to her by the thereinbefore and hereinbefore recited will and of every other power or authority in anywise enabling her in that behalf did thereby nominate and appoint the said William Henry Peisley the younger to be a trustee of the said recited will in the place and stead of Albert George Hanson And the said Albert George Hanson and Elizabeth Esther Hanson did and each of them did thereby grant bargain sell release and confirm unto the said William Henry Peisley the younger and his heirs all the lands hereditaments and real estates then vested in the said Albert George Hanson''   and... ''And whereas it would be for the benefit and advantage of the several persons beneficially entitled under the said will of the said Alcander Charles Hanson that the trustees of such will should at once and before the youngest of the said Alcander Charles Hanson's children being a son attaining the age of twenty-one years and being a daughter attaining or marrying under that age have power to sell and concur with those interested under the said will of the said Joseph Samuel Hanson in selling the real estate devised by such will And whereas the said sale and joining in selling by the said trustees of the said will of the said Alcander Charles Hanson cannot be carried out without an Act in that behalf of the Legislature of New South Wales And whereas it is expedient that such trustees of the said will of the said Alcander Charles Hanson should have such power to sell or to join with the proper persons in selling the said real estate devised by the said will of the said Joseph Samuel Hanson and to invest the moneys or proportion of moneys coming to them upon any such sale Be it enacted by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council and Legislative Assembly of New South Wales in Parliament assembled and by authority of the same as follows :—

1. It shall be lawful for the trustees or trustee for the time being of the said will of the said Alcander Charles Hanson from time to time and at any time to sell or to join with all proper and necessary parties in selling either together or in parcels and either by public auction or private contract the real estate to which the said Alcander Charles Hanson was at the time of his death entitled under the said will of the said Joseph Samuel Hanson and upon any such sale or sales to make or join or concur in making any stipulations or conditions as to title or evidence or commencement of title or otherwise and to buy in or rescind or vary any contract for sale and to resell without being responsible for any loss arising or being occasioned thereby....''

William Peisley the elder passed away in 1879, Alcander/Alexander's death Notice: 

DEATH. On the 29th May, at his residence. No. 2, Kellet-street, Darlinghurst, Alexander Charles Hanson, aged 34 years. Family Notices (1873, May 31). Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63230978

In the Supreme Court of New South Wales.
ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION.

In the will of Alexander Charles Hanson, late of Kellett-street, Sydney, in the Colony of New South Wales, gentleman, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given, that after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication hereof, application will be made to this Honorable Court, in its Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction, that probate of the last will and testament of the abovenamed Alexander Charles Hanson, deceased, be granted to Albert George Hanson, of Sydney, in the said Colony, gentleman, and Elizabeth Esther Hanson, also of Sydney aforesaid, widow of said deceased, the executor and executrix in the said will named.—Dated this 12th day of June, A.D. 1873.

PATRICK JOHN HOURIGAN,

Proctor for the said Executor and Executrix, 129, King-street, Sydney. 3216 6s. 6d.  ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION. (1873, June 13). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 1672. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223100687

In the Supreme Court of New South Wales.

ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION.

In the, will of William Peisley, late of Ithaca Road, Elizabeth Bay, near Sydney, in the Colony of New South Wales, gentleman, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given, that at the expiration of fourteen days from the publication of this notice in the Government Gazette of New South Wales, application will be made to this Honorable Court, in its Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction, that probate of the will of the abovenamed William Peisley, deceased, may be granted unto William Henry Peisley, the sole executor appointed by the said will.—Dated this 17th day of March, a.d. 1879.

JAMES GREER, Proctor for the said William Henry Peisley, No. 1, Wentworth Place, Elizabeth-street, Sydney. ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION. (1879, March 18). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 1232. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223660532

Elizabeth Esther Hanson (nee Peisely) married John Cecil Read after he passed away, but someone continued to pay for Memorium Notices for him in local newspapers into the 1880's and she continued to defend his holdings for his children, although it was clear she wanted to be free of this duty when youngest son Frank sought to have her and his uncle removed from being in charge:

READ—HANSON.—March 2, at St. Michael's, Surry Hills, by the Rev. Canon H. S. King, M.A., John Cecil, second son of John Cecil Read, of Darlinghurst, Sydney, the only son of the late Rev. Sir John Cecil Read, knight and baronet, of Moynoe House, county Clare, Ireland, to Elizabeth Esther, daughter of William Peisley, Esq., of Elizabeth Bay. Family Notices (1878, March 13). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28395255

Worth noting about John Cecil's father:

DEATH OF SIR JOHN CECIL READ.
Sydney March 2

Sir John Cecil Read, Bart., died at his residence, Arawa, Waverley, to-day. The deceased was the ninth baronet. He was born at Moyne, County Clare, Ireland, in 1820. His younger days wore connected with the London police force, and after wards with the police force of New South Wales. Of later years he was Governor of Darlinghurst Gaol, which post he retained till his retirement ten years ago. He had issue, four sons and two daughters. DEATH OF SIR JOHN CECIL READ. (1899, March 3). The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3205795

It's also worth noting that son Frank had a charge and filed bankruptcy against him in 1907 although an earlier Notice shows he had been placed in an asylum for the mentally unwell prior to this - he was then, too, a Manly resident. After his recovery he worked as an Insurance salesman:

A change of Trustee.

In the Equity Court yesterday, before Mr. Justice Manning, an application was made on behalf of Frank Hanson for an order to remove William Henry Peisley and Elizabeth Esther Read (the latter at her own request) from trusteeship under the will of the late Alcaner Charles Hanson, of Brougham-street, Woolloomooloo. Mr. Gordon and Mr. Rich (instructed by Messrs. Fitzhardinge, Son, and Houston) appeared for the plaintiff; Mr. Lunger Owen (instructed by Mr. Lunger Owen) for the defendant Peisley. Elizabeth Esther Read, Joseph William Hanson, and Walter George Hanson, who were joined as defendants, appeared to submit to any order the Court might make. Plaintiff also asked that defendants Piesley and Read should be restrained by injunction from in any way interfering with the estate, which it was prayed should be administered under the direction of the Court. After argument, counsel suggested that as the matter would have lo be referred to the Master to go into accounts and make a general investigation, the hearing should stand over until the following morning. This course was adopted. A CHANGE OF TRUSTEE. (1897, July 29). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article238402534

LAW REPORT.

Wednesday, September 8. BANCO COURT.

(Before the Chief Justice and a jury of four.) READ AND ANOTHER v. PEISLEY. (Part heard )

Mr Pilcher Q C , and Mr Garland, instructed by Messrs Chenhall aud Eddie appeared for the plaintiffs ; and Mr Rolin, instructed by Mr. M. A. Williamson, for the defendant. This was an action brought by Elizabeth Esther Read (formerly Hanson) and William Henry Peisley, executrix and executor respectively of the late Mr Hanson, to recover the sum of £1700, stated to be due by defendant on a memorandum of mortgage under the Real Property Act, bearing date May 20, 1890, by which the defendant covenanted with the plaintiffs that he would pay the sum of £1700 on May 20, 1896 with interest at the rate of 6 percent per annum as agreed upon The defendant, among other pleas, stated that he was induced to sign the memorandum referred to by plaintiff, William Henry Peisley, falsely representing to him that the memorandum was a discharge or release, and that he never received any consideration for signing it.

After some further evidence had been given the parties, acting upon the suggestion of his Honor, settled the matter, and by consent a verdict for the plaintiffs was entered for £1700 upon terms filed in court. LAW REPORT. (1897, September 9). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14092804

In 1892 Joseph William Hanson married:

HANSON— HACK.— June 14, at St. Matthews', Manly, by the Rev. R. S. Willis, Joseph William, eldest son of the late Alexander Charles Hanson, of Darlinghurst, to Florence Adele, third surviving daughter of Jesse Hack, Manly. Melbourne papers please copy. Family Notices (1892, June 29). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 1. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article236170127

The couple had three children, Romeo, Keith and Enid (later Moore). Joseph Hanson was a strongly community focused person of Manly who would use his assets and rooms to help benefit the local populace as a sole trader and as part of the Manly Corso based Robey, Hanson and Strong who were the gentlemen who oversaw subdivisions from Pittwater to Manly  - one example pf Mr. Hanson's community work:

A Bruce auction, organised by Mr. J. Hanson, was opened at his rooms in aid of the funds of the local hospital. The goods for sale were contributed by the hospital supporters. MANLY. (1903, October 17). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 14. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14530427

Some of the Collaroy- Narrabeen holdings brought under the Real Property act include those parcels of land gifted to his wife - these were all beach frontages at the Long Reef-Collaroy beach end of the 1881 Mount Ramsay subdivision:

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATION baring been made to bring the land hereunder described under the provisions of the real Property Act Certificate of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveat be lodged in accordance with, the Third Schedule to the said Act, OK OB BEFORE THE 19TH JUNE, 1907.

No, 14,681. APPLICANT:—Florence Adele Hanson, Manly. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, Shire Warringah, 1 acre 1 rood 15 1/2 perches, 1 acre 2 roods 33 1/2 perches, and 1 acre 0 roods 5 1/2 perches, in Ocean, Clarke, Wetherill, Stuart, and Frazer Streets, Narrabeen,—being lots 1 to 6, section 10, lots 1 to 8, section 14, and lots 1 to 5, section 18, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part of 410 acres (portion 1,217) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining the properties of H. J. Ackland and Narrabeen Progress AssociationDiagrams delineating this land may be inspected at the Land Titles Office, Elizabeth-street, Sydney. W. G. H-WILLIAMS, Registrar-General, 15th May, 1907.  NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1907, May 15). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2739. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220931071

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATION having been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the Real Property Act, Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in accordance with the Third Schedule to the said Act on or before the 9th June, 1909: —

No. 15,781. APPLICANT:—Florence Adele Hanson, Manly. LAND : —County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, Shire Warringah, 1 acre 2 roods 16 1/2 perches, in Clarke, Ocean, and Wetherill Streets, and on Long Reef Beach,—lots 1 to 8, section 17, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay.

Diagrams delineating these lands may be inspected at the Land Titles Office, Elizabeth-street, Sydney. W. G. H.-WILLIAMS, Registrar-General. 5th May, 1909. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1909, May 5). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2388. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221596611


Section from Mount Ramsay Estate, Parish of Manly Cove - Collaroy street, Malcolm St, Alexander etc. - 1881 - Auction Monday October 24th. Richardson and Wrench. Item: c050370117 - and parts from to show Section/Lot Numbers, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales.

Death of Jesse Hack.
An Interesting Old Identity.

Mr. Jesse Hack passed away about 9 o'clock on Thursday morning. Five days before his death, Dr. Waugh was called to see the old man, and found him suffering from paralysis and hemorrhage of the brain. The following, which appeared in "The Argus" last June, gives some interesting particulars of Mr. and Mrs. Hack: —

"Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Hack duly celebrated their diamond wedding on Saturday last. As we mentioned in our last issue, Mr. Hack is a native of Hollington, Sussex, England. He married Miss Green, the eldest daughter of Mr. Robert Green, of Rock Farm, Dundas; and both are with us still. On the 27th of June they celebrated their sixtieth wedding day. Mrs. Hack's memory was very good up till Saturday last; but she is free to confess now that the doings of Saturday after noon and evening have somewhat taxed her faculties. Imagine children and grand children — she said to "The Argus" trooping, nay, pouring in — amid a sort of confetti-shower of telegrams and cards of congratulation and other messages of joy — to take possession of the home for the time being, and play high jinks. Still, even now, Mrs. Hack can tell many an interesting tale of old Parramatta, of the Governors who lived here; of the building of Lennox Bridge, of the good old days when the crop on her father's orchard— where grew pears and apples and oranges — just a few yards past the Parramatta boundary stone — was worth thousands sterling a year, and when labor and dairy supplies were equally cheap. 

For many years Mr. Jesse Hack (who came to New South Wales in 1841) was mine host at "'The White Horse," and what a position for a philosopher to occupy was that.— In the classical days of the historic borough, and of old Alder man " Jimmy " Pye, of Garnet Walsh, the days when Henniker Heaton was a clerk at John Taylor's and Hugh Taylor was going strong in the early laps of his long and strenuous political career. Those were the days' before the later knights — F. C. Cox, H. Tucker Jones, Tom Moxham, Dowell O'Reilly, Alderman "Ted." Brown, and all that generation (or those generations, rather), came along. Mr. and Mrs. Hack were married at the Wesleyan Church, Macquarie-street, Parramatta, by the Rev. Benjamin Chapman, on June 27, 1849. Mr.and Mrs. Hack's family included in the old home, two sons (Messrs. Robt. and Geo. Hack) and three daughters (Misses Gertrude, Emily, and Florence Hack). The first named daughter is a resident of Parramatta still, and is now Mrs. Arthur Hayes. Miss Emily Hack was twice married, her first husband, being Archdeacon Innes. At his death she married Mr. J. Maxwell, of Melbourne. She resides at Kew, Victoria. 

Miss Florence Hack married Mr. Hanson, of Manly. Mr. Robert Hack's daughter is Miss Patience Hack (Burwood), the fiancee of one of the most popular of our younger citizens of Parramatta town. Mr. Geo. Hack's daughters are Misses Petrea, Gladys, Pauline, Muriel, and Mollie Hack, and his sons Messrs. Reginald, Darabin, and Robert Hack. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hayes are two daughters, Edith and May, and one son, Leo. The late Archeacon Innes' family include Mr. Geo. C. Innes (now of Western Australia), and two daughters, one now the wife of Dr. Sweetnam, of Pehshurst (Vic toria), and the other Mrs. Hutton, of Cheviot Hills (Vic). Dr. Sweetnam's little son. is Mr. and Mrs, Jesse Hack's one great-grand-child. Of the second family (Mr. Maxwell's), the daughter is Mrs. Hofman, of Berigan, N.S.W., and the son Mr. J. Maxwell, of Melbourne. Mrs. Hanson's children are Romney and Keefe, two sons. 

At the family gathering on Saturday there were 38 of the family present, and Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Hack, in the centre of the happy group, received many telegrams and cards from those at a distance, and lovely presents from every quarter. Among those who did not forget, the family re-union were some of our own citizens, Mr. C. Beresford Cairnes, Dr. Isaac Waugh, and Dr. Brown. The toast of the day was pro posed by a nephew, Mr. S. Knight (of the "Barrier Miner"), son of Mrs. Hack's eldest sister. The day was spent in the way proper to such an occasion, the guests remaining under the old roof tree till 10 p.m." Mrs. Hack, who survives her husband, comes of a family remarkable for longevity. When Mr. and Mrs. Hack celebrated the 59th anniversary of their wedding, not quite two years ago, a feature of the gathering was the presence of no less than six sisters, of Mrs. Hack. another in Victoria having sent word of her inability to be present to do honor to the occasion. 

The aggregate ages of the eight living sisters totals 547 years, Mrs. Hack. (79) being the eldest, whilst the youngest is in her 61st year. This is perhaps unequalled in Australia. Mrs. Hack was the eldest daughter of the late Mr. Robert Green, Rock Farm Estate, Dundas, near Parramatta, where a large family was reared. The children used to attend school at Parramatta, when Miss Houison (Macquarie-street) and Mr. Dan. Watsford were learning the three R's. Mr. Watsford, probably the oldest living native of Parramatta to-day, is a few years older than Mrs. Hack, and both are in splendid health. 

Mr. Jesse Hack arrived per sailing vessel in the year 1841, and soon afterwards settled down in Parramatta, at which time one of the early Governors of the colony was also resident here. With the exception of a few years' residence at Manly, the respected aged couple have resided in Parramatta during the whole of their married life. Mrs. Hack has an excellent memory, and speaks interestingly of the Governors she has seen come and go in Parramatta. the building of Lennox Bridge, and other notable local events. Her father's orchard at Dundas was one of the best and most profitable in those days. The orange crop alone brought over £2000. The orchard, too was renowned for its splendid apples and pears. Orchard hands and domestic servants were paid 8s and 1s respectively per week. Mrs. Hack often bought butter at 6d per lb., eggs 3d and 4d dozen, and half a sheep for 2s 6d. Death of Jesse Hack (1910, March 12). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950), p. 11. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86004289

Unfortunately Florence suffered from insomnia and took her own life;

The Rock Farm Tragedy
A Wealthy Lady's Death.

The Coroner (Mr. Richardson Clerk) held an inquest at Parramatta on Friday touching the death of Mrs. Florence Adele Hanson, wife of Mr. Jos. Hanson (Manly), who was found dead with a pea-rifle under her at Dundas.

Dr. E. Cuthbert Hall deposed that about 7 p.m. on 2nd August he went to the house of Mr. Knight, at Rock Farm, Dundas. Constable Bailey was with him. He went into a bedroom, and there saw the body of deceased lying in a corner on the floor fully dressed. There was blood on the face and a considerable pool of blood on the carpet under her head. Lying under tile body was a pea-rifle with the muzzle pointing towards the head. The body was removed to the Parramatta morgue, and there he made an external examination and found a bullet wound of entrance in the right temple just above the eye. On probing he found that the bullet had passed through the brain and to have struck the left temporal bone just above the left ear, fracturing the bone but not passing through. Death must have been instantaneous. The wound of entrance was blackened, showing that the rifle must have been discharged at close range. Upon the bed in the room were three portraits, which, he was Informed, were those of deceased's children. 

Joseph William Hanson deposed that he was a real estate agent, residing at Manly. Deceased was his wife. She was 52 years of age. There were three children, 26 years, 16 years and 8 years respectively. He identified the body at the Parramatta morgue on 3rd August. They lived together; but lately not as man and wife, owing to her health. She was possessed of real estate property valued at £9000 or £10,000, and her income was about £600 or £700 a year. Witness gave her the property. She had not been well for a long time and had been in hospitals. The last hospital was at a Randwick mental hospital, where she had been seven months. She came out in September last year. Saw her alive last about a fortnight before her death. She was at Rock Farm. She appeared to be reasonable and mentally all-right. She had never previously shown any suicidal tendencies. She was staying with Mr. Knight, her first cousin. Augustus Sydney Knight deposed that he resided at Rock Farm, Dundas. The deceased was his cousin. The deceased had been staying with him before; but that last time she stayed with him for two months. She seemed a great deal perturbed generally. She suffered from insomnia. Knew that she had been in a mental hospital. She prevailed upon him to let her stay at his place, because, as she said, the quiet of the surroundings of his home would suit her. Saw the deceased at breakfast-time on August 2. Went to town by the 9.15 a.m. train. She received a mail that morning. She received her taxation papers. They were simply for signature. They upset her, however, notwithstanding that witness advised her that everything was in order and that there was nothing to trouble about. Knew Mr. Hanson very well. So far as witness knows, Mr. Hanson was very attentive and devoted to his family. Got home by the 6.20 p.m. train; got home at 7.30 p.m. The members of the household (Miss Abell, the maid, in particular) told witness that Mrs. Hanson, had been very upset all day. Said, 'Where is she?' With that went into her room. She was lying in the corner. She was dead. Did not know that at the time. The walls of the house were very thick. The rifle found under the deceased's body was his property. It had been in his room for two months previously, unused. When witness left home there were two in the house -Miss Hack and Miss Abell. Witness's son was away. Had no doubt that the deceased committed suicide. There were some pellets of ammunition in his ash tray and elsewhere in the house. The pea rifle had not been loaded before for two months. The deceased — so far as he know — did not understand a pea-rifle. It had since puzzled him how she managed to manipulate the rifle. The deceased was a sober woman — -to an extreme. Vera Abell, one of the household at Knight's, Rock Farm, deposed that she knew Mrs. Hanson. Had never noticed anything queer in her behaviour. Was "about the place" all day on August 2. Saw Mrs. Hanson. She was at the back of the house and in the garden. Had just the ordinary conversation with her. Mr. Knight went away in the 9.15 a.m. train. Mrs. Knight and witness were left in the house and Mrs. Hanson. The Coroner:' Was Miss Hack there? The witness : Yes. The witness said that she heard no conversation between Mrs. Hanson and any one else. Saw Mrs. Hanson in the front part of the house about 5.15 p.m. She was just standing there by herself. Did not see her with a rifle during the after noon. Just noticed the deceased as she (witness) passed. Did not hear a shot. The walls of the house were thick. Mrs. Hanson was treated just the same as any lady would be expected to be treated. Did not say anything to Mr. Knight when he came home. Did say something. Told him that Mrs. Hanson had been upset all day. So far as witness could remember said, "Mrs. Hanson has been upset all day, and is in her room." Guessed that she was in her room. The Coroner: What gave you the impression that the deceased was upset? Witness: I don't know. I just noticed that she was upset. The deceased was not restful that day. She was walking about. The witness said that the deceased did not sleep well. Had been at Knight's for two years and three months. Did not know Mrs. Hanson very well; only whilst she had been staying there. Mrs. Knight and Miss Hack were somewhere in the house; but witness could not say Just where. The Coroner found that the deceased died at Rock Farm, Dundas, from a bullet wound In the head, self inflicted whilst temporarily insane. The Rock Farm Tragedy. (1919, August 23). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86116410

Joseph W. Hanson passed away May 31st 1943 at Bayview. 

The changing of the landscape, the popularity of the waters of the lagoon as a fishing spot, coupled with the extension of the tram line brought even more ‘excursionists, and then a clubhouse was needed for equipment and all-season life-savers, many of whom stayed in these original clubhouses over the season;

NARRABEEN LAKES. WORKS DEPARTMENT'S SCHEME AGREED TO.
A special meeting of the Warringah Shire Council was held to consider the proposed scheme by the Works Department for improving the Narrabeen lakes. The proposal is to cut a channel in the rock at the foot of Narrabeen head from the ocean into the lake, in which the tide will flow. 

Councillor Quirk moved that the Minister for Works be informed that the Council is prepared  to guarantee the following-"To Carry out the work of constructing an opening on the on the lines of the plan and specifications submitted, 18ft wide, at a cost of £580 that the council guarantee to put the work in hand immediately the work of constructing the tram is commenced which will allow it to be completed some months before the tram reaches Narrabeen and that a sufficient number of boats will be provided at four different points on the lake " The motion was unanimously agreed to. NARRABEEN LAKES. (1911, May 11). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15239491


Narrabeen Looking West -  From Scenes of Narrabeen album, ca. 1910-1927- Sydney & Ashfield : Broadhurst Post Card, courtesy State Library of NSW. Images No: a106056h (above) and a105060h Courtesy The Mitchell Library, State Library of Australia  




Narrabeen Wheelers estate 1911; Wetherill, Sturt now Stuart, Ramsay, Frazer, Goodwin, Mactier, Devitt, Ocean, Victoria Item c050370049 


VANDALISM AT NARRABEEN.

The Narrabeen Progress Association has written to the Warrringah Shire Council, complaining that people were destroying the trees on the fringe Of the Narrabeen Lake, which robbed the locality of its natural beauty. A sharp lookout will be kept by the council overseer for the offender. VANDALISM AT NARRABEEN. (1911, March 22). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 7 (FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221576736




Growing Narrabeen: The West Family


Another family that did not at first reside at Narrabeen but had a lot of input into early developments and changes were the Wests in Obed and his son, and an early President of the Narrabeen Progress Association, and a Mayor of Paddington, Thomas John. Biographies from the papers of the day read:

WEST.—August 24, at his residence, Barcom Glen, Paddington, Obed West, in his 84th year. Family Notices (1891, August 25). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13836315

THE LATE MR. OBED WEST. 


The Late Mr. Obed West.

Year by year the roll of colonists who knew Sydney when it was an unimportant and insignificant town is becoming briefer, and amongst those who could carry their recollections back to the early part of the present century there was, perhaps, no person in the colony who could give a more interesting and stirring account of the struggles of the early settlers than the subject of our sketch, who passed peacefully away to his rest, at his residence in Darlinghurst, on Monday week last. He was born in Pitt- street, Sydney, in the year 1807, on the banks of the Old Tank stream, and during his lifetime saw the erection of most of the old public and other buildings which graced the old colonial days. The Blue Mountains had not been crossed in his day, and the colonists were prohibited from proceeding further inland than Penrith on the west, and the Cowpasture River at Camden on the south ; all beyond was practically a terra incognita, so that he had seen the whole of these great colonies explored and opened up beyond the limits referred to. As marking the progress of the colony, he mentions in some of his reminiscences that he recollected the time when Governor Macquarie used to pitch a tent on the Race Course (Hyde Park), and give out to the residents orders for grants of town allotments, and some of these he has since seen become some of the most valuable in Sydney. When given they could be purchased in some cases for the sum of £1 10s and £2 each. 

He had seen the Ti Tree and the Black Butt give way to stately houses and well kept streets, and it was only such as he who could fully realise the change that had taken place in Sydney in the space of a lifetime. He was a robust type of man, standing six feet high, and a perfect type of the hardy old pioneers. 

His father was engaged for some time as superintendent of the Government gangs employed at Lane Cove, and when this establishment was broken up he turned his attention to milling. In the first year of Macquarie's Governorship, he was granted the Barcom Glen estate, which runs from the waters of Rushcutter's Bay to the main South Head-road, Paddington, for the purpose of establishing a water-mill to grind wheat. This mill was the first erected in Australia. 

Mr. Obed West went to reside there with his father in 1810, and he continued to live there up till the day of his decease. He, however, pursued for a time the businesss of cattle -raising and farming in the Camden district, in conjunction with his place at Barcom Glen. He was a keen sportsman in his early days, and won the first gold medal given for rifle shooting in the colony. The old house and grounds have been kept almost intact, and form one of the prettiest residential spots about Sydney. Mr. West preserved his faculties wholly unimpaired up to the last, and has left behind him a large number of descendants who now mourn the loss of a good and kindly progenitor. The Late Mr. Obed West. (1891, September 5). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 526. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162175303

Obed West was the son of Thomas West (1773-1858), convict and landowner, who was born on June 4th, 1773 at Hooe, Sussex, England, the fifth of nine children of John West, farmer, and his wife Margaret. Thomas was a carpenter at Canterbury when he married Martha Goodwin on July 8th 1793 at St Nicholas's Church, New Romney. At the Sussex Assizes, Horsham, on March 17th 1800 he was convicted of burglary and sentenced to transportation for life. He reached Sydney in the Earl Cornwallis in June 1801. His wife—who later remarried—remained in England, although one of their sons (Thomas d.1856) migrated as a free settler in 1821.

West formed a liaison with Mary Rugg (c.1769-1865), a convict; they had a daughter in 1805 and Obed, who was born December 4th 1807. Employed in the government lumberyard, Thomas showed entrepreneurial skills by making coffins and reputedly hanging the peal of bells in St Philip's Church. In June 1810 he successfully petitioned Governor Macquarie for permission to erect a watermill in Lacrozia Valley, on land that he named Barcom Glen, surrounded by Darlinghurst, Paddington and Rushcutters Bay. No document of title was issued, however, and the boundaries were vague: the deputy-surveyor James Meehan's 1816 survey indicated only forty acres (16 ha), but West extended his fences towards Old South Head Road. This would later become the core of a court case when his neighbours in Sydney, Alexander McLeay and (Sir) Thomas Mitchell and discussions on the boundaries, particularly with Mitchell, were unproductive and court action resulted. R. v. West commenced in the Supreme Court in October 1831, before Mr Justice John Stephen and a special jury of landholders. Thomas West relied on his twenty-one-year unbroken possession of the land as proof of title. The case was touted as one of emancipist against exclusivist, especially as West was represented by W. C. Wentworth. The jury returned a verdict of 'No intrusion'--a victory for West.

The Australian, co-edited by Wentworth, then reported the win as 'foiling Mr. McLeay and his favourites . . . the sharks are outwitted'. A review of the case by crown law officers followed and then the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case again. A compromise, in which West offered to accept a new western boundary, was rejected. In October 1832 the case was retried, with Wentworth again appearing for him. The jury found he had committed a minor trespass on about five acres (2 ha) but held good title to seventy-one acres (29 ha). Although this case helped establish Barcom Glen's boundaries and title it was not until 1844 that the title deeds were actually issued.

On December 23rd 1831 at St James's Church, Sydney, Obed married, with Anglican rites, Jane Margaret Lindsey (d.1875), daughter of a convict. Children of the union recorded in NSW Birth records were:

WEST MARY A442/1832 V1832442 16 OBED JANE
WEST REBECCA E554/1833 V1833554 17OBED JANE
WEST THOMAS 325/1835 V1835325 20 OBED JANE
WEST OBED 479/1837 V1837479 21 OBED JANE
WEST JANE M486/1839 V1839486 23AOBED JANE
WEST NAOMI 510/1841 V1841510 25A OBED JANE
WEST LOUISA 2250/1843 V18432250 27A OBED JANE
WEST CAROLINE A592/1844 V1844592 28 OBED JANE
WEST EMILY M 2131/1848 V18482131 33A OBED JANE
WEST MARGARET L 467/1849 V1849467 34A OBED JANE
WEST CLARA M E 434/1851 V1851434 37A OBED JANE M
WEST ARTHUR O 389/1853 V1853389 39A OBED JANE M

Obed extended the family's land holdings to include tracts, both for farming and speculation, on Sydney's northern peninsula, and goldmining at Hill End. He was 6 ft 4 ins (193 cm) tall and weighed 16 stone (101.6 kg), and won a gold medal for rifle shooting. Late in his life he published articles about his detailed memories of early Sydney in the Sydney Morning Herald, which can still be found via TROVE. Obed was buried in Randwick cemetery. His four sons and eight of his nine daughters survived him, inheriting an estate sworn for probate at £74,389; the ninety-nine-year leases of his land at fixed rentals, however, created a legacy of legal complexities for his beneficiaries.

In the will and codicils of Obed West, late of Barcom Glen, Sydney, in the Colony of New South Wales, freeholder, deceased.
PURSUANT to the "Trust Property Act of 1862" : Notice is hereby given that all creditors and other persons having any debtor claim upon or affecting the estate of Obed West, the abovenamed deceased, who died on or about the 24th day of August, 1891, and probate of whose will and codicils was granted by the Supreme Court of New South Wales, in its Probate Jurisdiction, on the 24th day of September, 1891, to Thomas John West, Clara Mary Elizabeth West, Lancelot Peel Iredale, Duncan M'Lachlan, and Edward Marriott, the executors and executrix in the said will and codicils named, are hereby required to send in particulars of their claims to the abovenamed executors and executrix, care of the under-signed, their proctors, on or before the 16th day of November next, at the expiration of which time the abovenamed executors and executrix will proceed to distribute the assets of the said deceased among the persons entitled thereto, having regard to the debts and claims only of which they shall then have had notice; and the said executors and executrix will not be liable for the assets so distributed to any person of whose debt or claim they shall not have had notice at the time of such distribution.— Dated this 1st day of October, a.d. 1891.
HOLDSWORTH & SON,
Proctors for the Executors and Executrix,
75, Pitt-street, Sydney.In the will and codicils of Obed West, late of Barcom Gien, Sydney, in the Colony of New South Wales, freeholder, deceased. (1891, October 2). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 7836. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222130894

DISPUTED TITLE.

LAND AT CURL CURL.

West and others v Mulroney and another.

Mr. Mann, instructed by Messrs. Holdsworth end Son, appeared for plaintiffs; and Mr. Flaanery instructed by Mr. B. A. M'Bride, for defendant Mary Mulroney. The other defendant, Patrick Smith, was not represented.

The hearing of this part heard suit was resumed.

The plaintiffs are Thomas John West, Lancelot Peel Iredale, Duncan M'Lachlan, Edward Marriott, and Clara Mary Elizabeth West, who are the trustees of tho will of the late Obed West. The statement of claim set out that the latter purchased the land in dispute, which has an area of 20 acres 30 perches, and is situated at Curl Curl Lagoon, near Manly, from the Rewse family, and that it formed part of a grant from the Crown in 1845 to one John Wheeler. Plaintiffs claimed to have been in possession ever since testator died, in 1891.

The defence is that the land is not the land of plaintiffs, as claimed, and that defendant Mary Mulroney and her predecessors had been in possession for 35 years. She therefore asked the Court to say that even if plaintiffs' documentary title to the land were held to be good, their claim to possession was barred by the Statute of Limitations. The case stands part heard.IN EQUITY. (1906, March 7). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14757673

DISPUTED OWNERSHIP OF LAND.
PROPERTY AT CURL CURL LAGOON.
A suit respecting the ownership of 20 acres of land at Curl Curl Lagoon, near Manly, was commenced before the Chief Judge in Equity (Mr. Justice A. H. Simpson) to-day. The plaintiffs were Thomas John West, Lancelot Peel Iredale, Duncan M'Lachlan, Edward Marriott, and Clara Mary West, trustees of the will of the late Obed West, of Darlinghurst; and the defendants Mary Mulroney and Patrick Smith.

The statement of claim set out that Obed West purchased the land in dispute from the Rewse family, and that it formed part of a grant from the Crown in 1845 to one John Wheeler. Since testator's death, in 1891, plaintiffs had been in possession of the land. It was alleged that the defendants were trespassing on the land, and plaintiffs, therefore, pray-ed for an injunction restraining them from so doing, and that they (plaintiffs) be declared to be the owners of the property. The defence was that the land did not belong to the plaintiffs' as alleged, and that it had been in the possession of Mary Mulroney and her predecessors for 35 years. The female defendant asked the Court to declare that even if plaintiffs' title to the land were held to be good, their claim to its possession was barred by the Statute of Limitations. Evidence was entered upon.DISPUTED OWNERSHIP OF LAND. (1906, March 7). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114226018

His eldest son Thomas brings in not only connections to ''Cape's Flat'' at Bayview:

ALDERMAN THOMAS J. WEST.
PADDINGTON.
Alderman Thomas J. West, a freetrade candidate for Paddington, was born In the Paddington electorate. His father, Mr. Obed West, whose writings on old colonial history are well known, was a resident of Paddington from 1810 until his death. 


The subject of the sketch received his early education at the private academy of Mr. T. W. Cape, and completed his studies under Mr. T. L. Dodd. He was engaged for a time in pastoral and agricultural pursuits in the northern districts of the colony, and is a warm advocate of the simplification of the land laws, to enable people of limited means to go upon the soil. He has had an honorable career in municipal politics, and is a good business man. ALDERMAN THOMAS J. WEST. (1894, June 30). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article236148707

Thomas John West was an Alderman of the Borough of Paddington before joining the Sydney Council. He was Mayor of Paddington from 1897 to 1899. West was Alderman for Bligh Ward from 7 December 1900 until his death in May 1906. He was a member and vice-chairman of the Health and By-Laws Committee, 1904-06, the Works Committee, 1901-06, the Labour Advisory Committee in 1901, the Staff and Labour Committee, 1902-03, the Health and Recreations Committee in 1903 and the Electric Lighting Committee, 1905-06. Thomas inherited Barcom Glen at Darlinghurst. In 1862, Thomas John West married Sarah Jane Alcorn (1833-1907) at Patrick’s Plains. Children of the union were:

WEST EDITH M12958/1864 THOMAS J SARAH J PATRICKS PLAINS
WEST EDWARD T13554/1865 THOMAS J SARAH J PATRICKS PLAIN
WEST ADA B19118/1869 THOMAS J SARAH J WARIALDA

He died at his Paddington home on May 4th 1906, aged 70, survived by his wife, son and two daughters - a list of those who paid tribute at his funeral service lists others associated with Narrabeen subdivisions and their roads developments among his chief mourners:

ALDERMAN WEST'S ILLNESS.
The health of Alderman T. J. West, of the City and Paddington Councils, who resides at 'Barcom Glen,' Glen View-street, Paddington, is occasioning his friends considerable anxiety just now. He has been suffering from an internal complaint for some time past, and a few weeks ago his medical attendants. Drs. Crago and Rennie, ordered him to New Zealand to see it the change would effect an improvement. He returned to Sydney 'much worse than when he set out, and has since been confined to his bed. To-day his condition was extremely critical, but as the day advanced he rallied, and showed a slight improvement.  ALDERMAN WEST'S ILLNESS. (1906, April 19). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114320951

ALDERMAN WEST'S FUNERAL.
A REPRESENTATIVE ATTENDANCE.
There was a large and representative attendance at the funeral of the Iate Alderman T. J. West, which took place from his late residence, "Barcom Glen." Glenview-street, Paddington, yesterday morning.
The late Mr. West had for a number of years been associated with the City and Paddington councils, and at the time of his death was a member of both bodies. He was held In the highest esteem by his fellow-representatives, most of whom were in the funeral procession. A short service was held at "Barcom Glen" by Rev. E. C. Beck, of St. John's Darlinghurst, prior to the cortege leaving tor St. Jude's Cemetery. Randwick, where the remains were laid to rest. 

The chief mourners were Messrs. E. T. West (son). E. A. S. West, O. West. and A. West (brothers). H. W. Ellis, and F. W. Loder (sons-in-law). L. P. Iredale, E. Marriott, and D. McLachlan, Commonwealth Public Service Commissioner (brothers-in-law). H. W. Ellis (grandson), A. Alcorn, E. Alcorn. W. West, Percy Iredale, Arthur McLachlan, Leslie Iredale, Percy Alton, Harry Blackwood, Ernest Blackwood, H. G. Iredale and Arthur Blackwood (nephews), F. A. Coghlan (Chief Clerk, Chief Secretary's Department). 

The City Council was represented by the Lord Mayor (Alderman Allen Taylor), the Town Clerk (Mr. T. H. Nesbitt). Aldermen Thomas Hughes, T. H. Barlow, T. Henley, M.L.A., G. Perry, T. H. Kelly, Fitzgerald, E. Lindsay Thompson, Evan Jones, Laurence, A. Kelly, English, M'lvor. Meagher, Henson, J. G. Griffin; Mr. W. G. Laytou (deputy' Town Clerk), Mr. P. S. Dawson (City Solicitor), Dr. W. G. Armstrong (City Healthy Officer). Mr. T. Rooke (Electrical Engineer), Mr. R. H. Broderick (City Building Surveyor), Mr. W. M. Gordon (City Surveyor). the Lord Mayor's orderly (Mr. Carrick). The Paddington Council was represented by Aldermen Denis Brown (Mayor), Gusbell, Yarroll, Meacle, Dillon, H.H. Laurence, Howard, Mr A Vlaloux (council clerk), Mr. George Davidson (engineer), Mr. A. D. Carmichael (municipal inspector). 

Included among the general public were Dr. W. H. Crago, Messrs. E. C. V. Broughton, M.L.A., C. W. Oakes, M.L.A.. J. A Brodie, C. Campbell, J. Robinson. C. Henderson, T. TenIan. M. Teulan, T. Dillon, A. Sloman, W. H. Robinson, A. Wells, A. H. Brown, W. Brown, W. Hornsby, C. Limbert, J. Spencer, T. Ridley,  V. A. Spence, D. Brown, J. Brown, J. Alford, C. Smart, Alex. Martin, A. Walker, D. Hickey, J. Lane Mullins, R. M. McC. Anderson, P. M'Mahon, M. Maloney, J. S. Alexander; and the members of the Narrabeen Progress Association.

In addition to wreaths by the family and relatives of deceased, floral tributes were sent by the following; The Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress, Lord Mayor and aldermen of the City Council,  Mayor and aldormen of Paddlngton, official staff of the Paddington Council, Narrabeen Progress Association, Paddington Cricket Club, Eastern Suburbs Football Club. Albion-street Public School,- Mr. John Robinson, Mr.' and Mrs. M'Lean, Mr. J. Alford, Messrs. Alford and Orwell and Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Oakes. Mr. A. B. Love, Mr. and Mrs. Wells, Mr. and Mrs R. D. Meagher, Mr, and Mrs. Jones and family, Mr. A. Martin. Misses Leslie and Davis; Mr. and Mrs. A. Carpenter, Mr. and Mrs. Buck, Mr, and Mrs. H. Curtis. 
At St. Jude's Church Rev. E. C. Beck conducted a funeral service and also at the grave site. . At last night's meeting of the Paddington Council It was decided to forward a message of condolonce to the widow and family of the deceased. The resolution was moved by Aldermen Walker and George, and supported by the Mayor and the other aldermen present, all of whom paid high tribute to their late comrade's worth. The council then adjourned for a week without transacting any business. ALDERMAN WEST'S FUNERAL. (1906, May 8). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article236843342

Mount Ramsay Estate subdivision, near Narrabeen, L88— Mr Obed West, sen, ; lot 8, section G, ... SALES OF PROPERTY. (1883, December 22). The Sydney Daily Telegraph (NSW : 1879 -1883), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article239272826

Mr. Ramsay held the country for many years, and eventually saw It pass into the hands of Mr. John Wetherill, who at one time had a big drapery shop in Pitt Street, somewhere near the Strand. At that time much of the land was subdivided under the name of the Mount Ramsay Estate. Messrs. Richardson and Wrench held the first sale of the property on October 28, 1881. It was at that sale that Mr. Obed West, of Barcom Glen, Paddington, purchased a section on the Pittwater Road, Goodwin, M'Tier, and Park Streets fronts. 

Four years later, Mr. John West, his son, built the Palm Cottage, which some of the residents still say was the old Reynolds home. A year or so later, Mr. Cyrus E. Fuller acquired the balance of the estate, and sold a lot of it at prices that ran from £10 to £14 a half-acre block. Beach frontages could be had 24 years ago at 10s per foot. Corner lots were offering at from 10s to 20s. During August, 1910, the Crown acquired the rights to the beach, and all the streets in the Mount Ramsay estate. Soon after that, Mr. Arthur Griffith came into the picture. He very quickly set the ball rolling. His trio of big actions altered the whole position. The tram lines were laid down as far as Collaroy, then the iron way was extended to the bridge terminus. Water was taken through to Narrabeen by means of wooden pipes, and the big Griffith Park reservation was acquired at a very low figure. 

To complete the tramway, a 33ft. resumption was made from Collaroy corner to the lakeside terminus. That was another wise stroke. Mr. Griffith was more than likely the prime mover in that action. It did not matter to him how many of the old residents had their homes disturbed. Was not the old church cut clean in two for the benefit of the tramway? Yes, and when all the old church timbers were sold by auction, the brass bell and the carved stone font were also knocked down to the highest bidder. I lost the opportunity of a lifetime in not getting hold of those two sacred items. Just now the people of the village are very anxious to know where the bell and the font are in hiding. Can anyone tell me? 

All I got at that sale was roof-iron, and long Oregon plates, which were worked into the small seaside home that overlooks much of the land where the earliest of the pleasure seekers spent their happy holiday hours. NARRABEEN (1926, January 4).The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245843909 


FOR CITY GIRLS holiday home
MEMBERS of the City Girls Amateur Sports Association have completed negotiations for a week-end holiday house at Narrabeen. "Palm Cottage" is an ideal place for a holiday, with the ocean in front and the big lake at the back. The creeks, too, offer pleasure to those whose fancy turns to quiet, inland waters. Mr. T. West, who built "Palm Cottage," went to Narrabeen in 1884, and from almost the whole coastline chose the site because it provided such an unusual vista of the sea. The house will accommodate 12 girls for each week-end, and it will probably be used for holidays also.


PALM COTTAGE The house at Narrabeen which has been secured by the City Girls' Amateur Sports Association for a week-end resort.FOR CITY GIRLS (1926, March 1). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 13 (FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224055821 

City Girls
New Holiday House At Narrabeen

PALM Cottage, one of the oldest houses In Narrabeen, Is to be the scene of many happy weekend parties for the City Girls' Amateur Sports Association. The cottage is large, and rambling, surrounded by wide verandahs, and stands on a hill, overlooking the ocean beach on one side and the Narrabeen Lakes on the other. It is an ideal place for large parties of club girls, the ample balcony space making It possible to accommodate unlimited numbers of camp stretchers for sleeping out, while a specially glassed-in portion will lend itself to the use of long, trestle dining-tables, to seat at least 20 girls. 

The lawns surrounding the house are excellently suited for circles courts and basket-ball. Already a number of clubs affiliated to the C.G.A.S.A. have booked up week-ends well into the winter, for the colder weather will make no difference, as the charm of boating on the lakes and tramping into the woods surrounding them will afford sufficient interest as a substitute for the joys of surfing. Each girl, with a minimum number of eight, will be charged five shillings for a party. At present there is only accommodation for twelve, but, as the popularity of Palm Cottage grows, the association will be prepared to arrange for further accommodation. City Girls (1926, March 11). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 4 (The Daily Telegraph Woman's Supplement). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245839929 




Narrabeen - West's Lake-Side Estate - The Esplanade, Government Rd, O'Keefe Ave, Wetherill St, Lindley Ave, Clarke St, Park St, Mactier St, Goodwin St, Devitt St, Robertson St, Narrabeen St, King St, Albert St, Waterloo St, Victoria St, Ocean St, 1911 - Item c050370013, courtesy  the State Library of New South Wales.

In the funeral service for T. J West there were Iredale family members present - the name of a subdivision in 1912 - and McLachlans present - another subdivision. The West family and the Iredale family and McLachlan family were connected through marriage, through serving on Paddington Council and also would have known Mr. Wetherill as they too had a Draper. They also haad a lot to do with railways:

Robert Iredale (1815-1890). Ironmonger, Draper, News Agent, was born in Gateshead, England, in 1815. He arrived in Australia in 1842 on the Arkwright. He was married to Sarah Peel in England and they had three sons and one daughter. Robert Iredale was the nephew of Lancelot Iredale, who was an alderman on the City of Sydney Council. Robert Iredale’s grandson was the cricketer Frank Iredale
He served as an Alderman at Paddington from 1864 to 1866 and as Mayor of Paddington for 1866. 
From City of Sydney (Council) archives https://www.sydneyaldermen.com.au/alderman/robert-iredale/

Robert Iredale was a Wesleyan, as was his uncle Lancelot. Robert Iredale of Paddington laid the foundation stone for the Wesleyan Day and Sabbath Schools on Bourke Street in Surry Hills on November 17th 1862. The Iredale family also provided the land on which the church was built. 

BOURKE-STREET (SYDNEY) WESLEYAN CHURCH. -Mr. Lancelot Iredale, of Auburn Cottage, Bourke street, Surry Hills, Sydney, who died on June 16, 1848, gave the land for this church. Several members of his family are yet living, and our querist may obtain any farther particulars at 195, Albion street ..." Australian Town And Country Journal (Sydney, NSW) - Sep 25 1886

In the Supreme Court of New South Wales.
ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION.
In the will of Robert Iredale, late of Bourke-street, Surry Hills, in the Colony of New South Wales, news agent, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication hereof in the New South Wales Government Gazette, application will be made to this Honorable Court, in its Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction, that probate of the last will and testament of the abovenamed deceased, who died on or about the 27th day of May, A.p. 1890, may be granted to Lancelot Peel Iredale, of Surry Hills, gentleman, and John Yates, of Surry Hills, news agent, the executors in the said will named.—Dated this 2nd day of June, a.d. 1890.
BEEHAG & SIMPSON, 
Proctors for Executory
77, Elizabeth-street, Sydney. In the Supreme Court of New South Wales. ECCLESIASTICAL JURISDICTION. (1890, June 3). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 4463. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219921359

Lancelot Iredale was born in 1789 at Gateshead, Durham, England, son of a master craftsman. He married Sarah (d.1828, aged 39) in England before 1815 and had three daughters. He later married schoolteacher Kezia Bedford on 8 January 1829 at Sydney and had one son and four daughters. He died 16 June 1848, aged 59, and was buried at Devonshire Street Cemetery before being transferred to Bunnerong Cemetery. Lancelot Iredale trained as a blacksmith and was employed at Tyne Iron Works, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. In 1815, he and an accomplice were convicted of stealing iron bars and transported to Australia on the Mariner, arriving in Sydney on 11 October 1816. Iredale worked in the lumber yard, and then at Windsor and applied for mitigation of his sentence in 1819, receiving his conditional pardon on 31 January 1820. He was joined by his wife Sarah and three teenage daughters in 1827; his wife died in childbirth around a year after arriving in Australia. A few months after Sarah’s death, Iredale married Kezia Bedford who had travelled to Sydney to teach in mission schools; they had eight daughters (four died young) and a son.

Lancelot Iredale set up a successful wholesale ironmongery and hardware business in George Street, Sydney, and by 1822 had several convict mechanics assigned to him. In 1832, his third daughter Mary married Ralph Hindmarsh (d.1842) who joined his ironmongery business. Another daughter Charlotte married her cousin Frederick Lassetter who took over the family business in 1867, initially in partnership with Lancelot Iredale’s nephew Robert Iredale.

Lancelot Iredale’s real estate holdings included three properties in York and George streets and land at Newtown where he is remembered by Iredale Street. In 1834 the family moved into Auburn Villa in Surry Hills, designed by John Verge. He took his family to England from 1841 to 1843.Iredale was a philanthropist and was Treasurer of the Sydney Infirmary in 1837 and a member of Sydney Hospital and Sydney College committees. A devout Wesleyan, he was a financial supporter of the York Street Wesleyan Centenary Chapel. Lancelot Iredale was Councillor for Cook Ward, 1 November 1844 to 26 November 1847, and was a member of the Committee of Public Works in 1844. His nephew Robert was an alderman on Paddington Council in 1864-66.



Lancelot Iredale 1789-1848,1830 watercolour drawing by Richard Read, 1796-1862, courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW.

IREDALE—WEST—January 26th, at the Wesleyan Chapel, Bourke-street, Surry Hills, by the Rev. Stephen Rabone, Lancelot Peel, second son of Robert Iredale, Esq., Paddington, to Caroline Amelia, seventh daughter of Obed West, Esq., Barcom Glen. Family Notices (1865, February 18). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13107767

IREDALE.—March 16, at her late residence, 423 Bourke-street, Surry Hills, Caroline Amelia, the beloved wife of Launcelot Peel Iredale, and daughter of the late Obed West, of Barcom Glen. At rest. Interred Long Bay Cemetery, Randwick, on the 18th inst. Family Notices (1912, March 19). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15318600

DEATHS. IREDALE.-March 10, at private hospital, Darlinghurst, Launcelot Peel Iredale, of 423 Bourke-street, eldest surviving son of the late Robert Iredale, in his 75th year. Late record clerk, Railway Department. -Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Publication date: Mar 16 1918

LATE MR. D. C. McLACHLAN.
The funeral of Mr. Duncan Clark Mclachlan, C.M.O., I.S.O.. the first Federal Public Service Commissioner, took place from his home in Milner-street, Mosman, on Satur-day afternoon to St. Jude's Church of Eng-land Cemetery, Avoca-street, Randwick.
Mr. Mclachlan was born In Glasgow 76 years ago, and came with his father and mother to Sydney while quite an Infant, his father setting up In business as a general merchant In Redfern, which at that time was quite a rural locality. Mr. McLachlan's early boyhood, therefore, was spent in Redfern. He was educated first at St. Paul's Church of England School, a seminary that was conducted by Mr. William Saunders; then at a school in Regent-street, the master of which was Mr. (subsequently the Rev.) W. H. Yarrington, father of the Rev. Clive Yarrington, of Mosman, who conducted the funeral service on Saturday; and, finally, privately by Rev. James McSkimming, minister of the Chalmers Presbyterian Church In Castlereagh.

His education completed, Mr. Mclachlan was given the choice of entering either the office of the Colonial Architect or the Railway Department, and, recognising the possibilities in railway development, chose the latter, which he Joined in 1870, being attached to the administrative staff. Being of a steady, persevering nature, he soon gained promotion, passing quickly through all grades until he attained to the position of chief clerk, and, for a time, acting as secretary.

In 1888, the administration of the rail-ways was handed over to three Commissioners, but work in connection with constructing was retained by the Department of Public Works, in which Mr. McLachlan became secretary to the tender board. Having successfully completed an important scheme of reorganisation, he was appointed to succeed Mr. Joseph Barling as under-secretary for Public works, being subsequently transferred to a similar secretarial capacity to the Department of Mines and Agriculture, where he had the oversight of the two principal industries of the State.

In 1902 Mr. McLachlan was again transferred, this time to the Commonwealth as Public Service Commissioner, the appointment being for seven years. So satisfactory, how-ever, were his services that he was asked to undertake the duty for another similar term, retiring in 1916, and, after 14 years' absence in Melbourne, returning to Sydney to enjoy less strenuous days. In 1919, however, he was asked by the Federal Government to inquire and report upon the condition of the Public Service, for which purpose he was appointed a Royal Commissioner. His report was made public in 1920.

Settling in Mosman, Mr. McLachlan became one of the directors of the Civil Service Stores, Ltd., and at one time was chairman of the governing body, from which he retired owing to ill-health.

In his early days Mr. McLachlan gained local renown as a cricketer, the Redfern team being the premier organisation of its kind outside Sydney, his clubs being the old Civil Service, the Warwick, and the Belvidere. Golf occupied his attention after his retirement, but latterly he became a keen bowler, his principal association In that connection being the Warringah Club, of which he was president.

Mrs. McLachlan died some months ago. She was Miss Emily West, daughter of Mr. Obed West, owner of the Barcom Glen estate, on which large parts of Darlinghurst and Pad-dington now stand. He leaves three sonsMessrs. Arthur Lindsay McLachlan, who practises as a solicitor in Sydney; Reginald Obed McLachlan, who is on the land near Stockinbingal; and Mr. Stanley Cowan McLachlan, who is in the Public Service; and three daughters, Mrs, H. L. Butler and the Misses E. M. and E. T. McLachlan, of Mosman. The late Mr. Hugh McLachlan, secretary to the Railway Commissioners, was a brother.

THE FUNERAL.
The chief mourners on Saturday were the three sons, Messrs. K. L. Butler (son-in-law), A. O. West, and H. O. Dreyer (brothers-in-law); and E. T., Hy and O. West, P. W., H. Ù. and L. Iredale, and E. Alcorn, E. Marriott, H. D. Mclachlan, H. Ellis, A. Hudson, and K. Loder (nephewsI; J. Alexander and John Macdregor, and John Campbell (cousins).
Among others present were: Messrs. Sydney Smith (formerly a State Minister), R. Slessor, J. S. Duncan (Commonwealth Public Service In-spector!, E. 0. Kreagan (formerly Commonwealth Public Service Inspector), P. A. Coghlan (late Audltor-acneral), P. R, clelland (Commonwealth Works Department!, W. Smith; Messrs. Ross, Hooton, Smythe, Sedeeley, Lloyd, Saunders, and other members of the Waringal, and Mosman Bowl-ing Clubs; Messrs. E. Collins and O. Fowler, re-presenting the Civil Service Stores; and Messrs. T. W. Oarnett, Q. Valder, Q. W. F. Kemsty, M. Young, C, Calvert, Aaron McLean, Donald McLean, ... Buckingham, J. Lamond, Roy Rasmussen, J. Inlgis, J. W. Perry, Dick Cavill, Victor Cohen, M. Webster, A. P. Curtis, s. Bolger, Stevens, and Walsh.LATE MR. D. C. McLACHLAN. (1929, October 21). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16594648

The opening of the transportation right to the edge of the lagoon at Narrabeen in the form of a tram, as with everywhere north of Narrabeen, was cause for more subdivisions - especially alongside the route, with sales commencing as soon as there was a stop at Collaroy. The street name at Narrabeen in 'Gondola' are a direct connection to and celebration of this development for the area that appears to stem from the original opening day celebrations.

TRAM WAY CONNECTION WITH NARRABEEN.


CUTTING OUT BALLAST FOR THE NEW TRAMLINE AT CABLE'S QUARRY, AT THE TOP OF DEE WHY HILL.


'PRINCE,' A GOVERNMENT HORSE EMPLOYED IN THE NARRABEEN TRAMWAY WORK, PULLING SIX TONS OF RAILS UP A GRADE OF 1 IN 19,


A PANORAMA OF NARRABEEN AND THE LAKE FROM THE TOP OF THE HILL NEAR COLLAROY.

TRAMWAY CONNECTION WITH NARRABEEN. (1912, March 6). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 35. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164295089 


Narrabeen from the Lookout. Image No.: a106055h, from Scenes of Narrabeen Album,  Courtesy The Mitchell Library, State Library of Australia  - NB: no tram tracks as yet


TRAMWAY EXTENSION.
BROOKVALE TO NARRABEEN.
A tramway extension from Brookvale to Collaroy Beach, Narrabeen, being a continuation of the present line from Manly to Brookvale, will be officially opened by the Minister for Works this afternoon. But though Mr. Griffith and the Ministerial party will not commence their official trip from Manly till 1.40 p.m., the car service will begin, according to the published timetable, at 6.42 a.m. to-day.

Work was commenced on the line in August last, following an official turning of the first sod by the Minister on July 29. The extension was commenced at about three miles 33 chains from Manly at the present Brookfield terminus. The new portion travels along Pittwater-road on the left-hand side for a distance of about one mile. Thence it runs through the Salvation Army property for two miles ten chains on a strip of roadway 33 feet wide, and passes the Deewhy Lagoon, over portion of which a light bridge has been built. The line continues on to Collaroy Beach, and thence on to Fielding-street, where it at present terminates. 

The new extension measures 3 miles 25 chains, and the total length of the line from Manly to Fielding street is 6 miles 58 chains. The first stopping-place after Brookvale is between Pine-avenue and Mitchell-road. Others are at victor-road, the intersection of Manly-road and Pittwater-road opposite the brick kiln; about 4 chains from Redmond road; about 12 chains from where the line enters the Salvation Army property; at 5 miles 52 chains; at 5 miles 64 chains; at the boundary of the Salvation Army property; at Collaroy-st, and at Fielding-street. There will be two penny sections making the fare from Manly to Narrabeen 5d. Cars will run about every hour from 6.42 am to 10.14 p.m.

The extension was built on the day-labor system, under the supervision of Mr Hutchison, chief engineer of the railway and construction branch of the Public Works Department. A successful trial run was made over the new portion on Thursday and the line has been handed over to the Railway and Tram-way departments.

There is also a distinct advance movement in real estate in the direction of Narrabeen. To-day the tramway is to be officially opened, and from this morning the public will have an hourly tram service between Manly and Narrabeen for 5d each way, and as the last tram from Manly for Narrabeen is somewhere about 10 p.m. the service will be a great improvement upon the present one of coaches and 'buses, running from Manly at the rate of only three or four trips a day, and at a cost to the traveller of at least 1s each way. The sales pf land at Narrabeen this season promise to be greater than last year. In fact, right along the Ocean beach, as far as Pittwater, estates will be opened up, and people will have an opportunity of securing a week-end allotment in a picturesque  spot on that magnificent stretch of coast line from Manly to Pittwater. REAL ESTATE. (1912, August 3). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 18. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15326801

CONNECTING CITY AND SUBURBS.


Mrs M’GOWEN (WIFE OF the PREMIER) cutting the ribbon, and declaring the new tramway extension from Manly to Narrabeen open for traffic. Mr. Arthur Griffith, minister for works, is holding the ribbon. CONNECTING CITY AND SUBURBS. (1912, August 5). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article238632940 

Although some reports state it was Mrs. Griffith who cut the ribbon, a comparison of the lady above and an article run the same year with Mrs. Emily McGowen (nee Towner) will show the same face.


An O class tram headed by car 1105 at Collaroy bound for Manly, Circa 1920. from D O'BRIEN COLLECTION - appears Trolley Wire December 1984 as part of K. McCarthy series on Manly to Narrabeen Trams 

The extension to the tram terminus at Narrabeen from Collaroy:

NARRABEEN TRAM.

Commencing Monday next, the extension of tram line from Collaroy Beach to Narrabeen will be opened for traffic, and a regular service of trams will be run daily between Manly Pier and Narrabeen, connecting with steamers to and from Circular Quay. NARRABEEN TRAM. (1913, December 6 - Saturday). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 22. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28121325

The official opening took place on Saturday December 20th, 1913, and included a carnival:

NARRABEEN TRAM OPENING.

The official opening of the Narrabeen tram extension will be performed on Saturday next, at 3.30, by Mrs. Arthur Griffith, wife of the Minister for Works. The Warringah Shire Council and a committee are making arrangements to suitably celebrate the occasion. 

A Venetian carnival on the lakes will be held at night, and there will also be a display of fireworks. The Pittwater tramway and transit committee has arranged to take the official party for a trip through the Pittwater district, including Newport, Bay View, and Church Point. Refreshments will be partaken of at the latter place, after which the party will journey back through Narrabeen for the purpose of witnessing the evening carnival. 

The tram has been running since Monday last on the route, and the traffic on the line is regarded as satisfactory. Passengers are now landed right at the Narrabeen Lakes, and within easy distance of the beach and other adjoining tourist resorts. NARRABEEN TRAM OPENING. (1913, December 12). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article238960637


A Holiday at Narrabeen, between Manly and Newport. This view was taken on the occasion of the recent carnival at Narrabeen Lake in honour of the extension of the tramline to the bridge. OUTDOOR AUSTRALIA. (1914, January 7). Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158397083


NARRABEEN TRAM.
OPENED TO BRIDGE.
A PICTURESQUE DISTRICT.
The extension of the tramway from Collaroy Beach to Narrabeen Bridge was on Saturday afternoon the subject of great local festivities.
A special tram, gaily bedecked with Christmas bush, waratahs, and palms, conveyed a large party from Manly Beach wharf to the bridge, a distance of about eight miles. The journey lies through remarkably pretty scenery, which will most likely make the run a favourite one with excursionists. During the whole distance the traveller is with-in hail of the beaches, upon which the waves of the Pacific Ocean beat, and the many glimpses of blue sea, with snow-white embroidery, as the rollers wash into spray on the shingle, and the glimmering stretches of sand, serve to make the trip a delightful one. Deewhy Lake, with its black swans, is passed en route, and the tram brings one to the first of the Narrabeen Lakes.


It was explained by Mr. Quirk, in opening the proceedings, that the Minister for Works  (Mr. Griffith) had built the tramway to Collaroy Beach, which was as far as he could make it, for less than £20,000. The mile section from Collaroy to Narrabeen was an addition.

The ceremony of cutting the blue ribbon across the track and declaring the extension open was carried out by Mrs. Griffith, the wife of the Minister, who said they were very pleased to have with them Mrs. B. W. O'Sullivan, widow of the Minister for Works who had turned the first sod in connection with the tramway. (Applause.)



A party of visitors were then driven round the district in motors as the guests of the Pittwater Progress Association, the excursion showing that the neighbourhood is progressing. The Narrabeen Lakes country together with that intervening between it land the "village," constitutes Manly's big "back yard," as it has been called. Judging by some of the vegetable and fruit gardens seen between Manly and Narrabeen, the country is by no means unsuitable for agriculture. After Mrs. Griffith had cut the blue ribbon, the local children rendered "Advance Australia Fair."

Mrs. Griffith was presented with a diamond ring as a memento of the occasion.
At the conclusion of the ceremony a Venetian carnival was held on the Narrabeen Lakes. 
NARRABEEN TRAM. (1913, December 15 - Monday). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved from  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15497971 

The other aspect of the tramway to Narrabeen is that it would actually require land for the tracks to be built on and where the 1881 named 'Ocean Street' and 'Victoria street' leading out of the Old Pittwater Road, and to become the 'new' Pittwater Road would be needed, if only in small slices, or 'perches' of these lots. As 'perches' were also brought under the Real Property Act later on it is worth noting that the NSW Land Registry Office states that 1 rood (rd) = 40 perches (p) Imperial measurement and in Conversion factors for imperial to metric 1 perch = 25.2929m2. 

The 'Old Pittwater Road' was that made in 1826 by James Jenkins, assisted by convict labour. He built a road at his own expense from North Harbour (now Balgowlah) to Long Reef. The road (now known as Old Pittwater Road) passed through the Brookvale valley via Miles Gully and was made official by Gazette Notice on 8 November 1861.

Department of Public Works,
Sydney, 16th November, 1915.
PUBLIC WORKS ACT, 1912.
IT is hereby notified, for the information of the public, that the lands described in the Schedule are, with the consent of the Governor, dedicated under section 81 of the ''Public Works Act, 1912,'' as additions to the public highways specified.
J. H. CANN,
Constructing Authority.
Schedule.
Addition to Pitt water-road, Warringah Shire.
All that piece or parcel of land situate in the Warringah Shire, parish of Manly Cove, county of Cumberland, and State of New South Wales, being part of Lots 72 and 73, as shown on deposited plan 3,675,  and part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,549, folio 186: commencing at the south-western corner of lot 72 aforesaid; and bounded thence on the north-west by 101 feet 2 inches of the arc of a circle of 310 feet radius the centre of which lies north-west of a chord bearing 74 degrees 19 minutes l(i seconds 100 feet 8 1/3 inches to the south-eastern boundary of lot 73 aforesaid; thence by part of that boundary and the whole of the south-eastern boundary of lot 72 aforesaid by lines as follow: - Bearing 243 degrees 52 minutes 28 seconds 49 feet 2'4 inches, 263 degrees 59 minutes 48 seconds 53 feet 0 7 inches, to the point of commencement; be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of "63 of a perch or thereabouts, and numbered 2a and 2b on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway.

Part 1.
Additions to Old Pittwater-road, Warringah Shire.
Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lot 75, deposited plan 3,675 aforesaid, and the whole of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,343, folio 192: Commencing at the south-western corner of lot 75 aforesaid; and bounded thence by part of the western boundary of that lot bearing 20 minutes 18 seconds 3 feet 10 inches; thence on the north-west by 93 feet 1 of an inch of the arc «f a circle of 310 feet radius, the centre of which lies north-west of a chord bearing 46 degrees 48 minutes 6 seconds 92 feet 8 inches to the south-eastern boundary of lot 75 aforesaid ; thence by part of that boundary by lines as follow: Bearing 215 degrees 18 minutes 48 seconds 61 feet '6 of an inch, 243 degrees 52 minutes 28 seconds 34 feet '75 of an inch, to the point of commencement;—be the said several dimensions all a little more or loss, containing an area of 1*59 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 3 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 1.
Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 80 and 81, deposited plan 3,675, and part of the land comprised in Certificates of Title, registered volume 1,675, folio 169: Commencing at the north-eastern corner of lot 4, deposited plan No. 3,675; and bounded thence by part of the south-eastern boundary of lots 81 and 80 by lines as follow:- Bearing 206 degrees 50 minutes 35 seconds 62 feet 11 inches, 223 degrees 43 minutes 20 seconds 65 fret 6 inches to the south-eastern boundary of lot 5, deposited plan 6,808; thence by part of that boundary and the whole of the south-eastern boundary cf lot 4 by lines as follow : 65 feet 6'75 inches of the arc of a circle of 422 feet radius the centre of which lies north-west of a chord bearing 39 degrees 28 minutes 25 seconds 65 feet 6 inches, 31 degrees 18 minutes 25 seconds 62 feet 5 inches, to the point of commencement being the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 perch or thereabouts, and numbered 3a on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 1.

Additions to Ocean-street, Warringah Shire.
Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. and 8 section '7, of the Mount Ramsay Estate, and being part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,422, folios 167 and 168, and the whole of the land comprised in Certificates of Title, registered volume 2,542, folio 56, and volume 2.541 folio 32: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1: and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 268 degrees 44 minutes 40 seconds 37 feet 7 inches; thence on the south-east by lines as follow-Bearing 330 degrees 7 minutes til seconds 345 feet 1 inch, 332 degrees 48 minutes 40 seconds r>l feet 4'5 inches to the northern boundary of lot 8 aforesaid; thence by part of that boundary bearing 88 degrees 48 minutes 40 seconds 36 feet 86 inches to the north-eastern corner of that lot; thence by the north-eastern boundary ot lots 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 aforesaid by lines as follow: — Hearing 152 degrees 48 minutes 40 seconds 3-3 feet 9 inches, 150 decrees 7 minutes 40 seconds 303 feet 1 inch, to the point of commencement;—be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 7 7 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, section 8, of the Mount Ramsay Estate, and part lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 of deposited plan No. 5,322, this being part of the land comprised in Certificates of Title, registered volume 1,990, folios 159 and 100, and volume 2,499, folio 189, and the whole of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,503, folio 83: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 of the Mount Ramsay Estate aforesaid; and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 208 degrees 49 minutes 50 seconds 36 feet 8 (3 inches; thence on the south-west by a line bearing 332 degrees 48 minutes 50 seconds 400 feet 3'0 inches to the northern boundary of lot 4, deposited plan 5,322 aforesaid: thence by part of that boundary hearing 88 degrees 49 minutes 50 seconds 36 feet 86 inches to the north-eastern corner of that lot; thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and the north-eastern boundary of lots 3, 2, and 1, deposited plan 5,322, and lots 4, 3, 2, and 1 of the Mount Ramsay estate aforesaid bearing 10 degrees 4 minutes 50 seconds 400 feet 3"6 inches, to the point of commencement;—being the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 8 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 27, 2ft, 29, 30, 31, and 32 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.
Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, section 11, of the Mount Ramsay Instate aforesaid: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 aforesaid; and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 268 degrees 49 minutes 50 seconds 38 feet 8(i inches; thence on the southwest by lines as follow:—Bearing 332 degrees 48 minutes 60 seconds 305 feet 4"8 inches, 341 degrees 52 minutes 50 seconds 114 feet 5'8 inches to the northern boundary of lot 8 aforesaid; thence by part of that boundary bearing 88 degrees 50 minutes 50 seconds 34 feet 0 inches to the north-eastern corner of that lot; thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and the north-eastern boundary of lots 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 aforesaid by lines as follow:—Bearing 101 degrees 52 minutes 50 seconds 101 feet 9'8 inches, 152 degrees 48 minutes 50 seconds 318 feet 10*6 inches, to the point of commencement;—being the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 8 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 34 and 35 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

A mile south of Narrabeen Tram Terminus, 1925

Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, section 12, of the Mount Ramsay Estate aforesaid, and being part of the land comprised in Certificates of Title, registered volume 2,499, folio 189, volume 2,036. folio 205, volume 2,299, folio 23, and volume 2,127, folio 223, and the whole of the land comprised in Certificates of Title, registered volume 2.560, folio 92, and 2,558, folio 108: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 aforesaid; and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 208 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet O'l inches; thence on the south-west by a line bearing 341 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 400 feet 2 0 inches to the northern boundary of lot 8 aforesaid; thence by part of that boundary bearing 88 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 31 feet 6*1 inches to the north-eastern corner of that lot; thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and the north-eastern boundary of lots 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 bearing 161 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 400 feet 2 0 inches, to the point of commencement ; be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 8 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 37, 38, 39, 40. 41, and 42 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, section 15, of the Mount Ramsay Estate aforesaid, deposited plan No. 7,224, and the wholo of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,58o, folio 23: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 aforesaid ; and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 2(38 degrees 55 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 6*2 inches; thence on the south-west by a line bearing 341 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 400 feet 5'2 inches to the northern boundary of lot 8 aforesaid; thence by part of that boundary hearing 88 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 6'4 inches to the north-eastern corner of that lot; thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and the north-eastern boundary of lots 7, (i, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 bearing l(jl degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 400 feet 5 inches, to the point of commencement ;- be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 8'5 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 41 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, and 3, section 18, of the Mount Ramsay Estate aforesaid, and part of Lots 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 of deposited plan No. 0,714, the last-mentioned lots being the whole of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,578, folio 145, and part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,201, folio 172 : Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 aforesaid; and bounded thence by part of the south-eastern boundary of that lot bearing 2(58 degrees 51 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet (> inches; thence on the south-west by a line bearing 341 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 400 feet to the northern boundary of lot 3, deposited plan No. 6714; thence by part of that boundary bearing 88 degrees 51 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 6 inches to the north-eastern corner of that lot; thence by the north-eastern boundary of lots 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 of deposited plan 6,714 aforesaid, and of lots 3, 2, and 1 of the Mount Ramsay Estate aforesaid bearing 161 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 400 feet, to the point of commencement be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 775 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 46, 47, and 48 on the plan and hook of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, (5, 7, and 8, section 19, of the Mount Ramsay Estate aforesaid: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 aforesaid : and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 2G8 degrees 51 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet (51 inches ; thence on the southwest by a line bearing 341 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 400 feet to the northern boundary of lot 8 aforesaid ; thence by part of that boundary bearing 2(58 degrees 51 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 61 inches to the north-eastern corner of that lot; thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and the north-eastern boundary of lots 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 bearing 161 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 400 feet, to the point of commencement ;—being the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 8 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 50, 51, and 51.\ on the plan of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 of the Heart of Narrabeen Estate, deposited plan No. 7,190, and being the whole of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,490, folio 167: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 7 aforesaid ; and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot hearing 268 degrees 51 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 6 inches; thence on the south-west by a line bearing 341 degrees 50 minutes 21 seconds 400 feet to the northern boundary of lot 16 aforesaid: thence by part of that boundary bearing 88 degrees 51 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 6 inches to the north-eastern corner of that lot; thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and the north-eastern boundary of lots 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10. 9, 8, and 7 bearing 161 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 400 feet, to the point of commencement; be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 8*25 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 53 on the plan and the book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

Additions to Victoria-street, Warringah Shire.
Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, section 25, of the Mount Ramsay Estate, lots 5 to 8 inclusive, being the whole of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,546, folio 155, and part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,381, folio 40: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 aforesaid; and hounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 268 degrees 46 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 5'9 inches; thence on the southwest by a line bearing 341 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 339 feet 11 inches to the northern boundary of lot 8 aforesaid ; thence by part of that boundary hearing 88 degrees 46 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 5'9 inches to the north-eastern corner of lot 8 aforesaid; thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and the north-eastern boundary of lots 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 aforesaid bearing 161 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 339 feet 11 inches, to the point of commencement;— be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 825 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 55 and 5(5 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.
Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1 and 2, section 27, of the Mount Ramsay Estate: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 aforesaid ; and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 268 degrees 54 minutes 35 feet 7*5 inches; thence on the south-west by a line bearing 341 degrees 50 minutes 100 foot 3 inches to the northern boundary of lot 2 aforesaid ; thence by part of that boundary bearing 88 degrees 57 minutes 50 seconds 35 feet 8'75 inches to the north-eastern corner of that lot: thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and lot 1 bearing 161 degrees 53 minutes 100 feet 2'5 inches, to the point of commencement; be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 12'5 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 58 and 59 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, section. 27, of the Mount Ramsay Estate, lots 6, 7, and 8, being part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,517, folio 132 : Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 3 aforesaid; and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 268 degrees 54 minutes 20 seconds 31 feet 6'25 inches; thence on the south-west by a line bearing 341 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 300 feet to the northern boundary of lot 8 aforesaid ; thence by part of that boundary bearing 88 degrees 54 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 6'2 inches to the north-eastern corner of lot 8 aforesaid ; thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and lots 7, 0, 5, 4, and 3 bearing 161 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 300 feet, to the point of commencement;—being the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 36 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 60, 61, 62, and 63 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12, section 32, of the Mount Ramsay Estate, lots 1, 2, and 3, being part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,517, folio 132 and the whole of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 2,560, folio 240: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 aforesaid ; and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 268 degrees 57 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 64 inches; thence on the southwest by a line bearing 341 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 615 feet 4'6 inches to the northern boundary of lot 12; thence by part of that boundary bearing 88 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 34 feet 61 inches to the north-eastern corner of lot 12 aforesaid; thence by the north-eastern boundary of that lot and lots 11, 10, 0, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 aforesaid bearing 161 degrees 50 minutes 20 seconds 615 feet 9 inches, to the point of commencement; —be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 34'15 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, and 73 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3.

Also, all that piece or parcel of land situate as aforesaid, being part of lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, section 32a, of the Mount Ramsay Estate aforesaid, this part of lots 3 to 8 inclusive being the whole of the land comprised in Certificates of Title, registered volume 2,510, folio 193, volume 2,559, folios 217 and 218, volume 2,446, folio 6, volume 2,460, folio 28: Commencing at the south-eastern corner of lot 1 aforesaid; and bounded thence by part of the southern boundary of that lot bearing 268 degrees 36 minutes 40 seconds 33 feet 7 inches; thence on the south-west by a line bearing 347 decrees 49 minutes 40 seconds 400 feet to the northern boundary of lot 8 aforesaid ; thence by part of that boundary bearing 88 degrees 36 minutes 40 seconds 33 feet 7 Inches to the north-eastern corner of lot 8 aforesaid; thence by part of the north-eastern boundary of that lot and lots 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 aforesaid bearing 107 degrees 49 minutes 40 seconds 400 feet, to the point of commencement;—be the said several dimensions all a little more or less, containing an area of 1 rood 7"7 1/5 perches or thereabouts, and numbered 75, 70, 77, 78, /9, 80, and 81 on the plan and book of reference of the Brookvale to Narrabeen Tramway, Part 3. [J. 1914-18,187] "PUBLIC WORKS ACT, 1912." (1915, November 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 7004. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226922481


Narrabeen Collins Estate; Park Road - surf shed in place at north end of beach circa 1913 onwards Item c050370058 

No. 14,499. APPLICANT:—John Thomas Collins, Narrabeen. LAND : —County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, shire Warringah, 2 acres 37 perches and 3 acres 37 perches, on Narrabeen Lagoon, and on Manly to Pittwater road,—parts 50 acres (portion 47 of parish), granted to William Bernard Rhodes; adjoining property of J. T. Collins. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, June 12). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3668. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221608288

No. 17,120. APPLICANT:—Roland James Pope, Manly. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 2 roods 214 perches, and 1 acre 1 rood 34 3/4 perches, Victoria, King, and Ocean streets,—lots 7 to 10 inclusive, section 33, and lots 7 and 8, section 34, Mount Ramsay Estate, and lots o and 10, section 33 of Narrabeen Lakes subdivision of part Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of Dr. R. J. Pope, and M. Mitchell. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1911, August 9). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4342. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230685054

No. 16,973. APPLICANT James Wheeler, Narrabeen. LAND : County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 1 rood 31 1/2 perches, 3 roods 18 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 1 perch, 3 acres 11 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 3 perches, 34 perches, 1 rood 30 1/2 perches, 35 perches, 2 roods 2 1/2 perches, 1 rood 30 1/2 perches, 2 roods 2 3/4 perches, and 2 acres 3 roods If perches, in Jenkins, Frazer, Ramsay, Stuart, Wetherill, Clarke, Mactier, Goodwin, Devitt, Lagoon, Wellington, and Park streets, and on Narrabeen Lagoon,—lots 22 to 28. section 8; lots 9, 16, 17, 18, section 11: lots 10 to 14 and 17. 18, 19, scction 12; lots 13 to 26, section 16; lots 12 to 15 and 18 to 21, section 19: part lot 14a, section 20: lots 3, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, section 21: lots 12, 13. section 22: lots 5, 7, 8, section 26: part lot 2: and lots 3 to 8, section 42, Mount Ramsay Estate: and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay: adjoining properties of J. Wheeler, R. Pfoeffer, C. A. S. Hayden, E. A. Powell, C. M. E. West, H. S. Haynes, E J. West, Mrs. E. M. Loader, A. E. Ellis, C. A. de Kantzow, D. McLean, A. O. West, H. H. Gordon, W. Pollard, W. S. Beale, W. A. Lipscombe, W. L. McFarlane, estate J. Langley, J. F. C. Goodridge, A. E. Dowling, W. Nicholls, T. H. Page, and G. L. Pring. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1911, August 30). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4711. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230685900

No. 16.930. APPLICANT:—Herbert Edgar McIntosh. Sydney. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 4 acres 3 roods 36 perches. in Emerald, Lagoon, and Malcolm streets, and on Narrabeen Lagoon, whole section 60, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1911, September 13). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4937. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227592326 

No. 17,037. APPLICANTS :—George Scales and David Lindesay Aitken, both Sydney. LAND : — County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 96 acres 2 roods 7 1/4 acreson Narrabeen Creek, near Narrabeen Lagoon,—land granted as 30 acres (portion 51 of parish), to James Wheeler, and 50 acres (portion 48 of parish), to John William Alexander Whiteadjoining property of estate late T. H. Kelly and Crown Land. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, April 10). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2230. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227591158 - north west side of lagoon


Narrabeen Iredale estate adjoining tram terminus 1912 - Item c050370078 

No 18,067. APPLICANTS:—Lucy Maud Iredale, Alice Emily Iredale, and Florence Constance Iredale, all Surry Hills; Percy William Iredale, Glebe Point; Herbert Stanley Iredale, Marrickville ; and Leslie Peel Iredale, Darlinghurst. LAND :—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah,—1 acre 17 1/2 perches and 1 acre 3 roods 35 1/2 perches in Alexander-street, Narrabeen ; lets 5 and 6 and 12 to 2.3 and part lots 1 to 4, section 1, Mount Ramsey Estate ; and parts 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of M. M. Calvert, S. C. Twight and Salvation Army, and Crown Land. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, November 13). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 6731. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221611917

No. 18,068. APPLICANTS:—Lucy Maud Iredale, Alice Emily Iredale, Florence Constance Iredale, Surry Hills; Percy William Iredale, Glebe Point: Herbert Stanley Iredale, Marrickville; Leslie Peel Iredale, Darlinghurst. LAND: —County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 1 rood 7 1/2 perches, Victoria-street at Narrabeen,—lots 6 and 7, and part lot 8, section 32, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of M. L. Marriott and Mrs. Naomi Cooper. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, December 18). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 7367. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221613534

NARRABBEN

Many land buyers have their eyes turned towards Narrabeen, which now that it has got tramway communication Is likely to rival many of the older seaside resorts. Land buyers will have their wishes gratified on Saturday. Messrs. Raine and Horne have the Iredale Estate in hand. This property has been cut up into 22 lots facing the main road, right opposite Collaroy Beach. Mr. Piercy Ethell is offering the beautifully situated Plateau Estate on Saturday, December 7. -This property, is on high land, and in close proximity to the famous fern gully. The land should bring tip-top prices. NARRABEEN. (1912, November 22). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228835242 

VIEWS NEAR NARRABEEN, SYDNEY.
BY THE NARRABEEN LAKE.
A WOODLAND SCENE.
VIEWS NEAR NARRABEEN, SYDNEY. (1905, October 11). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 921. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164999477 


Narrabeen - Collaroy 1912 - Item c050370060 




Narrabeen Tram Terminus estate 1912 - Item c050370045 




Narrabeen estate 1913; Ocean Street McTier Street, Parkes Street, Robertson and Victoria streets - Item c050370046 


Narrabeen, NSW Australia; Sepia toned black and white photographic postcard of 'NARRABEEN. N.S.W. AUSTRALIA.'. It is dated 24 Jun 1913, and shows a street scene with men walking down the street and men in a horse and buggy riding down the street. There is no sight of tram tracks though, as yet.

There is a handwritten message on the back that reads 'Dear Ernie, Received your photo's today/ Thanks very much for same/ Glad to hear you are better and had a good time at Herne Bay/ I truly hope you will not have to go under an operation/ I think the photo at the Convalescent home is a good one of you considering how many there are in the photograph/ I have not much time to write you a letter this week and I know you like a p.c. now and again/ That is why I am sending p.c. this week, besides I wrote to Lill, Pop, Annie a letter each this week/ This is a photo of a place not far from Manly been there a good many times/ Bert'. - The partially rebuilt Narrabeen Hotel, courtesy National Museum of Australia.


NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATIONS having been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the Real Property Act, Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in accordance with the Third Schedule to the said Act on or before the 27th August, 1913:

No. 18.137. APPLICANT: James Wheeler, Narrabeen. LAND: County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, shire Warringah, 109 acres 20 perches, on Pittwater and Gordon roads, at Narrabeen Lagoon, part land granted as 86 acres (portion 52. parish), to James Wheeler; adjoining properties of G. Sherring and J. Ingall, A Griffith, C. A. De Kantzow, G Powell, R. L. Walsh, J. T. Schecker, F. Francois, T. Watts, H. Shipp. A. J. Sheaves, J. E. Meller, Miss B. Munro, C. E. Ramsbotham, E. Young, A. Young, J. H. Mundy, C. Higson, A. Taylor. P. Fowler, P. Morrice, F. Eklum, J. Corless, T. H. Macpherson, and applicant. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1913, July 9). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4268. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227051136



Narrabeen Maclachlan estate 1914 c050370050 


Collaroy's Up to Date Estate Agency [Twight & Frazer Property Agents] from Scenes of Collaroy, N.S.W. Album ca. 1900-1927  Sydney & Ashfield : Broadhurst Post Card Publishers, courtesy The Mithcell Library, State Library of NSW. Images No.: a105164h and below: a105163


"THEATRES AND PUBLIC HALLS ACT, 1908." THE following list of theatres and public halls, to which the provisions of Part II of the "Theatres and Public Halls Act, 1908," have been applied, is published for general information. All previous lists are hereby cancelled.  Narrabeen Beach Cafe Hall, Collaroy  Beach:.  Twight's Hall. "THEATRES AND PUBLIC HALLS ACT, 1908." (1920, April 1). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), , p. 2055. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224641121 

WANT, Young Girl to assist in shop; others kept. Good home found. Write particulars Mrs. Twight, Collaroy Tea Rooms, Narrabeen, Manly. Advertising (1921, February 28).Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , , p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article140025978



Heart Of Narrabeen estate; Goodwin Street, McTier Park Street - 1914


NARRABEEN. A postcard featuring a coloured sepia photograph of a dirt road with grass, trees, fences and buildings on the left and right hand side. Handwritten text on the front of the postcard describes the photograph as 'NARRABEEN'. Handwritten text on the back of the postcard begins 'Wishing you all a very Happy New Year ...the cottage on the right is where we are - M. Aylinnes? - Addressed to 'Miss. R. Head, Orpheus Cottage, Murri street, Katoomba'. Has red 1d (one penny) NSW Crest stamp affixed which ran in circulation from 1897-1899. Stamp postmarked 'Narrabeen December 26 19??'... Is view along Pittwater Road - the State Library of NSW has the same postcard, by Broadhurst, and dates the view as circa 1900-1927. The road is unsealed. Courtesy National Museum of Australia. Don McLean was given the first postmaster position at Narrabeen.


Narrabeen estate superb view 1915; Dympna, Heather, Ettalong and Berith streets and Rose - Lantana Avenues  Item c050370021


Superb view estate price list 1914 - Item c050370062 


The Local Government Act 1919 

The earliest form of planning controls in NSW were contained in the Local Government Act 1919 - this allowed local councils to control osubdivisions and declare "residential districts" to prevent industrial and retail development in such areas - but did not provide planning controls as understood today.

From its formation in October 1913 by Narrabeen frequenters to the Narrabeen home of Charles Scultz, accompanied by Edward Hallstrom (See: First Flight in Australia at Narrabeen) George and Florence Taylor, the Town Planning Association of New South Wales lobbied strongly for planning reforms, initially with strong support from the city's leading architects, surveyors and engineers. The outbreak of World War I hampered practical outcomes but the dialogue between state officials, civic authorities and planning advocates was revived as considerations of postwar reconstruction and repatriation loomed large towards the close of hostilities. In 1917 John Daniel Fitzgerald, minister for both Public Health and for Local Government in the Holman government, called for the universal adoption of town planning ideals, involving the;

benevolent co-operation of statesmen of all parties … of men of good will of all churches and creeds… [and] of [all] unclassified bodies of men and women who love their country and desire its development and progress. 

His great passion was a new system of governance for greater Sydney to include metropolitan-wide town planning controls that culminated in the revised Local Government Act in 1919. This extended the range of discretionary powers for councils in subdivision and development matters (although not far enough according to Nesbit). While planning controls were not introduced, councils were empowered to declare 'residential districts', a provision exploited wilfully by well-heeled municipalities anxious to prevent incursions by factories and shops. Fitzgerald also appointed a Town Planning Advisory Board. The pattern of metropolitan growth was left to market forces.[4.]

From the Local Government Act 1919:

DIVISION 3.—Residential districts.

309. (1) The Governor may on the application of the council—

(a) declare by proclamation any defined portion of an area to be a residential district;

(b) by proclamation alter or abolish a residential district ;

(c) prohibit the erection in such district of any building for use for the purposes of such trades, industries, manufactures, shops, and places of public amusemen t as may be described in the proclamation ; and

(d) prohibit the use of any building in the district for any such purposes ; and

(e) prohibit the erection or use of advertisement hoardings in the district.

(2) Nothing in this section shall preclude the continuance of the use of any building for any purpose for which such building was used at the date of the proclamation aforesaid, or for such other purpose as the council may in the circumstances deem reasonable. 

DIVISION 4.—Applications, plans, and specifications.

310. Subject to the provisions of this Ac t and of any ordinance every building hereafter erected in the area shall be erected to the satisfaction of the council—

(a) in conformity with this Act and the ordinances ;

and

(b) in conformity with the application, plans, and specifications in respect of which the council has given its approval for the erection of the building. 

There was also, in the commencement of the Local Government Act 1919 in 1920, the status of roads shown in plans of subdivision has rarely been in doubt.  That Act, and its successor, provided that, on the registration of a plan of subdivision showing a road and containing a statement of intention to dedicate it as a public road, the road was so opened, and remained so.

Before that date, and this Act, the status of roads in plans of subdivision could be, and often was, in doubt.  Save for a limited number of roads governed by some early 19th century statutes, the question of whether a road in a subdivision had been opened as a public road or not was left to the common law, which required both an intention to dedicate the road as a public road, and actual use of the road by the public, or adoption by the council on the public's behalf (as, for example, by sealing it).  The position was further complicated by the possible application of an ancient legal rule which provided, in effect, that the creation or sale of a lot described or shown as adjoining a road gave that lot title to the land to the middle of the road, subject to any rights of use which the public, or other owners, might enjoy.

Because of this uncertainty, the Local Government Act 1919 contained provisions enabling a council, in cases of doubt, to publish a notice in the Gazette after notifying affected owners, whereupon the roads became public roads.  An appeal process was open to owners who received notice.  Similar provisions are now found in sections 16 and 17 of the Roads Act 1993.

From the Local Government Act 1919:

226 . (1) Public roads may be classified in relation to the use which they are intended or calculated to serve.

(2) The classification shall be as follows, that is to say—

(a) main roads, being roads proclaimed as main roads ;

(b) secondary roads, being roads for general local traffic ;

(c) residential roads, being roads primarily for access to residences;

(d) pathways, being roads exclusively for footpassengers and such classes of vehicles propelled by foot-passengers as may be prescribed ;

(e) lanes, being roads primarily for access to the back of premises.

(3) The classification shall be made by the council except in respect of main roads.

(4) The classification shall be fixed and take effect upon notification in the Gazette. It shall also be notified in a newspaper.

(5) Subject to the provisions of this Act and until roads are classified hereunder—

(a) all public roads which are sixty-six feet wide or over (other than main roads) shall be deemed to be secondary roads ;

(b) all public roads which are more than twenty feet and less than sixty-six feet wide (other than main roads) shall be deemed to be residential roads ;

(c) all public roads which are more than twelve feet and not more than twenty feet wide shall be deemed to be lanes ;

(d) all public roads which are not more than twelve feet wide shall be deemed to be; pathways.

(6) The provisions of this Act with respect to classification of roads shall, unless inconsistent with the context, be deemed to include alteration of classification and re-classification.

227 . (1) There shall be a standard width for each class of public roads, that is to say—

(a) for a main road not less than eighty feet;

(b) for a secondary road—sixty-six feet;

(c) for a residential road—sixty-six feet;

(d) for a pathway—twelve feet;

(e) for a lane—twenty feet;

(2) In the case of a public road in existence at the commencement of this Act the fact that the road is less than the standard width for a particular class shall not preclude it from being assigned to that class.

(3) The Width of Streets and Lanes Act, 1902shall not apply to a municipality or shire.

228 . The width of a road shall be ascertained by measuring at right angles to the course thereof from the alignment on each side of the road.

229 . (1) Subject to this Act every new public road shall—

(a) be classified before it is opened; and

(b) be opened to or beyond the standard width for its class.

(2) In the case of a new residential road the council may on such terms as it deems proper permit the opening of a residential road of less than the standard width : 

Provided that any such residential road shall not have less space than three feet for a footway on each side and fourteen feet between the footways for carriage way, treeplanting, and the like, together with such turning and passing places of additional width for vehicles as the council may require. 

Section 340A Local Government Act 1919 provides that parcels shown as 'public garden and recreation space' (and no others) can be conveyed or transferred to the council as public reserve. The provisions of s.340A were carried over to s.50 of the 1993 Act and still enable a council to acquire title to 'public garden and recreation space' shown in a plan approved before 15 June 1964. The section provides that the council may either:

direct that the parcel be transferred to the council (s.50(2)) or

publish a notice in the Government Gazette notifying that the land is vested in its name (s.50(4)).

Section 340D Local Government Act 1919 commenced on 16 June 1964 and enabled a 'Public Reserve' to vest automatically in Council upon registration of a deposited plan of subdivision provided the plan bears a statement (on the administration sheet) to that effect:

IT IS INTENDED TO DEDICATE LOT .... AS A PUBLIC RESERVE

See also s.195C(1)(d)(ii) Conveyancing Act 1919.

The words 'PUBLIC RESERVE' must be added to the relevant lot on the face of the plan.

A certificate of title for the new public reserve lot is created in the name of the council. A 'KP' notification is entered in the second schedule:

THE LAND WITHIN DESCRIBED IS PUBLIC RESERVE

The provisions of s.340 were carried over into ss.49(1) and (2) Local Government Act 1993.

Locally:

MAKING NEW HOMES FOR SYDNEY

NOTABLE SUSPENSION BRIDGE 

Gordon-Narrabeen Belt

To the north of Sydney— not very far north, indeed, but sufficiently so to be out of the reach of anything short of well-organised exploration— lies a region where man (so far as a speculative builder can be called man) has never placed his foot. The dense population which accumulate more and more' thickly around Sydney's central area, do not spread that way. South of the harbor they have accumulated evenly and without serious gaps. A five-mile half circle, struck out from the post office, reaching1 the Heads on the east and Drummoyne on the west, -will take in Cook's River on the south, and this half circle will be full of houses. It practically represents the area of the congested residential suburbs. 

But across the harbor, the remaining half of the circle will be filled mainly with scrub. There is an inhabited nucleus of Milson's Point and Neutral Bay, with Mosman, Artarmon and Gore Hill scattered around them, but once out of these redoubtable suburbs, whatever population there is drags along the three gradually dwindling lines of the Lane Cove, the northern line, and the ocean front, till it subsides, little by little, into the unpopulated deserts of the' Hawkesbury slopes beyond Hornsby and Newport. 

Keeping away from the three main lines of settlement — or rather keeping between' them, for they stretch out like arms of a star fish from Lavender Bay — one can get into virgin bush in about three or three and a half miles in any direction. 

New Residential Belt 

Energetic spirits in the neighborhood have accordingly aimed at adding to the available residential area of their ''Shore' a new belt running east, and west from Gordon to Narrabeen. The proposal (which lately came before Mr. Estell, the Minister for Works) for a railway connecting these two points, owes its origin to the general rushfulness of the two enterprising shire councils of Kuring-Gai and Warringah — representing respectively the hills and the coast areas concerned. From Gordon the suggested route stretches across St. Ives, a highly successful orange-growing district, and then plunges at once into 10,000 acres of Crown lands — almost entirely unpeopled at present — all, or nearly all, of which it is asserted could be made to' (yield as freely as St. Ives, if connected up with the existing lines by a rail to Gordon.

The visitor to the district, before being permitted to tax his intellect with speculations of this character, however, is taken to see Gordon's latest triumph of local administrative and engineering skill, a suspension bridge across one of its many picturesque gorges, which, so Mr. Fitzsimmons, the president, freely boasts, has cost neither the Council nor the Government a penny. When one asks how this miracle has been achieved, It is replied, by the imposition of a light special tax upon the enhanced value of the land upon the farther side of the gorge, which the bridge has opened up. 

Residences here — previously inaccessible—are now brought within ten minutes' easy walk of the station. Land is rapidly being built upon, and is in high demand, and owners pay without audible repining the tax required to cover interest and sinking fund on the cost ol the bridge 'that carries them over.' The design of this bridge-itself a most elegant example of constructional aesthetics — is the work of the shire engineer, Mr. Kirkpatrick, who is the son of the late Under Secretary to the Treasury. 

The bridge, which is so built as to sway slightly under the footsteps of the pedestrian, thus had to be traversed twice by the members of a select party which waited upon Mr. Taylor, the 'oldest inhabitant' of the gorge, once M.P., and it was noted by all that the swaying was distinctly more perceptible on returning after a brief but quickening experience of his discriminating hospitality. 

Tumble-down Dick 

Having passed St. Ives and the homes of various orange growers who are making huge incomes on tiny allotments, one skirts the boundary of Kuringai Chase for a while, before plunging into the Crown land area before mentioned. This area is a rich one. The soil is black, the timber heavy, and the undergrowth o£ the dense and varied type that tells the experienced Sydneyites that there is something there besides his native sandstone. Beyond its eastern boundary .lie.; the long descent on the road which leads from the highlands one has hitherto been traversing, to the water levels of the coast. 

This is Tumble-Down Dick, once, a mere vaguely known remoteness to dwellers on the southern side; now, in this age of motor cars becoming more familiar, from which a finer series of views of the Pacific can be had than from any other point this side of Newport. The ocean and the Narrabeen Lagoon come swiftly into view in aspects so rapidly changing and so enchanting that the journey is ended among them practically before one realises that the. plateau has been left behind. Narrabeen is reached — bustling and prosperous Narrabeen, with its new houses arising apparently in countless hundreds and its many thriving shops and businesses.

'This is the transformation,' it is said 'that a mere tramline has effected here. A few years ago and Narrabeen had no population beyond a couple of hotels full of guests, and a few dsmented artists who had wandered down here to seek for local color for pictures of the Dead Heart of Australia. What an infinitely greater change will a direct connection! with the Northern line necessarily bring' about!' 

The financial prospects of the line are stated locally thus. First, the sale of Crown lands at an enhanced value would pay for the whole line, or nearly so. Secondly, there would be large settlement along its route — chiefly of orange growers —and their traffic would make the line pay; Thirdly, it would be used by residents of the Northern Suburbs as a way down to the ocean beaches of Collaroy and Narrabeen. The possibilities of this last source of revenue can, no doubt, be easily overstated, but apart from this its prospects look solid enough. The advantages to the metropolis as a whole of the opening-up of this hitherto untouched hinterland would be enormous.


A SUSPENSION' BRIDGE BUILT WITHOUT A SHILLING OF GOVERNMENT OR MUNICIPAL LOAN. HOW WAS IT DONE. BELOW, MAP OF PROPOSED INTER-SUBURBAN RAILWAY. 


MAKING NEW HOMES FOR SYDNEY (1921, July 24). Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123240150

WHERE TO LIVE
Our Suburban Problem EXPANDING RESIDENTIAL ZONE Great Lack of Facilities

Sydney's rapidly expanding- suburban area and the congestion of the nearer suburbs raises the Important question; In which direction must people drift to make their homes?

There is adequate land in handy localities for all classes, but the system of transit is behind the times and people are being forced along certain defined routes at an ever - increasing distance from the city.

The City of Sydney, with its enormous suburban areas, is outgrowing itself. Like a great commercial giant, it is stretching its arms, and sweeping the rapidly Increasing suburban population further afield; and all this huge expansion is taking place at a pace that is years ahead of the transit and water and sewerage facilities.

In which directions is suburban Sydney to expand In the future? Where are the large tracts of land to be found within reasonable travelling distance of the great centre of employment and industry to house the people under the healthy hygiene conditions which ... civilisation demands?

Obviously settlement follows lines of communication, but on all sides there is the spectacle in suburban Sydney of important settlements springing up in areas where the transit facilities are hopelessly inadequate. Still, the tendency is to follow the railways and tramways, and so, in many cases, vast outer areas are being developed and settled while comparatively close tracts of land of exceptional residential value are lying idle for the want of communications and other facilities. 

To express the position In a few words, there is ample land within less than a twenty miles radius of the Sydney General Post Office to carry more than double the present population. 

Three Types of Expansion 

There are, broadly speaking,  three distinct types of residents drifting into the outer suburbs. There is the working man who, in increasing numbers, is acquiring his own home; there is the middle to wealthy class, who seek exclusive areas, and perhaps a larger area of land tor their homes; and there is, generally, the lover of the waterside, who insists on living within reach of the surf or the harbor. 

So, accordingly, there are definite directions of expansion, chosen almost automatically by those different classes. Among all, however, the spreading out is rapid, and there is a vast quantity of land either on the market or ready to be put on In all quarters.

Hugging the Beaches 

There is a growing tendency to flock to the beaches. All classes of people seek to get as near to them as possible, with the result that the suburbs situated handy to the City are already greatly over-crowded. But, fortunately, there is room for expansion, and those who are closely associated with the business of providing land for building purposes declare that the whole of that vast area between Manly and Narrabeen, and later on even as far as Newport, will become the waterside suburbs to the north; while on the southern side of Sydney the whole of the land between Bondi Coogee and Long Bay, will be taken up and built upon. 

It is in this latter direction that the waterside expansion of the working class section of the community will in all probability rapidly drift, because of its proximity to the ever-growing Industrial areas. 

The steamer Journey from Manly, preceded by the long tram trip from the beaches to the north, make it an awkward place for workers. 

But the Increasing popularity of the beaches cannot be denied, and, apart from those definitely defined areas, such as the Illawarra suburbs, which are pretty well linked up with railway communication, should be among the most sought after localities.

Working Class Areas

A spreading out of the population throughout the whole of the county of Cumberland is Inevitable In the years to come. The county is rather a mysterious place to most persons who have not the faintest Idea of the actual area it embraces, despite the fact that it is brought under their notice every week by hundreds of Government notices and proclamations. 

It extends from the Hawkesbury River on the north to between Bulli and Thirroul on the south, and to Penrith in the west.  .... 

Choice Sites 

As Is only natural of course, the areas where large homes already and the direction in which this class of expansion is likely to go, is to be found among the higher altitudes  of the North Shore and main northern lines, beyond Mosman, through Middle Harbor, and out over that magnificent high country that extends almost from Northbrldto to Narrabeen and Newport.  .... WHERE TO LIVE (1919, March 6). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article120839591

Warringah (N.S.W.) Shire Council is considering a report furnished by their engineer, suggesting that 50 feet by 100 feet be the minimum size of building allotments in residential areas.  Business Opportunities (1920, August 2). Construction and Local Government Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1913 - 1930), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108986690

Not every suburb in our area was instantly proclaimed a residential one, these occurred as more and more homes were built and people settled permanently in these areas or 'villages'. We still had a 'country' feel and 'resort' atmosphere that persisted, with lots of orchards, dairies or tomato growing districts that persisted into the 1960s. This first version of local governemnt often chose to respond to meeting the needs of its residents - one example comes from the Shire Conference of 1921:

Disposal of Fruit.

The Warringah Shire Council asked for co-operation-re the following resolution;

''That, in view of the recent wholesale wastage of fruit, this -council invites the co-operation of the Kuring-gai, Hornsby, Erina, and Baulkham Hills Shire Councils-in asking the Minister for Agriculture to convene a conference of representatives from all fruit-growing districts to consider the best means of disposing of this necessary commodity, either by co-operative jam factories on the lines of those of the butter industry, which have made dairying such an enormous success, or by any other means the conference may consider desirable."

Cr. Pye moved, '' That we co-operate." Something should be done with regard to this matter. They had adopted this idea at Leeton, and he did not see why it could not be done here.

The motion was carried.

The President and Cr. Pye were appointed delegates to the proposed conference. Blacktown Shire Council (1921, January 29). Nepean Times (Penrith, NSW : 1882 - 1962), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article104928566

A few years later:

THE WONDERS OF WARRINGAH

IN FIVE YEARS Shire Has Doubled Its Population
Valuations made recently by Mr. P. Carew, a former shire clerk and famous International footballer, speak more eloquently than words ever can regarding the growth of Warringah Shire, of which Narrabeen is such an important centre. The unimproved value of shire lands for rating and the number of rate payers are shown in parallel columns for the past five years: 
Year.  Rating.       Population. 
1920  £1,086,056'    6,050 
1921  1,386,847      8,365 
1922  1,903,179     9,308 
1923  2,137,618     9,424 
1924 2,390,850     10,654 
1925  2,926,890     11,577 
The population of the shire all the year round is estimated to be between - 13,000 and 14,000. There are about 6500 buildings in the shire.


COUNCILLOR ATKINS is Narrabeen's. universal 'provider. 
COUNCILLOR HAROLD ATKINS.  president of the local Progress Association and a prominent man in other directions at Narrabeen, followed, in the father's steps, for he, too, is a nursery man. A scheme the Progress Association has in hand is building a first-class road right round Narrabeen Lake. 
Electric light and city water are laid on in the portions of the district which range from Manly to Narrabeen, and the whole of this area now carries within the Sydney fire district. The area of the shire is 109 square Miles, and it extends from Manly on the south to Barrenjoey on the north, from the Pacific Ocean on the east to Middle Harbor, French's Forest and Pymble' on the west.


MR. ROBERT GEORGE JAMIESON has been Shire Clerk for the past 10 years. He came to Warringah from Coolamon.
THE WONDERS OF WARRINGAH SHIRE (1925, February 1). Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 7 (Social and Magazine Section). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128164179


Of the many glories of Warringah Shire — which embraces 109 square miles of picturesque country, and charming ocean beach between Manly and Barrenjoey — is. Narrabeen, the progressive seaside resort, famed for its surf beach, lake, and beautiful bushland. A great future awaits a spot so lavishly favored by Nature. From many parts of the Commonwealth people are now building handsome homes by Narrabeen's sea beach and lake waters.

ELANORA ESTATE
300 Allotments for Sale
Elanora Estate, Narrabeen, is a portion of 640 acres purchased last year by a company composed of wealthy and mostly retired gentlemen for the purpose of subdividing into building allotments. 
Last year the first subdivision was opened to the public for purchase. This subdivision contained 127 allotments, which were sold within six weeks of the date of opening. The prices ranged from £1 .to £3/3/ a foot. The majority of purchasers are people living in and around this district, and every block sold was inspected before purchase. The company have now opened up a second subdivision, which contains about 300 allotments, the prices ranging from 25/- to 50/- a foot. An amount of approximately £10,000 has been expended on the subdivisions by way of clearing and road-making, surveying, etc. Every allotment has a frontage to a properly constructed 66ft. road, and practically every allotment has permanent panoramic outlooks of lake and ocean. 
FINE FRONTAGES. 
The surveyors in laying-out this estate have taken great care not to repeat the mistakes which were made in the majority of our present-day suburbs. Every allotment has an area of over 5000 feet, and has a frontage of 50 feet. There are no narrow roads or laneways, and this should be an inducement to any person desirous of becoming a land-owner. World tourists who have inspected this estate say there are no views in the world better than those to be obtained from practically every part of the estate. Narrabeen is situated exactly seven miles by tram from the Manly Wharf. An idea of the growth of this part of the coast can be formed from the figures given elsewhere. With the ad-vent of the North Shore Bridge, and the electric railways all that part of the coast which lies between Manly arid the Hawkesbury River must be-come the finest suburban sites for the city of Sydney. 
WONDERS OF THE LAKE. 
Elanora Estate, situated as it is, should prove to purchasers a splendid investment over a period of a few years. Narrabeen will, on account of its lake and ocean beaches, be the premier suburb lying along the coast-line. Narrabeen at the present time is a tram terminus. Motor 'buses meet each tram at this terminus for all the surrounding beauty spots. Narrabeen Lake is one of the most beautiful in New South Wales. Week-ends find it thronged with the tired business man seeking his pleasures and relaxation in a way that is cheap and healthy. Boating, fishing, swimming, and picnicking are some of the charms offered on this lake.
'I bought two blocks of land when I arrived at Narrabeen several years ago. They cost me £50 for the-pair — a pound down and a pound a month. Recently I sold them. A man cheer-fully gave me £650; and he can get more already for them. Is there any-thing wrong with this place?' Narrabeen resident ELANORA ESTATE (1925, February 1).Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 7 (Social and Magazine Section). Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128164075 

NARRABEEN AND ITS PANORAMAS
ARCADIAN SPOT OF SURF AND LAKES  HAS DOUBLED ITS POPULATION IN LAST FIVE YEARS 
NARRABEEN, with its golden beach', shining lake, and flowery forest, is a jewel in a fairyland called Warringah. Electric trams, motor bus services, and motor cars have enabled city folk to easily reach this beautiful spot, but greater wonders still have been worked lately. The new bridge across the Spit has had an effect upon Narrabeen, which very few people anticipated. Any number, of motorists are now driving across Spit bridge and direct into Narrabeen, thus avoiding the detour through Manly. Narrabeen is naturally very happy on this account. When the North Shore bridge is built, and the railway is running through Narrabeen, as it is anticipated it will, the place will be- one of great importance. It is difficult, as one regards crowds of gaily-dressed bathers on Narrabeen's beaches to-day, to realise that 20 years ago there were but three houses in the place. 


FURLOUGH HOUSE, Where, thousands of soldiers' wives and children have received kindly treatment. 
NARRABEEN AND ITS PANORAMAS (1925, February 1). Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 7 (Social and Magazine Section). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128164073 


The panoramic picture above depicts the beauties of Narrabeen, its rugged headlands, bushland, highlands and beautiful lake.

MR. PAT McCAULEY,
Boniface of Narrabeen
Mr. Patrick Bernard McCauley, proprietor of Narrabeen Hotel, is known from end to end of the shire, and is a popular figure in several spheres, though he has been in the district only three years.
Born at Clyde River N.S.W., half a century, ago, he takes a keen interest in all sports, and before moving to Narrabeen was known from Newcastle to Goulburn, an area of 200 miles. Recently he showed his horses at Gosford Show and won two first prizes. He is a member of the executive of Warringah Shire Association, and works hard to make the annual show a success. Mr. McCauIey was for 15-years a member of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade, hold the Bronze Medal, and was present at many of the biggest fires in Sydney. During the time he has resided at Narrabeen Mr. McCauIey has made his presence felt, by building shops and dwellings, and laying out an area for fruit growing. He is also the owner of a mixed farm, and guests of his at the hotel are always assured of everything fresh.

MR.McCAULEY'S NARRABEEN HOTEL.


MR. P. B. McCAULEY. of Narrabeen, is a prominent figure in Warringah Shire.

WHAT BRIDGES MEAN.
As a result of the construction of a bridge of concrete across Middle Harbor between Roseville and French's Forest, the distance between the northern suburbs as far west as Parramatta and the coastal beaches north of. Manly has been greatly reduced. 
Traffic over the roads leading from the bridge to the coast, especially at weekends, and on holidays, is enormous. The council is asking the Main Roads Board to proclaim the chief road a main road, so that it may be kept in reasonably good order. 
The construction of the bridge brought French's Forest and the adjoining, settlement of Belrose within easy-distance of the North Shoreline, and in consequence the development of French's Forest, by way of subdivision and increased values, is considerable. 
NARRABEEN LAKE. 
Rapid development is taking place on the northern side of the lake. An estate recently cut up (Collins' Estate) is rapidly being built; on. Other large estates on the northern side are now being subdivided, notably, Macpherson's Wimbledon Estate, Carefree Estate, and Elanora Estate. In each case portions of the lake frontage are being dedicated to the council for public recreation purposes, and the time when there will be a public road or public reserve right round the lake, should not be far distant. Some of the land on the north side is low-lying, particularly part of Wimbledon Estate — the land nearest the main road — but the owner, with commendable enterprise, has just entered into a contract, for the raising of the land by dredging operations. This will not only render useful what is now waste land, but will deepen the lake channel and make it more attractive for boating, etc. '
‘About £30,000 was sunk in the electric lighting scheme, the president went on, 'and 500 private consumers were benefiting — after two years. We thought that was wonderful, but to-day we have 1400 people subscribing. And hundreds of -new applications are coming in from all parts, of the shire. 
THE PREMIER'S GIFT. 
'The new reinforced concrete; bridge over Middle Harbor, between Roseville and French's Forest, has proved a splendid thing for the district. Sir Geo. Fuller, when he sanctioned this work, rendered a great service to a large number of Returned Soldiers who hardly needed employment at the time. Those who had land at French’s Forest had it converted into residential block.’
Councillor Parr does not make mention of the fact, but, as a matter of fact, the returned men of French’s Forest showed their appreciation of the work he had put in on their behalf during the agitation for a bridge by presenting him with a handsome silver service. 
The projected road of concrete between Manly and Newport – 9 ½ miles —is still a live matter in the shire and it is hoped that it will not be long ere the work is begun. As soon, as the Main Roads Board is formed the shire hopes for, better treatment in the way of monetary grants, and when it is mentioned that among her beaches are Harbord, Curl Curl, Dee .Why, Collaroy, Narrabeen, Mona Vale, Newport, Avalon, Whale Beach, and Palm Beach, it will be realised the need there is for good communication between Sydney and these populous spots. 

COUNCILLOR PARR
President of the Shire
The Shire President, Councillor Arthur George Parr, was born in Sydney 47 years ago of Australian parents, and he takes a real Australian view of things Warringah. Though it is but 12 years since he entered the shire, he has prospered in business, and all his eggs are in one basket 
'I wouldn't have money anywhere else,' he says, 'for I think the shire has a wonderful future. It seems only yesterday since we got electric lighting. Now we are busy promoting all sorts of bigger schemes, and will go on doing so for many years, I hope.

COUNCILLOR PARR, the Shire's President.

'BOOST IT'
Narrabeen has no more ardent admirer than Mr. Edward N. Atkin, of Lagoon-street. Born 46 years ago at Auckland, N.Z., he tripped round the world for five years as a lad, and worked as a sugar boiler in almost every European capital before he settled 'in the richest district in Australia,' to quote his own words. Mr. Atkin says Narrabeen, less than 20 years back, boasted three houses, and no roads other than the main road.
Today the total-assessments of the shire every year exceed £1,000,000: 
'All I make here in business I invest in 'Narrabeen. That's what I think of the place, ''he added. 'The place badly needs boosting, and I am glad to know the Sunday Times is out to give it a shove along.' 
He thinks not another resort on the coast can be compared with Narrabeen, which has bush-flowers, beautiful panoramic views, glistening beaches, and jutting headlands, and a wonderful beach. 
Two buses ran daily between Manly and Narrabeen. To-day a string of fashionable cars almost continually passes through the town. 'In two decades roads have been cut, bush has been cleared, surf sheds erected, a capital hotel has been built, businesses established, and a residential population has sprung up. Who can tell what Narrabeen will be in another 20 years ?


MR. ATKIN, an old resident of Narrabeen.
SURF AND GOLF
Linking Up of Collaroy
Mr. A. C. Greenwood, J. P., who has been prominently identified with real estate transactions and the progress of the district for a decade, says it is typical of the area that the values of business sites in Collaroy have increased during that period from 17/6 to £50 a foot. Choice residential sites are now worth up to £20 a foot.
There is little doubt that this pretty spot will before long lose its week-end aspect, and become a suburb of Sydney in which business men of Sydney will reside permanently. Speedier transit is all that is required, and that is coming fast. 
AN £11,000 SALE. 
The popularity of the district was never so much in evidence as it is this season, and this in spite of the wretched climatic conditions which have prevailed. People from many parts of the country were present on January 3 at the sale held by Messrs. Raine and Horne, of Sydney, associated with Mr. A. C. Greenwood. Forty seven lots were sold out of 65 offered. Prices ranged from £2/15/ to £5/15/ a foot, and the total proceeds of the sale were approximately £11,000. The land forms part of the famous Collaroy Heights Estate, owned by the Salvation Army, and is opposite the pretty Dee Why Lagoon. At the present time the Army authorities are constructing, at their own expense, a footbridge on the northern end of the lagoon, and this should prove a boon to residents, for it will provide a quick cut to the surfing beach. 
A BEACH SCHEME.
Attention is directed to the Plateau Estate, the views from which are said to be quite equal to those obtained from the heights of Bulli. About 800 subdivided lots of this estate were acquired by the late Mr. T. H. Green; who was a successful speculator and a keen judge of land value. The estate is rather difficult to get at owing to the steep grade of Alexander street, the natural link between the estate and the main street; but once it is possible for a motor car to reach the Plateau Estate, this land will be of great value indeed for residential purposes. Vendors and persons, interested should bestir themselves to obtain better access to this valuable rate-producing estate. 
The beach resumption at Collaroy is eagerly awaited in its final stages. About half of the purchase price is already assured, as the result of the Government contribution of £6000, a gift of £2000 from the Property Board of the Salvation Army, and £1000 from the ratepayers in the immediate vicinity. When the area is finally resumed, no doubt schemes of beautification will be carried out. The Surf Club have money in hand for the erection of a club-house worthy of the club and the district. Another great attraction to Collaroy is the nine-hole golf course, which is exceptionally well patronised. The tennis courts have been so popular, as to warrant extensions. The swimming pool or rock bath is a big draw.

MR A. C. GREENWOOD has land to sell.
Telephone .Y 8249. 
A. C. GREENWOOD,
VALUATOR and REAL'' ESTATE AGENT.
Offices: Collaroy- Beach Tram Section, and at Corner South Creek-rd., Dee Why.
SURF AND GOLF (1925, February 1).Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 7 (Social and Magazine Section). Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128164070 

The bridge opening are they referring to:

Above: OPENING OF THE BRIDGE ACROSS MIDDLE HARBOUR. THE CEREMONY NEAR ROSEVILLE ON SATURDAY, AFTERNOON. OPENING OF THE BRIDGE ACROSS MIDDLE HARBOUR. (1924, September 22). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16174040 

Below: OPENING OF THE MIDDLE HARBOUR BRIDGESeveral thousand people attended the official opening on Saturday afternoon of the –Middle Harbour Bridge between French's Forest and Roseville. After the opening ceremony, which was performed by the Premier, Sir George Fuller, hundreds of motor cars passed in procession over the bridge. Sir George Fuller said the new bridge would prove an important link between the northern suburbs and the important beaches on the northern side of Sydney Harbour, besides substantially assisting settlers in French’s Forest. OPENING OF THE MIDDLE HARBOUR BRIDGE. (1924, September 24). Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article169149144 



Changing The Landscape: The Macphersons

Narrabeen Lagoon and surrounds, alike elsewhere in waterside frontages of Pittwater, was subject to dredging. The most standout among these was the reclaiming of land to form the present site of Wimbledon Avenue and this was undertaken by a member of the Macpherson family during the 1920's. The Macpherson family is where the name of 'Warriewood' originates from. Although they allowed others to purchase and subdivide some of their many larger holdings along the peninsula, the reclaiming of land to form Wimbledon was undertaken by one of the Macpherson brothers.


Five women stepping into a punt at Narrabeen Lagoon with [Macpherson] male at stern, c1905, Image No.: c071400026, courtesy State Library of NSW. From MacPherson Family Albums

Plan of Subdivision.

An owner of property submitted a plan of subdivision of an estate at Narrabeen to the Warringah Shire Council for approval. He proposed to allow a road around the waters of the Lake that would provide a beautiful parade, if the council would make some concession in return. Plan of Subdivision. (1911, October 20). The Land (Sydney, NSW : 1911 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102900950

Further north, on the site of the present Narrabeen High School, the family brought land under the Real Property Act: 

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.
Applications have been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the Real Property Act, Certificate of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in accordance with the Third Schedule to the said Act, on or before the 15th JANUARY, 1908.
No. 13,753. APPLICANT:—Tertius Horatio Macpherson, Narrabeen. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, Shire Warringah, 62 acres 1 rood 34 perches on Narrabeen Lagoon and Pittwater Roads, part portion 8 granted to Thomas Collins, exclusive of the road 1 chain wide the area of which has been deducted from the total area; adjoining the property of J. Wheeler.  NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1907, November 27). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 6473. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226586609

MACPHERSON SUBDIVISION.
Messrs J E. Green and Co. report having sold lots in the Macpherson Subdivision, Narrabeen, at prices from 38/ to 20/ per foot. PROPERTY MARKET. (1912, January 7). Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126053819


Macpherson subdivision no 1. 1912; Oak Street and in pencil 'now Jackson road'. Item No.: c050370039, from Narrabeen Subdivisions Album, courtesy State Library of NSW

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.
APPLICATIONS having been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the Real Property Act, Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in accordance with the third Schedule to the said Act on ...th March, 1912.
No. 17,427. APPLICANT:—Septimus Wharrie Macpherson, Glebe Point. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, shire Warringah, 33 acres 1 rood 23 perches, on Pittwater-road, and on Main Creek, at Narrabeen Lagoon,—part land granted as 50 acres( portion 47 of parish) to William Bernard RhodesNOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, January 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales(Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 364. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226770272

GOVERNMENT NOTICES.
NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.— APPLICATIONS having been made, to bring the lands hereunder described under 'the provisions or the Real Property Act, Certificates of Indefeasible Title will Issue "unless Caveats be lodged In accordance with the Third Schedule to the said Act ON OR BEFORE THE 28th FEBRUARY, 1912:
No. 17,427. APPLICANT : — Septimus Wharrie Macpherson, Glebe Point. Land: —County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, shire Warringah, 55a. 1r. 28p., on Pittwater-road, and on Main Creek, at Narrabeen Lagoon,— part land granted as 50a. (portion 47 of parish) to William Bernard Rhodes. Advertising (1912, February 10). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 2 (FINAL SPORTING). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221998185 

The Macpherson's appear in the earliest Warringah Shire Council Minutes of Meetings. This notice, a few decades on, is interesting when in contrast against Tertius later giving land to council closely alongside where Wimbledon Avenue now is:

26th August, 1918 - Continued. 8, W. B. Giles 21/8/18, stating Mr. T. H. Macpherson's bedrock price for land adjoining  Narrabeen Lake, proposed to be purchased for a park Resolved (on notion of Councillor Atkin, seconded by Councillor Duffy) that application, under Seal of the Council, be made for the Governor's approval to the Council purchasing from T. H. Macpherson, for public recreation purposes. 25.acres, or thereabouts, on the north shore of Narrabeen  Lake, and being part of Portion 8, Parish of Narrabeen  County of Cumberland for Two thousand. four hundred pounds (.£2400) on the following terms, namely :- £100 cash deposit, balance to stand over until after the termination of the war, and to be then repaid in six equal annual instalments, interest at 6% to be paid on unpaid balances. 

There was an apparent uproar about having 25 acres put aside apparently - possibly the cost, and the plans ended up being ditched - this acquisition of land for public purposes is one of the markers of the Warringah Shire Council of the 1920's - under this policy and program numerous areas now still intact were acquired for the people here and those who visit:

Local Government Department 23/10/18, relating to French's Forest Progress Association's protest against the purchase of  Macpherson's land at Narrabeen for park purposes. I 5. Local Government Department, 31/10/18 relative to the Brookvale Progress Association's and a public meeting's protest against same proposed purchase :. Councillor Atkin Ditto. moved, That in view of the apparent close proximity of the termination of the war, consideration of these matters be deferred for three months, and that the Local Government Department be asked to stay its hand accordingly.; Councillor Sterland seconded. Carried. Councillor Corkery voted in the negative. .

W. B. Giles. 8/5/19, on behalf of T. H. Macpherson re: proposed park, withdrawing from sale the land offered for public park purposes at Narrabeen   Resolved, 8212; That the Department be informed that the Council's application for the purchase of the land as now necessarily withdrawn, and that a letter be sent to Mr Macpherson thanking him for has consideration in holding the offer open so long.

T. H. Macpherson 8/4/22, agreeing conditionally to Contribution £50 towards the cost of a culvert to connect Pittwater Road with the unnamed road on the north side of Narrabeen Lagoon: Received. S.W. Macpherson, 29/3/22 requesting sufficient time to go thoroughly into the question of the matter of the public creek having access across his property from the proposed bridge across Narrabeen Creek: Resolved; - (Crs. Hewitt, Quirk) That fresh tenders be called for the construction of a foot- bridge across Narrabeen Creek.

27th June, 1922 - Contd. J - : Tenders, Macpherson’s One tender only was received for the construction of  Macpherson Bridge, Narrabeen, and was not accepted.

18th September 1922 That Contractor Heaton's offer to extend the wing fencing on the eastern approaches to Macpherson's culvert, Narrabeen, be accepted.

J. W. Maund & Christie, 6/2/23, submitting plans (1) of proposed subdivision by T. H. Macpherson of part Portion 8, Narrabeen Lake, adjoining Carefree Estatecontaining new road, and (2) of proposed subdivision of another part of same Portion abutting into the Lake; and also stating proposals for dredging the Lake for the purpose of filling in the land : Referred to the Works Committee for report

Tramway Commissioners. 28/1/24 (1) declining to alter arrangements made for extension of tramway terminus at Narrabeen and (2) stating that no action is at present being taken to remove the waiting shed : Resolved, - (era. Parr, Hewitt) That a reply be sent stating the Council does not agree that there Is no danger to the public; further that the bus stand will remain as at present, and  the Council trusts the Department will co-operate and arrange for the to stop at the waiting room. 

Wimbledon Estate. .Maund & Christie -29/1/24, re Wimbledon Subdivision Estate. (No. 1 Macpherson's) requesting modification  of certain of the Council's requirements re road construction ; Resolved, -. (Crs. Campbell, Hewitt) That the previous requirements regarding gravelling be adhered to, and it be explained to the writers that their client is being treated in the same way as other subdividers.

Wimbledon Estate - Narrabeen Lagoon Dredging February 1924: That the Council assist Mr. Macpherson in every plausible way on the lines of the plan submitted with the letter, the dredging to be on the lines of the Councils letters of July 28th and 31st.

The Narrabeen Rock Baths history page research provides some pictorial evidence of the changes during the reclamation works:


Narrabeen lagoon, circa 1915, Item hall_34703h, courtesy State Library of NSW

Narrabeen Lake, circa 1900- 1927, from album scenes of Narrabeen. Image No; a106063h, courtesy State Library of NSW


NB: the large sign showing on the sand verge on this sid eof the bridge is for the Elanora Estate, dating this image to circa 1927-1928


Narrabeen Lagoon, General View showing Lagoon and Ocean and Looking Towards Barrenjoey, From Narrabeen circa 1927, from Album 'Samuel Wood - postcard photonegatives of Narrabeen,' - Items a1470096h, a1470091h, courtesy State Library of NSW 


Narrabeen Lagoon aerial, from album Milton Kent aerial views of Bondi, Cronulla, Granville, Haberfield, Middle Harbour, Narrabeen, Mascot, Sydney, Sydney Harbour, Tempe, between 1926-1938, Item: c111660015, courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales - and sections from to show details; NB - no Bridge from Ocean street across Lagoon present, and old Nth. NSLSC still on beach - so pre-1927 and showing the larger section now reclaimed where Wimbledon Avenue will be formed.



Photo: The intersection of Pittwater Road (Main Road No. 164) and Wakehurst Parkway (Main Road No. 397) at North Narrabeen. (From Page 12) 1966-67


Advertising (1926, March 21). Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 19. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128129123


Wimbledon Estate No. 2 - Narrabeen - Deep Creek Rd, Wimbledon... Item c050370012, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales.

PROPERTY SALE.
Richardson and Wrench, Ltd., in conjunction with
Messrs. Sunter and Mackenzie, reports having sold on the ground yesterday portion of the Wimbledon Estate No. 2, Narrabeen, at prices ranging from £5/10/ to £6/15/ per foot. PROPERTY SALE. (1926, April 6). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 13. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16268332 

Residents trying to stop the destruction of local trees: 

Narrabeen Progress Assn. 22.6.26. nominating the following gentlemen as Honorary Rangers to assist the Council in putting a stop to the cutting of trees Reserves namely T. H. Macpherson,.Kinneir Tarte, P. W. Heaton, J. Atkinson and P. Ferguson : 'Resolved; .(Crs. Atkins,. Caapbell) That the gentlemen named be appointed Honorary Rangers and each be given a letter of authority, 

Meeting of 27th September, 1926: That the Inspector's recommendations regarding the water-course through S. W. Macpherson's land, Warriewood, be adopted.

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.
APPLICATIONS have been made to bring the lands respectively described under the provisions of the Real Property Act. Caveats may be lodged on or before the respective dates mentioned:—
30th October, 1929.
No. 27,488. Tertius Horatio Macpherson, 61 a. 34 p.,por. 55 (ph.), on Narrabeen Lagoon and Narrabeen Creek, ph. Narrabeen, co. Cumberland. (A title by possession is claimed against John Scanlon or Michael Sullivan, devisee of Robert Pearce, who died in 1840.)  NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1929, August 30). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3593. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223084662

Where Bilarong Reserve is now, 5.3 hectares, stems from Tertius Macpherson - transferred to council in 1931, and was preluded by a community push to have access to the lagoon - from Warringah Shire Council minutes:

52. Warriewood Progress Assoc. - 25/10/29. (1) Again requesting that Orchard Street be made trafficable, and (2) requesting that the work of draining the bad ditch and remetalling in Vineyard Street near Macpherson Street Orchard Road be expedited. -. Decision,: (i) Overseer to furnish an estimate for making a trafficable track; (2) referred to A. Riding Councillors. ,. .. . . 53 Greenhills Improvement League. 25/10/29.. (1) Requesting that corner of Kobado Road and Powderworks Roads be widened, that the dangerous covering over the drain be removed, and that a silent cop be installed at the junction, (2) on the necessity for regulating the waters of Narrabeen  Lake, (3) on the danger to children from potholes dredged in the Lake, (4) that a protective railing be placed at the corner of Narrabeen  Road and Ingleside Road to obviate the existing danger, and (5) requesting the Council to use its best endeavours to prevent the reservation along  Narrabeen Lake being included in T.H. Macpherson 's Real Property Application

10th of March 1930
A letter from A. R. Bluett, Solicitor, 5.3.30, advising the Council against proceeding with litigation in connection with Mr. T.H. Macpherson's Real Property Application 1 portion 52, Narrabeen  Lake, was Resolved (Crs. Corkery, Hitchcock) - That the Council adopt the advice, and Mr. Bluett be instructed accordingly.


Narrabeen Estate 'Heart of Narrabeen; second using this phrase - Lake Ave, Windsor Rd, Deep Creek Rd, Wimbledon Avenue (part formed) - Item: c050370209, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales.


Advertising (1929, December 15). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 16. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225159413

Tertius had been a core member of the Narrabeen community since his Narrabeen Progress Days when part of the group who worked for over a decade to get a tram to Narrabeen and provide easier access - even if he benefited from such a development. Although Warringah Shire records show a policy of requiring a dedication of portions of land by developers to be set aside for public use, advised against litigation, allowing people to follow their own hearts, often produces the same result:

Council Reserve - Dedicated to Council from Tertius Horatio MacPherson on 9th December 1930. Title transferred to Council (C42190) on 27th January 1931. Covenant on original title ‘that the transferee will not use or permit to be used the land hereby transferred for any purpose other than as public park for public recreation’ - visit Bilarong Reserve POM - Pittwater Council, June 2008

In 1932 Isabel, his second daughter, married - 13080/1932 BIRD DOUGLAS P MACPHERSON ISABEL T M SYDNEY
The marriage was not popular with her father who in his will stated 'and as to the other one half thereof for the child or children if more than one in equal shares of the said testator's daughter Isabel Winifred Bird by any husband other than her present husband Douglas Bird whether by or during their present marriage or any re-marriage, and in default of any such children of the said Isabel Winifred Bird for the children of Peter Dunn who shall attain the age of twenty-one years in equal shares.'

In 1933 one of the aspects of being one of the early landholders of inherited wealth rears its head for those still standing where others want to move in and profit - from Warringah Shire Council Minutes of October 23rd, 1933, Item:

50. Suburban Subdivision Co. Ltd. 18/10/33, further regarding the need of access to the bridge across Deep Creek, Narrabeensuggesting the Council resume 50 links right-of-way through Macpherson's property, and also between it and the lagoon, and that the Deep Creek construction of the road be carried out as an unemployment relief work, stating that the two Companies interested would undertake to strengthen and repair the bridge at their joint expense. Resolved- That the Valuer General be asked to make a special Evaluation of land for a road Covering the private right-of-way through Macpherson’s land from the end of Deep Creek road to the bride over Deep Creek. (Drs. Hughes, Austin)

At the same time, although a few months earlier (and taking much longer to resolve):
June 19th, 1933
At this stage Mr. A. C. Greenwood presented an authority from Isaac Larkin-for himself and Mr. Isaac Larkin to discuss with the Council matter of the proposed acquisition of the Narrabeen Progress Association's block of Land upon which the South Narrabeen Surf Clubhouse stands. Mr. Greenwood stated that the matter had been referred to him by Mr. Larkin  in the ordinary course of business; that Messrs. J.T. Hewitt, S. Twight, T.H. Macpherson and other members of the original Progress Association desired that the land should not be disposed of except at the Valuer General's valuation, the Money to be paid into a Trust Fund and not given to any private individual; that when the money has been paid, the members of the old Association would meet for the purpose of deciding what fund or organisation the money should go to. Mr. Greenwood said he felt sure that while Mr. Larkin lived the Council would not get the land free of cost, and that Mr. Larkin would appoint his son as Trustee to succeed him when he died; also-that the old original members of the Association who had been interviewed also objected to Mr. Larkin agreeing to the Council's request. Resolved, - That the matter be dealt with in Committee later.

Another instance of how landscape appearance is changed:
July 3rd, 1933
QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS GENERALLY. The following requests, submitted by the Councillors named, were agreed, to By Cr. Hitchcock, seconded by Cr. Austin - That the trees on the western side of Pittwater Road from Narrabeen Bridge to Powderworks Road be removed altogether instead of being lopped as previously directed. By Cr'. Hitchcock, seconded by Cr. Hughes 

Tertius passed away in the winter of 1936:

MACPHERSON. - June 5, 1936, at his residence, Wimbledon, Deep Creek-road, Narrabeen, Tertius Horatio Macpherson, aged 64 years. Family Notices (1936, June 8). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17241065

MACPHERSON. - The Funeral of the late TERTIUS HORATIO MACPHERSON, of Wimbledon, Deep Creek-road, Narrabeen, will leave our Private Chapel, 92 The Corso, Manly, THIS AFTERNOON (Saturday), at 2.15 o'clock, for the Church of England Cemetery, Manly. T. WAUGH and CO., Funeral Directors. Tele., YU1118. Manly. Family Notices (1936, June 6). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17240637 

The Shack in the Clearing


A humble abode glorified by the flaming splendor of coral trees in full bloom, — At Deep Creek, Narrabeen. The Shack in the Clearing (1934, September 18). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 1 (FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230318329



LATE AFTERNOON STUDY IN DEEP CREEK-ROAD, NARRABEEN. Woodland Shades-- (1935, October 30).The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), , p. 16. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17237516 


Heart of Narrabeen Estate - Lake Ave, Windsor Rd, Deep Creek Rd, Wimbledon avenue - Item c050370209 - reclaimed land


Narrabeen Tram terminus 1921 - Item c050370094 


McLeans boatshed. From Scenes of Narrabeen album, circa 1900-1927 Image: a106065h, courtesy State Library of NSW - the McLean family members were among founders of the Narrabeen SLSC and part of the Narrabeen Progress Association

NEXT WEDNESDAY, 18th JANUARY, 1922.
OCEAN BEACH, NARRABEEN right at the Surf  Sheds, and a few yards only from the Lagoon, close to the Entrance, opposite ''Ocean House," and adjoining "Hillcrest". 2 FINE SITES, each 50 feet to OCEAN-STREET and THE SANDY BEACH, by through depths of from 271 feet to 285 feet,' being Lots 3 and 4, Section 63, Narrabeen Lakes Estate.
Title Torrens. Plan on view at Salerooms.
HARDIE and GORMAN PROPRIETARY, LIMITED, will sell the above by Public Auction, at  the Salerooms, Ocean House, 30 Martin-place, at 11.30 o'clock, NEXT WEDNESDAY, 18th JANUARY, 1922. Advertising (1922, January 14). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28085075




Narrabeen 1922 - Item c050370043 


BY ORDER OF THE EXECUTOR ESTATE LATE JAMES WHEELER, NARRABEEN.

1.-WATER-FRONTAGE and BUSINESS POSITION, near the TRAM TERMINUS, AT THE BRIDGE. THE BRIDGE HOUSE, built of weatherboards, wood lined inside, on stone piers, iron roof, verandah In front, and containing 6 rooms and kitchen, detached sheds of wood and iron, standing on Lots 2 and 3, sec. 42, Mount Ramsay Estate, having 61ft 7in to PITTWATER ROAD, and 60ft 7 1/2in to the lake, with depths of 300ft and 331ft back to LAGOON-STREET, to which the frontage is 100ft,

2.-HARBORD. MANLY, VACANT ALLOTMENT, in DALLEY-STREET, situate on the north side, close to Harbord-road, JUST OFF PITTW'ATER-ROAD. Frontage 25ft 9Hn by depths of 188ft 10 1/2in. and 190ft 8in, being part of Lot 7, D.P., 1448. TORRENS,

RICHARDSON and WRENCH, LTD., will sell the above by PUBLIC AUCTION, at the Rooms, 92 PITT-STREET, on FRIDAY, 15th SEPTEMBER, at 11 a.m. Advertising (1922, September 6). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16023116


Image No.: a106069h from Scenes of Narrabeen Album ca. 1900-1927, Sydney & Ashfield : Broadhurst Post Card Publishers, courtesy State Library of NSW - the second Narrabeen Hotel may be seen with the dome a little north of the butcher's shop.


Narrabeen west 1927; Robertson, Devitt, Goodwin and Mactier- Item c050370059 



'Narrabeen Lake, 1928'- from Photograph album of the Parker and Davidson Families [B 71787/163] courtesy State Library of South Australia


Lagoon Heights Estate 1928; Acton Street, Colooli Road Item: c050370054 

No. 25,989. James Wheeler, 179 acres, 1 rood 13 3/4 perches, on South Creek and Narrabeen Lagoon, Shire of Warringah. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1925, July 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3279. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223014659

REAL ESTATE
SEA VIEWS
NARRABEEN HEIGHTS
Separated from Narrabeen Lagoon only by a park, Lagoon Heights Estate, Narrabeen is to be sold by auction on the ground next Saturday.
Messrs Raine and Horne, in conjunction with Messrs. Kelsey and Martin, will be the auctioneers. The estate Is on the high land which rises above and overlooks the narrow flat section, fringing the ocean. From it fine views of both lagoon and ocean can be had. Sheltered from westerly winds, the land has an easterly aspect and is not very far from tram and 'bus services, which skirt the beach. There are 60 allotments, all with frontages of about 44 feet, and depths of about 130 feet. The position of Jameson Park guarantees a permanent pleasing outlook. Terms of sale are 10 per cent, deposit, and balance in five years. REAL ESTATE (1928, February 29). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 2 (LAST RACE EDITION). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224226374

Greater Sydney Estates, Limited, capital £250,000 divided Into 50,000 first preference shares of £1 each, and 200,000 ordinary shares of £1 each, to acquire certain lands in the parish of Narrabeen, County of Cumberland, and to carry on all of the businesses usually carried on by land companies. First directors, N. Weekes, T. A. Miller, and J. F. King. COMPANY NEWS. (1927, September 14). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28054063 




Narroy Park Estate 1929; Gondola,  Rickard, Wooarra, Venetian, Nareen -  Item c050370076 


Narroy park estate - Item c050370108 


Narrabeen Narroy price list - Item c050370077 


Narroy Park Estate - Item c050370109 


A 1926 Overland, a 1928 (?) Chrysler, and a 1928 (?) Dodge ploughing through Narrabeen floods - November 1927 Image. No: hood_06391- from the collections of the State Library of NSW.


A car and a horse plough through a flooded road, Narrabeen - Image. No: hood-006394 from the collections of the State Library of NSW



Narrabeen Park 4th subdivision 1929 Item c050370040 


THE OLD ROAD
Narrabeen's Unspoilt Days

by AMY ELEANOR MACK

Once, long ago, the drive along this road was a feast of beauty, when one bowled along between sea and bush, with wide-spreading views on either side. We used to leave Circular Quay by the 8 o'clock boat to Manly, where at the wharf was waiting the old coach with its four horses. With luck-one seemed to be always lucky in those far-away days we got box seats and set out on our journey with gay spirits in the morning! sunshine. Down the Corso we rattled, and along the Steyne, with the pine trees making a delicate screen between us and the blue ocean. Leaving the Steyne, we crossed the bridge over the lagoon, not yet drained and ordered, into a golf course and suburban lots, but stretching lazily over the lowlands, where a vegetable gardener or two grew produce for "The Village." Then on past swamps, where red callistemon flowered in thousands, on round the foot of the hills, where a million flowers bloomed amongst the grey rocks and birds sang gaily and darted to and fro before us.

Here and there, at long intervals was a dwelling-some hermit in search of solitude, or an intrepid pioneer sensing the future value of the land. But so few they were that they scarcely made an impression on the landscape, and the drive seemed to be all bush. All bush and sea, for ever and again as the road leaned seawards we had the uninterrupted view of golden sand and blue ocean. Deewhy Lagoon, with its background of sand- hills and bushy cliffs, was a-swarm with black swans. Narrabeen stretched In a long, unbroken vista from Long Reef to the Lakes. What houses there were were mostly on the land side of the road, and a few on the shore were so scattered that they did not interrupt the view. (Our young architect used to plan an ideal Narrabeen, with all the dwellings on the hillside and the whole sea front a reserve.) And so all the way to Church Point. At Rock Lily and Bayview, where painters and professors had holiday homes, the houses were built on the higher side of the road, above the encroachment of the tide and the mosquito-laden swamps, and the view was free for all travelers to enjoy.

JOLTS AND JERKS.
Perhaps time has shed a glamour on that drive. Certainly the road surface was not what it is to-day, and the old coach rolled and rattled at times, but what are jolts and jerks to sixteen on a fresh spring morning, with sea and sky and bush alive with beauty?

Of the road which branched off to Newport and beyond we knew less, but we used to hear of the many charms along its length from two young men who every winter Sunday morning set out with a packet of sandwiches to walk to Barrenjoey. (They didn't "hike" in those days; they simply walked.) Later we came to know that road well, too. The green slopes and beach of Mona Vale, where a man ahead of his generation had built a mansion, almost at the end of the world it seemed then, the spreading sandhills of Newport, and the little beach beyond, with its rich palm grove-we knew them in their unspoiled days. Leaving the sea, the road climbed across to the inland harbour and ran along the water's edge, with nothing but the tall gumtrees to break our view of the blue bay; past Careel Bay, with its mangrove swamp; past the green flats, with their narrow border of pearly sand, to Palm Beach itself, where the gaunt grotesque tea-trees and banksias grew to the edge of the rosy sands.

But year by year the road grew, and In Its growing lost much of its charm. Tramlines stretched out mile upon mile; houses sprang up in long rows; the swamps were drained; the wild flowers disappeared. At Deewhy the black swans still floated on the lagoon, but in lessening numbers; Narrabeen Beach-now Collaroy-was hidden by a continuous line of cottages, and the sea was glimpsed only at the end of side streets; our young architect's dream of an ideal Narrabeen was gone for ever. The pleasant green sward which flanked Broken Bay at Palm Beach was covered with dwellings, and the white beach which encircled it "like a lovely woman's arm." as a poet said, was barely visible from the road. On the ocean front most of the tea-trees and banksias had gone to make way for neat lawns stretching to within a few yards of the water. Everywhere beauty had been driven out by profit, and the road which might have been one of the loveliest of seaside drives had been reduced to an almost suburban dullness.

THE NEW ROAD THREATENED.
With a luck which comes but seldom to those who have wasted their opportunities, this coastal strip has been given another chance. A new road has been built along the top of the cliffs, with wide views over hills and ocean. It is a road along which we always take our visitors, and we are never disappointed at their exclamations of surprise and delight. One world traveler said: "I have never seen a more beautiful seascape. It alone Is worth the long journey to Australia!" But alas! this new road is threatened with the fate of the old one. Already here and there a building stands between the road and the ocean. At present they are too few to spoil the landscape, but unless some action is taken in a few years, the whole of the view will be blocked out by rows of houses, and our last chance of a magnificent scenic drive will be gone.

From; THE OLD ROAD. (1933, May 6). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16965117

Above: Photo of Amy Eleanor Mack, by May Moore - from National Library of Australia, nla.pic-an3084668


Narrabeen Park estate 8th subdivision 1951 - Item c050370057 


NARRABEEN
BENEATH a clouded sky of pearl and snow,
Where soft robes hide the sunset's rosy
hands,
The white gulls breast the wind, and far below,
White horses ride the breakers to the sands.
Beyond the clear green waves of Narrabeen,
The dim, long headlands, lying in the arc.
Grey with the evening hawks, keep, serene,
Their watch above the ocean's majesty.
— KITTY BARNES.

NARRABEEN (1926, January 30). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126135763


Streets in Narrabeen and Real Property act

Albemarle Street 

Albert Street 

Catalina Close 

Clarke Street 

Claudare Street 

Colooli Road 

Cutler Circuit

Devitt Street 

Edgecliffe Boulevard 

Edmondson Drive 

Emerald Street 

Endeavour Drive 

Essilia Street 

Fuller Street 

Gondola Road 

Goodwin Street 

James Wheeler Place 

King Street 

Lagoon Street 

Lake Park Road 

Lakeshore Drive 

Lakeside Road 

Lantana Avenue 

Lindley Avenue 

Lisle Street 

Loftus Street 

Mactier Street 

Malcolm Street 

Nareen Parade 

Narrabeen Street 

Narrabeen Park Parade 

Nioka Road 

Ocean Street 

Octavia Street 

Park Street

Pittwater Road 

Rickard Road 

Robertson Street 

South Creek Road 

Tallawarra Place 

The Esplanade 

Tourmaline Street 

Veterans Parade 

Wakehurst Parkway 

Walker Avenue 

Waterloo Street 

Wellington Street 

Wetherill Street:  named for John Wetherill, 

Wimbledon Avenue: named after the place in England which was visited by the Macpherson family and clearly was a place dear to their hearts. Visit: The Macphersons Of Wharriewood: The William Joseph Macpherson Albums

SHIRE OF WARRINGAH.—Renaming of Road.—

Ordinance 30, clause 53—Local Government Act.—Notice is hereby given that the undermentioned road has been renamed in accordance with section 249 (a) of the Local Government Act, 1919, as amended:—Past name or location: Millewa-road, North Narrabeen. New name: Nareen-parade, North Narrabeen. J. MORGAN, Shire Clerk, Shire Hal'. Brookvale, 11th March, 1963, 1776—16s. SHIRE OF WARRINGAH.—RENAMING OF ROAD.— (1963, March 15). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 753. Retrieved November 7, 2020, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220329588 

WARRINGAH SHIRE COUNCIL.—Naming of Lanes at North Narrabeen as Minarto Lane, Verona Street, and Bristol Lane.—Notice is hereby given that the Council, in accordance with the provisions of section 249 of the Local Government Act, 1919, as amended, has named—(a) the unnamed lane running between Windsor Parade, Rickard Road, Gondola Road, and Nareen Parade as Minarto Lane; (b) the unnamed road between Gondola and Rickard Roads as Verona Street; (c) the unnamed lane running between Grenfell Avenue, Windsor Parade, and Rickard Road as Bristol Lane, J. MORGAN, Shire Clerk, Shire Hall, Brookvale. 7883—$3.30. WARRINGAH SHIRE COUNCIL.—NAMING OF LANES AT NORTH NARRABEEN AS MINARTO LANE, VERONA STREET, AND (1970, May 8). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1748. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220182364 


_________________________________________________________

Property sale at Warriewood - Mona Vale end

On WEDNESDAY, February 27, 1884.

IN THE PARISH OF NARRABEEN, between MANLY and PITTWATER.

THE PICK OF THE DISTRICT, about 7 miles from Manly Beach, and only a short distance on the other side Of the newly-erected bridge across the Narrabeen Lagoon.

281 ACRES of RICH ARABLE LAND, situate at the junction of the main PITT WATER-ROAD with the LANE COVE ROAD.

THE PROPERTY will first be offered In ONE LOT, and, If not so sold,- then in THREE LOTS as per plan, comprising blocks of of 114a. 1r. 39p, 84a. 1r. 21p., and 80a. respectively.

THE LAND itself is of the richest possible soil, and most eminently adapted for fruit-growing, vine culture, market gardens, or equally well suited for subdivision into small farms of from 10 to 20 acres, the whole of the Land, with exception of about 20 acres (on which are good stones for building purposes), is capable of being ploughed. The property is bounded on almost all sides by  good roads, and several Creeks run through the land, which, if regulated by a small outlay, would ensure a permanent water supply.

TITLE-CROWN GRANT. 

Plans are ready and can be had on application at the Rooms, 133, Pitt-street.

HARDIE and GORMAN have received instructions to sell by public auction, at their Rooms, 133, Pitt-street, at-11.30 a.m., on WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 27, 1884.

The above-described block of RICH ARABLE LAND containing 281 ACRES, situate in the Parish of NARRABEEN, between MANLY and PITTWATER. Advertising (1884, February 20). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 14. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28373191 - Warriewood valley.

PROPERTY SALES.

Messrs, Hardie and Gorman report having sold by public auction and private contract, during the week, the following properties: ...Mr Phillips, block of land at Narrabeen 53a 2r in area, for the sum of £1 per acre £53 10s-Mr Inglis, Pittwater, block of land, 6a 1r 2p In area being lot 7a of villa sites in Pittwater Estate, for £60 ...PROPERTY SALES. (1886, March 20). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13614719

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATION'S having been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the Real Property Act, Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in Form B of the said Act, on or before the date named opposite each case respectively.

No. 6,571. Narrabeen, 107 acres, parish Manly Cove, comprises the land granted as 100 acres to D. MooresApplicant John Wetherill. Caveats to be lodged by May 6, 1886

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1886, April 2). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2418. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227667518

Real Property Act narrabeen + surrounds to Warriewood-Bayview-Mona vale

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATION'S having been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the Real Property Act, Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in Form B of the said Act, on or before the date named opposite each case respectively.

No. 6,571. Narrabeen, 107 acres, parish Manly Cove, comprises the land granted as 100 acres to D. MooresApplicant John Wetherill. Caveats to be lodged by May 6, 1886 NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1886, April 2). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2418. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227667518

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATIONS having been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the Real Property Act, Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in Form B of the said Act, on or before the date named opposite each case respectively. 

No. 6,845. Narrabeen, 455 acres 1 rood 38 perches,—comprises the land granted as 100 acres and 250 acres to James Jenkins and 50 acres to Daniel Rowan. Applicants: Elizabeth Jenkins, Martha Jenkins, and John Jenkins of Long Reef, Manly. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1887, April 1). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2327. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224184246 

Private advertisements.
REAL PROPERTY ACT.
Notice of intended issue op Provisional Certificate of Title, Vol. 808, Folio 101.

Proprietor: Charles James Bulpin. Land: 1 acre 0 roods 6 perches, lots 1, 2, 19, and 20 of section 9 on deposited plan 1818, at Narrabeen, in the parish of Manly Cove and county of Cumberland.

THE proof of loss of the abovenamed original and other particulars required by section 98 of the abovenamed Act (26th Vic, No. 9) before issue of Provisional Certificate of Title having been supplied,—I hereby, with the consent of the Land Titles Commissioners, and in further pursuance of the requirements of this section, notify my intention to issue such Provisional Certificate of Title accordingly, at the expiration of twenty-one days from the date hereof.

E. G. WARD, Sydney, 13th December, 1888. Registrar General. Private Advertisements. REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1888, December 14). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 8912. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221690187

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATIONS having been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the Real Property Act, Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in Form B of the said Act, on or before the date named opposite each case respectively.

No. 7,879. Narrabeen Lagoon, 36 acres 0 roods 17 perches,—comprises the land granted as 30 acres to James Jenkins. Applicant: Ballington Booth - of New York, America, Charles Herbert Lindsay - of Ballarat, Victoria, and Thomas Henry Howard - of Melbourne, Victoria. Caveats may be lodged until 27, Feb., 1890. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1889, December 20). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 9252. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224336900

No. 6,571. Narrabeen, 107 acres, parish Manly Cove, comprises the land granted as 100 acres to D. Moores. Applicant: John Wetherill, Sydney. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1886, April 2). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2418. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227667518

No. 6,845. Narrabeen, 455 acres 1 rood 38 perches,—comprises the land granted as 100 acres and 250 acres to James Jenkins and 50 acres to Daniel Rowan.Applicants: Elizabeth Jenkins, Martha Jenkins, and John Jenkins. Long Reef, Manly. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1887, April 1). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 2327. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224184246

No. 7,879. Narrabeen Lagoon, 36 acres 0 roods 17 perches,—comprises the land granted as 30 acres to James Jenkins. Applicants Ballington Booth New York, America, Charles Herbert Lindsay of Ballarat, Victoria and Thomas Henry Howard, Melbourne Victoria. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1889, December 20). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 9252. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224336900

No. 8,528. Near Narrabeen Lagoon, 109 acres,—comprises the land granted as 40 acres to Capper Pass and 50 acres to R. Stewart. Applicant: Thomas Collins of ManlyNOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1892, April 29). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 3733. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223544141

No. 12,176. County of-Cumberland, parish of Narrabeen, 1 acre 0 roods 1 1/2 perches, on the road from Manly to Pittwater, adjoining the properties of the trustee of the Salvation Army and J. T. Collins,—is part of 21 acres 2 roods 33 perches (portion No. 46 of parish) granted to John Thomas Collins. Applicant: John Thomas Collins. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1902, October 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 7723. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222048973


Advertising (1905, November 8). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 14. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14730937

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATIONS having been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the real Property Act( Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in accordance with, the Third Schedule to the said Act, on or before the date named opposite each case respectively.

No. 13,759. County of Cumberland, parish of Manly Cove, 1 acre 2 roods 374 perches, 1 acre 2 roods 29 1/2 perches, 1 acre 2 roods 34 perches, 1 acre 2 roods 38 1/2 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 3 1/2 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 8 perches, 1 acre 2 roods 22 perches, 2 acres 2 roods 17 perches, 1 rood 1 perch, 4 acres 1 rood 22\ perches, 3 acres 3 roods 1 1/2 perches, 3 acres 2 1/2 perches, 4 acres 1 rood 22 1/2 perches, 4 acres 12 1/2 perches, 4 acres 1 rood 22 1/2 perches, 4 acres 1 rood 33 perches, 4 acres 18 1/2 perches, 4 acres2 roods 34 1/2 perches, 4 acres 2 roods 34 1/2 perches, 4 acres 3 roods 34^ perches, 4 acres 1 rood 21 1/2 perches, 4 acres 3 1/2 perches, 3 acres 3 roods 35 perches, 3 acres 2 roods 39 1/2 perches, 4 acres 3 roods 23 perches, 4 acres 2 roods 32 1/2 perches. 3 acres 36 1/2 perches, 3 acres 2 roods 6 1/2 perches, 2 acres 1 rood £2 perches, 1 acre 35 1/2 perches, 2 roods 15 perches, 2 acres 3 rood, 2 acres 3 roods 16 1/2 perches, 2 acres 3 roods 11 perches 2 roods 30 perches, 3 roods 20| perches, 2 roods 25 1/2 perches 2 acres 2 roods 7 1/2 perches, 1 acre 32 perches, 1 acre 1 rood 20 1/2 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 13 1/2 perches, 361 perches, 3 acres 2 roods 25 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 32 perches, 2 acres 4 perches, 3 acres 2 roods 24 1/2 perches, 2 acres 17 1/2 perches, 1 acre 1 rood 25 1/2 perches, 1 acre 13 perches, 1 rood 6 1/2 perches, 2 acres 2 1/2 perches 3 acres 2 roods 25 1/2 perches, 2 acres 1 1/2 perches, 2 acres 173 perches. 3 acres 2 roods 24 1/2 perches,—comprising lots Nos. 1 to 16, section A; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section B; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section C; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section D; lots Nos. 1 to 16. section .E; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section F; lots Nos. 1 to 7 and 9 to 16, section 6; lots Nos. 1 ti 16, section J; lot No. J, section K; lots Nos. 1 to 42, section L; lots Nos. 4 to 21 and Nos. 25 to 42, section M; lots Nos. 7 to 35, section O; lot? Nos. 1 to 42, section P; lots Nos. 1 to 21 and Nos. 25 to 42, section Q,; lots Nos. 1 to 42, section K; lots Nos. 1 to 36, section S ; lots Nos. 3 to 22 and Nos. 25 to 44, section T; lots Nos. 1 to 44, section U; lots Nos. 1 to 44, section V; lots Nos. 1 to 44, section W; lots Nos. 1 to 21 and Nos. 23 to 42, section X; lots Nos. 1 to 36, section Y; lots Nos. 2 to 21 and Nos. 26 to 43, section Z; lots Nos. 4 to 20 and Nob. 24 to 40, section A1; lots Nob. 1 to 40, section Bl; lots Nos. 1 to 38, section C1; lots Nos. 1 to 14 and Nos. 16 to 27, section D1; lots Nos. 1 to 29, section E1; lots Nos. 7 to 16 and Nos. 22 to 31, section F1; lots Nos. 6 to 9 and Nos. 11 to 14, section G1; lots Nos. 1 to 4, section H1 lots Nos. 7 to 21, section H1; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section K1; lots Nos. 1 to 18, section L1; lots Nos. 1, 2, and 3, section M1; lots Nos. 3, 4, 5, and reserve section Nl; lots Nos. 8 to 11, section M1, and Plateau Park of The Plateau; lots Nos. 2,3,4,7,8, and 9, section No. 33 of Fuller's subdivision; lots Nos. 9 to 14, section No. 41; lots Nos. 9 to 16, section No. 44; lot No. 3, section No. 47; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section No. 50; lots Nos. 1 to 8, section No. 51; lots Nos. 1 to 8, section No. 52 lots Nos. 1 to 16, section No. 53 ; lots Nos. 1 to 20, section No. 54 of Mount Ramsay Estate; lots Nos. I to 10, section No. 54,  lots Nos. 1 to 5, section No. 55a ; lot No. 10, section 55a ; lots Nos. 2 to 20, section No. 55 of Fuller's subdivision; lots Nos. 1 to 16, section No. 56; lots Nos. 1 to 8, section No. 57; lots Nos. 1 to 8, section No. 58 ; lots No. 1 to 16, section No. 59 of Mount Ramsay Estate, situated at Narrabeen, in Victoria, Sturt, Lagoon, Ocean, Wellington, Albemarle, Loftus, Octavia, Tourmaline, Emerald, Malcolm, Collaroy, Jenkins, Ramsay, Wetherill, Mason, Fuller, Claudare, Essilia, Stella, Bland ford, Aubreen, Idaline, Hilma, and Alexander Streets, Park Road and Edgecliffe Boulevarde,— being parts of 410 acres (portion No. 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining the properties of F. B. Bays, Miss Alice M. Neal, E. J. Black, A. E. C. K. Lindfield, A. Porter, J, Berry, Isabella E. J. Shortland, Sarah Morris and G. Morris, Maude M. Rowson, Elizabeth Campbell, S. J. Fowler, C. Shepherd, G. E. Litchfield, Emily Mason, Amy F. Barton, T. W. Willans, A. Smithson, The Bank of New South Whales, The Salvation Army, Mrs. Mary Ann Osborne, Maria E. Mitchell, Dowling and Sullivan, D, McNab, A. Amos, — Harlow, Christina Beel, The Commercial Banking Company of Australia (Limited), J, Wheeler (junior) and J. Wetherill. Applicant. The Union Bank of Australia (Limited). NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1905, November 17). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 7654. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220985744


Rough sketch plan , Plateau Estate] - Mason St, Fuller St, Claudare St, Essilia St, Stella St, Blandford St, Aubreen St, Idaline St, Hilma St, Boulevarde, Collaroy St, Jenkins St, Ramsay St - circa 1905-1906. For the Union Bank of Australia. Item: c050370064, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales.

The Union Bank of Australia was an Australian bank in operation from 1837 to 1951, when it then merged with the  Bank of Australasia to form the Australia and New Zealand Bank Limited (ANZ).

It was established in London in October 1837 with a subscribed capital of £500,000. The foundation of the bank had followed a visit to England by Van Diemen's Land banker Philip Oakden with a view to forming a large joint stock bank operating across the Australasian colonies, during which time he gained the support of businessman and banker George Fife Angas who had founded the South Australian Company. The new bank absorbed Oakden's struggling Launceston-based Tamar Bank upon his return, and opened its first branch in the former Tamar Bank premises on May 1st 1838. It expanded into Victoria on October 18th 1838, when it acquired the Melbourne business of the Tasmanian Derwent Bank, which had been the first bank in the city. It then opened its first Sydney branch on January 2nd 1839. In 1840, it opened its first New Zealand branch in Wellington. In its early years, it had an agreement with the original Bank of South Australia, of which Angas was also a director, not to open branches in that colony; however, an Adelaide branch was established in 1850. A Brisbane branch opened in 1858 and a branch in Perth followed in 1878.

It became the Union Bank of Australia Limited in March 1880.



THE UNION BANK OF AUSTRALIA LIMITED. (1880, March 23). The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article174714370

The bank remained open throughout the economic crises of the 1890s. It acquired the Bank of South Australia in 1892.[7] By its centenary in 1937, it had 267 branches and agencies through Australia and New Zealand.


No. 14,531. APPLICANT Commercial Bank of Australia (Limited). LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove,Shire Warringah, 3 acres 12 perches and 3 roods 25 1/2 perches, in Albert, Lagoon, Waterloo, and Ocean Streets, Narrabeen,— being lots I to 13, section 38, and lots 2, 3, 4, and 15, section 41, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining the properties of A. K. Goldsmith, E. E. Fosbery, E. Fishburne, and J. Stevenson. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1907, April 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2352. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223091411

No. 14,616. APPLICANT :—Alexander Barclay Shand, Sydney. LAND :—Shire Warringah, parish Manly Cove, county Cumberland, 3 roods 6 1/2 perches in Robertson and Victoria Streets. Narrabeen.—lot 1 and pait lot 2, section 32, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217) granted to John Ramsay ; adjoining the property of T. G. G. Gibbons. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1907, July 10). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3918. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226593100

No. 14,756. APPLICANT:—N. S. W. Realty Co. (Limited). LAND :—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 1 rood 22 1/2 perches, 1 acre 0 roods 29£ perches, 1 acre 1 rood 22 1/2 perches, and 2 acres 0 roods 12 perches, in Albemarle, Wellington, Ocean, Frazer, Jenkins, Fielding, and Collaroy Streets, Narrabeen ; lots I to 8, section 6, lots 1 to 8, section 6, lots 1 to 8, section 9, and lots 1 to 8, section 45, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217) granted to John Ramsay. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1907, October 9). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5642. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221600550

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATIONS have been made to bring the lands hereunder described under the provisions of the Heal Property Act, Certificates of Indefeasible Title will issue, unless Caveats be lodged in accordance with the Third Schedule to the said Act, on or before the 15th JANUARY, 1908.

No. 13,753. APPLICANT:—Tertius Horatio Macpherson, Narrabeen. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, Shire Warringah, 52 acres 1 rood 34 perches on Narrabeen Lagoon and Pittwater Road, part portion 8 granted to Thomas Collins, exclusive of the road 1 chain wide the area of which has been deducted from the total area ; adjoining the property of J. WheelerNOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1907, November 27). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 6473. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226586609 

No. 14,938. APPLICANT:—Hannibal Hugh Gordon, Homebush. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 2 acres 1 rood 38 perches, in Stuart, Ocean, and Ramsay Streets, near Narrabeen Lagoon, lots 1 to 8, 20 and 21, section 12, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay and adjoining the properties of W. Pollard and J. Wheeler. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1907, December 11). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 6672. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226587161

No. 14,852. APPLICANT :—Henry Ferdinand Halloran, Sydney. LAND :—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, Shire Warringah, 32 perches, 23 1/2perches, and 31 perches, in Robertson, Devitt, Ocean, and Victoria Streets, Narrabeen, lots 1 and 7, section 28, and lot 1a, section 29, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 12,17), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of Mrs. M. A. Heylin and P. E. Fallon. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1907, December 31). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 6982. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226587711

No. 16,385. APPLICANT:—Thomas George Gordon Gibbons, Narrabeen. LAND : — Shire Warringah, parish Manly Cove, county Cumberland, 1 acre 1 rood 5 perches, in Victoria-street,—lot 3, and part lot 2, of section 32, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish), granted to John Ramsay ; adjoining properties of N. Cooper and A. B. ShandNOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1908, November 4). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5789. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226595198

No. 10,674. APPLICANT; George Robert McIntosh, Hunter's Hill. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 10 acres I rood 15 perches, on Narrabeen Lagoon and South Pacific Ocean, and in Lagoon, Malcolm, and Ocean Streets, sections 62 and 68 ; and adjoining portions of Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres granted to John Ramsay. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1909, January 28). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 458. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227059299

No. 16,112. APPLICANT:—N.S.W. Realty Co. (Limited). LAND: —County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, Shire Waringah, 2 roods 27 1/2 perches, in Ocean-street, Narrabeen,—lots 4 and 5, section 39, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion I,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining the properties of J. P. Slack and C. De Burgh-Kirwan. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1909, September 22). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5150. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226579215

LAND:—County Cumberland, No. 16, 072. APPLICANT:—John Calvert Lewtas, Manly. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 2 acres 16 1/2 perches, in Ocean and Robertson streets, at Narrabeen, lots 1 to 8, section 30, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining the property of W. H. McLaughlin. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1909, November 3). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5948. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226590387

No. 16,145. APPLICANT: George Scales, Darlinghurst. LAND : County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, Shire Warringah, 3 roods 26 1/4 perches, in Ocean and Collaroy streets, Narrabeen, lots 5 to 8, section 2. Mt. Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining property of G. Scales. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1910, January 12). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 144. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227061041

Messrs. Hardie and Gorman report having sold during the week the following; ...Official Assignee's right, title, and interest (if any) in and to roads, streets, ways, and reserves, Mount Ramsay Estate, £250...PROPERTY TRANSACTIONS. (1910, February 13). The Sunday Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1903 - 1910), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226884387

No. 16, 330. APPLICANT:—Henry Wolstenholme, Killara. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 2 roods 15 1/2 perches, at intersection of Narrabeen and Ocean streets, at Narrabeen, lots 9 to 12, section 30, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1/J1T of parish) granted to John Ramsayadjoining property of J. C. Lewtas. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1910, June 29). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3509. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226906893

No. 16,518. APPLICANT:—Arthur Joseph Reynolds, Sydney. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Waningah, 1 rood 34 perches, at intersection of Ocean and Mactier streets, Narrabeen,—lots 7, 8, section 18, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay ; adjoining property of Narrabeen Progress Association. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1910, August 10). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4393. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226765895

No. 10,577. APPLICANT:—N.S.W. Realty Co. (Limited). LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 rood 41 perches and 2 acres 3 roods 22} perches, in Victoria-street and on Narrabeen Lagoon.—lots 3 to 12, and 21, 22, and 23, section 32a, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of J. Russell, T. H. Macpherson, and Church of England. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1910, September 28). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5310. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226763068

No. 16,239. APPLICANT Maria Emily Mitchell, Narrabeen. LAND: —County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringab, 1 acre 1 rood Hi perches and 2 roods 8 perches, in Victoria, Ocean, and Narrabeen streets—lots 1, 2, 15, and 16, section 33, and lot 2, section 34, Mount Ramsay Estate, and lots 1 and 6, section 33, Fuller's subdivision part Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of Dr. Pope, O. J. Carr, and Mrs. Thompson or Mrs. McDonald. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1911, April 5). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1932. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221617932

No. 17,0.58. APPLICANT:—George Scales, Manly. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 3 roods 33 perches, in Ocean street, Narrabeen,—lots 2 to 7, section 24. Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining property of Mrs. M. Thompson. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1911, June 28). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3480. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226774250

No. 17,140. APPLICANTS:—Edith Mary Loder, Paddington, Edward Thomas West, Chatswood, and Ada Blanche Ellis, ChatswoodLAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah,  13 acres I rood 1 1/2 perches, and 42 acres 2 roods 30 perches in Clarke, Mactier, Park, and Wetherill streets and on Narrabeen Lagoon,—lots 9 to 14, lot 14b, lots 15 to 20 and part lot 14a, section 20, lots 5 to 14, lots 14a and 1 in, and lots 15 to 28, section 20a, and blocks 1 and 2, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part of 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of E. F. C. M. Sivyer, N.S.W. Realty Co., J. Wheeler, and N. Cooper. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1911, July 26). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3981. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230684495

No. 17,120. APPLICANT:—Roland James Pope, Manly. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 2 roods 214 perches, and 1 acre 1 rood 34 3/4 perches, Victoria, King, and Ocean streets,—lots 7 to 10 inclusive, section 33, and lots 7 and 8, section 34, Mount Ramsay Estate, and lots o and 10, section 33 of Narrabeen Lakes subdivision of part Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of Dr. R. J. Pope, and M. Mitchell. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1911, August 9). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4342. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230685054

No. 16,973. APPLICANT James Wheeler, Narrabeen. LAND : County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 1 rood 31 1/2 perches, 3 roods 18 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 1 perch, 3 acres 11 perches, 1 acre 3 roods 3 perches, 34 perches, 1 rood 30 1/2 perches, 35 perchos, 2 roods 2 1/2 perches, 1 rood 30 1/2 perches, 2 roods 2 3/4 perches, and 2 acres 3 roods If perches, in Jenkins, Frazer, Ramsay, Stuart, Wetherill, Clarke, Mactier, Goodwin, Devitt, Lagoon, Wellington, and Park streets, and on Narrabeen Lagoon,—lots 22 to 28. section 8; lots 9, 16, 17, 18, section 11: lots 10 to 14 and 17. 18, 19, scction 12; lots 13 to 26, section 16; lots 12 to 15 and 18 to 21, section 19: part lot 14a, section 20: lots 3, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, section 21: lots 12, 13. section 22: lots 5, 7, 8, section 26: part lot 2: and lots 3 to 8, section 42, Mount Ramsay Estate: and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay: adjoining properties of J. Wheeler, R. Pfoeffer, C. A. S. Hayden, E. A. Powell, C. M. E. West, H. S. Haynes, E J. West, Mrs. E. M. Loader, A. E. Ellis, C. A. de Kantzow, D. McLean, A. O. West, H. H. Gordon, W. Pollard, W. S. Beale, W. A. Lipscombe, W. L. McFarlane, estate J. Langley, J. F. C. Goodridge, A. E. Dowling, W. Nicholls, T. H. Page, and G. L. Pring. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1911, August 30). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4711. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230685900

No. 16.930. APPLICANT:—Herbert Edgar McIntosh. Sydney. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 4 acres 3 roods 36 perches. in Emerald, Lagoon, and Malcolm streets, and on Narrabeen Lagoon, whole section 60, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish) granted to John Ramsay. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1911, September 13).  Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4937. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227592326 

No. 17,037. APPLICANTS :—George Scales and David Lindesay Aitken, both Sydney. LAND : — County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 96 acres 2 roods 7 1/4 acreson Narrabeen Creek, near Narrabeen Lagoon,—land granted as 30 acres (portion 51 of parish), to James Wheeler, and 50 acres (portion 48 of parish), to John William Alexander Whiteadjoining property of estate late T. H. Kelly and Crown Land. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, April 10). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2230. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227591158

No. 14,164. APPLICANT:—William Booth, London, England. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, Shire Warringah, 259 acres, on Pacific Ocean and Narrabeen Lagoon; and on Manly to Pittwater-road,—lands granted as 60 acres (portion 13 of parish) 60 acres (portion 14 of parish), and 80 acres (portion 15 of parish) to Elizabeth Jenkins, exclusive of road 1 chain wide from Manly to Pitt water, and resumed road 1 chain wide near Narrabeen deducted from the total area, and adjoining properties of W. Booth, H. F. Hallorahan, trustees of E. H. Macpherson and Crown Land. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, June 5). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3564. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221608059

No. 14,499. APPLICANT:—John Thomas Collins, Narrabeen. LAND : —County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, shire Warringah, 2 acres 37 perches and 3 acres 37 perches, on Narrabeen Lagoon, and on Manly to Pittwater road,—parts 50 acres (portion 47 of parish), granted to William Bernard Rhodes; adjoining property of J. T. Collins. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, June 12). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3668. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221608288

No 18,067. APPLICANTS:—Lucy Maud Iredale, Alice Emily Iredale, and Florence Constance Iredale, all Surry Hills; Percy William Iredale, Glebe Point; Herbert Stanley Iredale, Marrickville ; and Leslie Peel Iredale, Darlinghurst. LAND :—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah,—1 acre 17 1/2 perches and 1 acre 3 roods 35 1/2 perches in Alexander-street, Narrabeen ; lets 5 and 6 and 12 to 2.3 and part lots 1 to 4, section 1, Mount Ramsey Estate ; and parts 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of M. M. Calvert, S. C. Twight and Salvation Army, and Crown Land. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, November 13). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 6731. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221611917

No. 18,068. APPLICANTS:—Lucy Maud Iredale, Alice Emily Iredale, Florence Constance Iredale, Surry Hills; Percy William Iredale, Glebe Point: Herbert Stanley Iredale, Marrickville; Leslie Peel Iredale, Darlinghurst. LAND: —County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 1 rood 7 1/2 perches, Victoria-street at Narrabeen,—lots 6 and 7, and part lot 8, section 32, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of M. L. Marriott and Mrs. Naomi Cooper. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, December 18). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 7367. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221613534

No. 17,790. APPLICANT:—Mary Scales and David Lindesay Aitken, both Sydney. LAND: — County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 2 roods 3 3/4 perches, in Victoria, Devitt, and Park streets, at Narrabeen,—lots 5 to 11 (inclusive), section 25, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining Crown Land. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1913, April 9). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2054. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226761056

No. 18,043. APPLICANT:—Harry Sidney Haynes, Sydney. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, Shire Warringah, 4 acres 1 perches, in Ocean, Mactier, Park, and Goodwin streets, at Narrabeen—lots 1 to 11, and lots 14 to 20, section 22, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining property of estate of late J. Wheeler. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1913, April 9). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2053. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226761048

No. 18,520. APPLICANT:—Emily Matilda McLachlan, Armadale, Victoria, Ethel Margaret McLachlan, and Arthur Lindsay McLachlan, both Sydney. LAND :—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 4 acres 2 roods 26 3/4 perches, and 3 roods 22 1/2 perches, in Ocean, Collaroy, and Fielding streets, at Narrabeen,—part lots 1 to 4 inclusive, parts of 6, 7, and 8, and whole lots 9 to 28 inclusive, section 4, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of D. McLachlan and A. Reilly. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1913, May 7). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2782. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221594288

No. 18.137. APPLICANT: James Wheeler, Narrabeen. LAND: County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, shire Warringah, 100 acres 20 perches, on Pittwater and Gordon roads, at Narrabeen Lagoon, part land granted as 80 acres (portion 52. parish), to James Wheeler; adjoining properties of G. Sherring and J. Ingall, A Griffith, C. A. De Kantzow, G Powell, R. L. Walsh, J. T. Schecker, F. Francois, T. Watts, H. Shipp. A. J. Sheaves, J. K. Meller, Miss B. Munro, C. E. Ramsbotham, E. Young, A. Young, J. H. Mundy, C. Higson, A. Taylor. P. Fowler, P. Morrice, F. Ekium, J. Corless, T. H. Macpherson. and applicant. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1913, July 9). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4268. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227051136

No. 18,442. APPLICANT:—Florence Amelia Shand, Sydney. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 6 3/4 perches, and 1 rood 33 1/2 perches, in Loftus and Lagoon streets, and on Narrabeen Lagoon,—lots 4 to 8, inclusive, section 48, and lots 5 and 6, section 41, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsav: adjoining properties of A. Barry, A. B. Shand, T. Rhodes, E. Aikens, and T. Barry. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1913, July 23). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4509. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227051721

No. 18,443, APPLICANT: — Alexander Barclay Shand, Sydney. LAND:- County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 rood 2 1/2 perches, 31 3/4 perches, 2 roods 23 3/4 perches, and 1 rood 33 1/4 perches, in Robertson, Victoria, Ocean, Devitt, Lagoon, and Wellington streets, at Narrabeen,—lot 5, section 23; lot 8, section 24; lots (5, 7, and 8, section 27; and lots 1 and 2. section 44, Mount Ilamsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1.217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of C. Thackeray, Miss King, T. Macpherson, A. R. West, C. Frape, A. J. Vause, and P. Maher. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1913, November 5). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 6622. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228060110

No. 17,739. APPLICANTS Mary Scales, and David Lindesay Aitken, both Sydney. LAND: County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 2 acres 1 rood 22 1/2 perches, on Narrabeen Lake, in Albemarle, Lagoon, and Wellington streets. —lots 1 to 8, inclusive, section 43, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1913, December 10). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 7336. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228061585

No. 18,969. APPLICANT:—Caroline Marianne Buckland, Akaroa, New Zealand. LAND :-County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 3 roods 6 1/2 perches, in MacTier-street, at Narrabeen,— part lots 5 to 8 inclusive, section 19, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of E. Carter and R. Pfoeffer. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1914, March 4). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1398. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227332864

No. 18.953. APPLICANTS: - Tom Raine Raine and Claude Gerard Phillips, both Sydney. LAND: — County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 1 acre 1 rood 10 1/2 perches, in Clarke and Mactier streets. Narrabeen,—lots 6, 7, 8, 21, 22. and 23, section 20, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1.217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of E. L. Chauvel, P. B. chauvel, E. T. West, W. R. Opie, S. C. Lindley, G. W. Walker, and C. A. De Kantzow. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1914, June 10). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3419. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226768655

No. 18,962. APPLICANT :—Martha Alice Bors, Manly. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 3 roods 20 1/2 perches, in Wetherill-street, Narrabeen,lots 27 to 30, section 16, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of F. A. Shand, Mrs. A. Vallack, E. Lines, W. A. Purves, D. McLean, junior, and W. Robinson. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1915, April 21). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2276. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226911286

No. 19,961. APPLICANTS:-Lily May Langley and Sydney Burton Langley, both of Narrabeen. LAND: -County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 3 roods 30 1/2 perches, in Ramsay street,—part lots 5 to 8 inclusive, section 11, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay ; adjoining properties of Mrs. L. A. E. Robertson, C. Boutin, and A. 0. Tunbridge. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1915, October 6). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5846. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227064426

No. 20,132, APPLICANT:- Duncan McLachlan, Armadale, Victoria. LAND:- County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringan, 1 rood 33 1/4 perches, in Albert-street, Narrabeen,- lots 10 and 11, section 30, Mount Ramsay Kstate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217 of parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of A. F, Pritchard, H. A. Hudson, A. King, A. Rawson, Mrs. J. Thompson, Mrs. B. L. Wall, Mrs. J. R. Millington, and Mrs. A. M. Russell. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1915, November 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 7010. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226922526

No. 20,102. APPLICANT:—Arthur Lindsay McLachlan, Sydney. LAND County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 2 roods 6 1/2 perches, on Narrabeen Lagoon,—part lot 10, section 32, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres fnortion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay: adjoining properties of the Minister for Public Works, the Chief Commissioner for Railways and Tramways, and A. L. McLachlan. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1915, December 22). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 7636. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226923657

No. 20.467. APPLICANT:—Alice Mabel Ferrier, Surat, Queensland. County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 2 roods 21 perches, in Aubreen, Jenkins, and Idaline streets, Narrabeen,— lots 1, 2, 3, 22, 23, and 24, section M, of The Plateau, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining property of J. Green. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1916, June 23). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3530. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225963271

No. 20,393. APPLICANTS :—Ellen Jane Camden Goodridge, Sydney, and Georgina Mary Camden FitzGerald, Merewether. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 3 roods 12 perches, in Jenkins-street,—lots 18 to 21, section 8, Mount Ramsay Estate, and, part 410 acres portion 1,217, parish, granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of F. K. Chisholm, N. E. Dowling, and C. N. Backhouse. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1916, September 1). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5237. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225844876

No. 20,545. APPLICANT:—Sara Susan Nolan, Burwood. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Manly Cove, shire Warringah, 35 perches, in MacTier street, Narrabeen,—lot 5, section 20, Mount Ramsay Estate, and part 410 acres (portion 1,217, parish), granted to John Ramsay; adjoining properties of P. B. Chauvel, A. L. Hinton, Mrs. C. G. Noller, and G. GowardNOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1916, September 8). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5392. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225845120

No. 21,142. APPLICANT:—Arthur Lindsay McLachlan, of Sydney. LAND:--Shire Warringah, 3 acres 1 rood 22 perches, part of section 27, Mount Ramsay Estate, situated on Narrabeen Lagoon, and fronting Devitt and Robertson streets. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1918, October 18). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5114. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227332157

BY ORDER OF THE EXECUTOR ESTATE LATE JAMES WHEELER, NARRABEEN.

1.-WATER-FRONTAGE and BUSINESS POSITION, near the TRAM TERMINUS, AT THE BRIDGE. THE BRIDGE HOUSE, built of weatherboards, wood lined inside, on stone piers, iron roof, verandah In front, and containing 6 rooms and kitchen, detached sheds of wood and iron, standing on Lots 2 and 3, sec. 42, Mount Ramsay Estate, having 61ft 7in to PITTWATER ROAD, and 60ft 7 1/2in to the lake, with depths of 300ft and 331ft back to LAGOON-STREET, to which the frontage is 100ft,

2.-HARBORD. MANLY, VACANT ALLOTMENT, in DALLEY-STREET, situate on the north side, close to Harbord-road, JUST OFF PITTW'ATER-ROAD. Frontage 25ft 9Hn by depths of 188ft 10 1/2in. and 190ft 8in, being part of Lot 7, D.P., 1448. TORRENS,

RICHARDSON and WRENCH, LTD., will sell the above by PUBLIC AUCTION, at the Rooms, 92 PITT-STREET, on FRIDAY, 15th SEPTEMBER, at 11 a.m. Advertising (1922, September 6). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16023116

NB: BRIDGE HOUSE, NARRABEEN LAKES-Good ACCOMMODATION for VISITORS. AFTERNOON TEAS. BOATS FOR HIREMr KIRKPATRICK. Advertising. (1912, September 24). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 16. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15363379

No. 23,909. Alfred Sydney Clayton and Edith Clayton, 8 p., in Pittwater-rd., 116 ft. 7 3/4 in., sthly. from Waterloo-st., Narrabeen. 6th April, 1923. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1923, March 2). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1288. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225020957

No. 24,965. Robert Taylor, 27½ p., in Victoria-st., 149 ft. 9 in., nth.-wstly. from Devitt-st., Narrabeen. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1923, August 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3768. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219903912

No. 25,567. Ellen Seares, 27 1/2 p., cor. Albemarle and Ocean sts., Narrabeen. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1924, February 15). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1043. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223594556

No. 25,103. Bror Otto Englundh, 2 r. 14 p., part lot B, sec. 32, Mount Ramsay Este., Narrabeen. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1925, April 9). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1773. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223030836

No. 25,989. James Wheeler, 179 acres, 1 rood 13 3/4 perches, on South Creek and Narrabeen Lagoon, Shire of Warringah. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1925, July 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3279. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223014659

No. 27,153. Arthur William Bridge, Wilfred Charles  Taylor, John Walter Jira, 20 1/2 perches, cor. Pittwaterrd. and Waterloo-st., NarrabeenNo. 27,169. Alfred Sydney Clayton and Edith Clayton, 16 perches in Pittwater-rd, abt. 77 ft., south-easterly from Waterloo-st., Narrabeen. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1926, February 26). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 982. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223020590

No- 27,523. Frank Albert, 2 r. 12 p., cor. Ocean and Albert sts., Narrabeen. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1926, June 18). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2610. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222996351

No. 27,604. Eliza Jane Thomas, 35 p. cor, Mactier and Park sts., Narrabeen. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1926, June 25). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2737. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222996566

24th August, 1928. No. 28,702. Robert Keith Stokes, 1 r. 8 1/4 p., lot 6, sec. 23, Mount Ramsay Este, Pittwater-rd., NarrabeenNOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1928, July 13). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3223. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219951178

No. 29,291. Edward Nicholas Atkin, 1 r. 2 p., cor. Loftus and Lagoon sts., Narrabeen. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1928, August 3). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3684. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219952022

No. 28,888. Lebbeus Hordern, 1 r. 22 1/2 p., lot 6, sec. 49, Mount Ramsay Est., Lagoon-st. and on Narrabeen Lagoon, Narrabeen. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1928, December 7). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5168. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223028463

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.

APPLICATIONS have been made to bring the lands respectively described under the provisions of the Heal Property Act. Caveats may be lodged on or before the 18th August, 1944:—

No. 34,089. Mary McLean, 1 r. 9 ½ p., lots A and E, Registered Plan No. 614, cor. Devitt-st. and Pittwater-rd., Narrabeen.

No. 34,090. Adelaide Narrabeen Giles, per., lot B, Registered Plan No. 614, Pittwater-rd., Narrabeen, together with an appurtenant easement (right of way) over pt. lot E as granted by Conveyance dated 31st May, 1934, regd. Book 1,692, No. 64.

No. 34,091. Amy Maud Hilliary McLean5 1/2 per., lot C. Registered Plan No. 614, Pittwater-rd., Narrabeen, together with an appurtenant easement (right of way) over pt. lot E as granted by Conveyance dated 31st May, 1934, rcgd. Book 1,692, No. 65.

No. 34,092. Christabelle McLean, 5 ½  per., lot D, Registered Plan No. 614, Pittwater-rd., Narrabeen, together with an appurtenant easement (right of way) over pt. lot E as granted by Conveyance dated 31st May, 1934, regd. Book 1,692, No. 63..

Diagrams delineating these lands may be inspected at the Land Titles Office, Sydney.

R. W. WILLIS, Registrar-General. 14th July, 1944. (8SC7) NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1944, July 14). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1212. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225096866 

Street names - local family connections ongoing:

GOODWIN—ROBINSON.—June 15, 1932, at St.Matthew's Church, Manly, by Rev. Ebbs, Dorothy Jean Robinson of Narrabeen, to Enoch Kempshall Goodwin of Narrabeen. Family Notices (1932, August 13). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16889257

References And Extras


  1. TROVE - National Library of Australia
  2. Charlotte Boutin
  3. The Macphersons Of Wharriewood: The William Joseph Macpherson Albums
  4. Ashton, Paul, Freestone, Robert, Planning, Dictionary of Sydney, 2008, http://dictionaryofsydney.org/entry/planning
  5. Leon Houreux
  6. Pittwater Restaurants You Could Stay At The Rock Lily Hotel – Mona Vale
  7. St Cloud Jersey Stud: Elanora Heights
  8. Waratah Farm: Ingleside - The Narrabeen Plum
  9. Leichhardt Historical Journal. No. 21 written by Dr Peter Reynolds
  10. Profiles of the Pioneers in Manly, Warringah and Pittwater (2013 Edit) by Shelagh and George Champion OAM'S.
  11. THE WATERLOO ROLL CALL. WITH BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES AND ANECDOTES. BY CHARLES DALTON, F.R.G.S., Online at: https://www.gutenberg.org/files/51143/51143-h/51143-h.htm 
  12. North Narrabeen Rock Pool: Some History
  13. Tram Memorabilia - Historic Daylight Run For Sydney Light Rail Begins 80 Years After Last Tram To Narrabeen Closed
  14. 'Billabong' and 'Ocean House', Ocean Street, North Narrabeen 
  15. The Narrabeen Hotel - Timeline included in Ken 'Sava lloyds' 'The Firecracker that Closed Narrabeen pub'
  16. Ingleside Powder Works
  17. Pittwater Roads II: Where the Streets Have Your Name - Warriewood
  18. Pittwater Roads II: Where the Streets Have Your Name - Elanora Heights, Green Hills and Ingleside

Also Available:

ANNO QUINQTJAGESIMO SECUNDO VICTORIA REGINA

An Act to authorize the construction of a Tramway from the northern terminus of the North Shore Cable Tramway to the Spit at Middle Harbour, and from the Spit aforesaid to Manly Village, and a Light Railway thence to Pittwater, Broken Bay. [Assented to, 10th January, 1889.]

WHEREAS Clement Alban Benbow and Leslie Johnston, both  of Sydney, in the Colony of New South Wales, Esquires, are desirous of constructing a tramway from the northern terminus of the present cable tramway running from Milson's Point, Saint Leonards, in the parish of Wllloughby, to the Spit at Middle Harbour, in the parish aforesaid, and from the Spit aforesaid to Manly Village, and thence a light railway to Pittwater, Broken Bay; such tramway and light railway lines to run through certain private lands and certain streets described in the Schedules annexed hereto. And whereas it is desired to construct such tramway and light railway for the purpose of giving better access for the public to the districts through which the said proposed tramway and light railway run and the places before named, and also to the Hawkesbury Hiver. And whereas the increased facilities of communication and traffic which would result from the construction of the said proposed tramway and light railway would be for or the public convenience and benefit. And it is desirable to authorize by Legislative enactments the construction and maintenance of the said proposed tramway and light railway, subject to the provisions hereinafter contained. Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council and Legislative Assembly of New South Wales in Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows :—

No. 1. It shall be lawful for the said Clement Alban Benbow and Leslie Johnston, their heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, upon the terms and conditions and subject to the provisions hereinafter contained, to make and construct a tramway and light railway for conveying passengers and their luggage and other goods and merchandize from a point at or near the northern terminus of the aforesaid North Shore Cable Tramway, and thence by the lines described in the Schedules A and B to this Act, and to effect through communication between the said North Shore Cable Tramway and Manly Village and PittWater aforesaid, and to take and use so much of the streets or lands referred to in the said Schedules as may be required for the purposes of such tramway and light railway, but so that the same shall not occupy in any part thereof a greater space in breadth than twenty feet, including the support and foundations thereof. Provided that the said tramway and light railway shall be completely constructed between the points above indicated Respectively and brought into use within three years from the passing of this Act. And the same shall be constructed in a proper and workmanlike manner. Provided that the construction of the said tramway and light railway shall be commenced within six months from the passing of this Act, and that within twelve months from the passing of this Act four miles at least of the permanent way of the said tramway and light railway shall be completed, and that within eighteen months from the passing of this Act the whole of the permanent way of the said tramway and light railway, between Saint Leonards and M&nly, shall be completed, and in the event of the works provided by this Act or any of them not being commenced and carried out to the satisfaction of the Engineer-in-Chief for Railways, or other officer charged by the Government with the construction of railways, within the times in this Act prescribed, all the works and property of the said Clement Alban Benbow and Leslie Johnston, their heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, in connection with the said tramway or light railway, shall go and belong to the Government, to be disposed of as the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, may direct; and as regards lands resumed or obtained in connection with the said tramway or light railway works, the same shall revert to the former owners thereof as of their former estate. Provided further that the authorities, powers, and privileges given by this Act shall not extend beyond thirty years from the passing thereof.

....

No 39. This Act may be cited for all purposes as the "North Shore, Manly, and Pittwater Tramway and Railway Act of 1888."

...

SCHEDULE B.

Manly Beach to Pittwater—Light Railway or Tram.

Commencing at the junction with the North Shore and Manly tram-line, situated five chains east of south-west angle of land marked on county map as belonging to J. Farrell; thence through south-west angle of said land and across a road into and through lands marked on county map as belonging to Thomas M'Clelland and H. G. Alleyne, through G-overnment reserve and across Curl Curl Lagoon into and through lands marked on county map as belonging to J. H. Palmer, across a road into and through land marked on county map as belonging to John Wheeler and W. Tobin, across a road into and through land shown on county map as belonging to John Wheeler, where the road will be required to be diverted half a chain to the east of present position across the Manly to Pittwater Road, into and through lands marked on county map as belonging to W. E. Parker and W. Nicholson, into and through the subdivision known as the Greendale Estate, across a Government road along Pittwater to Manly Road, which road at this point will be diverted one chain to the westward for the length of eight chains into land marked as belonging to W. Redman; thence through lands belonging to James Wheeler and James Jenkins to the southern boundary of the Mount Ramsay Estate; thence through lands belonging to C. E. Euller, for a length of four chains, and thence along Ocean-street to its intersection with Loftus-street; thence through lands belonging to C. E. Euller to Narrabeen Lagoon, across the said lagoon into and through lands belonging to J. E. Collins; thence through lands shown on county map as belonging to E. Jenkins and J. Jenkins, where the Pittwater to Manly Road will have to be diverted for a length of twenty-six chains to the west; thence through land shown on county map as belonging to J. C. Hedeman; thence through Government reserve No. C 46-20 30 roll lxxi lxx, across the Pittwater Road; thence into and through the property marked on county map as the Mona Yale Estate; thence across the head waters of an arm of Pittwater; thence along the foreshores of said Mona Vale property, across an inlet from Pittwater; thence into and through lots six and seven, section E of Newport subdivision, across Beaconsfield-street, across allotments five, six, seven, eight, section D same subdivision, across Queen's-parade, across Kings-street and Trafalgar-square and Gladstone-street, into and through allotments five to seventeen, section J of the same subdivision of Newport, which will be the terminus. Subject to power for the said Clement Alban Benbow and Leslie Johnston, their heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, to deviate to the extent of fifty feet from either side of the above line, subject to the approval of the Railway Commissioners.  

SYDNEY: Printed and Published by Charles Potter, Government Printer. [Pncej QdJ] .—1889. An Act to authorize the construction of a Tramway from the northern terminus of the North Shore Cable Tramway to the Spit at Middle Harbour, and from the Spit aforesaid to Manly Village, and a Light Railway thence to Pittwater, Broken Bay. [Assented to, 10th January, 1889.] (1889, January 15). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 397. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224312093

Chief Secretary's Office,
Sydney, 30th April, 1914.
PUBLIC HEALTH ACT, 1902," SECTI0N 55.
UNHEALTHY BUILDING LANDS, McPherson's Estates, Nos. 1 and 2 subdivisions; Collins' Estate; and Lakeside Estate, Narrabeen, Warringah shire, county of Cumberland.

In pursuance of the provisions of the "Public  Health Act, 1902' I hereby declare that I have revoked the notices regarding McPherson's Estate, being part of portion 47, parish of Narrabeen, published in the Government Gazette of 24th May, 1911 ; Collins' Estate, being part of portions 39 and 47, parish of Narrabeen, published in the Government Gazette of 24th May, 1911 ; Rickard's Lakeside Estate, Narrabeen, published in the Government Gazette of 24th May, 1911; and McPherson's No. 2 subdivision, allotments 4 to 8, both inclusive, Pitt water-road, Narrabeen, published in the Government Gazette of 19th June, 1912, with a view to the issue of the subjoined amended notice.

FRED. FLOWERS,

For Chief Secretary,

Chief Secretary's Office,

Sydney, 30th April, 1914. PUBLIC HEALTH ACT, 1902' SECTION 55.

UNHEALTHY BUILDING LAND AT NARRABEEN LAGOON, WARRINGAH SHIRE.

THE Board of Health have reported that after due inquiry they are of opinion that it would be prejudicial to health if certain lands situated at Narrabeen, Warringah Shire, parishes of Manly Cove and Narrabeen, county of Cumberland, and fully described in Schedules numbered 1 to 8, were built upon in its present condition.

The Board of Health have further reported that in order to render such laud fit to be built upon it is necessary that 

(a) the surface of the whole of the land described in Schedules Nos. 1 to 7 inclusive, be raised by clean, dry soil or sand to the height of 3 feet above the level of high-water during spring tides;

(b) the surface of the whole of the land described in Schedule No. 8 be raised by clean, dry soil to the height of 4 feet 6 inches above the level of high-water during spring tides;

(c) the surface of all that part of the land which is included within the walls of every building which may be built upon it (in case any weatherboard building is built upon such land raised on piles or piers, the whole of the surface occupied by such structure) be covered with a layer of concrete composed of the following ingredients, namely: One measure of cement of approved brand, 3J measures of clean, sharp sand, free from loam or organic matter, and 6J measures of broken metal or gravel of 2}-inch gauge, laid G inches thick, properly spread, and well rammed ;

(d) all floors be laid on joists raised not less than 1 foot above the concrete covering, the space thus formed to be ventilated by the insertion of air-bricks, each measuring 9 x 0 inches to every (i feet (lineal) of foundation ;

(e) in the case of buildings erected on piles or piers, the floor joists be not less than 2 feet above concrete covering, the space between piles or piers to be left open, but protected by wire-netting of 1/2-inch mesh—

the whole of the work to be done to the satisfaction of the Board of Health.

Now, therefore, in pursuance of the power and authority vested in me by section 55 (1) of the ''Public Health Act, 1902' I hereby declare that such land shall not be built upon until the measures above referred to, which are also specified in a document deposited in the office of the Local Authority (the Council of the Warringah Shire), and open to the inspection of any person, have been complied with, or until this notice has been revoked by me.

FRED. FLOWERS,

For Chief Secretary.

Schedule 1. 

Commencing in the parish of Manly