May 2 - 8, 2021: Issue 492

 

Avalon's Village Green: Avalon Park Becomes Dunbar Park - some history + Toongari Reserve and Catalpa Reserve

General View, Avalon, from album 'Samuel Wood - postcard photonegatives of Avalon, Bilgola and Newport, ca. 1928', Item a1470004h, courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales

AVALON.
Pearling waves that cream milk-white,
Sun-drenched sands and skies of blue
Linger in my memory -
Avalon, my heart's with you!
DOROTHEA DOWLING.

AVALON. (1935, May 4). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17151649

Avalon [From the air], 1949, Item e23711_0001_c, courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales
With the consultation period on the Avalon Place Plan just a few weeks off closing (May 16, 2021) and a Public Meeting being held by local residents associations today, Sunday May 2nd at the Avalon Bowling Club, a glance backwards while looking forwards may be of interest to Readers.


This page on Dunbar Park, with 'Extras' on Toongari Reserve and Catalpa Reserve, are part of an ongoing Pittwater Online News' project to create records on the past and present to inform the future of Pittwater reserves and parks. Fortunately, in this case, there is a lot of material, descriptions that date back to European colonisation of this area, and a great cache of photographs being made available by our state and federal libraries and museums to highlight the records found during research.

Once again, the 'rule' of Warringah Shire Council, along with the ethos of developers to set aside green spaces and public places from when all subdivisions had to go through Council, from 1921 on, is the reason we have these beautiful tranquil sanctuaries for native wildlife and original plant ecosystems.



Prior to European settlement, the Guringai tribe inhabited the foreshores and headlands of Pittwater with their tracks for passing through the land or to favoured food places in their season being the only marks showing on the landscape.

In 1824 Reverend John Joseph Therry was granted 1200 acres of and that comprised an area that ran from Newport to Careel Bay and encompassed most of Avalon. Published in the Government Gazette lists:

113. Thomas Warner, 50, Fifty Acres, Parish of Narrabeen, commencing at the Northeast corner, and bounded on the East by a side Hue of twenty-five chains; on the South by a West line of twenty-five chains to Pitt Water; and on the West and North by the waters of Pitt Water to the commencing corner.
Promised by Governor Macquarie on 31st March, 1821. Quit-rent Is. sterling per annum,
 commencing 1st January, 1827.
114. Henry Gaskin, 
50, Fifty Acres, Parish of Narrabeen, commencing at the North-east corner of Warner's fifty acres, and bounded on the West by a South line of twenty-nine chains; on the South by an East line of twenty chains ; on the East by a North line of twenty four chains to Pitt Water ; and on the North by the waters of Pitt Water to the commencing corner. Promised by Governor Macquarie on 31st March, 1821. Quit-rent Is. sterling per annum, commencing 1st January, 1827.

115. John Joseph Therry, 1200, One thousand two hundred Acres, Parish of Narrabeen, commencing at the South-east comer of the Government Reserve of two hundred and eighty acres, and bounded on the North by that Reserve by a line West twenty-five chains to a Stream ; on the North by that Stream and Careel Bay to the North-east corner of Henry Gaskin's fifty acres; on the West by Gaskin's by a line South twenty-four chains ; on the South by a line West twenty chains, and again by a line North four chains to the South-east corner of. Warner's fifty acres; on the North by Warner by a line West twenty-five chains to Pitt Water; on the West by the waters of Pitt Water to the North-west coiner of John William's sixty acres ; on the South by that farm by a line South fifty degrees East 38 chains ; on the West by a line South forty decrees West sixteen chains ; on the North by a line North fifty degrees West thirty-nine chains to the North corner of John Taylor's thirty acres ; on the West by Taylor by a line South twenty three chains to Pitt Water ; on the West by the waters of Pitt Water to the North-west corner of James M'Donald's thirty acres ; on the South by that farm by a line East eleven chains ; on the West by a line South twenty-three chains to Robert Melvyn's sixty acres; on the South by part of Melvyn's farm, and by Porter's and Anderson's farms by a line East fifty chains to  Martin Burke's fifty acres; on the East by that farm by a line North six chains to a Stream ; on the East by that Stream, which is the Western boundary of John Farrell's sixty acres; on the South by that farm by a line East twenty-eight chains to the Village Reserve of one hundred acres ; on the East by part of the Village Reserve by a line North seven chains to a Stream ; on the South by that Stream, which is the North boundary of the Village Reserve to the Sea; and on the East by
the Sea to the commencing comer. Promised by Sir Thomas Brisbane, 200 acres, on 23d July, 1824 ; 500 acres on 1st September,1824; and 500 acres on the 19th December,1825. Quit-rent £9 8s. 4d. sterling per annum, commencing 1st January, 1829.
 Classified Advertising. (1832, November 1). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2209217


Sir Thomas Mitchell sketchbook - Careel Bay 1828 (flat area leading north towards; where present day Careel Creek is) - Item c03082_0024_m, courtesy State Library of NSW

The Rev. Therry allowed John Doyle, an Irishman transported for insurrection in 1823, to lease part of the area for farming once had had obtained his Ticket of Leave.  From Shelagh and Geaor Champion's Profiles of the Pioneers: 

John Doyle, whose native place was County Cork, had been sentenced to seven years transportation on 14 September 1822, arriving in New South Wales by the Earl St. Vincent in 1823. His year of birth was 1798. He was 5 feet 7 inches tall, with a ruddy complexion, brown curly hair and chestnut eyes. John Doyle of Pittwater was granted his Ticket of Leave on 29 December 1827. [AO TL 27/938] He was employed as David Foley’s ploughman in 1828.

On 22 December 1837 David Foley wrote to Father Therry: “Revd. Sir, I have to inform you that I have seen Doyle and Culhane as you requested, they told me they intend to remain another year and that they will pay their rent as soon as they can get their Produce to Sydney.” Again, on 14 February 1839 Foley wrote Father Therry’s agent, John O’Sullivan, “J. Doyle I saw several times, respecting his rent, he promised to pay but as yet has neglected to do so. He is in partnership with another Man on the Farm.” As they treated Foley and his authority as “useless”, he suggested the execution of a distress warrant against them to obtain the rent. [ML MSS 1810/18 p.199; 1810/55 p.137a-b]

John Doyle and Thomas Culhane wrote to John O’Sullivan from Pittwater on 12 August 1839:

“Sir, Having seen the Revd. J.J. Therry’s overseer some few days since and being informed that he was empowered to rent the farm which I now occupy, my lease being out, I beg leave to state to you that I should be willing to hold possession of the farm as usual at a fair rent (namely) 30£ per annum which is as much as it ever realised - you being aware that none of the Revd. Mr Therry’s tenants ever paid him any rent at least but a small trifle - and me being a tenant under the above Gentleman so long, I consider I should have the first preference. I am willing to find security for the rent if required. I am a very old resident in that District and my Cattle being Bred here it will put me to an ill convenience which I flatter myself you will take into consideration.

...I am rather surprised to find that Mr Foley should be appointed to fix a rent on the farm after all the improvements I have made on it.” The rent was £16 per annum. “...There is one year’s Rent due but I beg leave to state that there is some accounts between me and Mr Therry which was to be allowed me for some improvements made on the Farm, (namely) Ploughing the Ground in the first instance together with fencing some of the said Ground, Doors for the House, and some Wheat & Maize that was given to some of the Men by Mr Therry’s orders, the whole amounting to about 9£ which still leaves the balance of about 7£ which I will settle when I receive your answer.” A note at the top of the letter states: “He took a new piece of ground & fenced for his own use & advantage.” Another note at the end of the letter states, “Rent £45 from 1 Septr. Mr Hurly Security.” [ML MSS 1810/55, p.193-5]

On 29 February 1840 Doyle and Culhane wrote again, to know whether they should pay the rent to Mr Hurley or into the bank, “if it is in the Bank mention to us the name of the Bank it is to be paid in two as it will be Due next month.” A reply to their letter was to be sent to David Jordan at the Bird in Hand, Gloucester Street, Sydney, to be forwarded to Thomas Culhane. [ML MSS 1810/55, p.325-8]

Tragically, John Doyle drowned in Pittwater on January 20th, 1841:

INQUEST.-An inquest was held on Tuesday morning at the house of Mr. Murphy, the Sign of the Bard's Legacy, Queen's Wharf on the body of John Doyle, who was accidentally drowned by the upsetting of a boat at Pitt Water, on Wednesday, the 20th instant. The body was found at Broken Bay on Monday last by some fishermen,who brought it to Sydney. It appeared from the evidence that the persons who were in the boat along with deceased at the time the accident occurred, as well as deceased himself, were perfectly sober, and the jury returned a verdict of accidental death. THE REGATTA. (1841, January 28). Australasian Chronicle(Sydney, NSW : 1839 - 1843), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31730651

John Doyle was a relative of the Collins family. Called by many in the early rural district of Pitt Water the 'Patriarch of Pittwater', John Collins was the eldest son born to Jeremiah and Catherine Collins (Nee Roche) at Annakissy, Killavullen Parish, Ireland. Shelagh Champion OAM and George Champion OAM, in their Profiles of the Pioneers (2013 - Warringah Shire Library) state Jeremiah and Catherine had four known sons, John, Francis (Frank), William and Æneas and two daughters, Mary and Catherine. A US relative who has been researching this branch of his family also lists two of the Collins sisters, Margaret, who married Jeremiah Hartnett (also from Cork) in Sydney in 1846, and Ellen immigrating to San Francisco at the height of the California Gold Rush in 1849. There are four other daughters listed in Church records, Bridget and Hanora, and two Mary's (one born in 1811 and the other in 1828). Of the 17 children the couple had baptised, only 12 were known to still be living when they embarked for New South Wales.


Catherine Collins - photo courtesy Avalon Beach Historical Society

Phil Michelson of California on Jeremiah and Catherine: Jeremiah immigrated to Sydney, NSW with 12 of his children aboard the Elphinstone in 1840.  He had been evicted from the Pierce Nagle Estate at Clenor even though he had paid his rent on time.

Many other tenants were evicted from the same estate during these years. The Elphinstone sailed into Sydney in October of 1840 - a check of the ships records shows only three of the sons aboard - John, Aenas and William. The Champion's research points to Jeremiah and Catherine arriving later:

Shipping Intelligence. ARRIVALS-YESTERDAY. ELPHINSTONE, barque, Friendlen, master, from London and Plymouth the 3rd of June, Gore and Co., Agents. Cargo-Merchandise.  Passengers - Cabin - Mr. Capper, Captain Edinborough and Lady. Mr. Arthur Edinborough. Mr. Thomas Boyed. Intermediate - Mr. and Mrs. Levy, Mr. Forsyth, Mr. Hynd, Mr. Cullender,  Mr. Gibbes, Miss Roach, and two hundred and forty-eight Emigrants, under the command of  D.M. Salter, Esq., Surgeon. Shipping Intelligence. (1840, October 9). The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (NSW : 1838 - 1841), p. 3 Edition: MORNING. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32185727

Ship News. By the Elphinstone from London, we have received 248 emigrants, who appear to be a most respectable set of people, and principally agriculturists. They have arrived in a healthy condition, notwithstanding that during the passage out, a slight case of fever was witnessed, which occasioned the death of four adults and six infants. This is the second vessel arrived from the firm of Carter and Bonus, and are sent out in addition to Marshall's emigrants. They consist of 158 adults, 28 children, between the age of seven and fourteen years, and fifty-five infants. The Himalaya, from London, bound to Port Phillip, with emigrants, was spoken by the Elphinstone, on the 11th September in lat. 38 ° 40' S , long. 90 ° 30' E., out 80 days, all well. The Mary Dugdale from Liverpool, bound to Adelaide with emigrants, and out 19 days, was spoken by the Elphinstone on the 29th of June, in lat. 8 ° N. Ship News. (1840, October 10). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2539219

The Rev. J J Therry allowed the Collins to take over John Doyle's farm in Pittwater. In the 1841 Census (from State Records of NSW):

COLLINS, Jeremiah: Hole in the Wall, Parish Broken Bay, County Cumberland, District Sydney.

The Collins family engaged in farming, with John Collins running the farm when his father Jeremiah passed away soon after the son named for him did:

FUNERAL. — The friends of Mr. Jeremiah Collins, Pitt Water, are  requested to attend the funeral of his deceased son, Jeremiah, to move from the Ferry Wharf, Windmill - street, Tomorrow, Wednesday afternoon, at half-past three o'clock.  JAMES CURTIS, Undertaker.  Hunter-street, October 5. Family Notices. (1852, October 5). The Sydney Morning Herald(NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12940492

FUNERAL.—The friends of the late Mr. JEREMIAH COLLINS, Pitt Water, are requested to attend his Funeral, to move from the Ferry Wharf, Windmill-street, this (Wednesday) afternoon, at five o'clock. JAMES CURTIS, Undertaker. Hunter-street, November 10.  Family Notices. (1852, November 10). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12941451

Jeremiah's wife Catherine went to live with her daughter Catherine, now wife of Bernard Daly. She passed away in 1872. Bernard Daly, prior to his passing, transferred the licence of the Union Inn to his brother in law, John Connolly, also of Cork, and his sister-in-law, Mary (nee Collins), who some may recall from our history page on the Broken Bay Customs Station under the tenure of Albert Thomas Black:

By special license, on the 17th April, at the Roman Catholic Chapel, North Shore, by the Rev. Peter Powell, Mr. Bernard Daly, Union Inn, North Shore, to Miss Catherine Collins, daughter of the late Jeremiah Collins, Pitt Water. Family Notices. (1856, April 18). The Sydney Morning Herald(NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12981900

Albert Thomas Black, Collector of Customs at Barranjuie, deposed to starting with his crew to the rescue of some men in a boat which he heard had upset; he rescued George Williams, John Walker, and deceased (whom he believed to be dead),and seeing that a boat was making for Francis Smith, and considering him safe to be picked up, he made for home; he tried for a couple of hours to restore life in Tucker, but failed; he desired to mention the heroic conduct of a lad named Jeremiah Connolly, who, of his own accord, put off in a small boat to save these drowning men. John Connolly, one of Mr. Black's crew, gave evidence as to the up-setting of the boat, which he witnessed from the shore. From the evidence adduced, Mr, Smith, gave it as his opinion that death had resulted from drowning. FATAL OCCURRENCE AT BARRANJUIE, BROKEN BAY. (1871, December 29). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13250096

COLLINS—April 13, at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. Bernard Daly, Union Inn, North Shore, Mrs. Catherine  Collins, relict of the late Jeremiah Collins, of Pitt Water, aged 81 years. Family Notices. (1872, April 20). The Sydney Morning Herald(NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13256066

The license of the Union Inn, St. Leonards, from Bernard Daly to John Connolly. WATER POLICE COURT. (1877, March 28). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13387885

A very old resident of the Shore, Mr. Bernard Daly, late of the Union Inn, was buried last week. He was a civil, obliging, honest man, whose house was always open to weary travelers, some of whom would remain days without paying him a penny. He and his late wife were those ideal innkeepers so highly spoken of by that great saint Francis De Sales, who said 'that he saw no condition in life which furnished greater means of serving God in our neighbour, and advancing heavenward, because it keeps a man continually engaged in works of mercy, although like the physician he receives his salary.' Mr. Daly was instrumental in procuring from the Government the unrivalled site upon which the Catholic Church stands. In his last days his spiritual wants were constantly attended to by Dean Kenny; and Mrs. Connolly, his sister-in-law, Mrs. Boyd, and Mr. John Collins of Pittwater, his brother-in-law, left nothing undone that would conduce to his comfort. He has left four grown-up children, who are well provided for. ST. LEONARDS. (1877, October 13).Freeman's Journal(Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115375940

John married Honorah (nee Stanton) in 1847. Their children were Ellen (b.1848), Patrick John, Margaret (b.1850), Jeremiah Joseph (b.1851), Katherine Mary (b.1853), Francis Edmund (b.1855) and twins John and Matthew Æneas (b.1859). 

In the Life and Letters of Rev JJ Therry, reference is made to a Dr. Bergin being in charge of the Pittwater properties given in Land Grants to the Arch-priest  - John O'Sullivan, who had earlier worked with the J J Therry on behalf of newly landed Catholics, and still looked after his interests even after he had died, had become a Manager of the Commercial Bank at Goulburn, where he would remain for 31 years until retirement in 1867. This may be Dr. Bergin's 'strayed' equine:

A REWARD.-Stolen or Strayed, from Mr. John Collins paddock, Pittwater, one HORSE COLT, two years old, brownish colour, small white star in forehead, branded on near shoulder B. Any person bringing me information to his recovery two pounds reward, if stolen, ten pounds reward, on conviction of the thief. Advertising. (1857, October 21). The Sydney Morning Herald(NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13001858

This would not be the only time someone was reaching into the pocket of John Collins:

Christopher Coyle was brought, before the Court by police-sergeant Smith, charged with stealing a silver watch, value £4. John Collins, farmer, of Pitt Water, stated that he was in Sydney on Friday, the 29th ultimo, and had the watch in his trousers' pocket. He did not know how he lost it, but he missed it about 8 o'clock. He did not recollect having seen prisoner before. Sergeant Smith happened to call at Sly's pawn office, just us the prisoner was offering  the watch in pledge. Committed for trial at next Quarter Sessions. WATER POLICE COURT. (1866, July 5). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved fromh ttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28612209

John and his brother Frank ran the farm, essentially a dairy. A description by Charles De Boos in his 1861 My Holiday series of Articles allows readers to envision not only the valley of Avalon but also what or how John or his brother may have spoken and what the farm looked like, commencing from their descent into the Bilgola Beach cove:

Following the road, we mounted and crossed the range which terminates in the bluff headland, at the base of which I had been so completely drenched on the proceeding day, and then followed a gradually descending track which wound round the hill side into a deep indentation of the land, until it came down to the level of the sandy ridges which bordered the beach, and then dived into a thickly wooded dell, which though so close to the borders of the sea was one tangled mass of vegetation. It was in fact the embouchure of a long gulley, that, separating two extensive and lofty spurs from the main range was so far sheltered by each from the cutting breezes of ocean, as to allow of the growth of every description of plant in we same profusion as in the gullies I have previously described. Through the midst of it ran a tolerably broad sheet of water, the ordinary brooklet of clear, bright, and sparkling water having been transformed by the late rains into a miniature torrent, turgid and bellowing and carrying down before it small boughs and debris from the hills above, in humble imitation of larger streams. By the aid of a fallen tree we managed to cross the stream dry footed, but it was only by breaking down and walking over the branches of the bangolas and by taking advantage of such tufts of grass or such dead timber  as offered that we could manage to cross the centre of the gully which the brook had covered with a mimic inundation.

Once through this jungle of a gully, and we had a gently rising road, creeping steadily up the face of the range, by easy graduation until at last it had gained the crest. Then we had a monotonous walk along the top of the ridge, in full view of the vast Pacific to our right, whose waves were now beating almost lazily along the beach at our feet and whose waters had barely swell enough on them to keel over the tiny fleet of coasters that had put out from different ports of shelter on the coast with the first slant of the favouring wind, and were now lying almost motionless, with scarce wind enough to lift their sails. To the left, the hills, covered with the low close scrub common to our coast ranges, bounded our view, the inland ridges, with their heavily timbered sides being hidden from our sight. Suddenly, however, the road took a curve round to the left, crossed a knoll of the range, and then swept down, in some fifty different tracks, on to a broad swampy plain, or flat, which seemed to us to be inundated, for we could see the water sparkling and glistening in the sun over its whole face. I pulled up short here.

" It won't do to go down there, Tom," said I.

"Oh, but we must," he replied. "This is the Priest's Flat, and there, where you see those shears erected, with the two tents alongside of them, is where they are boring for coal. We must go and report progress."

I looked ruefully at Nat, who made no reply, but, grinning viciously, bent down and turned up his trousers to the knees.     

“Do you think there are any leeches there ?” I asked. Nat's trousers were instantly turned down again, and this time he didn't grin,

"Oh, no," Tom answered, "there's too much water there for them, and not enough shelter.

I was easier in my mind, though I had my misgivings; but as these Antipodean leeches seemed to be ruled by laws, and to have amongst themselves habits and customs totally at variance with those of leeches in civilised communities, possibly Tom might be correct; so, tucking up my trousers, I prepared to descend. And, after all, when we got down to the flat it was not so bad as it had appeared to us from the hill. The ground was somewhat honeycombed and the water lay in pools, between which however, we managed to find sufficient footing without actually walking in water.

Arrived at the tents, warning of our approach was given by a solitary dejected bark, ending in a melancholy and prolonged howl, from some unseen dog, that was evidently too broken down and low-spirited to repeat the challenge and it was only after we had approached the shears, and had commenced our examination of the boring, which, to tell truth, none of us could make head or tail of, that a tall sailor looking man, who appeared as if he had but just that instant been uncoiled full-rigged from between the blankets, came out to the entrance of one of the tents, and regarded us with an air of blank and sleepy astonishment. Just after him followed his watchful canine guardian, whose short bark and long ululation had effected his master's awakening, but so far behind as not to be within kicking distance; his cowering watchful look, and his tail hard down between his legs, evidently saying as plain as could be said, " I  don't know whether I have done right, so I must stand by for squalls."

It took a good deal to waken up our friend to a full sense of the information we required from him, and it was only by the casual mention of Farrell's name that he was brought to his full mental perceptions. A grin spread over his countenance when we said where we had just come from.

“Did you go candling with him ?" he asked.   We explained how it was that we had not done so.'

“Oh, isn't it prime fun !" He was fast getting lively. 

He had been of the party the night before our arrival, had got wet through, had disported himself like a grampus in the pool, and had got home with an exulted notion of the sport. Of course we did not undeceive him; but having now got him up to the proper communicative pitch, we proceeded to worm out of him, by dint of much questioning, and much labour in bringing him back to the subject in hand for he would insist upon darting off from it at a tangent to give us collateral evidence upon matters in which we had not the slightest interest-all that he knew of the boring.

From the information thus acquired, as well as from enquiries subsequently made, I learnt that the spot now being bored was about the centre of a very fine property of some 1200 acres in area, granted many years ago to the Rev. Father Therry, and extending across the Barranjuee peninsula from the shores of the Atlantic to those of Creel Bay; the one being its eastern, the other its western boundary. Hence the plain had been christened the Priest's Flat. It had been for some time surmised, taking into account the dip of the coal basin, which crops up to the north at Newcastle, and to the south at Wollongong, that at this spot, which lies so near the northern cropping point, the coal seam might be struck at such a medium depth as would allow of payable working. Somewhere about twelve months ago, the reverend proprietor determined upon trying the experiment, and he has continued perseveringly at the work in spite of every discouragement that has beset him; and certainly he has had in this matter to bear up against contrarieties sufficient to have wearied out the majority of ordinary persons.

At no time have the men employed ever injured themselves by hard work, for the testimony of the natives goes to show that they hung it on most amazingly, and when obliged to do something for their money, rather than sink deeper they would break the auger. On another, occasion, an overseer that was employed bolted with the month's pay of the men, and, not satisfied with that, took also the reverend father's horse, though this was subsequently recovered, but only after paying a pretty Bullish sum for stabling expenses. Just as we visited the spot the 'works were again at a stand-still by the breakage of the apparatus, and the newly-appointed overseer was away in Sydney getting it repaired, whilst the hands were scattered hither and thither. They had at that time got to a depth of 186 feet, but had come upon no indications of coal, if we except the passage of the auger through a 6-inch pipe of coal at a depth of 123 feet. (Since these articles were commenced, I have learnt that the boring has reached a depth of 220 feet), when the work was suddenly brought to a close by the breaking of the auger, and, what was worse, by the cutting portion of it being left firmly embedded in the rock that was then being pierced.  

Whilst upon this subject, it may-not be out of place to mention that I visited, though somewhat subsequently to the time now alluded to, the bluff headland almost in an easterly line with the boring, and named by the reverend proprietor St. Michael's Head; and there, at about eight feet above high water mark, and quite open to view, is a thin seam, or, as miners term it, pipe of coal, scarcely an inch in thickness. On examination I found also that very much of the shale, both above and below the seam, bore carboniferous indications-leaves, ferns, &c, being distinctly traceable on the face of the cleavages. Another great discouragement that must have operated very strongly upon the rev. owner has been the expense that the work has entailed on him, in consequence of the bungling inexperience and roguery of the persons who have, until lately, been entrusted with it. On this point I speak only on hearsay, and my information is consequently liable to correction ; but I was told with an air of authority that the cost of sinking had, up to that time, reached very nearly £800, being at the rate of rather more than £4 per foot, whilst the time occupied in sinking had been over nine months, or about twenty feet per month not a foot per diem ! If this was not enough to put an extinguisher upon ordinary enterprise, I can't conceive anything that would be. Under the present management I am informed that the work promises to progress more favourably.


f.110 Mount Saint Patrick road to Broken Bay December 11, 1860.: Image No.: a5894118h all three from album: Volume 1: Sketches of N. S. [New South] Wales, 1857-1888 / by H. Grant Lloyd, courtesy Dixson Library, State Library of New South Wales - Mount Saint Patrick was the name for what we now call Bangalley Head - Mount Saint Mary, opposite, is where Stapleton park now sits atop this hill/'mount'.

We were not very long in pumping perfectly dry the maritime-looking individual who had charge of the works pro tem ; and, by the way, I would here ask how it is that nearly all the males we have encountered in our tracks have so decidedly nautical an appearance? Can it be that, like the islands in the Pacific have been said to have been, this particular portion of the territory of New South Wales has been peopled by the sole survivors of awful wrecks, by men supposed by anxious friends to have been drowned years ago, and who now turn up mysteriously in this unknown land? or, are the inhabitants of the Peninsula like the Arabs on the African coast, and do they seize and treat as slaves the shipwrecked mariners that are cast amongst them by the Pacific, in its un-pacific moods? or have they fled to these wilds to escape the too fond and anxious enquiries, through the water police, of disappointed shipmasters or deluded agents ? The question is one that perhaps some future Australian physiologist may be tempted to solve.

We parted with our friend with but scant ceremony, he turning on his heel and walking into his tent when we told him, "that was all;" whilst we shouldered our loads and walked ahead. Pushing along the edge of the flat, we crossed the foot of the hill we had not long previously descended, and, passing along an inner one of well-grassed sandbanks, that formed the landmost barrier against any encroachment of the waves, we came after a walk of half a mile to a paddock fence, through a slip panel of which the road evidently ran. Entering the paddock we found the upper part overgrown with young timber, principally wattles, that had sprang up since the cultivation of the toil had been discontinued, whilst about half-way across it we encountered a beautiful stream of running water, bright and clear as crystal, and crossed by a very rustic, and at the same time, very dilapidated-looking bridge. Nat was in the van at the moment, and I was astonished to see him, when he reached the brook, throw down his load and descend the bank to the water. Arrived there, he began hastily selecting some of the darkest leaves of a plant which I now observed grew very thickly on the margin of, and even in the water.

"What's the row ?" said I.

" Watercresses," replied he. "Stunning!"

" I'm there," cried Tom; whilst I made no answer, but slipped my shoulders out of my load, and commenced an attack upon this favourite pungent water plant. We amused ourselves for some five minutes over them, and then, filling our billy with the choicest stems we could find, once more made tracks.

After crossing the creek, we came in sight of a homestead, small but neat, having evidently been only recently whitewashed. The paddock was now clear of all undergrowth, and, as a goodly cluster of large trees, the remnants of the former occupants of the soil, had been left standing round the house, it had an exceedingly pretty and picturesque appearance, its white sides gleaming out markedly from amongst the bright green of the shrubs around it, and the dark and sombre verdure of the forest monarchs that overshadowed it.

"This," said Tom, "is Tom Collins, and he's the man that will show us the cave."

“The cave ?" asked I. "What cave ?".

" You'll see," he answered, "a rum 'un; such a one as you won't find anywhere else within a day's ride of Sydney, I can tell you."

Here was a surprise indeed. I had never, during the whole of my lengthened sojourn in Sydney, heard of this cave, and I don't believe that fifty persons in the metropolis are to this day cognisant of its existence; thus, with a feeling something near akin to that of a first discoverer, I hastened up to Collins domicile.  
(To be continued.) 
MY HOLIDAY. (1861, August 26). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13059581

MY HOLIDAY
[CONTINUED.]
(From the Sydney Mail, August 31.)

A tap at the door brought out the mistress of the house, accompanied by her brood of little ones, all fat, chubby, and rosy faced, bearing on their countenances the imprimatur of good health. Having mentioned our errand, we were invited to enter, and we found the interior of the domicile even more neat, and white, and bright, than the exterior, for it was the very beau ideal of cleanliness, and care. The tin-ware which hung from the shelves was polished till it shone like silver, whilst the shelves themselves being of deal, were scoured almost to whiteness. The floor, though an earthern one, was swept so clean that it more resembled a single large slab of stone than what it really was; and the fire in the huge bush fireplace was nicely kept in the centre, each side being swept as carefully as the floor itself had been. The hut had been recently whitewashed throughout, and the whole had such a light and cleanly air as strongly to remind me of some of the farmhouses it has been my lot to visit in the mother country, where, perchance, some notable housewife would take such a pride in polishing that even to the iron hoops of the churn, the piggins or the milk coolers would be burnished up till they resembled steel.

Unfortunately our man, Tom Collins, who knew all about the cave, and who was, in fact, its first discoverer, was absent from home; his brother, however, would very willingly guide us to the spot, so said Mrs. Collins, and waiting the arrival of her brother-in-law, she brought forth a huge jug of milk, from which she desired us to help ourselves; and if Tom and Nat didn't do so to a pretty considerable extent, they made a very good attempt at it, that's all. I verily believe that they would have had impudence enough to have asked for another quart, had not the arrival of Collins frer turned their attention to another quarter. He at once expressed his willingness to conduct us, and furnished himself with a piece of candle, the interior part of the cave being so dark as to require a light for guidance amongst the fallen rocks that encumber it.

He led us off in a straight line from the front of the house to the sea, to a spot where the high wall of rock which is here presented to the waves sinks rather slightly, and a little to the north of the well-known rock, "The Hole in the Wall." Bringing us to the edge of the cliff, he pointed to a bit of a track, down which there had evidently been some slipping and shuffling. This went down for about five feet, and then we could see no more. All beyond that appeared to us, from where we stood, to be blank space; and I had a kind of faint idea that, like Farrell's candleing, this was some more of the peninsularies' fun, and that they let themselves slip down here, shot out into space, and chanced the rest. Tom looked at the track and turned pale. Nat inspected it, and turned up the bottoms of his trousers, a sure sign with him of determination, and about equivalent to the turning up of the coat cuffs by the school boy when he has made up his mind to dare some bigger boy to combat. I have already said what my feelings were, but in the position I occupied, as leader and originator of the expedition, it was necessary that I should set an example of decision, if not of courage. There was a small ledge or platform about three feet down on which the whole four of us could have stood easily ; so down on to this I leaped, with something of the same kind of feeling as Marcus Curtius must have had when he took his leap that everybody has heard so much about. Nat followed very readily, but Tom still hung fire.

"It's only just a little bit that's awkward," said Collins, "after that there's as good walking as there is up above."

But Tom was not to be tempted, and that "little bit" struck terror even to my heart, though I was determined upon prosecuting my discovery to the utmost. From the ledge on which we stood, we could only see just two or three feet' of downright slippery descent, and beyond that nothing but the black rocks two hundred feet below, and the crested waves breaking on them in white foam.

"Follow me," said Collins, as griping a projecting point of rock, he slid down the track, dislodging the stones and pebbles, and sending them rattling down upon the rocks below in a regular shower. In another second he had disappeared, and I heard no smash, no cry of torture, so taking heart of grace, I laid hold of the point of rock - oh, if I didn't hold it tight - slipped down the path, shot round a corner, almost breaking my spine with the twist, found my feet laid hold of by somebody, who placed them firmly upon a stone, and then, looking round, perceived that the worst was really over, and that now there was a good plain track running down to the rocks.

My admiration, however, was somewhat marred by a pair of thick boots which, cocking rapidly down from above, struck me somewhat rudely over the head, and as Nat's feet happened to be in them, and, as wanting the guiding hands that had placed me on the friendly rock, they were thrown wildly about, the blows were rather more than I had calculated upon. Nat soon got his footing, and then began to abuse me for getting in his way instead of apologising for his carelessness. We now shouted to Tom that we were all right and bade him follow. As he saw that the thing was done so easily, he hardly liked to jib, so he sang out to us to wait for him, as he was coming. We looked upwards for him with some anxiety, and in the course of a couple of minutes we had a full view of "the boots." They and they alone stopped in sight for a full minute, and we began to fear that Tom had caught somewhere, when suddenly down came the boots and Tom too, all in a lump, sliding down on the hunkers' after the same fashion as I have seen children slither down a slanting board. He had taken the notion that if instead of griping the cliff as we had done, he stooped down in the way I have described he could guide and check his progress with hands and feet. Here he made a woeful mistake, for the breaks in the descent were too heavy, and poor Tom came jumping down kangaroo fashion, bumping and thumping against the rocks, and so completely done up, that if Collins hadn't caught hold of him, he would certainly have gone bumping and thumping to the bottom.

We now descended to the rocks by a comparatively easy path, and passing along to the southward of the point whence we had started, we followed the rocks round a small projecting headland, on the south eastern face of which the cave is situated.

It is about eighty feet above high water mark, and about twice that distance from the summit of the headland. When we had mounted to it, and stood at its entrance, we found that a kind of bank or platform had been formed in front of it, covered with coarse grass and with an extensive growth of wild parsley, that seemed to flourish here in great luxuriance. The entrance forms a kind of rude irregular gothic arch, about twenty or five-and-twenty feet high in the centre, - the interior of the cave, that is, its first compartment, being about twice that height, in consequence rather of the descent of the flooring of the cavern than of the rising of its roof. It has evidently at some former period been considerably deeper than it now is, as vast masses of rock that have fallen from the roof above lay strewn about, and heaped upon each other, particularly in the centre, to be gradually, but surely, covered by the fine sand that drifts in with every southerly breeze through the entrance, and also by the guano, if such it may be termed, deposited here by the myriads of bats that make this cavern their home. 

The first thing that strikes the visitor on entering is a long flaw or rent in the sandstone which is here the prevailing rock. This flaw runs along the centre of the whole length of the roof of the cavern, being about three feet in width, and in a perpendicular position, and is filled up with a highly ferruginous sandstone, sounding particularly hard and metallic when struck. 

At about eighty feet from the mouth, the floor is covered with immense boulders of stone that have fallen from the roof of the cavern, and almost block up the way to the second compartment. A great part of these has fallen during the bad weather of the last year or two, a continuous rain, followed by a thunderstorm, being sure to bring down some one or more of the huge projecting masses that bulge out from the roof, and threaten to fall at the smallest provocation. 

Passing round this heap of debris, we now light our candle, for the mass of wreck so far shuts out the light of day as to render artificial light necessary. We now find ourselves in what may he termed the second compartment, which has a more regularly arched and compact appearance than the first, though it is somewhat smaller, being about twenty feet in height and the same width across, whilst the first is at least forty feet high and as many feet in width. Here we can more clearly perceive the ferruginous character of the interloping seam or flaw that has doubtless been the primary cause of this peculiar formation. The drippings from this perpendicular inset between the native rocks hang down in long rust-coloured pendants of oxide of iron, whilst the rocks on either side are formed in regular horizontal layers, the edges of the different strata, and in fact every protruding point of this part of the cave being covered with a white efflorescence from the phosphate of lime that has gathered on them ; whilst here and there other emanations from the rocks have settled in small chrystals upon its face, and reflect back the rays of the candle in all the gorgeous colours of the prism.

This compartment is the favourite resort of the bats and birds, the lighting of the candle creating a regular commotion amongst the denizens of the place. That they have occupied it for many long years possibly for centuries, is probable from the fact that in rooting among the sand and guano that cover the floor to an unknown depth, Collins informed me that he had met with large masses of an ammoniacal salt, that it must have taken the simple laboratory of nature very many years to bring to the state in which it is found.

Somewhere about ninety feet from the heap which I take as forming the boundary between the first and second compartment the cavern narrows very considerably, and we enter by a passage about wide enough to admit four persons abreast into the last chamber of this extraordinary place. As the sides come closer together, so also does the roof descend, and a tall man would here be able, by a good stretch of his arms, to touch the top; and so it runs in for another twenty or thirty feet, sides and top gradually collapsing, until at last there is but the width of the flaw, and scarcely height sufficient for a man to sit down. Here the iron percolations prevail, as in the second compartment those of the lime are most abundant ; and we strike against the interjected seam, and, by dint of much labour and perseverance, chip off from it a piece of rock which has all the appearance of being actually iron in a rude state of preparation. We also see portions of it lying in long seams upon the sandstone rock it has divided, and which appear burnt and charred as though it had been subjected to powerful electric action. We also look back now to the way by which we have entered, and just over the heap of rubbish and natural ruins that impede our sight, we mark the bright light of day, which, from the distance we are placed at, is chastened and subdued almost to a twilight. Everything seems solemn and suppressed; all outward sound is shut out, and there is not even a drip from the roof above to break the pervading stillness. We speak in our ordinary tone, but our voices, crushed down by the massiveness around, sound as if we were conversing in whispers. We are in no grand echoing hall, the work of mans' hands that sycophantly sends back the compliments that are given to his skill. We see before us the work of the Great Architect of the Universe, who labours not by the hand, but employs the meanest and the humblest instruments to do His bidding, and who, with the drop of water or the grain of sand, hollows out mighty caverns, or builds up giant mountains. Nature seems to acknowledge the Almighty presence, and to stand silent and awestruck as she watches the never ceasing work.

Something like these thoughts passed through my mind as I sat at the extremity of the cavern and looked out towards its entrance, a distance of over   two hundred feet, and I could see that my companions were also somewhat similarly affected. We consequently retraced our steps with feelings very much sobered from those with which we had entered. Having collected a few specimens from the rocks around, we beat a retreat, and it was like coming into another world when we had emerged from the cave, and the hoarse roar of the waves beating upon the rocks, the songs of the birds, and the numerous and inexplicable sounds of nature and of life, struck vividly upon ears fresh from the oppressive stillness of the cave. We journeyed for some distance round amongst the vast heaps of rocks, on which the waves were breaking lazily though unceasingly, until we had reached St. Michael's Head, where the narrow seam of coal, alluded to in my last, was shown to me, together with the strata of carboniferous shale lying above and below it.

When we had seen all that was to be seen here-abouts, we retraced our steps, the point at which we had descended being the only one by which an ascent could be effected ; and no sooner were we on the back track than we missed Tom. Enquiries were mutually made, and then it was remembered that none of us had seen him since leaving the cavern. I was uneasy. I was fearful that he had fallen down some of the immense crevices that yawned between the vast masses of stone that we had had to traverse on our way; and on our retreat I peered down these as I passed them with a kind of nervous dread on each occasion that I should see his crushed and mangled body lying inanimate at the bottom. We didn't find him in any of these, but just as we were mounting the track up to the first slippery point of descent, we heard Spanker's bark, and looking in that direction saw Tom stalking along the rocks half a mile away, looking for the pathway that he had passed.

A cooey from us showed him his mistake and he was not long in rejoining us, whilst Spanker was so elated that he made a spring up the ascending path in the exuberance of his spirits, but happening to jump rather short, and not being gifted with hands to secure a hold, he came rolling back amongst us, and nearly sent us toppling off the narrow pathway, which we were mounting in Indian file, something after the manner in which children knock down the long files of suppositious soldiers represented by bent cards. By dint of some little muscular exertion, and some pushing and pulling at each other, the ascent was successfully accomplished, and we once more stood upon terra firma, for the vast boulders of rock over which our way had been made was certainly not entitled to that designation. Tom was so elated at finding himself once more safe and sound from an adventure over which, from the very first, as he afterwards confessed, he had had the most painful misgivings, that he fired at and killed the first bird that came across him, the victim in this instance being an unfortunate gill-mocker, who had attracted Tom's attention by several times telling him to " Go back," a piece of advice that, in Tom's then state of mind, must have savoured strongly of sarcasm.

Having thanked Collins for his kindness and attention, we once more pushed ahead, the road now leading us across a long level piece of country that intervened between the sea and the waters of Creel Bay, until it brought us down to the margin of the latter. Arrived here, we had before us as pretty a marine picture as ever painter sketched, and as directly opposite to the one we had but so recently left as could be well conceived. The flat level land had here narrowed to some sixty rods in width, being backed by a heavily wooded range, the base of which was here and there encumbered by large masses of rock, from which the incumbent soil had been washed, and which now protruded in huge boulders, or lay out bare and detached from their native beds. On the margin of the bay were three little whitewashed slab huts with bark roofs, the passionate squalling of an infant that proceeded from one of them would have given evidence of their being inhabited, even if we had not seen two or three barelegged and barefooted children peering at us round the corner of the house.

Through the narrow belt of low swamp oaks that edged the margin of the bay, the clear smooth waters of Creel glistened in the sun, as the gentle breeze swept over its face and slightly ruffled its surface. On the sands, midway between the shore and the retreating water, for it was nearly low tide, two boys were busied collecting shells, by filling an old basket with the sand, and then agitating it in a water-hole, made for the purpose, until the sand was washed away, and nothing was left but the shells that had been mingled with it. These, when washed clean, were thrown into a boat that lay down helplessly on its side close to them. Out on the waters of the bay, floated a smart little cutter, which, though probably only a shell boat, looked from the clear atmosphere, and perhaps also from the fact that she was the only vessel in view, smart and dapper as a yacht, the red shirt and striped cap of the one man on board, adding still farther to the picturesque appearance of the vessel. Behind her again stretched out the waters of the bay, until they encountered the ranges of the other side, which coming down in many a ridge and gully, and forming many a deep indentation or projecting point, gave a gorgeous variety of tints and lights to a background that under a less brilliant sun or less pure atmosphere would have been sombre and monotonous.

Manly to Broken Bay. (1893, November 11). Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 19. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71191632

We halted here just long enough to admire the scene, and to have a shot at one of a number of blue cranes, that were stalking about most consequentially and at the same time most warily upon the sands. It was only by dint of a good deal of manoeuvring and dodging that Nat was enabled to get even within possible shooting distance of the rearmost of the lot; and after all, when he fired, he didn't kill his bird. He however succeeded in frightening it, and not only it but all its companions, for they one and all took to flight with a wild cry. But if he had in one quarter caused a fright and a cry he had in another caused a fright and quietness for the report of the gun had stilled the squalling in the hut so effectually that it was not resumed, so long at least as we remained within hearing.

The track, a mere bridle path, now led along the flat, then across a dank luxuriant gully, down which a little stream roared and brattled and foamed with as much fuss and bother as would have been sufficient for a volume of water twenty times its quantity; afterwards, up a wet sloppy hill from which the water exuded in every direction, round the point of the range, down a correspondingly wet and sloppy descent on the other side; and then on to another flat the very counterpart of the one we had just quitted. Another luxuriant and overgrown gully, another wet hill teeming with springs, and then we come down, upon a somewhat broader flat, at the extremity of which we see two tents a short distance apart that we at once recognise, from the description we had received of them, as being the Chinamen's place.
(To be continued.) 
MY HOLIDAY. (1861, September 2). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13057913



EB Studios (Sydney, N.S.W.). (circa 1917-1918). Panorama of a bush track in the Careel Bay area, Pittwater, New South Wales  Enemark list title Careel Bay, Pittwater. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-162412531 - and sections from to show detail; with road at far right of photo seen between trees leads to Palm Beach - courtesy National Library of Australia.

Whale Beach road (?) just up the hill from Careel Head road-Whale Beach road junction and looking back towards hill above Careel Bay. NB: flowering gum seen in one enlarged portion, and road running north glimpsed between trees going north, also portion of road visible running up to this road near fence posts in mid section.




Section showing John Collins Dairy Fields - from  Stanton & Son. Careel Ocean Beach estate [cartographic material] : "The hole in the wall", 2nd subdivision, 1922. MAP Folder 37, LFSP 499. Part 1. and Stanton & Son. Careel Ocean Beach estate [cartographic material] : "The hole in the wall", 2nd subdivision 1922. MAP Folder 37, LFSP 499. Part 2., courtesy National Library of Australia.

ST. MICHAEL'S ARCH.

This beautiful Arch is situated on the estate of the late Very Reverend J. J. Therry, about three miles south of Broken Bay. As the scenery along. the coast from Manly Beach to the Bay is of the loveliest description, we advise all lovers of the picturesque to hire a spring cart from Mr. Miles - who lives about half a mile from the Pier Hotel - and proceed, early in the morning, to Mr. Collins' house, about thirteen miles distance, so as to be able to inspect this extraordinary specimen of natural architecture, and to return to Manly the same day if necessary.

As this excursion may gradually become fashionable, we quote a description of the places on the road from the late Postmaster- General Raymond's valuable work, the "Post Office Directory for 1855."

"Seven and a half miles from North Harbour, - Jenkins' house ; the road for the last mile along a level sandy beach. On the left is Narrabeen lagoon. Mr. Jenkins has a snug house here, and much land in cultivation, which is an agreeable prospect -    from the sea. Eleven and a half miles from North Harbour -Hut on the sea shore. The path from the Pennant Hills Road reaches the sea, and joins this coast road at the farm of one Foley - a tenant of. Mr. Wentworth's ; the distance from thence being twelve miles. About half a mile further on is the south-east arm of Pitt Water, on which there are some small cultivated farms. The head of Pitt Water as seen from the heights along which the road or path leads, is equal to any lake scenery, and there are many romantic spots, with good land, on its banks, which might be converted into good farms. Thirteen miles from North Harbour - Several farms and cottages. Fourteen miles- The Rev. Mr. Therry has a grant here. Fourteen and three-quarter miles - The Hole-in-the-Wall, being a rocky projection forming a rude archway with the shore."

The arch mentioned by Mr. Raymond is about twenty-two feet across the inside, and between thirty and forty feet high underneath. The rocks, of which it forms a part, are seventy feet in height - the colours of these rocks are exceedingly beautiful. At low water the visitor can pass through the arch.

Ascending the cliffs, a view of Pitt Water is beheld, being the harbour belonging to this estate. If an arrangement were made to have a small steamer plying along the beautifully wooded, lofty, and precipitous shores of the Hawkesbury River, parties of travellers could meet it at this spot, avoiding the disagreeable sea voyage by coming from Manly by land. The steamer could convey them from Mr. Collins' house to Windsor, and the train would take them back to Sydney - it being understood that the Windsor railway will shortly be completed.


Illustration: ST. MICHAEL'S ARCH.  

ST. MICHAEL'S ARCH. (1864, October 15). Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 - 1872), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63512130 


W.H. Raworth (Brit./Aust./NZ, c1821-1904). St Michael’s Arch, NSW [Avalon] c1860s. Watercolour, signed lower left, obscured title in colour pencil verso, 34.2 x 56.5cm. Tear to left portion of image, slight scuffs and foxing to upper portion.  Price (AUD): $2,900.00  at:https://www.joseflebovicgallery.com/pages/books/CL181-53/w-h-raworth-c-brit-aust-nz/st-michaels-arch-nsw-avalon 

St. Michael's Arch 1867 - The storm that turned an arch into a pedestal:

BROKEN BAY.

[FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT] 

June 24 – We have had tremendous weather, but, as far as Pitt Water is concerned, no damage has been done with the exception to one of our picturesque curiosities, St. Michael’s Arch. It has at length to the too mighty elements and the destroying influence of time, that which was the admiration of all who have beheld it is now almost baseless fabric-there is only about one half of the outer support left, looking at it at a distance it has the resemblance of a coloured pillar. In its fall it carried a large portion of the overhanging rock with it, a thousand tons of gigantic boulders, and in such masses that I think it will stop the ingress from that part to the cave, but at yet we have had no close inspection for the rollers are dashing to the height of the stupendous rocks. The only idea I can give of the gale is that the froth of (not spray) the sea came over Mount St. Joseph, opposite the house, half a foot in size, and spread itself down to the dam, at times shading the heights of the mountain,-its resemblance was that of an overwhelming snow storm.

The sea at Barranjoey washed away the flower garden in front of the Chinamen's huts, taking soil and all, so that the beach comes close up to their door. There must have been awful havoc in the Hawkesbury, for all the beaches from Barranjoey to the Long Beach are strewn with fragments of houses, boxes, chairs, door frames, dead pigs, hay, wheat, broken bedsteads, weather-board sides of houses, oranges with large branches, pumpkins, melons, corn cobs, and other debris, that scarcely any portion of the beaches can be seen. Mr. Conolly picked up a workbox, in which was contained a number of receipts and letters directed to Mr. Moss, Windsor. The beaches on which are the debris is Barrenjoey, Whale Beach, Collins's Beach, Mick's Hollow Beach, Farrell's Beach, Mona Beach, and Long Beach, so it may be imagined the great extent of destruction. BROKEN BAY. (1867, June 27). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13144304 

Another version of same report:

BROKEN BAY[From the Herald's Correspondents.]

June 24. — We have had tremendous weather, but, as far as Pitt Water is concerned, no damage has been done, with the exception to one of our picturesque curiosities, St. Michael's Arch. It has at length yielded to the too mighty elements and the destroying influence of time,— that which, was the admiration of all who have beheld it is now almost a baseless fabric,— there is only about one half of the outer support left, looking at it at a distance it has the resemblance of a colossal pillar. In its fall it carried a large portion of the overhanging rock with it, a thousand tons of gigantic boulders, and in such masses that I think it will stop the ingress from that part to the cave, but as yet we have had no close inspection, for the rollers are dashing to the height of the stupendous rocks. The only idea I can give of the gale is, that the froth of (not spray) the sea came over Mount St. Joseph, opposite the house, half a foot in size, and spread itself down to the dam, at times shading the heights of the mountain, — its resemblance was that of an overwhelming snow storm. The sea at Barranjoey washed away the flower garden in front of the Chinamen's huts, taking soil and all, so that the beach comes close up to their door. There must have been awful havoc in the Hawkesbury, for all the beaches from Barrenjoey to the Long Reach are strewed with fragments of houses, boxes, chairs, doorframes, dead pigs, hay, wheat, broken bedsteads, weatherboard sides of houses, oranges with large branches, pumpkins, melons, corn cobs, and other debris, that scarcely any portion of the beaches can be seen. Mr. Conolly picked up a workbox, in which was contained a number of receipts and letters directed to Mr. Moss, Windsor. The beaches on which are the debris is Barrenjoey, Whale Beach,  Collins's Beach, Mick's Hollow Beach, Farrell's Beach, Mona Beach, and Long Reach, so it may be imagined the great extent of destruction. BROKEN BAY. (1867, June 29). Sydney Mail (NSW : 1860 - 1871), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166799304

Many resident historians are fairly certain that the above was written by then resident in this region John Collins, or his brother Frank, who worked occasionally at the Broken Bay Customs Station, Barrenjoey headland during these years. Mr. Conolly, who is also mentioned, became a relative by marrying one of the Collin's ladies.

It is not apparent from the above reference to 'Creel Bay' that visitors to the Collin's Dairy Farm were becoming more frequent, including their landlord - these two accounts also describe the landscape:

PITT WATER.
Yesterday, being Easter Monday, a pleasant steam excursion took place in connection with the St Benedict's Young Men's Society. The commodious steamer the Collaroy, under the command of Captain Mulhall, had been chartered for the occasion, and left the Australasian Steam Navigation Company's Wharf, Sussex-street North, with about 260 persons on board, at ten o' clock a.m. Part of the band of H. M. S. 12th Regiment were in attendance, their cheerful and untiring efforts contributing not a little towards making the day pass harmoniously and agreeably away. Working along through the ever changing scenery displayed on the shores of our harbour, the Collaroy at length rounded the Heads, and, taking a northerly course, rushed past that enormous barrier presented by the weather-worn cliffs which face the ocean between the Great North Head and the seaward aspect of Manly Beach. Following on the interesting coast line of Curl Curl, Dee why, Long Reef, and Narrabeen, &c, - varied succession of wooded eminences, long sandy reaches, towering precipices, and grassy park-like slopes, - the pleasure-seekers were at length abreast of the singular headland of Barrenjoey, forming the extreme south-eastern limit of the estuary which serves as a common outlet for the River Hawkesbury and the Pitt Water. Shortly after passing the Custom House station the course of the Collaroy then took a southerly direction, and so brought the holiday folks into the lake-like solitudes of Pitt Water, until wooded hills seemed to be rising on every side of the vessel.

The passengers were landed at a small, but commodious wharf, erected on the property of the Venerable J. J Therry, under whose especial patronage the excursion had been got up. Most of the visitors set off in quest of St. Michael's Cave, determined not to lose the opportunity of seeing so great a natural curiosity. The walk, it was found, lay through woods, a long flat, and a hilly scrub, until, facing to the east at the head of the inlet, the merry party, in a straggling Indian file, at length arrived in the vicinity of the cave, cautiously descending the rocks, and creeping carefully along a narrow path specially made for their convenience on the face of the cliffs, they were thus finally rewarded for their perseverance. Almost every body managed to scramble up into the cave, and not a few of the more adventurous explored its inmost recesses by candle-light. The effect of the gloomy inner arch looked down upon from the top of the second angle of the cave, was much admired; and so also was the wider arch at the entrance, as contemplated from the spot where the bright daylight again began to stream down upon the faces of the returning explorers. There was, for some time, a pleasant buzz of conversation and a discussion of food at the mouth of St Michael's Cave, and then the party set out on their way back to the steamer, where dinner had been prepared.

Some with sharpened appetites posted thither at once, but many remained with the band near the house on the flat, and amused themselves with dancing, playing cricket, and so on. There was some dancing also at the steamer after dinner was over. The Kembla steamer visited the wharf at an early hour, landed some passengers, and afterwards returned for them. The Collaroy left the wharf for Sydney at about five o'clock, and arrived safe at Sydney soon after eight. The Right Worshipful the Mayor of Sydney, the Mayoress, and other members of the family were on board. We also observed the Rev. Fathers Corish, Curtis, Hanson, and Powell, besides the Venerable J. J. Therry. The trip appeared to give general satisfaction, although a slight shower, soon after the arrival of the Collaroy at Pitt Water, interfered with some of the arrangements.
PITT WATER. (1862, April 22). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13227471

Passing Burraujuee Head, which spreads out East and West like the head or a hammer at the end of along, narrow isthmus, which may not inaptly he compared to the handle, we steamed up Pittwater, and entered tint arm on its Eastern side upon which Father Therry's property is situated. As we proceeded up the Bay, the beautiful scenery on every side — so similar in its general character to that of our own harbour, and yet so different in its arrangement and general effect — excited the unqualified admiration of everyone on board. The situation of Pittwater and the beautiful country which surrounds it on every side renders it particularly available for the foundation of a watering place, which it will probably be at no distant period, when it becomes fashionable, for our citizens and their families to seek for change of air and scene during the heats of summer.

The steamer having landed its freight at the wharf constructed by Father Therry for the convenience of persons residing in the locality, and for those excursionists to whom he might give permission to land upon his property, they proceeded to walk towards the Cave, one of the chief attractions of the day's excursion. The path lay across a pleasant, undulating country to the rocks fronting the ocean, on the face of which the Cave is situated. A path has been constructed on the ledges of rock jutting out from the face of the cliff, and presenting in some places difficulties of approach to it which might have deterred many from venturing on the expedition had they been aware of them. The steps were frequently so steep and narrow that the slightest slip might have subjected a person to serious injury by precipitating him from a height of thirty or forty feet on to the rocks below, very similar to those at the base of the Gap, and against which the waves dashed with violence as great as we see at that spot, with which so much melancholy interest is associated. After what we had heard of the Cave itself, we certainly were rather disappointed on gaining the entrance: it is only by scrambling over the rooks, taking up a position at the extreme end and looking back towards the entrance that the full solemnity of the scene can be realised. The dim unearthly light streaming through the entrance and broken up by the projections of the roof and sides left an impression upon the mind not easily to be effaced; it was a fitting scene for all the horrors of the incantation scene in per Freischutz, its resemblance to which was rendered more striking by numbers of bats which flitted to and fro through the gloom; or to that scene in Macbeth where the Weird Sisters' Round about the cauldron go.'

...Below shows 'Mount Patrick and Dam constructed by Collins.

Wreck of the S.S. Collaroy, 1881 / photographer unknown. State Library of NSW Image No: a1528938: A passenger steamer owned by the Australian Steam Navigation Company, built in 1853, went ashore on Collaroy Beach in 1881 and remained there for almost 3 years, giving her name to the stretch of sand and ocean. When refloated she went back into service plying between Sydney and the Hunter River. She was withdrawn from duty in 1886, converted to a schooner, sailed to San Francisco, where she again ran ashore and broke her back on the Californian Coast in 1889.

It was intended that Father Therry should have delivered the inaugural lecture of the season of St. Benedict's Society in St. Michael’s cave, but he was compelled, with great reluctance, to turn back without having reached it, having found the journey too fatiguing for him.

A great number of the excursionists scattered themselves in the bush and on the shores which skirt the beautiful bay, and several employed themselves in shooting and fishing. The Collaroy left Pitt Water about six o'clock in the evening and arrived in Sydney a little after eight no accident having occurred to mar the pleasures of a most agreeable day. Among the guests onboard we noticed the Very Rev. J. J. Therry Archpriest, Rev. Dr. Powell and Fathers Anselm, Corish, Donovan, McGirr, the Mayor of Sydney, with Mrs Oatley and family, &c. &c. The Band of the 12th Regiment had been engaged by the committee and played a selection of drama and other music which tended greatly to increase the pleasures of the day.

We must not omit to mention the extremely discreditable conduct of those who without asking any permission of Father Therry, on whose property St. Michael's cave is situated, very coolly advertised the Kembla to proceed there on another occasion at a less rate than the Collaroy, to the great annoyance and discomfort of those who had asked and obtained permission of Father Therry to make use of his ground...  PITTWATER. (1862, April 23). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115761495

J . J. Therry passed away on May 25, 1864 and his estates were left to his church. The first subdivisions occurred in 1871 and continued in 1880, 1881 and 1882, with large farm lots of acreage being purchased or bought for investments. Many of these early lithographs show the topography of the land. On May 3rd 1880, Richardson and Wrench offered the Therry estate, as they did again the following year:

PITTWATER and CAREEL COVE.
The whole of the residue of
THE PITTWATER ESTATE.
Also,
STOKES POINT, which is now subdivided into VILLA SITES, fronting CAREEL COVE 
and PITTWATER.
adjoining the Township of BRIGHTON, PITTWATER.
RICHARDSON and WRENCH have received instructions to sell by public auction, at the Rooms, Pitt-street, on MONDAY, 16th May, at 11 o'clock, The whole of the unsold lots of 
THE PITTWATER ESTATE, as follows :
NORTH DIVISION.
TWO CHOICE FARMS.
No. III. Area. 128 ACRES 1 ROOD .14 PERCHES, having frontages to the PACIFIC OCEAN and the MAIN ROAD to BARRENJOEY, on which is the HOMESTEAD and, RESIDENCE now in the occupation of JOHN COLLINS, Esq.. and also the CELEBRATED CAVE.
No. IV. Area, 65 ACRES and 32 PRRCHES, adjoining the above, and which are the WELL-KNOWN SPRINGS.
SUBURBAN SITES.
Nos. 8 to 16 and 10 and 20, surrounding the TOWNSHIP OF BRIGHTON, in areas from 2 ACRES 3 ROODS 35 PERCHES to 9 ACRES 3 ROODS 10 PERCHES, having frontages to the MAIN PITTAVATER ROAD and other roads and streets, all 1 chain wide.
Nos. 1A and 2A. Areas. 5 ACRES 3 ROODS 21 PERCHES and 7 ACRES 34 PERCHES respectively, overlooking PITTWATER.
SOUTH DIVISION.
Nos. IV. and V. TWO FINE FARMS, areas 97 ACRES 3 ROODS 17 PERCHES, and 91 ACRES 2 ROODS 9 PERCHES respectively.
No. VI. A FARM of 127 ACRES 3 ROODS 29 PERCHES, near SALTPAN COVE and the TOWNSHIP of NEWPORT.
Lots 5 to 8 and 5A to 8A. EIGHT CHOICE VILLA SITES in PITTWATER, fronting LONG BEACH ; areas from 4 ACRES 2 ROODS 10 PERCHES to 17 ACRES 27 PERCHES.
Lots 9 and 11. TWO SMALL FARMS in REFUGE BAY; areas. 25 ACRES 1 ROOD 6 PERCHES, and 11 ACRES 1 ROOD 24 PERCHES.
Lots 16 to 21, and 24 and 25. S GRAND BLOCKS of RICH SOIL in CABBAGE-TREE VALE, on BILGOLA BEACH : areas, from 5 ACRES 2 ROODS 36 PERCHES to 21 ACRES 1 ROOD.
Lot 26. A SMALL FARM, fronting the RECREATION RESERVE on OCEAN BEACH ; area, 12 ACRES 3 ROODS 8 PERCHES.
STOKES' POINT, PITTWATER.
ADJOINING THE TOWN OF BRIGHTON, AT THE STEAMERS WHARF.
The whole of this Magnificent Point will be submitted in lots, as per lithograph, now published, viz..
Section A. 15 VILLA SITES; areas. 3 ROODS 17 PERCHES to 2 ACRES 20 PERCHES.
Section B. 14 VILLA SITES : areas. 1 ACRE 10 PERCHES to 6 ACRES 3 ROODS 32 PERCHES
Section C. 9 VILLA SITES. CAREEL BAY ; areas. 1 ACRE 3 ROODS 34 PERCHER to 4 ACRES 21, PERCHES
Section D. WATER FRONTAGE SITES; areas. 2 ACRES to 4 ACRES 21 PERCHFS. PITTWATER HARBOUR 
Section E. 10 VILLA SITES, adjoining the TOWN OF BRIGHTON : areas. 1 ACRE 11 PERCHES to 4 ACRES 1 ROOD 23 PERCHES.
This subdivision is well worthy of attention, as there is no doubt that PITTWATER will become an important and attractive resort for our BUSINESS MEN requiring CHANGE OF AIR, QUIET, and REST from the busy turmoil of the city.
The communication between the city and Pittwater is now more frequent than formerly, besides having the coaches daily from MANLY BEACH, there are now commodious fast steamers plying regularly from the city.
The NORTHERN RAILWAY will pass within 7 miles of CAREEL COVE at Pittwater.
TERMS EXCEEDINGLY LIBERAL AT SALE.
LITHOGRAPHS are now READY FOR DISTRIBUTION.

Messrs. ELLIS and MAKINSON, Elizabeth-street, are Solicitors of the vendors.  Day of Sale, MONDAY NEXT. Advertising (1881, May 12). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13479502


Pittwater Estate Monday May 16th, 1881 - Richardson and Wrench - Item c050370020, courtesy  State Library of New South Wales.

Mr. Barry's A Trip to Pittwater in full, since it describes the then of what we call 'Clareville' now:


A TRIP TO PITTWATER.

Some friends of mine having purchased part of the Pittwater estate recently offered for sale, were anxious to see the land, and they invited me to accompany them. Saturday last was fixed for the trip. On that morning we were all up betimes. The night before we agreed that whoever rose earliest should call the others. Being known to rise on the first sound of the ' cock's shrill clarion,' I was expected to rouse my friends. At 5 o'clock when I went to do so I found that one of them had been up two hours, the others even longer. They had evidently worried themselves into wakefulness all night, for which there was no necessity, as a late sleeper might catch the first Manly boat, by which we were to leave Sydney. Saturday morning broke in smiling silence on the city and suburbs: it was one of those mornings which call forth praise and prayer to heaven for the blessing of such a climate as we enjoy in this Southern land. The waters of the harbour from our point of view (the heights of North Shore)looked like several lakes which were as calm as millponds. Our unrivalled harbour, it appears to me, presents scenes at, daybreak and by moonlight that cannot be viewed at any other time.

In summer mornings, before the sun rises, you may see creeping over the waters of its various nooks and bays gauze-like exhalations, which magnify the ships and boats in the stream. On the appearance of the great, vaporizer the mist is dispelled and the grand picture we all admire is unveiled. The nocturnal beauty of Port Jackson one never ceases to admire. Music only is wanted to make a moonlight view of it one of the most pleasurable sensations. Another harbour,  pre-eminent for its capacity and safety,' and no mean rival of our own is more blessed in this respect, for the melody of the Shandon Chimes supplies the void felt here. On this I ponder,

Where'er I wander,
And thus grow fonder,
Sweet Cork, of thee ;
Why thy bells of Shandon,
That sound so grand on
The pleasant waters
Of the river Leo.

On board the Royal Alfred we were joined by a young gentleman who was also a guest. There were not more than half-a-dozen other passengers besides our party. Some of them looked sleepy and sullen, and appeared as if they had parted on bad terms with Morpheus. One of them who was late had to jump on board. The unamiable mood in which he appeared soon gave way to perfect equanimity, the effect, as one observed, of the soothing influence of the incense from the North Shore gums. 

"Royal Alfred" at wharf Circular Quay, date; 9/1935 (?!), Image. No: d1_20453, courtesy State Library of NSW. 

Arrived at Manly, we had an appetite for breakfast which many might, envy. This watering place reminds one of Passage, which Father Prout describes as situated

Upon the say;
'Tis nate and dacent,
And quite adjacent
To come from Cork,
On a summer's day.

The 'trap' which was awaiting us at, the hotel door, and which had been bespoken, was certainly not one of Kearey Brothers'. It had the appearance of a disused milk-cart, or a superannuated costermonger's conveyance. Our young companion did not like the look of it, but on being told there was no other available for our journey, he had sufficient of the Stoic in him to sink his personal feelings. Needs must when a Manly coach proprietor commands the drive to Pittwater. There is nothing very charming in the neighbourhood of the Pittwater road from Manly. Ducks and water fowl might find it a suitable abiding locality, but Manly-ites, if they have any regard for the future repute of their rising suburb, will extend it on the higher ground Spitwards.

Some four or five miles out of the township we overtook the 'royal mail coach' with its convoy conveying the mails and passengers to Boulton's or Newport at the head of the navigation of the Pittwater harbour. We sailed alone in this company until we crossed the Narrabeen Lagoon. As we emerged there from we descried a church, which appeared to be as well supported as the Smithy described in one of Swift's anecdotes. Seeing no residents around, we inquired where the congregation came from, but our Jehu was not a Matt Ryan. Indeed he was the most taciturn ' whip ' I ever travelled with.

Shortly after we entered upon the estate at Bilgola beach, where there is a deep leafy glen well adapted for the growth of bananas. On ascending to Bilgola Head a splendid view of the coast from Cabbage Tree Head to Barranjoee is obtained. The broad Pacific lay on our right at that moment as placid as Farm Cove. A splendid valley lay before us with the homestead of the patriarch of Pittwater, Mr. John Collins, in the distance; on the left, undulating land, well timbered.

Descending to the valley, we crossed the farm purchased by Mr. Canty, which is believed to be carboniferous. Some years ago competent judges gave it as their opinion that coal existed there. A bore of four hundred feet, made in the ground many years ago, when an attempt was made to test it, passed through strata that indicated the immediate vicinity of the black diamond. Mr. Coghlan's diamond drill would soon settle the question whether coal could be struck there. Mr. Collins's farm is situated in the valley, being flanked on the east by St. Michael's Cave and the South Head of Broken Bay, and on the West by Mount St. Mary

After doing full justice to Mr. Collins's hospitality, we sallied forth under his guidance to survey that part of the estate in which we were interested. We directed our steps towards Long Beach, nearly opposite Scotland Island, Pittwater Harbour. The land improved as we receded from the valley. Indeed we were agreeably surprised at finding soil and slope not excelled by any locality we had seen on the coast, except Irishtown, Lane Cove. My friends were delighted with their investment, and were only sorry they had not purchased more of the land.

Pre- 1905 Land Titles Map - Showing 'Claraville' and 'Long Beach' and land taken from 'W.B. Smith & others at 'Claraville''. Courtesy Land Titles Office Historic records of NSW.

Pittwater estate belonged to the late Very Rev. Archpriest Therry, who bequeathed it to the Society of Jesus. It is surrounded on all sides save one by water; and it has been highly praised for its salubrity. It has a Catholic church, at which the Rev. Dr. Hallinan officiates once a month; it has also a Provisional school, attended by some twenty children. 

There is an incipient town called Brighton at Careel Bay, north-west of Barranjoee. The site is eminently unsuited for a township, and the sooner it is abandoned the better. A low swampy beach from which the water recedes at ebb tide, is not well adapted for settling on. A better site is that on the harbour higher up at Long Beach, where there is ‘ample room and verge ' enough, besides a moderately elevated coast and deep water. West Carbery, as we christened the place, is the site for a township.

A large block of land at Stokes's Point is reserved for a College. The scenery at Pittwater and on the greater part of the way thither is simply grand. When the road is better— (Mr. Collins informed us there is money on the estimates to form it all the way), and when a better style of conveyance is available, I know of no place or drive that will present so many attractions to the invalid, the pleasure or holiday-seeker. Everything conspires to quiet the anxieties of the mind and invigorate the body. Wooded slopes and deep ravines, picturesque views of ocean, beach, and headland, are features that would dissipate the megrims of a miser or restore peace to the mind of a rejected swain. Notwithstanding the discomforts we laboured under from the vile vehicle we had, we enjoyed the trip to and fro uncommonly well, and arrived at 7 in the evening at Manly without any mishap beyond that which a little application of Australian Ointment will remedy, as our young friend of bills and briefs said. 

CRUIG BARRY.
11th May, 1880.  
A TRIP TO PITTWATER. (1880, May 22). Freeman's Journal(Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 19. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133488037

Clareville itself was one of the first places after Careel Bay to be offered for sale in smaller blocks for holiday or residential purposes. Among these is the 1914 'Clareville Ocean Beach Estate' which featured what we today call 'Avalon Beach' and was advertised by Arthur Jabez Small. 'Clareville', derived from Irish and meaning was a reference to Cork, Ireland, points out that the name likely given to that original Careel Bay jetty and Clareville pier, by the Irishman in Therry, stems from reminiscence  about where he came from and how that compared, or reminded him of, the bright bay Careel Bay is, whichever season you see it in - a brightness that also applies to Clareville.

'Scorcha' is common to both the Irish and Scottish Gaelic languages, and is derived from a Gaelic word meaning "brightness". In Scotland, Sorcha has traditionally been Anglicised as 'Clara', which retains the name's Gaelic meaning: the English Clara is derived from the Latin clarus, meaning "bright", "famous". The word 'ville' has a definition: ( denoting ) a place, condition, or quality with a character as specified, - a combining form extracted from place names ending in -ville. So, 'bright place'.

This original 'Clareville Ocean estate' shows the land set aside for this 'village green' was part of this original subdivision.



Avalon subdivision plans, September 16, 1912. Image No.: c027560011h, courtesy State Library of New South Wales

The Beach itself was also once called 'Burne's Beach' after one of the early landholders and subdivisions;

No. 17 749. APPLICANT:—Frederick Burne, Forest Lodge. LAND:—County Cumberland, parish Narrabeen, shire Warringah, 61 acres 13 perches, on road from Manly to Barranjoey and Central-road, Pittwater,—lot 2, south division, Pittwater Estate, and part 1,200 acres (portion 20 of parish), granted to John Joseph Therry; adjoining properties of City Mutual Insurance Society and executors of late J. Tomkins. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1912, June 12). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3669. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221608291

Part of the beach reserve itself had already been dedicated to council:

Warringah Items.
It was unanimously decided to place the seal of the council to a document from the trustees of the late Father Terrey's Estate, dedicating to the council a 20 acre reserve, including the whole of the beach on "Priest's Flat," Barrenjoey Peninsula. This land was left for a reserve some 25 years ago, when the Pittwater Estate was being cut up, but was never dedicated, and the Registrar-General would not recognise it as such. After considerable trouble the dedication was arranged, without expense to the council, and the shire deserves congratulation on the result of their negotiations. Warringah Items. (1912, March 8). The Land (Sydney, NSW : 1911 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102916271

Newport- Pittwater.
SANDY BEACH FRONTAGES, in the SHELTERED WATERS of PITTWATER HARBOR, opposite SCOTLAND ISLAND, and only 12 MINUTES WALK of the OCEAN BEACHES.
The Clareville Beach Estate.
Adjoining the CLAREVILLE PUBLIC WHARF, and embracing ABSOLUTE BEACH and WATER FRONTAGES, and CAMPERS' SITES, Overlooking the Beach.
TITLE WILL BE TORRENS. NOTE THE TERMS: £2 and £5 per Lot Deposit, balance by quarterly payment extending over 5 years. Interest 5 per cent.
FREE LAUNCHES from BAYYIEW and NEWPORT JETTIES all day of Sale. LIGHT REFRESHMENTS ON THE GROUND.
Lithographs obtainable from the Auctioneers and Local Agent.
INTENDING PURCHASERS ate requested to take TRAM to NARRABEEN, then MOTOR 'BUSES to NEWPORT or BAY VIEW, and catch the FREE LAUNCHES from both these places on day of sale, and attend the Sale of CLAREVILLE BEACH ESTATE, IN PITTWATER HARBOR.
AUCTION SALE, ON THE GROUND, S O'CLOCK,
Anniversary Day, January 26.
RICHARDSON AND WRENCH, LTD., AUCTIONEERS. — J. WILLIAMS, Bayview, Pittwater, Local Agent.  Advertising (1914, January 11). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 9 (SUNDAY EDITION). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221563893




Pittwater Clareville Ocean Beach Estate - Central Rd, Barrenjoey roads - A J Small. Item No.: c027560009 [Avalon subdivision plans] - courtesy State Library of New South Wales. And sections from to show residences and name for Avalon Beach.

Mr.  Arthur J. Small, of Royston Park, Asquith, takes exception to the statement last week that Palm Beach Estate, Barrenjoey where land brought £4 per foot, is inaccessible to the public, and practically can only be reached as a residential area by persons owning their own car. He draws attention to the fact that there is an hourly service of motor cars from the present tram terminus at Narrabeen to Newport, and a regular ferry service thence to Clareville and Palm Beach of two trips each way daily. This service was Inaugurated by the Palm Beach Co. when they first opened up the estate some five or six years ago. REAL ESTATE. NOTES OF THE WEEK. (1917, March 31). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28101228

As can be seen from this sales lithograph the original Recreation Reserve formed part of a corridor of open space stretching from Avalon Beach westward through the Avalon valley to a location close to the existing Toongarie Reserve and had a creek running through it. This Lithograph also shows some of the earliest buyers of lots of land at Clareville and the earlier names for the streets.

Warringah shire council records Minutes of the Meeting held October 31st, 1921 records; ''Chatfield & Brown's letter, submitting plan of subdivision of A. J. Small’s land fronting Clareville Road, (Subdivision A.) was read in conjunction with the report. Resolved,: (C's. Hewitt', Quirk) That the Council approve of the request that the name "Avalon  Parade be given to the roads now known as ’’Arnold' road" and "Clareville Road", and that Mr. Small be asked to notify purchasers of lands fronting Clareville Road of the proposed change. Resolved, - (Crs. Parr, Cavill) That the plan of the subdivision be approved, provided a connecting road between Central Road and Clareville Road be reserved, as recommended 

The State Records of NSW has this listing under Primary Application - Arthur Jabey Small 60 acres 1 rood 24 perches on Barrenjoey Road and on Pacific Ocean in Shire Warringah Parish Narrabeen County Cumberland Volume 3467 Folio 211 - Feb 1922 and a later that year:

NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT.
APPLICATIONS by the undermentioned have been made to bring the lands described under the provisions of the Real Property Act. Caveats may be lodged on or before the respective dates mentioned : 
No. 24,008. Arthur Jabez Small, 60 a. 1 r. 24 p., on Barrenjoey-rd. and Pacific Ocean, pt. block 1, Sth. Div., Pittwater Est. 20th Oct., 1922. NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1922, September 15). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5087. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222060038

June 28th, 1922 The Engineer's Report was read and dealt with as follows- 10 Resolved, - (Crs, Quirk, Campbell) That in regard to A. J. Small’s plan of 1st subdivision of Avalon Estate, the Council  disapprove of the fronting of lots to the beach reserve; require that Lot 7 be marked as "reserved for road purposes’’, and enquire what drainage improvements it is proposed to make in the lane.

July 24th, 1922: Arthur J. Small1 12/7/ 22; his northern subdivisions and contending that a road exists on the Dedicated boundary, between his land and the public reserve  a11 that the Engineer should go into the matter with Mr.  Small (Avalon  Estate) and look up plans at the Land Titles Office

LEGAL MATTERS- Avalon R 233; The Council's solicitors' letter of 12/10/22, Beach1\\ in regard to Mr. Smalls’ application to bring land adjoining Avalon Beach Reserve Under the Real Property was read and received.

Cronulla was, Palm Beach is, and Avalon Beach will be. This is the catch slogan which has been adopted by the vendor of the Palmgrove Estate at Avalon, which is to be sold by Messrs. H. W. Horning and Co., on Boxing Day. Judging by the beautiful panoramic views which appear in an attractive booklet, and which also occupy a conspicuous position in Messrs. Horning and Co.'s windows, Martin-place, the scenery surrounding the estate must be exceptionally beautiful. Avalon is the new seaside resort between Newport and Palm Beach. The Palmgrove Estate is on the main Barrenjoey-road, and is right at the beach. 

The owner has evidently had the public good in mind, as the estate has been well planted with Ornamental shade trees, while a section of it known as the Palm Grove, has been presented as a park. This is a remarkable beauty spot, with a wealth of graceful palms, maidenhair, burrawang, and other ferns. The estate is in every respect a most attractive proposition to those looking for week-end and holiday sites. REAL ESTATE NEWS (1921, December 11). Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123241058

That booklet - and enlarged sections from to show the details - also includes why 'Avalon' became the name, for sales purposes and because Mr. Small was obviously finding this place as such:





1921 Brochure - Palmgrove Estate, Avalon Beach, new seaside resort between Newport & Palm Beach Newport Beach, Palm BeachImage No.: c027560016 and Avalon Beach first subdivision. Image No.: c027560017 and Palmgrove Estate, Avalon BeachNo boundaries shown. Image No.: c027560018 - from Avalon Subdivision Maps, courtesy State Library of NSW







NB: ' Recreation ground about 4 acres and proposed recreation grounds'.

The palm grove ... Avalon Beacphoto by Rex Hazlewood, Image Courtesy The Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW, No.:c046220008h


The Palm Grove, Avalon Beach - ON 165/924  Item No.: c07771_0001_c photo by Rex Hazlewood, Image Courtesy The Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW, Sign reads; 'This Palmgrove Also 10 other Reserves, Are Included to be DEDICATED by the Vendors of the Avalon Beach Estates as Parks for Public Recreation.' The 'Vendors' was Arthur Jabez Small.

IMPROVING AVALON. ROADSIDE TREES PLANTED

Since the sale of Avalon Beach Estate at Christmas additions and improvements have been effected on the estate. 

The rock pool baths at the southern end of the beach have been extended 18ft., and are now 57ft. long, with a smooth bottom. Ladies' dressing sheds have been erected immediately at the rear, on a spot once occupied by a jumble of rocks, and a general store and refreshment room of original design has been built close to the beach. 

Several landowners are already building homes on their lots. A new, wide road has been constructed, giving the land direct access to the beach, and at the side of all the roads, trees, of eight different varieties, chosen as specially suitable for the land and atmosphere, have been planted. One of these is the Illawarra Flame Tree, which carries blooms of fire color. IMPROVING AVALON (1922, March 22). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 10 (FINAL RACING). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225222882


Avalon Beach Store, circa 1922-23. Item c07771_0002_c - a Rex Hazlewood photo, courtesy State Library of NSW - note the pipes at right hand side of photo

Minutes of Meeting of 5th February, 1923 – A J Small 21/1/1923, submitting amended plan of Avalon Estate No 1 to conform to Council’s requirements Resolved, Crs. Hewitt, Hitchcock) That the plan be approved when the Engineer certifies that the drainage improvements, previously specified, have been carried out 11. A. J. Small, 3/2/23, stating willingness of land-owners concerned at Avalon Beach, to construct drains through their properties to take this water from Barrenjoey Road, if the Council will put in the necessary culverts, : Resolved, (Crs, Hitchcock Hewitt) That the engineer supply whatever pipes he finds necessary for the purpose

12. Arthur Small, 24/11/23, giving reason for not providing reserves in No. 2 subdivision of Avalon Beach : Resolved, - .(o Hewitt; Hitchcock) That he be informed of the Council’s rule requiring provision for reserves when an' estate is being subdivided in Sections, and again asking what provision he is making in regard to this Estate. 

The Warringah Shire meeting of December 3rd, 1923 reminds today's residents that those who first lived here had to pay for the roads themselves to access their homes:

Item 21. Arthur Small. 24/11/23, re road at Avalon Beach, adhering to his proposal Of 26th ult., and agreeing to pay half of total cost of B. and C. Sections of Road ,and 22. Linda Dorph, .26/11/23, agreeing, with certain reservations: to the Council's proposal for the construction of the road at Avalon in three sections : Resolved, - (era-Parr, Hewitt) That they both be written to suggesting that they equally share in the cost of construction B. and C. sections, otherwise the Council adheres to its original suggestion as set out in its letters already sent to them.






EB Studios (Sydney, N.S.W.). (1925). Panorama of Avalon Beach, New South Wales, ca. 1925 Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-162503612 - and enlarged sections from to show details

As the subdivisions continued the central recreation space among the retail centre was called 'Avalon Park' on subsequent sales plans and lithographs:


Avalon Beach Estate, Item c027560010h, courtesy State Library of NSW - NB showing 'Avalon Park'.

Arthur Jabez Small was a member of the Town Planning Association and had firm ideas about how to set out an area so it would be liveable, with the current day Avalon Beach Golf Course being among the first projects to ensure Avalon was a place to play as much as to live. Added to this was tennis courts, with reports of matches from 1925 on being recorded in newspapers and a mini-golf course.

Soon afterwards this item appears:

SEASIDE GOLF
Links at Avalon
People Interested in the attractiveness of seaside resorts are beginning to realise the value of golf links. The latest proposal is to establish a course at Avalon Beach. Avalon is a favorite holiday and week-end resort of the motorist, who enjoys a short run, and when links are in playing order Its popularity, will; increase. The course will be laid out on a sheltered pocket on the Manly side of the beach. The main road to Palm Reach will form its western boundary, so that there will be no question of its accessibility. 

The course will be of nine holes to commence with, and a beautiful site has been reserved for the clubhouse, within one minute of the beach and swimming pool. The ground at present is mostly covered with ti-tree, but clearing it will not be expensive or difficult. Patches have already been cleared, and are well grassed, the soil being sandy and most suitable for golf. The work of laying out the course and getting It In order will be taken In hand almost Immediately, and an effort made to get the links in playing order by next summer. SEASIDE GOLF (1923, February 27). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), , p. 5 (FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223446089 


Grass with sign reading Avalon Golf Links in preparation - photo by Rex Hazlewood, circa 1920-1929 Image Courtesy The Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW, No.:c046220009h



Enlarged section of golf course cleared from Panorama of Avalon Beach, New South Wales, ca. 1925 [picture] / EB Studios. PIC P865/212/2 PIC P865 LOC photographs in Hurley Stack 52/4-Enemark 

Being still considered semi-rural is further underlined in this item by Mr. Small - an investigation into Palm Beach Golf Course found cows could be a problem there too as many were legended to have developed an appetite for the round white requirement of the game or general interference:

AVALON BEACH. 
TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.
Sir,-My attention has been drawn to a letter in your columns' under the nom de plume "Spectator," in which, after paying a high compliment to the beauties of this district, inquiry is made both to the ownership of a number of cattle afflicted with "rickets" and also why the S.P.C.A. does not take action in the matter. This is not the first time that the question has been asked in your columns, and for the Information of "Spectator" and others Interested, a little explanation is necessary. 

In the first place the partial paralysis in evidence In the hindquarters, and which gives such a pitiable appearance to these poor beasts, is not a disease communicable from one to another, but is the effect of eating the Zamia Palm, or "Burrawang," as it is more commonly termed. Although predecessors of this particular herd have had the free run of the Barrenjoey peninsula for over half a century, yet It is only within the last 15 years or so, that the disease has made Its appearance, the habit of eating this plant being acquired during a particularly dry season.

As regards ownership, I understand that most of these animals belong to a dairyman at Newport, who has found It difficult to dispose of them on account of their condition. Every winter there are numerous deaths from cold or starvation but as they are always breeding the supply is kept up. It is not possible to impound them, as they cannot be driven, and the nearest pound is at Manly, some 14 miles away. Representations have been made to the shire council from time to time by the S.P.C.A., and others, over this matter, but apparently without result. In the meantime those unfortunate beasts are a distinct danger wandering about on the public roads, as they are unable-to move quickly out of the way of motorists. "Spectator" has done a good service by drawing attention to this matter, and early action should be taken by the responsible authorities to end this deplorable state of affairs, which can well be described as a blot on Warringah Shire. 
I am, etc., A. J. SMALL
Avalon Beach. Jan. 12. AVALON BEACH. (1925, January 13). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16201117 

Soon afterwards the links were complete and open- this item lists the fees:

AVALON BEACH CLUB. 
The nine holes at Avalon Beach (near Newport) are now ready, and interesting golf can be played there. The first player to equal the bogey of the course will receive a box of Sliver King balls, and a trophy will be given each month for a player sending, in the best card on handicap. Play is not restricted at present. The general public are permitted to use the links on payment of 2/6 for half -a day and 4/- a day. The course is beautifully situated on undulating country right on the sea. GOLF (1926, July 21). Referee (Sydney, NSW : 1886 - 1939), , p. 16. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128106053 

A J Small was also behind the Parks and Playground movement and there are several still existing reserves, such as Angophora and Palmgrove, which exist due to his dedicating them as part of his subdivisions - in line with Warringah Shire Council's rules for subdivisions of then but also part of his own philosophy:


PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS. 
Aims of Movement. 

"That every child shall have a chance to play and every citizen the opportunity for recreation" was adopted as a chief aim in the constitution of the New South Wales Parks and Playgrounds Movement, which held its first annual meeting at the New South Wales Cricket Association's Chambers on Wednesday. "The normal expansion of Sydneys playing fields should be, at a minimum, from 100to 120 acres of level land every year," says the report of the movement. A report on the whole matter by the Surveyor-General, who was being assisted by a committee of the movement, was expected shortly. "In the meantime, the executive of the movement has taken up (as an Immediate measure) the question of pressing for 'Five More Moore Parks."

The meeting, which was a full one, delegates from 30 bodies being present, was concerned largely with the elimination by the Legislative Council of the parks clauses of the Greater Sydney Bill. 'This meant', said Dr. C. E. W. Bean, honorary secretary of the movement, 'that, although the Greater Sydney authority, if established, could plan parks and playgrounds, It would not be able to acquire them, or even to accept them if given to it-powers which were possessed by greater-city authorities all over the world. '

On the motion of the chairman, Mr. A. J.Small, seconded by Mr. D. G. Stead, the meeting expressed its unanimous disapproval of the elimination of these powers from the bill. The liability of all State school playgrounds to taxation while many private school grounds were exempt was also strongly criticised in the report, a case being cited in which public land lying Idle was heavily rated as soon as it was permitted to be used as a play-ground for State schoolchildren. On the motion of the chairman, seconded by Mr. R.A. Bennett, it was resolved to urge that, in the bill projected by the Government, exemption should be extended to all school play-grounds. A committee was appointed "to co-operate with the city authorities in their task of re-organising the playground system of Sydney," And It was also resolved, on the motion of Mr. Burrows and Mrs. Wyatt, to urge the preservation by some means of the Pymble State forest. Mr. A. J. Small (president of the Town Planning Association) was elected as first president of the Parks and Playgrounds Movement. PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS. (1931, September 25). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16818070

AVALON BEACH.

Improvements being made at Avalon Beach Include the improvement of a miniature golf course in conjunction with the erection of tea gardens, the main feature of which will be a semi-open air pavilion, Mr. Bertram W. Ford, architect, has accepted the tender of Mr. J. A. Carter, contractor, Manly, for this work. The walls of the pavilion will be lined externally with shingles, and the roof of colour-blended tiles. AVALON BEACH. (1931, December 29). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16799986 

The mini golf course was already installed by December 1930, with an official opening taking place on December 24th, Christmas Eve, 1930. They were on the present day site of the petrol station on the corner of Avalon Parade and Barrenjoey road. Around the same time an extension to the beach and central recreation area was envisioned by both the Council and Arthur Small. The Council took a hard line which persisted into the 1930s. There were other factors at work here, such as those of the 1936 elected Hon. Treasurer of the NRMA, George Killigrew Dunbar, whose name appears as early as 1925 among those who were playing matches on the Avalon Tennis courts and later stood for and was elected to the Council.

Warringah Shire Council records provide:

A. J. Small 19/4/29. Inquiring if the Council Beach desires to purchase any of the allotments in his recent subdivision in Avalon Parade for the purpose of obtaining better access to the beach. Resolved that a letter be sent to Mr. Small suggesting that in view of the benefit he derives from the deviation of Barrenjoey Road, he might give a little land for access to Avalon Beach  52. Same. 19/4/29. Requesting that steps be taken to convey to him portion of an old Government road in exchange for similar land adjoining, which he conveyed to the Council. Resolved that Mr. Small pay the expenses of the exchange of the land, unless he gives the desired access to Avalon Beach.

17. Avalon Beach Estates Ltd. 30/4/29. Inquiring if the Council will affix its Seal to the Deposited Plans of Avalon subdivision, if furnished with a Bond from the Southern Union Insurance Co. Ltd for an amount sufficient to cover the cost of completing the unfinished roads. Referred to the Works Committee. 

Meeting of 7th August, 1929. 59. Avalon Beach & District Progress Assoc.30/7/29. - Protesting against the inadequacy of the proposed access to Avalon Beach Reserve, and submitting a conditional offer made by Mr. Small for a strip of land 80 ft wide for the purpose. Referred to the Works Committee and "A" Riding Councillors. 60. Same. Again complaining of the bad condition of Avalon Parade. To be informed of the water tables vote padded at this meeting. 61. Same. 30/7/29. Requesting that danger signs be erected at the Six Ways at the top of Bilgola Hill. Resolved (Crs Hitchcock, Robertson) -. That a post be erected as requested, and the N.R.M.A. be invited to give an expression of opinion. 

7/5/1934: 5. Re conference with Mr. A.J. Small, respecting proposed acquisition of his land adjacent to the beach reserve, Avalon Beach, and his request for improvements to Avalon Parade: Avalon Resolved, - That the question of improvements to Avalon Parade be deferred until the matter of the main road deviation proposal is finalised. Resolved, - That it be left to the President and Shire Clerk to negotiate with Mr. Small on the matters on the lines recommended by the Works Committee, and as to whether he will give a certain portion of his land on the eastern aide of the proposed road. 5. Re Water supply for  Avalon Beach surf buildings: Resolved That the Inspector go further into the matter, and make tests to ascertain where he can get the flow of water. (Ors. Hitchcock, Sterland).

21/5/1934: 40.  Avalon Beach Progress Assoc., 10/5/34, inquiring what further action has been taken towards acquiring land adjacent Reserve to Avalon Beach Reserve, and with what results, if any. Extension Resolved, - They be informed the Council has done nothing further on account of the negotiations between the Main Roads Department and Mr. Small respecting deviation of the road through Mr. Small's property. (Crs. Hitchcock, Hughes) Proposal for extension of Avalon Beach Reserve: Resolved. That a copy of the report on the interview which the President and the Shire Clerk had with Mr. A.J.Small regarding this matter be sent to the Avalon Progress Association. (Crs. Hitchcock, Sterland)  67— Postmaster General’s;15/5/34, inquiring whether Public Council has any objections to the erection of an improved telephone cabinet at Mr. S. Wickham's Store & Post Office, Avalon Beach, in position shown;a accompanying sketch. Resolved, - That the Council offer no objection. Mr A J Small 4/5/34, drawing attention to the fact that some one has enclosed, within a fence a lane batmen Lots 21 Closing of and 22, Clareville Ocean Beach Estate, Avalon Beach, thereby Lane preventing public access, requesting Council to take immediate steps to have the obstructions removed and the thoroughfare re-opened. Absolved, - That consideration be deferred until next meeting. - (deferred for a further three meetings in fact).

Warringah Shire Council held on Tuesday. 5th June 1934. 56. Avalon Beach -., 29/5/34, drawing attention to the state of Central Road, Park Road and Careel Head Road. suggesting the Works Committee permit a member of the Association to point out parts complained of; (b) re-requesting. that a street light be placed at the junction of Park Road on Kevin Avenue. Referred to the Engineer for report. 57. Isla, 29/5/34, re proposed addition to Avalon Beach Reserve, opposing any proposal for resumption unless the whole of the "island block" be included, contending that the Council should meet the wishes of the signatories to the earlier extension petition, and requesting that the Valuer General be asked to give a valuation of the "island block". Resolved, - That the Engineer prepare a plan of the "island block" and the 80-ft. strip adjoining for submission to the Valuer-General for valuation. (Ore. Hitchcock, Hughes) 

5/11/1934: 25. A.J.Small 26/10/34, stating he is repeatedly receiving requests for permission to camp on his property at Avalon Beach, suggesting the Council make a flat charge of, say, up to £5 per annum, for camping on Lot 26 and Lots 3 and 4, Avalon Beach, he being prepared to erect sanitary accommodation to any reasonable extent, and have the camping area properly run and supervised; that N.R.M.A. officials have inspected the camping area, and are prepared to support the proposal; inquiring whether if such camp be established, the Council would prevent the indiscriminate camping on adjacent public roads and reserves, and by trespassers on private property. Resolved, - That the proposal be approved on the condition suggested by the Inspector, viz - that three earth closets be provided for men, and three for ladies, and Mr. Small arrange direct with the sanitary Contractor for adequate sanitary services, and pay him direct for same; that a notice be erected in a suitable position prohibiting camping on the roads and reserves. (Crs. Hitchcock, Hughes)

MOTOR CAMP AT AVALON

The N-R-MA has made arrangements for establishing a summer motor camp at Avalon Beach, 22 miles from Sydney, between Narrabeen and Palm Beach. There is a fine surf beach at 'Avalon, and a nine hole golf course, on which members of the association are entitled to play at a reduced fee. A tennis court is situated nearby. All stores and petrol supplies may be obtained at Avalon. Full details of the camp may be obtained from the N-R MA. Touring Department. MOTOR CAMP AT AVALON (1934, November 29). Glen Innes Examiner (NSW : 1908 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article183575064 


The Warringah Shire Council Meeting held on February 5th 1935 shows a letter from George Killigrew Dunbar among the records: Item 34. G. K. Dunbar, 25/1/35, re: lack Of public parklands adjacent to Avalon Beach, and the fencing off of private land adjoining the Beach reserve, and contending the latter land should be resumed by the Council before the owner puts more improvements on it. Received.  A.E. Felton, 28/1/35, contending that camping on the Bilgola reserve at Bilgola Beach should not be prohibited, agreeing that the area becomes congested, suggesting there be on one line of tents permitted, with a 3-ft. space between them:  Resolved, - That the Council's previous decision to prohibit camping on the reserve be agreed, and the Inspector see that it is carried out. (Crs. Hewitt, Hughes)

National Roads & Motorists Assoc., 21/2/35, pointing but that persons camping on the public reserve at Avalon Beach pass through the section of Mr. Small’s ground used by N.R.M.A. members, requesting the Council to give its attention to this matter before the Easter holidays. Resolved, -That the matter be left to A. Riding Councillors. 63. A.J.Small, 2712/35, re camping on Avalon Beach Reserve, taking exception to a recent report by the Inspector on the matter, explaining the position, and requesting a definite statement of the Council's intention in regard to allowing camping on the beach reserveCr. Hughes moved, Cr. Hewitt seconding, that the Inspector should not have made the remarks concerning Mr. Small which he made in recent report to the Council. Cr. Campbell moved an amendment, Cr. Beello seconding, that consideration of the letter be deferred until the Inspector returns from holidays. The amendment was carried.

Fred Holmes, 26/2/35, re proposed resumptions at Avalon Beach, inquiring whether it is intended to levy a local rate, and whether in such case, the local ratepayers of Avalon Beach may demand a poll. 70a. Avalon Beach Progress Association. Resumption 27/2/35, thanking Council for its decision to effect this resumption. 70b. G. K. Dunbar, 28/2/35, contending that the whole of Mr. Small's land between the beach reserve and Barrenjoey Road should be resumed. Resolved, - That these letters be considered by the Finance Committee. (Crs. Hewitt, Hughes)

26. A.J.Small, 15/4/35, stating his intention to enclose with a fence his land adjoining Avalon Beach Reserve, requesting Council's approval to the type of fence proposed, and to pay in reserve its proportion of the cost when completed. Resolved,- That the matter be left to "A" Riding Councillors to confer upon, and to report in a month's time. (rs. Hughes, Nicholas)



(1930). [Motor cars, some with tarpaulins attached, parked adjacent to Avalon Beach, New South Wales, 1930, 2] Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-147290238 - and enlarged section from to show the Recreation Reserve as it was then



(1930). [Motor cars, some with tarpaulins attached, parked adjacent to Avalon Beach, New South Wales, 1930, 1] Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-147290036 - and enlarged section from to show the Central Avalon Village Recreation Reserve as it was then.

February 11th, 1936: 1. A motion by Cr. Hewitt to rescind the Council's resolution of 19th February, 1935, respecting resumption of part of the land at Avalon Beach was, by consent, withdrawn. 2. a motion by Cr. Hewitt for the prohibition of the parking of cars on the beach reserve at Avalon was, by consent withdrawn. Regarding these two matters, it was decided that the whole Council, if possible, should view Mr. Small's land and the beach reserve on Saturday afternoon, 15th inst., and that in the meantime, no action should be taken in regard to the Finance Committee's report on the question of resuming Mr. Small's land. C) 3. Cr. McPaul moved that Mr. Reid, M.L.A., and also Mr. B.C. Forsyth, our representative on the Metropolitan Water, Sewer- Disposal age & Drainage Board, be written to and asked to support the movement to safeguard our beaches from pollution by adopting some other means of disposing of sewerage instead of by

Tuesday 7th of April, 1936:

Avalon Beach & District Ratepayer's Assoc., 23/3/36, advising Council of the formation of the Association. "Received". National Roads & Motorists Assoc., 26/3/36, advocating for the resumption of the whole of the flat area between the beach reserve and Barrenjoey Road at Avalon, as the ground is admirably suited for camping, picnicking and parking. Extension - The Association be informed the Council is taking all necessary steps to resume the land. (Crs. Campbell, Ross .A. J. Small, 26/3/36, resubmitting application for approval to proposed subdivision of Lots 10 and 11, Avalon No. 1 Subdivision into shop sites, contending that the Council’s requirement that each lot be 30 ft. wide is unreasonable, pointing out that in a similar subdivision at Avalon, the width is 22 foot, inquiring in what other part of the Shire such a width has been insisted upon, requesting approval to the proposal, or a definite statement of grounds for disapproval. Resolved, That the matter be referred to the Shire engineer for report to next meeting. (Crs. Ross, Campbell (Cr. Hewitt recorded his vote against the motion.)

The Warringah Shire Council has advised the N.R.M.A. that action Is to be taken to effect the resumption of the whole land between Avalon Beach Reserve and Old Barrenjoey Road, with the exception of a rectangular portion at the Junction of Avalon Parade and Barrenjoey Road, on which a shop is situated. The association, when advocating the resumption, stated that the existing reserve is narrow and sandy, and does not offer facilities for car-parking. The area which it is proposed to resume is admirably suited for camping and picnicking. HAVE YOU HEARD? (1936, April 28). The Labor Daily (Sydney, NSW : 1924 - 1938), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article237771798 

Avalon Beach Reserve

THE Warringah Shire Council has advised the N.R.M.A. that action is to be taken to effect the resumption of the whole of the land between Avalon Beach reserve and the Old Barrenjoey road with the exception of a rectangular portion at the junction of Avalon Parade and Old Barrenjoey road, on which a shop is situated. The association, when advocating the resumption, pointed out that the existing reserve is narrow and sandy, and does not offer facilities for car parking. The area which it is proposed to resume is admirably suited for camping and picnicking. Avalon Beach Reserve (1936, May 13). Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938), p. 44. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160638679 

Avalon Beach Reserve, south and north, as it was and now is will form another history insight into a local park and reserve - here at this time in our history it was part of the run of green and original landscape set aside that ran from the beach to Clarevilles' verges.

SHIRE OF WARRINGAH.
Special Loan, £21,000—"A'' Riding.

WARRINGAH Shire Council hereby gives notice, in accordance with the provisions of Local Government Act, 1919, that:—

1. The Council proposes to raise a Special Loan of twenty-one thousand founds (£21,000) for the purpose of carrying but in Riding "A" of the Shire certain public works, the acquisition of certain lands for public recreation purposes, and the acquisition of certain lands for road purposes; and for the purpose of paying expenses incidental to the carrying out of such works and acquisitions.

2. The Council proposes to expend the loan money as follows, but reserves the right to utilise the surplus or saving on any one item in paying the excess cost of any other:—

(a) In Palm Beach-Whale Beach District: £

Public Reserve on shore of Pittwater, Palm Beach — Filling, levelling, and construction of retaining wall 1,000 

Ocean Beach Reserve, Palm Beach—Making parking area and constructing pipe-line in southern portion 250 

Governor Phillip Park — Erection of public lavatories 500

New Wharf—Construction of, at Palm Beach, Pittwater side 500 Improvements to roads, viz.—Florida-road, £1,000; Pacific-road, £405; Palm Beach road, £500; road from Barrenjoey-road to Whale Beach, £500; road from Whale Beach to Palm Beach, £500 2,905 

(b) In Avalon-Bilgola-Clareville District:

Public rock-bath at Avalon Beach—Enlargement of 250

Avalon Flat Drainage—Construction of concrete culverts 700 

Avalon Beach Reserve, Extension, etc.— Acquisition of lot 26, Pittwater Estate, with exception of small portion at south western corner 2,750  .... A. H. HUGHES, President. R. G. Jamieson, Shire Clerk. Shire Hall, Brookvale, 20th July, 1936. 358 £7 10s. SHIRE OF WARRINGAH. (1936, July 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3236. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223038435



Hurley, Frank. (1910 - circa early 1950's). Avalon Beach & surroundings [Aerial views, Sydney, New South Wales] Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-160005527 - and enlarged section from to show detail and section to Old Barrenjoey Road resumed and paid for to enlarge the camping and picnic grounds and Avalon Beach Reserve itself. 

Warringah Shire Council's records show correspondence read at the Meeting held on November 3rd, 1936: 

Item 22. A J. Small, 13/10/36 regarding a recent large bush fire at Avalon Beach, which, on his giving the proscribed guarantee, the Fire Brigades Board attended to, and saved several houses, requesting that the burnt scrub in Avalon Parade and on the Council's reserve nearby be cleared back and burned. Resolved,- That consideration be deferred. 22a. Same,23/10/36, Re above, stating the...   [via Cr.Dunbar]; that the Avalon Progress association had informed them that a collection was being taken up from the property owners concerned with an aim of reimbursing Mr. Small. Resolved, - That if the collection be not sufficient, the council make up the difference, so that Mr. Small will not be out of pocket. 23. Same, 13/10/36 Re Council's notice of intention to resume his land at Avalon Beach, stating that proceedings in respect of his proposed subdivision are being withheld on the understanding that immediate steps will be taken to carry the Council's intention into effect, and requesting a plan showing the area proposed to be resumed. Council resolved - That the Engineer's report that the purpose of the resumption is for purposes of recreation, drainage and road access, be adopted, and that a copy of the plan be supplied to Mr. Small. 

The Council Meeting held on December 1st, 1936 records more from Mr. Small: 

AVALON BEACH RESERVE EXTENSION; that to avoid unnecessarily heavy compensation, access should be Provided to Lot 3 on the southern side of the Avalon Service Station; (b) contending that the Council has, in its resolutions and actions for years past, prevented, him from disposing of the land to his advantage, and stating grounds for this contention; ... (c) contending that he is entitled to know when the resumption will be carried into effect. Resolved - That he be informed that as soon as the Governor's approval.to the proposed loan has been secured, and the loan has been raised, the resumption will be carried into effect.  

Also worth noting from the same records as it illustrates people were camping anywhere they could during this era of low employment and homelessness - Item 40:

G. J. Brandon, 23/11/36, (a) reporting that a swagman or fisherman has taken possession of the small bathing shed, erected by voluntary workers on the reserve at the northern end of Scotland Island, has closed it against the residents, steals water from the residences in the locality, and has no sanitary arrangements; (b) reporting that the wire-netting on the baths has perished and the baths are no longer safe and requesting that the causeway loading to the wharf be repaired; and complaining that damage is being done to property on Scotland Island by wandering horses owned by a baker at Mona Vale. Council's Decisions:. (a) that the person referred to he notified to vacate the bathing shed immediately, (Cre. Hitchcock, Campbell); (b) that £5 be voted for repairing the bathing enclosure, and the Overseer be instructed to use heavy gauge wire for the purpose, (Crs. Hitchcock, Ross); (a) referred to the Overseer for report; (d) that the baker referred to be notified to remove his stock. From Scotland Island. 41. G. Damyon, 23/11/36, also complaining of the misuse of the bathing shed mentioned above, and of the condition of the causeway leading to the north wharf on Scotland Island..

The Council found their loan and continued to save green spaces for current and future residents. A few years after that the green core of Avalon Beach village was acquired:

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919, AS AMENDED.

PUBLIC WORKS ACT, 1912, AS AMENDED.

Warringah Shire Council: Acquisition of Land for the Purposes of Public Recreation.

APPLICATION by the Council of the Shire of Warringah having been made that the land described in the Schedule hereto be appropriated and resumed for the purposes of public recreation, it is hereby notified and declared by His Excellency the Governor, acting with the advice of the Executive Council, and by the Minister for Public Works, that so much of the land described in the said Schedule hereto as is Crown land is hereby appropriated, and so much of the said land as is private property is hereby resumed, under Division 1 of Part V of the Public Works Act, 1912, as amended, for the purposes aforesaid; and the Minister for Public Works hereby further notifies that the land described in the said Schedule is vested in the Council of the Shire of Warringah. 

Dated at Sydney, this thirtieth day of March, 1938.

WAKEHURST, Governor. E. S. SPOONER, Minister for Public Works.

Schedule.

All that piece or parcel of land situate in the Shire of Warringah, parish of Narrabeen, county of Cumberland and State of New South Wales, being part of lot 26 of the South Subdivision of Pittwater Estate, and being also 'part of portion 20 (of parish) : Commencing on the south-eastern side of Central-road at the northernmost corner of the land comprised in Real Property Application No. 17,128; and bounded thence on the south-east by the south-eastern boundary of that land bearing 189 degrees 28 minutes 30 seconds 1,615 feet 8 1/2 inches; on the south-west by the north-eastern side of Avalon-parade bearing 286 degrees 218 feet 11 3/4 inches; on the north-west by the south-eastern boundary of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 4,605, folio 143, and its prolongation north-easterly, bearing 36 degrees 240 feet; again on the south-west by a line bearing 286 degrees 261 feet 10 1/2 inches to the south-eastern side of Barrenjoey-road; and again on the north-west by that side of that road and the aforesaid south-eastern side of Central-road bearing 16 degrees 946 feet 8 inches and 51 degrees 23 minutes .513 feet 5 1/2 inches respectively, to the point of commencement, but excluding thereout the land comprised in Certificate of Title, registered volume 4,197, folio 83,—having an area of 10 acres 3 roods 6 3/4 perches or thereabouts, and said to be in the possession of Arthur Jabez Small. (Sh. 38-1,114) * (1375) LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919, AS AMENDED. PUBLIC WORKS ACT, 1912, AS AMENDED. (1938, April 8). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1442. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article225071613

No. 24,008. Arthur Jabez Small, 60 a. 1 r. 24 p., on Barrenjoey-rd. and Pacific Ocean, part. block 1, Sth. Div., Pittwater Est. 20th Oct., 1922 NOTICE UNDER REAL PROPERTY ACT. (1922, September 15). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5087. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222060038

And more taken/given - you can understand why Geoff Searl OAM, President of the Avalon Beach Historical Society, calls Mr. Small the 'Father of Avalon':

THE COUNCIL OF THE SHIRE OF WARRINGAH.—Local Government Act 1919, as amended (Section 340c).—On the 14th day of June, 1988, the Council doth hereby declare that all that public garden and recreation space, being lot 3 in file plan 322514, being part of the land in Certificate of Title, volume 3960, folio 61. volume 3820, folio 155, formerly owned by Arthur Jabez Small and referred to in the said file plan as public garden and recreation space, be and is hereby vested in the Council of the Shire of Warringah in fee simple as a public reserve.

(l.s.) E. W. JACKSON, Shire President.

The Common Seal of The Council of the Shire of Warringah was hereunto affixed this 14th day of June, 1988, pursuant to an order made under delegated authority by the General Manager and Shire Clerk of the Council.

F. L. Thomson, General Manager/Shire Clerk. THE COUNCIL OF THE SHIRE OF WARRINGAH.—Local Government Act 1919, as amended (Section 340c).—On the 14th (1988, July 1). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3610. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article231381405

Current NSW Land Registry Services provides the following on Resumptions: [these] enables Commonwealth, State and Local Government authorities, pursuant to an expressed statement in a statute or a delegated power, to acquire under compulsion:

  • land that has previously been alienated, ie conveyed; or
  • the benefit of an easement.

The land or easement is generally resumed for public purposes and compensation for compulsory acquisition is regulated by statute. See:

  • s11 Land Acquisition (Just Terms Compensation) Act 1991
  • s22 Lands Acquisition Act 1989 (Commonwealth)
  • s185 or Part12 Division 2 Roads Act 1993
  • s196A Conveyancing Act 1919
  • Rule 4.3 of the Lodgement Rules and Clause 8 Conveyancing (General) Regulation  2018.


When it Rains these Ancient Creeks flow

The Avalon Beach Reserve and present day Dunbar Park are within the Careel Creek catchment, which flows into Pittwater at Careel Bay at North Avalon. Careel Creek flows from west to east through Avalon and has been diverted through stormwater pipes beneath the Park leaving Dunbar Park as a major overland flow path in times of flood. This piped section of Careel Creek joins an open concrete channel near the 'Woolworths' carpark, before heading north towards Careel Bay. 

As can be seen from Charles De Boos' account, this whole area was always wet and marshy, across 'Priests' Flat' and to the mangroves of Careel Bay. The present site of the Careel Bay playing fields was once all mangroves that were filled in through being used as a tip until the conversion to playing fields was made under Warringah Shire Council.

Early WSC records are filled with reports of floods through the central village business district and suggestions as to how this could be 'fixed'. 

30/4/1928: 40.,Garland, Seaborn & Abbott 13/4/28 Suggesting certain drainage improvements at Avalon Beach to prevent damage to A J Small's property. Resolved (Crs. Hitchcock, That the Engineer furnish an estimate of the cost, and the work of cutting the drain be put in hand immediately the transfer is finalised. 

62. Garland. Seaborn & Abbott. 29/6/28. Again requesting that the Shire Engineer confer with the green-keeper of Avalon Beach golf links in regard to defective drainage. Referred to the Overseer for attention. 

18. Main Roads Board. 16/7/28. Advising that the length of Barrenjoey Road which is proposed to be proclaimed a main road is that extending from Newport to the end of the last at deviation at Avalon. Resolved: (Crs. Hitchcock, Atkins) - That an application be made to have the whole length of Barrenjoey Road proclaimed a main road. 20. H.E. Fry. 12/7/28. Requesting a garage approach to 57, Avalon Beach Estate. Referred to the Overseer for report. 

23/7/1928: 45. Garland. Seaborn & Abbott. 10/7/28. Suggesting, as a temporary measure to relieve the drainage trouble at Avalon Beach, that a drain be cut from the junction of Barrenjoey Road deviation and Avalon Parade to the 25-ft.easement opposite the tennis courts. Left with the Engineer to deal with

Warringah Shire Council's records show

30/7/1934: 4. A,J, Small, 12/7/34, regarding Board of Health's notification at Avalon Beach, advising that the Valuer General has been requested to make a revaluation, and also Lands at stating that certain sections of the land should not have been included in the embargo, and requesting the Council to take immediate steps to have the embargo lifted. 4a. Public Health Dept. 26/7/34, forwarding copy of a reply it has sent to Mr. Small. "Received" 

Department of Public Health, Sydney, 23rd May, 1934.

PUBLIC HEALTH ACT; 1902, SECTION 55.

Unhealthy building land at Avalon, fronting Barrenjoey-road, Old Barrenjoey road, Avalon-parade and Central-road, Shire of Warringah.

THE Board of Health have reported that after due inquiry, they are of opinion that it would be prejudicial to health it certain land situated in the Shire of Warringah, and described in Schedules hereunder, were built up on in its present condition.

The Board of Health hare further reported that in order to render such land fit to be built upon it is necessary that:—

(a) the land be drained by properly constructed storms water channels of capacity sufficient to carry off all water passing over the area;

(b) The surface of the land comprised in Schedule be raised with clean soil or sand to conform to the following grades—

1. at Barren joey-road and Old Barrenjoey road to the height of the adjacent crown of those roads, rising therefrom 011 a grade of one in 100;

2. at the drainage easement or lane to a height 3 inches above the natural surface of the land, rising therefrom on a grade of one in 100;

(c) the surface of the land comprised in Schedule 2 be raised with clean soil or sand at the watercourse to a height 3 inches above the natural surface, rising therefrom on a grade of one in 100;

(d) all floors be laid on joists, the undersides of which shall be not less than 18 inches above the surface of the land when raised;

(e) the whole of the work be done to the satisfaction of the Board of Health.

Now, therefore, in pursuance of the power and authority vested in me by section 55 (1) of the Public Health Act, 1902, I hereby declare that such land shall not be built upon until the measures above referred to which are also specified in a document deposited in the office of the Local Authority (the Council of the Shire of Warringah) and open to, the inspection of any person, have been complied with, or until this notice has been revoked by me.

R. W. D. WEAVER, Minister for Health.

Schedule No. 1.

Commencing at a point of the north-western side of Old Barrenjoey road, being the southernmost corner of lot 10, d.p. 9,151; and bounded thence 011 the south-west by the south-western boundary of Jot 10 north-westerly to lane; thence by that lane north-easterly to Avalon-parade; thence by a line north-easterly to the westernmost corner of lot 13; thence by lane north-easterly to the northernmost corner of lot 20; thence by part of the north-eastern boundary of lot 20 south-easterly to a point 135 feet along that boundary north-westerly from Barrenjoey-road; thence by a line north-easterly to a point on the south-western boundary of lot 22, being 70 feet along that boundary from Barrenjoey-road; thence by that boundary south-easterly to Barrenjoey-road; thence by lines bearing consecutively 37 degrees 185 feet, 47 degrees 310 feet, 122 degrees 125 feet, 189 degrees 250 feet, 196 degrees 0*50 feet; thence by a line southwesterly to the easternmost corner of lot*8, d.p. 13,975; thence by the south-eastern and south-western boundaries of lot 8 to the westernmost corner of lot 8; thence by a line south-westerly to the southernmost corner of lot 13, d.p. 12,047; thence by lane south-westerly to the*southernmost corner of lot "21; thence by the south-western boundary of lot 21 north-westerly' to Old Barrenjoev road; thence by Old Barren joey road north-easterly to the westernmost corner of lot 13; thence by a line northwesterly, to the point of commencement.

Schedule No. 2.

Commencing at a point on the north-eastern side of Avalon-parade, being the westernmost corner of lot 33, d.p. 9,151; and bounded thence on the south-west by Avalon-parade north-westerly to the westernmost corner of lot 52; thence by the north-western boundary of lot 52 north-easterly 80 feet; thence by a line parallel to Avalon-parade north-westerly to the south-eastern boundary of lot 60; thence by a line north-westerly to the north-western boundary of lot 66, beings point 190 feet north-easterly along that boundary from Avalon-parade; thence by that boundary north-easterly 430 feet; thence by a line south-easterly to the south-eastern boundary of lot 37, being a point 30 feet north-easterly from the southernmost corner of lot 37; thence by a line parallel to the south-western boundary of lot 36 south-easterly to the south-eastern boundary of lot 34; thence by a line south-easterly to the southernmost corner of lot 33; thenee by a line bearing 116 degrees 160 feet; and by a line north-easterly to the northernmost corner of lot 20; thence by lane south-westerly, to the point of commencement. PUBLIC HEALTH ACT, 1902, SECTION 55. (1934, May 25). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2030. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223060059

Department of Public Health, Sydney, 11th January, 1935.

PUBLIC HEALTH ACT, 1902, SECTION 55.

Unhealthy building land at Avalon, fronting Barrenjoey-road, Old Barrenjoey road, Avalon-parade and Central-road, Shire of Warringah.

IN pursuance of the provisions of the Public Health Act, 1902, I hereby notify that I have amended in the following manner, the notice regarding the abovementioned land published in the issue of the Government Gazette No. 97 of 25th May, 1934:—

By the deletion of the following words contained in Schedule No. 1:—

thence by a line south-westerly to the easternmost corner of lot 8, d.p. 13,975; thence by the south-eastern and south-western boundaries of lot 8 to the westernmost corner of lot 8; thence by a line south-westerly to the southernmost corner of lot 13, d.p. 12,047;

and the substitution therefor of the following words:—

thence by a line westerly to a point on the south eastern boundary of drainage reserve, being 125 feet north-easterlv along that boundary from Avalon-parade; thence by that drainage reserve south-westerly to Avalon-parade; thence by a line south-westerly to the northernmost corner of lot 10; Whence by the north-western boundaries of lots 10 and 11 and the south-western boundary of lot( 11 south-westerly and southeasterly to lane.

__ R. W. D. WEAVER, Minister for Health. PUBLIC HEALTH ACT, 1902, SECTION 55. (1935, January 18). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 273. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224745510

When it rains these water flows through the land and old creek would flood the flat area. Avalon camping ground campers, established in the early 1930's beside Careel Creek and behind the Avalon Beach dunes, was often the site of flooded tents with residents recalling even into the 1950's seeing people catching 'floaties' along the creek to Careel Bay and the surf life saving clubhouse being called into duty to house those who suddenly found themselves without any shelter in the middle of the night. 




Dunbar Park is designated as a Low Hazard Floodway in a 1% flood. A Floodway is where the majority of floodwaters flow and so any blockage of the floodway can change the flood behaviour at neighbouring properties, including increasing flood levels. In a 1% flood, which has a 1% chance of occurring at least once a year, floodwaters would be up to about 30cm deep across the bowling greens, car parks and Dunbar Park itself. At the eastern end of Dunbar Park, floodwaters would be up to about 1.5m deep in an extreme flood (known as a probable maximum flood). The effects of climate change, including sea level rise and increased storm intensities, are likely to make flooding deeper and more frequent in the future.


A Village Green

Avalon, alike greater Pittwater region, was once heavily vegetated with thick bushland species consisting mainly of Casuarinas, Oaks and Ironbark trees. In the gullies wonderful 'palm groves' were evident such as those still to be seen in Bilgola Beach's' curves or in Palmgrove in Avalon, on the heights, spotted gums and angophoras alike the landscape that can still be visited in Stapleton Park.  The area of Dunbar Park and Avalon’s commercial centre consisted of swamp type vegetation such as Paperbarks due to its low lying position. It is evident from old photographs that this original bushland was cleared in the early 20th century and then revegetated some decades later. 

The current Dunbar Park setting of mowed grass and surrounding tree canopies. Major vegetation within the Park includes scattered and formal rows of Canary Island Date Palms near Barrenjoey Road, Paperbark and other native trees within the western car park, Norfolk Island Pines along Old Barrenjoey Road, Palms and Paperbark trees lining paths within the main lawn, a row of mature Paperbark trees between the central car park and bowling club and boarder vegetation consisting mainly of mature Fig, Eucalyptus, Casuarina and Paperbark trees.

Dunbar Park provides for a range of community facilities including park space, playground equipment, community halls, bowling club and greens, outdoor dining, war memorial and facilities associated with the Avalon Recreation Centre. The Park is used by a wide spectrum of the community for activities such as informal recreation, children’s play, lawn bowls, croquet, outdoor dining, markets, personal training, various community events and activities associated with the Avalon Recreation Centre and former scout hall. Girl Guides and Scouts were once a prominent activity in Dunbar Park however both these groups are no longer active in the Avalon area. A key objective of the plan is to create opportunities for the community to make use of the former scout and guide halls along with improving public access and encouraging recreational use of Dunbar Park. The central lawn of Dunbar Park hosts a number of community events. These include markets and annual events such as the military tattoo and Art in the Park. Ancillary uses of the Park include car parking (for park users and to serve adjacent land uses), informal vehicular access to residential properties on the northern boundary of the Reserve

Sydney, 15th December, 1961.
APPLICATION FOR THE CLOSING AND PURCHASE OF ROAD

NOTICE is hereby given that application has been made under the Public Roads Act, 1902, for the closing and purchase of the road described hereunder, and that it is intended to close same, unless valid objections are found to exist. Any person desiring to lodge objections should forward them in writing addressed to the Minister for Lands within one month from the date of this notice.

K. C. COMPTON, Minister for Lands.

Description

Land District—Metropolitan; Shire—Warringah

Warringah Shire Council, about 1 rood 36 perches. Public road (part Old Barrenjoey road, Avalon) extending between the south-easterly prolongation of the north-eastern boundary of lot 19, deposited plan 9,151 and the north-westerly prolongation of the south-western boundary of lot 8 in plan on dealing D. 111,647 at Registrar-General's Department, parish Narrabeen, county Cumberland. R. 60-1,273. APPLICATION FOR THE CLOSING AND PURCHASE OF ROAD (1961, December 15). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3991. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220287747

Avalon Boy Scouts

Warringah Shire Council records show that correspondence was received from the Avalon Boy Scout Group Committee, 19/11/51, stating that a Boy Scout Troop has been formed in the district, and that a hall is needed for the holding of meetings and for training purposes, and inquiring whether Lot 16, Barrenjoey Road, could  be made available in this regard. Council Resolved that this be referred to the Engineer for report as to whether Lot 19 could be made available to the Committee. Local knowledge states meetings were held in a home in Central Road, Avalon prior to this hall, which had been used as an RSL Meeting place prior to an RSL structure being built, was gifted to the scouts.

Local lore has it that the same Scout Hall in Dunbar Park currently being used was originally a shed placed there for the benefit of members of the Avalon Beach RSL Club, formed by the Returned Servicemen in 1947, the first official meeting was held at the rear of the general store and later at the Avalon Golf course. The Club was formed in 1950 with 60 members who purchased a temporary shed, which still stands in Dunbar Park. This building was the Scout Hall for many years and was renovated as part of the Plan of Management for Dunbar Park by Pittwater Council in 2012.

Old Warringah Shire Council records show that Avalon Boy Scouts Committee wrote, dated 5/9/52, stating that advice of the Council's intention to postpone consideration of the granting of land for a Scout Hall at Avalon until receipt of the Progress Association's "overall plan" for Dunbar Park, has been received with regret; contending that the Association does not necessarily represent the true wishes of the population of Avalon in this matter and that the Scout movement at Avalon represents directly at least 60 families, and that the Committee has raised about £800 towards the cost of building, and that building plans has been submitted to the Council; and requesting that the Council reconsider its original suggestion for a grant of Scouts land in Barrenjoey Road. 

In July 1953 it was resolved they could build a hall 'on Council's land' as long as the space in questions was filled in as required by the Department of Health, the area chosen being subject to floods and sitting in an old creek bed, as Avalon Guide Hall was when first built too. 

One newspaper report states the council was going to allocate £5000.00 for this edifice - nothing could be found to indicate it was.

Avalon Beach "Scouts are to have a Scout Hall built in Barrenjoey Rd., Avalon Beach, at a cost of £5,000. OPPORTUNITIES FOR BUSINESS (1953, November 18). Construction (Sydney, NSW : 1938 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222899341

Geoff Searl OAM, ABHS President provides this insight:


Avalon Scout Hall - photo courtesy Geoff Searl, ABHS

In 1954 the Scout Hall was originally built in Dunbar Park, with its two front doors facing east on Old Barrenjoey Road (approximately where the entrance to the Recreation Centre is now located). It was later moved to make way for the new and first Community Centre to the southern side of Dunbar Park with its front doors facing north. In the 1990s it was relocated a second time to its present site in the north west corner of Dunbar Park with its doors facing west. It has been totally reworked and is now referred to as the Annexe of the Recreation Centre. 

By August 1958 the Council had forwarded Notice of Intention to Resume on the owner of Lot 15, D.P.9151, Barrenjoey Road, Avalon (Mrs. Inez D.White - a lady who lived at Terrey Hills) for the purposes of Section 348 (recreation, etc). The land is zoned as Open Space, and is on the western side of Barrenjoey Road between the shops and the Scout Hall. Council decided, on the recommendation of the TP.D. Committee 2/6/58 (Min.8) that Lot 15 be adopted as the best site for a rest park and public conveniences, that its acquisition be expedited and that plans be prepared for the conveniences. This response was to calm J. Harry, of Elouera Road, Avalon Beach, and Messrs .A.E.& M.M. Geake, Avalon Health Foods, and two other lessees of the shops in question who were protesting against the Council's proposal to erect public conveniences on land adjoining these premises.

Members of the Avalon Beach Beautification Scheme, (letter dated 21.11.61) were advising Council the Committee ''views with alarm the decision forced upon the Council by a Court decision to open Old Barrenjoey Road at the north section of Old & New Barrenjoey Roads opposite the Fire Station, as the planning of the layout of amenities and beautification of this area was on both beauty and safety for adults and Children and it is felt that the opening of this-road has produced a safety hazard, as this area contains a Village Green, Scouts, Hall, Girl Guides, Kiddies Playground and proposed Baby Health Centre and public tenets. They added the Committee trusts that every effort will be made by Council to have this decision rescinded.''

As most residents know, that road is now open. There is also a record that the hall was moved in 1968 to its present position with its flagstone entrance and flagpole moved too. 


1970s Avalon Public School sports day in Dunbar Park - Scout Hall in background, photo courtesy Gary Clist

The Avalon Girl Guide Hall was officially opened on October 21st 1967. Patron Cora Adcock's husband, Councillor Noel Adcock managed to obtain the land. It was low lying and swampy and without access but Mr Adcock organised fill and drainage and soon had constructed an access road.

The Avalon Guides had been in recess because of a lack of leaders but Doreen Cherry managed to persuade 3 friends, Shirley Reilly, Betty Gaddes and Sylvia Harrison to train with her as guiders. Because of the huge waiting list 2 companies were soon formed.

The Brownies were thriving under their Brown Owl, Miss Miriam Myles who was helped by Beryl Redman. Commissioners were Gloria Ogden and Brenda Kable and Connie Adams was a very enthusiastic Local Association President.

The desire to have their own hail created plenty of enthusiasm and so a public meeting was called. The Avalon Lions Club was very supportive of the cause and helped organise lots of fundraising.

Simultaneously the local netball group was trying to get an indoor netball court as a part of the new Community Centre which was being built. Fortunately through lots of hard work and with their new goal in mind the Avalon Guides were able to secure a bank loan for six and a half thousand dollars.

Ken McLean was the architect and Doreen's husband John Cherry became the Honorary Clerk of Works. He was in charge of the volunteers and worked side by side with a builder, Stan Barry. There were times when helpers were so scarce that only John and Stan turned up for weekend work. A roster of parents was established and even Father Boland from the neighbouring Catholic Church leant a hand. The wonderful community spirit which helped build the hail was let down some years later when vandals broke into the hell and stole the collection of photographs taken which showed the progress of construction and some log books.

Mrs Barbara Wentworth (wife of the then local Member of Parliament, Bill Wentworth) who was the State Commissioner of Girl Guides and Patron of the-Avalon Palm Beach Girl Guides opened the halldamp conditions. However the conditions didn't really dampen the girls' enthusiasm for the fun of the fair outside the hall.

When the Guide Hall was built it was always anticipated that the Hall would also be available for rental by the greater community and indeed the rentals helped pay off the debt owing on the Hall.

Avalon Guide Hall - From Oral History - Doreen Cherry OAM:

By December 1951 we had moved to North Avalon to a block of land we’d bought with a small converted garage on it; everyone had converted garages, log cabins here then; it was all very simple, basic places. Tasman road had only five houses. There were so many koalas; he learned to eat oysters; loved them; the English were amazing. David Goddard (the English producer who started Bellbird the popular television series) had been brought out here to do the show, and no one met his boat, no one there to welcome them, so he and his wife took a taxi and drove out here. They loved it too and took a place at Nth Avalon, up on the cliff there. 

Avalon was a true village then; its whole history owes a lot to these people who came out from England after the war; they ran the P&C, ran Girl Guides, helped build a new school; they said the hills reminded them of Cornwall. John started building the Guide Hall as he had two daughters and  they didn’t have anywhere to meet; it was used for everything, a community hall. We had meetings and Councillor Adcock offered a block of land where it was.


With her daughters and friend, Avalon Beach home on Barrenjoey Road (NB: Avalon Beach sandhills in background) 



The Avalon Girl Guides hall can be seen in the Background - John W. Stone photo

Brown Owl, Miss Miles(she was educated at a Ladies college; taught the Brownies good manners; we had a background of ethics and standards then), lived up Bellevue Avenue, and she was great, we had the Lions Club behind us too. It was to be a community hall, not just Guides. 

John became Clerk of Works because of his experience with figures and business management. Stan Barry was a very reliable and well known builder (he was living in Central Road then); all the rest was voluntarily. Father Boland of the Catholic church helped and supported us; They got working bees going, then these fell off a bit, so they made a roster; and everyone had their day and shift. John would call them, let them know. A cousin of ours came and did the brickwork for the chimney; we designed an outside veranda; we had to make people think to of the future, of future uses. Mrs Wentworth was the District Guider at this stage; she opened her house, we had morning teas and suppers to raise money.


Inside the Avalon Girl Guides hall - Doreen is the lady in the red blouse - image from a Cherry family slide.

The people that helped a lot were the family of Alice Robertson, a fishermen family with seven children at Careel Bay, great folk, they were very helpful; so we had wonderful families like those; you could always rely on Alice to do things, even with all those children. We ended up having two companies that I (Doreen) put together, instead of one. The hall was officially opened on the 21st of October, 1967 and had paid for itself within two years, solely through community use.

The John Cherry Memorial Shield Annual Citizenship Award named to honour John's work, and presented annually to a worthy Guide or Brownie ended in 1999.

In 2011 Pittwater Council ran the following Notice:

Avalon Guide Hall And Dunbar Park

Pittwater Council is advertising for expressions of interest for the fit-out and future use of the former Guide Hall at Avalon’s Dunbar Park. The Council has already placed a moratorium on the former guide hall, which in recent years has fallen into disuse, until it has received feedback from the community on its potential use in the future.

The expression of interest will formalise the process of seeking future uses for the building. Expressions of interest must be submitted by 2pm on Friday 11 February 2011.

Background information on lodging an expression of interest is available at www.pittwater.nsw.gov.au

This week at its meeting the Council considered a draft plan of management for Dunbar Park as a whole and recommended that it be placed on public exhibition for comment.

Mayor Harvey Rose said the draft plan for Dunbar Park was prepared in response to community feedback on its use, including several public meetings.

“The draft plan proposes retaining Dunbar Park as a ‘park environment’ providing a variety of community-based activities,” he said.

Mayor Rose said the Council was keen to see the retention of the guide hall building for the community and urged residents to submit ideas for how it could be used in the future.

Highlights of the draft plan include:

  • Renovating the former Scout Hall to include a performance stage, deck, storage areas and toilets;
  • A small kiosk/café as an addition to the scout hall to serve visitors to the playground and other users;
  • A expansion of the existing playground;
  • Maintaining the main park area as a ‘town green’ to be used for a variety of events;
  • Upgrading of seating, lighting, picnic facilities and pathways.

The draft plan is on exhibition for comment at the Council’s customer service centres at 59A Old Barrenjoey Road Avalon and 1 Park Street Mona Vale and online between 10 December and 12 February 2011.

  

Photos by A J Guesdon, 2008-2012

Then on May 9th 2012 Pittwater Council announced:

Former Avalon Scout & Guide Halls

Pittwater Council has decided to demolish the former Avalon Guide Hall at Dunbar Park, as work on the upgrade to the former Avalon Scout Hall nears completion.

The Council made the decision this week to demolish the former guide hall, following a lengthy search for alternative uses for the building.

The two buildings were formerly used by the girl guides and the other by the scouts, but these uses ceased several years ago.

Acting General Manager Chris Hunt said the Plan of Management for Dunbar Park had identified a need for the Scout Hall to be used as a multi-use community facility if refurbished.

“However the Guide Hall was more problematic to retain,” he said.

“In this context and after almost two years of exploring options, with no feasible and funded alternate use of the former Guide Hall found, the Council has resolved to remove the building from Dunbar Park”.

Mr Hunt said one of the options examined in detail for the Guides Hall was its potential use as a ‘men’s shed’.

“However the cost of refurbishment, in the order of $350,000, would be prohibitive and tend to limit its use to a single group.”

Mr Hunt said the former Scout Hall had been identified as a more suitable building for a broad range of community activities. The building is currently being refurbished with work expected to be complete by the end of June.

He said the refurbished building would be an additional community facility for the highly popular Avalon Recreation Centre with a particular focus on youth activities and performing arts.

The plan was met with opposition in the community, however, the fabric from which the hall had been built, including asbestos, and the cost to upgrade it for reuse, meant its days were numbered. Demolition took place, returning some open space to Dunbar Park, which had been diminished by around 40% by then due to all the structures that had been erected on its perimeters and the sell off of land towards the Clareville end where a retirement village was built to the verges of Avalon Bowling Club's greens. 


Demolition of Avalon-Bilgola Guide Hall. A J Guesdon photo

Girl Guides and Scouts were once a prominent activity in Dunbar Park however both these groups are no longer active in the Avalon area. 

Dunbar Park, including Avalon Bowling Club & Avalon Recreation Centre and Avalon Community Gardens remains a key space for this village by the sea.

In 2007 Dunbar Park was consolidated into a single lot from seven land parcels comprising five lots. The eastern section of Dunbar Park (Avalon Community Gardens) was created when Barrenjoey Road was constructed and divided Avalon Beach Reserve. Avalon Community Gardens has since been consolidated from five lots.

Dunbar Park is the central open space for the for the Avalon community. The Park acts as a town common due to its location adjacent to Avalon’s commercial centre. Surrounding land uses include single residences on large blocks and a four-storey block of residential units (western and northern boundaries), the Avalon Recreation Centre, the Avalon Returned Services League Club, and council managed car parking facilities (to the south) Woolworths Supermarket and local shops (across Old Barrenjoey Road on the eastern boundary). The residential edges provide a soft edge to the open space through significant mature tree canopies planted within the properties on the northern boundary of the reserve. The Avalon Recreation Centre, located on the southern side of Dunbar Park, provides a venue for a wide range of community services, functions and events. Its high use and close proximity to the town centre ensures it remains as a significant facility within the Avalon community.

Dunbar Park provides for a range of community facilities including park space, playground equipment, community halls, bowling club and greens, outdoor dining, war memorial and facilities associated with the Avalon Recreation Centre. The Park is used by a wide spectrum of the community for activities such as informal recreation, children’s play, lawn bowls, croquet, outdoor dining, markets, personal training, various community events and activities associated with the Avalon Recreation Centre and former scout hall. 

The green space has been used by Avalon Soccer club prior to their relocation to the Careel Bay Playing Fields and was used by Avalon Public School as the venue for their sports days. Former resident Gary Clist provided some wonderful photos he had taken of a sports day in 1970 for a record published in 2020

The central lawn of Dunbar Park hosts a number of community events. These include markets and annual events, such as the military tattoo that ran for 10 years through the hard work of Graham Sloper, and Art in the Park. Ancillary uses of the Park include car parking (for park users and to serve adjacent land uses), informal vehicular access to residential properties on the northern boundary of the Reserve.

All structures, including the RSL, are renting their space from Council with leases that run for around 5 years and are renewed.

Some more of Gary's brilliant photos from that 1970's Avalon Public School Sports Day that show us the village green as it was then:


Cheering on the runners. 1970 Sports day, Dunbar park. Guide Hall in background


1970s Sports day  – Bowling Club in background and snippets of hills


1970s Sports day extra 11 - with RSL in background - Nick M; - Could that be Teacher from Avalon primary Mr Armstrong in the coat and Rayban style sunnies?


1970s skipping race 2: Sports Day skipping race, 1970 – no Woolworths carpark in sight; see how the reserve runs all the way to beach


1970s sports day –  Brian Friend; The old Avalon Police Station on the left at the back.

Nick M. -  that little Police Station was a temporary building and was not always manned. I remember sharing a cigarette on the steps....Old Sarg arrived only moments after we got up and walked away. We were 11 or 12.)


1970’s sports day Sports day, 1970. Julia B; The Teacher looks like Mr Rogers, he had the comb over! And I remember those sports uniforms and groups

Judy Z; I was in Persius    -  Maureen P; I was in Achilles  - Sue N; I was in Hercules. Mr Rogers was my teacher too

Nick M;  Yes. I am thinking Mr Rogers. I remember watching Neil Armstrong walk on the Moon on a 26 inch TV live in his classroom. They crammed just about the whole school in there two rooms had a retractable divider which provided more space....it was jam packed.


1970s Sports day – Avalon Beach RSL in background


Who was 'Dunbar'?


More "Heads" at the Radio and Electrical Exhibition


Mr. G. K. Dunbar. More "Heads" at the Radio and Electrical Exhibition (1928, March 30). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245425975 


Same photo as below – clearer: 


Electricity and Gas at Golf Rabbit's Reputation Doubted (1931, May 12). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 14 (FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved April 28, 2021, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224701958 


THERE was plenty of light on the game when electric light and gas company officials met at golf at Kensington Messrs. J. C. Net (left), G. K. Dunbar and T. Moore before the start of the matches. Lady Game Opens Junior Red Cross Appeal :: Coursing Scenes (1931, May 13). The Newcastle Sun (NSW : 1918 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article164324769 

George Killigrew Dunbar was born on 1 December 1885 in Castlemaine, Victoria-. DUNBAR. - On the 1st inst., at Castlemaine, the wife of George Killegrew Dunbar of a son.

The Society of Australian Genealogists card index claims that he was born at Louth on the Darling River, 60 miles south of Bourke!. He was the son of George Killigrew Dunbar and Rebecca Grace Baring.

George Killigrew Dunbar married Catherine Agatha Cannon on 9 January 1909 in Sacred Heart church, Inverell, New South Wales. Catherine Agatha Cannon was born in 1882 in New South Wales. She was the daughter of Dudley John Cannon and Catherine O'Keefe.

Catherine Agatha Cannon married George Killigrew Dunbar on 9 January 9th 1909 in Sacred Heart church, Inverell, New South Wales. His sister Jessie stated that George's only child died at birth. He was aged 24 at his marriage and a station manager, she was a nurse. They may have had a son George Killigrew baptised at Inverell in 1909 according to findmypast but he is not listed in the NSW registry records.

George Killigrew Dunbar was registered in the 1914 electoral roll with John Thomas Killigrew Dunbar and Margaret Ann Green. George Killigrew Dunbar was listed in a directory dated 1915 as George K Dunbar at Stanmore St, Enmore, New South Wales.

George Killigrew Dunbar & Oswald Green applied for a patent for "Improvements in extra air devices" in 1924. See National Archives of Australia 422402. 

There is a photo and article about him in the AGEI magazine "Hotpointer" of September 1949.

George K Dunbar was a Shire Councillor of Warringah Shire. He was a qualified engineer.  He was NSW sales manager with Australian General Electric Company.  He was a member of the board  of  management  of  the  NRMA, and a director of  NRMA Insurance  Ltd.  He lived at Concord and also lived or had a holiday home at Avalon. He was a vice-president of Avalon Beach SLSC. He died  while  bowling  with the President of Warringah Shire, Cr. Russel Kent, at  Newport  Bowling Club on 6 August 1949, aged 64. He was a member of Lodge Pittwater 697. 

Some more notes from the pages of the past:

The Prince of Wales' Birthday dance will be held at Concord on June 22, the eve of the birthday of His Royal Highness. Mrs. Squires is the president, Miss Rita Squires the honorary secretary, Mr. George Dunbar and Major Marr. M.C.. M.P., the honorary treasurers. The dance is in aid of St. Margaret's Hospital. At a meeting of the committee of St. Margaret's held yesterday, when Judge Heydon presided, it was resolved that in recognition of the £50 raised by the Concord committee, Mrs. Squires, the president, should be granted a life governor of the hospital, a bed should be endowed in the name of Mrs. George Dunbar, and a bassinette in the name of Mrs. Smithers. WOMAN'S WORLD (1922, June 15). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245727990 

A meeting was held yesterday morning at the Australia, presided over by Judge Heydon when a committee was formed to organise a monster matinee at the Theatre Royal on September 22 in aid of St. Margaret's Hospital for Women. Sir Walter Davidson and Dame Margaret Davidson have granted their patronage to the function, and Mrs. Hugh D. M'Intosh. the originator of the movement, was elected president, Captain Stevens hon. organiser. Lieutenant Alaxwell, V.C., hon, secretray; Judge Heydon, Mr. W. A. Holman, K.C., and Miss Alice Sheehan hon, treasurers; Lieutenant Bedn Kenny, V.C.. and Mr. Lew Parks hon. publicity, officers; Mr. C. W. Browne, L.I. C. A., and Mr. Nelson. hon. auditors. Mrs. E. J. Tall, agreed to be responsible for the sale, of flowers; Mrs. Furze and Mrs. Greatorex for the sale of sweets. Mrs. W. D. Langton Is organising a separate movement to pay the Incidental expenses. Mr. Hugh D. M'Intosh, M.L.C., has agreed to bear all the expenses of advertising and publicity. 

The following ladies were elected on the committee: Sister Kerven, Mrs. W. D. Langton (president of the ladies' committee of the hospital). Mrs. W. A. Holman, Mrs.. E, J. . Tait, Mrs. Bert M'Donald, Mrs. Marks, Mrs. Harry Hughes, Mrs. D. Foy, Mrs. J. Tansey, Mrs. C. Fallon, Mrs. J. Hill. Mrs. M. Slattery. Mrs. James Hughes, Mrs. Fred. Flowers, Mrs. J. C. Leeto, Mrs. Rosich, Mrs. Vincent M'Cauloy, Mrs. Greatorex, Mrs. G. Dunbar, Mrs. C. .Squires, Mrs. Furze, Mrs. A. J. Mecliuelsen, Mrs. W. Chambers, Mrs Grimwood, Mrs Llewellyn, 'Mrs. Rees, Mrs. Dunn, Mrs. Windred, Mrs. Margarot Humphries, Miss Donnelly, Miss Furze, Miss A. Hynes, Miss H. Bruton. At the conclusion of the meeting Mrs. C. Squires (president of the Concord committee) handed in a cheque for £33 from the mask dance. Judge Heydon intimated that he had received £20 from Mr. G. H. Hebden and £10, 10s from Mr. James A. Dunlop, all these amounts being credited to the drive which is being made this month to raise 200,000 sixpences, viz., £5000. SOCIETY and THE HOME (1922, September 2). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article245777388 

Concord.—Stolen, between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. the 6th instant from the residence of George Killigrew Dunbar, 6 Broughton-street, Concord,—A lady’s gold heavy- chased keeper ring, “Hardy Bros.” thereon; a metal ring with stone missing; a lady’s plain gold band ring; a lady’s gold ring with two small diamonds set in platinum; an imitation cameo brooch; a gold brooch made of ear-rings, set with emeralds and pearls; a gold mounted grass stone brooch; a gold brooch engraved with flowers, with a hollow back; a gold brooch with a cat’s eye mounted in a circle; a small gold map of Australia brooch; a glass-tube brooch of opal chips; a bar brooch with chased ivy leaves; a flat gold expanding armlet; a gold cablelink bangle: a gold Indian design bracelet, bar and three short links pattern, with clasp and safety-chain; a gold mounted glass-tube cross broocli, with opal chips; a small gold cross; pair of Broque blister pearl ear-rings; pair of unmounted long-drop orange-coloured ear-rings; a turquoise ear-ring; a scarf-piny | swallow set with pearls; a lady’s gold scarf-pin with I small gold cross attached; a fine gold neck-chain with I pear-shaped pendant; a gold neck-chain with a broken clasp; a gold sleeve-link “B” thereon; an old Turkish five-chambered revolver minus spring, in leather pouch; and the sum of £7 10s.; value £30. Identifiable, except money. Burglaries, etc. (1924, June 11). New South Wales Police Gazette and Weekly Record of Crime (Sydney : 1860 - 1930), p. 307. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article251767112

ROAD DANGERS

Sir,-Councillor Dunbar's letter on the road deviation at Avalon Beach attacks the well-considered plan of the Main Roads Department to by-pass the Avalon business centre and avoid two dangerous right-angle turns therein

The new traffic deviation will preserve a well-planned district lay out and appears to be the only practical solution

The Main Roads Department stated as far back as 1938 in a letter to the late E Lloyd Sanders, M L A , that after full investigation of alternatives and all circumstances, the route now criticised by Councillor Dunbar should be adopted The land was resumed by the Department in 1939 and formally accepted as a public road by the Warringah Shire Council early in 1946

In view of the many serious accidents which have occurred and the near capsize of two buses recently at the existing road junction, the Avalon Ratepayers' Association, which strongly supports the Commissioner's plan, has urged its earlv completion in the interest of public safety

The deviation will provide a much safer road and will certainly not create the potential death trap imagined by your correspondent

ARTHUR J. SMALL President, Avalon District Ratepayers' Association. Sydney.  ROAD DANGERS (1947, May 14). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18026153 

ROAD PLANNING

Sir,-Mr. A. J. Small's letter commenting on my criticism of the Main Roads Department would carry more weight were it not for the following facts:

The Warringah Shire Council has never agreed to the proposed deviation, nor formally accepted the road, but it has been paid for the land to be used as a road by the Main Roads Department. The deviation proposed by the council and approved by the planning engineer of the Cumberland County Council not only does away with the bends in the sub-division road now used as a main road referred to by Mr. Small, but three other bends as well.

I have been on every relevant deputation and conference in connection with the reserve resumption and Main Roads Department proposed deviation that has been held, and know all the facts.

Road traffic has increased since the deviation objected to was first proposed, and, consequently, it is not part of a well considered plan to-day.

I have the authority of the Avalon Beach and District Progress Association to object to the Main Roads Department's outdated proposal. 

GEO. K. DUNBAR, Councillor. Sydney. ROAD PLANNING (1947, May 16). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18026446 

SHIRE OF WARRINGAH

Notice Is hereby given that In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 1919 as amended by subsequent Acts and Ordinance No 8 thereunder I have this day nominated as candidates for election to the Council of the Shire of Warringah the undermentioned persons

FOR A RIDING

BLADON George Blackett

DUNBAR George Killigrew

FORSTER Henry Gregory

KENT Russell Clement

LLOYD Frederick Lancelot

McLEAN John Thomas

STEPHENS William Henry

TAYLOR Roy Cameron

TOWLER Frederick

FOR B RIDING

XLLAN Thomas Edward

UAGNELI Brian George Ridley

BUTCHER Charles Edward

CHAMBERS David Alexander

CORKERY Mum Ice Joseph

DOHERTY Edward

CREFN George Henri

HARRIS Walter Laurence

HEWITT William Stanley

FOR C RIDING

BATHO Wilfrid Russell

BLAKE Du id Valentine Jardine

DEAHM Roy Kitchener

FISHER John Lawrence

FROST William Beverley

HAND Thomas Joseph

MANNING Hugh

McNALLY Norman Denis

RA?? Stephen

SCULLY Charles Henry

WALSHAM Carl ,

There being a greater number of candidates nominated for each Riding than are required to be elected a POLL will be taken on SATURDAY 6th DECEMBER next between the hours of 8 a m and 8 p m at the undermentioned polling places tor the purpose of electing THREE (3) COUNCILLORS FOR FACH RIDING  POLLING PLACES FOR A RIDING Brookvale Manly Sydney Palm Beach Avalon Newport Mona Vale Bayview Terrey Hills North Narrabeen Narrabeen Terminus Taylors Point …. Advertising (1947, November 15). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18049869 

Hotel Plan Opposed At Avalon

A number of Avalon residents yesterday opposed the transfer of a hotel licence from Redfern to Avalon. They claimed that the hotel would disturb the peace of the area, and would attract an undesirable class.

Charles Leslie Dawe applied to the Metropolitan Licensing Board for the conditional removal of the publican's licence of the Royal Standard Hotel, Cleveland Street, Redfern, to Barren-joey Road, Avalon.

"QUIET DISTRICT"

Among the objections raised by residents were:

Henry Robert Holmes, of Old Barrenjoey Road, Avalon (retired clergyman): The district was quiet and suitable for family life. Campers were of a most respectable type. He had not met one resident in the district in favour of a hotel.

Cecil Leslie Cook, of Avalon Parade, Avalon Beach (exporter): If a hotel was established at Avalon a less desirable type of camper would be attracted to the camping reserve. Road traffic would also become more congested..

DISORDER FEARED

Frederick Fuller: A hotel would lead to drunkenness and disorderliness.

Douglas Bernard Sheather: The district was sufficiently catered for already.

George K. Dunbar (sales manager and a Warringah Shire councillor): Population at Avalon did not warrant a hotel.

Gordon Henry Lobban (motor car salesman and an ex-Serviceman): The only new buildings at Avalon at pre-sent should be new homes.

The further hearing was adjourned till Friday.

Mr. W. Lieberman, of Messrs. Lieberman, and Tobias, appeared for the applicant; Mr. J. E. Cassidy, K.C, instructed by Messrs, Maund and Kelynark for objectors ; and Sergeant J. H. Milne for the police. Hotel Plan Opposed At Avalon (1947, June 4). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18028939 

George died on 6 August 1949 in the Bowling Club, Newport, New South Wales, aged 63. His usual residence was 13 Broughton St, Concord. He also had land holdings in a rural setting. The Sydney Sun reported: Bowling man's death on green. He was buried on 9 August 1949 in the Church of England section, Northern Suburbs crematorium, North Ryde, New South Wales.

'Won't play' -then died

When Mr. George K. Dunbar, 64, collapsed at Newport Bowling Club yesterday he said: "Tell them I won't be playing this afternoon." Then he died. Bowlers abandoned play for the afternoon. Mr. Dunbar, who lived in Broughton Street, Concord, was sales manager in New South Wales for Australian General Electric, with whom he had been employed for more than 30 years. He was a member of Newport and Concord Bowling Clubs. 'Won't play'--then died (1949, August 7). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1931 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article248974999 

Bowling man's death on green

The New South Wales sales manager of the Australian General Electric Company, Mr. George Killigrew Dunbar, collapsed and died; on the green at the Newport Bowling Club today. Mr. Dunbar had been with the AGE for more than 30 years. He was treasurer and a member of the board of management of the NRMA, a director of NRMA Insurance Ltd. He is survived by his widow. Bowling man's death on green (1949, August 6). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 2 (FINAL FOOTBALL LAST RACE). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article231050221 

DUNBAR George Killigrew -August 6 1949 suddenly at the Newport Bowling Club dearly beloved husband of Catherine Dunbar of Broughton street, Concord Family Notices (1949, August 9). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18124712 

DUNBAR, George Killigrew.—August 6 (suddenly), at Newport Bowling Club, loving brother of Jessie (Mrs Lessel) and Fred (Western Australia). Family Notices (1949, August 27). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 34. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18126160 

DUNBAR -Lodge Pittwater No 697 U O L of N S W Officers and Brethren are fraternally invited to attend the Funeral of our late well beloved Wor. Bro GEORGE KILLIGREW DUNBAR P M For particulars see family notice. G R BURCHALL W M J R PARNELL P M Secretary Family Notices (1949, August 9). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 12. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18124712 

NEW N.R.M.A. COUNCILLOR

Filling the vacancy on the N.R.M.A. Council following the recent death of the honorary treasurer, Mr. G. K. Dunbar, is a man with extensive country interest. He is the Hon. E. J. Eggins, ML.C., a former Mayor of Lismore, who was chairman of the Commonwealth Fodder Conservation Board and the Stock Dispersal Committee during the war. Mr. Eggins is chairman of the Australian Country Party of N.S.W. A former Mayor of Lismore, and a past-president of the Seed; Merchant's Federation of Australia, he is now president of the North Coast National A: & I. Society; and a councillor of the Royal Agricultural Society. MT. Eggins was born in Grafton, took up banana growing On the Brunswick River and later' established a seed distribution, I business in Lismore. He now has dairy farming interests, and lives in Sydney NEW N.R.M.A. COUNCILLOR (1949, August 26). Western Herald (Bourke, NSW : 1887 - 1970), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142313820 

Warringah Shire Council's records show that during the first meeting held in 1951 they recieved a letter from Mr. Dunbar's widow:

Mrs. K. A. Dunbar, 9/1/50, thanking Council for naming a park at Avalon Beach "Dunbar  Park" in memory of the late ex- Councillor Dunbar. "Received".

FIRST WHITE CHILD BORN AT DANDENONG

Interested by the keen discussion over the origin of Eumemmering, an old-timer dropped in this week to say that the first white child was born in Dandenong in 1851, and his name was George Killigrew Dunbar. First White Child Born At Dandenong (1952, January 30). The Dandenong Journal (Vic. : 1927 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222356996 

Dunbar Park was originally set aside as 'Avalon Park' and measured 4 acres or 1. 6 hectares - Toongari was originally 9 acres or 3.6 hectares - Catalpa was originally 2 acres, 2 roods and 27 1/2 perches or just over 1 hectare.

Pittwater Council's Dunbar Park POM adopted June 6th, 2011 state that  Dunbar Park (including Avalon Bowling Club & Avalon Recreation Centre)  was 22,122 square metres or 5.4 acres/2.1 hectares (details under 'extras' of blocks that were resumed into the park at later dates), Dunbar Park (Avalon Community Gardens) was 6,646 square metres, or 1.6 acres/0.647497 of a hectare.

Warringah Shire Council’s ‘Amended Warringah Scheme’ to allow the zoning of 90 acres (36.5 hectares) for flats in Avalon in 1967 brought an overwhelming response. Although Avalon Progress and Ratepayers’ Association fired the first shots, it was the impetus that stirred a new residents’ group into formation to engage in positive action. According to ‘The Avalon News’ vol. 15 no.12, the Avalon Preservation Trust (APT - now the Avalon Preservation Association) held its inaugural general meeting in July 1967. The new Trust wasted no time and became immediately active, opposing this new zoning.

In 1985 the Pittwater Palms retirement village was mooted and on behalf of the Trust, Connie Adams approached the Heritage Council to ‘put an interim conservation order on the site to preserve existing trees’. Leightons asked for Council’s approval of change of consent.

The Ombudsman replied that he could ‘under his act, do nothing to help us’. The Trust then asked the Councillor Frank Beckman to have council defer consideration of plans until after the Heritage Council had approved it.  However, with this deferral came the sudden loss, overnight, of all the remaining trees. 




Ron Searl and then State MP for our area Max Smith - ABHS newspaper clipping - Manly Daily; 'He admitted some trees may have been bulldozed 'accidentally

This development was the ‘straw which broke the koala’s backs’. It severed the corridor necessary for their transit from their food trees of choice (grey gums) in Angophora Reserve to those in Stapleton Park and further afield to Bangalley. Our walk around Toongari Reserve on May 1st 2021 showed some food trees still in place and this word itself means 'native bear' as they were once at home here.

All this, and what runs below, underlines what we have is worth protecting and looking after and that it is the residents who must do so as those placed in charge over them frequently cannot or do not follow the community's vision for keeping this place as it shoudl be and restoring what was once there for now, and for all to come in the future.

These images are from the 2018 Avalon Beach Historical Society curated by Geoff Searl OAM (with info from Mr. Searl) - they were taken by Geoff and John W. Stone who was the principal photographer for the then Warringah-Pittwater News. John was one of the original tenants in the Barefoot Boulevard building, moving there in 1965. More in his Profile.


Geoff Searl OAM and all the great team of volunteers at ABHS are putting together a special Centenary Celebration of Avalon Beach for its 100th year in 2021 - more on that later this year.

References, resaerch and extras


  1. TROVE  National Library of Australia
  2. Warringah Shire Council records
  3. Avalon Place Plan Open For Feedback - Feedback Closes May 16
  4. Archpriest John Joseph Therry 1790 - May 25, 1864
  5. John Collins of Avalon - Pittwater Patriarchs series I
  6. My Holiday By Charles De Boos – 1861
  7. St. Michael’s Arch, Avalon – 1864 To 1962
  8. Pittwater Roads II: Where The Streets Have Your Name - Clareville
  9. Pittwater Roads II: Where The Streets Have Your Name - Careel Bay
  10. Pittwater Roads II: Where The Streets Have Your Name - Avalon Beach
  11. The Roads And Tracks Of Yesterday: How The Avalon Beach Subdivisions Changed The Green Valley Tracks
  12. Stapleton Reserve In Spring 2020: An Urban Ark Of Plants Found Nowhere Else
  13. Careel Bay Playing Fields Reserve - Including Hitchcock Park:  Birds, Boots & Beauty
  14. Avalon Beach Golf Links - Pittwater Fields of Dreams II
  15. Avalon Beach Surf Life Saving Club - The First Clubhouse
  16. Avalon Camping Ground - Fields of Dreams I
  17. Photos Of Avalon Beach And Surrounds From 1968 And 1970 - Taken By Gary Clist
  18. John W. Stone - Profile of the Week Issue 271, 2016
  19. Avalon Preservation Association - Profile and History, Issue 337, 2017

Arthur Jabez Small

Arthur Jabez Small was born on October 10, 1878, at Marrickville to Emma Augusta (nee Newsham) and Jabez William Small. He was barely a teenager when his father passed away:

On the 9th instant, at the Congregational Church, Petersham, by the Rev. Thomas Roseby, B.A., J. W. SMALL, youngest son of the late William Small, M.D., M.R.C.S.E., Boston, Lincolnshire, to EMMA AUGUSTA, second daughter of Captain JOHN NEWSHAM, N. S. W. Rifles, Bayswater, Marrickville.  Family Notices. (1870, November 12). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13218849

SMALL. October 10, at her residence, Mordiallic, Sydenham-road, Marrickville, the wife of Jabez W. Small, of a son. Family Notices. (1878, October 26). Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 40. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70595988

SMALL—December 20, 1891, at his residence, Balwyn, Victoria, Jabez William Small, aged 51 years. Family Notices. (1892, January 25). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13845008

SMALL -On the 20th inst, at his residence, Balwyn, Victoria, Jabez William Small, formerly of Manly, NSW, aged 51 years, youngest son of the late William Small, of Boston, Lincolnshire, England, surgeon. Family Notices - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 21 December 1891, page 1

Jabez William Small was born in 1840 in Boston, Lincolnshire, UK. In 1850 he arrived in Melbourne aboard ship Anna Maria with his family. Residence 1863 Chapel Street, Prahran, Melbourne, Vic. and subsequently went into business with brother Thomas Stephen as photographic equipment importers. "Photographer and photographic dealer Jabez William Small exhibited English and foreign, coloured and plain photographs, and ran photographic studios in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Adelaide between 1870 and 1900. Jabez William Small was the brother of Thomas Stephen Small, who was also for a time a photographic dealer with George Wills Priston (who had married their sister Elizabeth). By 1866 'Small’ was in Melbourne, in a photographic partnership with George Priston at 73 Little Collins Street. They exhibited English and foreign, coloured and plain photographs at the 1866 Melbourne Intercolonial Exhibition. By 1871 Priston and Small had separate Melbourne studios (Small’s was in the Royal Arcade) but the partnership apparently continued until the 1890s. They also opened branches in Sydney (1870-1900), Brisbane (1893-94) and Adelaide (1894-97). Jabez W. Small was often referred to as Smale or Smail and he also seems to be the 'John Small’ listed as a photographer of Chapel Street, Prahran, in the Melbourne Directory for 1863. " - retrieved from Design and Art Australia Online
     
Man, almost whole-length, to left, beard and moustache, seated with knees crossed, left arm resting on arm of chair by Small, Thomas S., 1872-1876, photographer. State Library of Victoria has a few of these old images, mostly undated, but flourish dates for photographer in Melbourne, circa 1872-1876, image H2005.34/2420 dated 1871.

Shelagh Champion OAM and George Champion OAM refer to Jabez William Small in their Manly Biographies records, stating that Jabez William Small purchased 20 acres of land at Manly for ₤140 on 27 February 1874.

Although children born at this time are registered in St. George, in February 1882 J W Small stood for Manly Council and was successful. One daughter, Stella Elizabeth was born at Manly:
MUNICIPALITY OF MANLY. ANNUAL ELECTION OF ALDERMEN. Voting of Ratepayers pursuant to Licensing Act 1882.
NOTICE is hereby given that FRIDAY NEXT, the 10th instant, has been appointed for holding a POLL for the ELECTION of TWO ALDERMEN in the place of Messrs. Austin and Duff, who retire by effluxion of time; and also FOR TAKING THE VOTE   OF THE RATEPAYERS in conformity with the LOCAL OPTION CLAUSE (No. 34) of the Licensing Act of 1882.
The following gentlemen have been nominated for the offices of Aldermen :—
CHARLES RUDLAND AUSTIN, Agent, Holmesdale, Pittwater-road, Freeholder.
JABEZ WILLIAM SMALL, Importer Photographic Goods, East Esplanade, Freeholder.
WILLIAM JOHNSON, House and Land Agent, Raglan-street.
POLLING PLACES :
MANLY — ODDFELLOWS' HALL, Raglan-street.
SYDNEY — CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, EXCHANGE, Bridge-street, 
The Poll will open at 8 a.m., and close at 3 p.m.
J. B. SMITHERS, Deputy Returning Officer. Municipal Council-chambers, Tuesday, February 7, 1882. Advertising. (1882, February 8). The Sydney Morning Herald(NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13504685

SMALL.—May 7, at her residence, East Esplanade, Manly Beach, the wife of Jabez W. Small of a daughter.  Family Notices. (1882, May 27). Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 41. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70969484

The Champions also offer an insight into J W Small's father's influence and credo:
Alderman Jabez William Small was elected to Manly Council in February 1882. He was an importer of photographic goods and lived on East Esplanade. A fervent believer in the establishment of a volunteer rifle corps at Manly Beach, he drew up a list on 9 July 1883 headed “Manly Beach Volunteer Rifle Corps” which stated, “We, the undersigned Residents of Manly, hereby express our willingness to join a Volunteer Rifle Company at Manly, and to conform to such rules and regulations as may be deemed expedient for its
management. In witness whereof we attach our signatures.” Seventy-four Manly residents signed up. - Shooting for Pleasure in Manly. By Shelagh Champion, OAM, and George Champion, OAM, May 2007. Manly Library Local Studies. 

The Volunteer Rifle Corps, Manly, never came about. In 1886 Jabez and Emma's youngest daughter was born, Ida V, with birth registration at Petersham. This child, and all of J W's five daughters and three sons were left well provided for, with a clearly large investment in land and properties:

WILLS AND ESTATES. Probate has been sealed of the will of Jabez William Small, late of Balwyn, formerly of Manly, N.S.W. , importer. The testator died  at Balwyn on the 20th December, 1891, and probate of the will, dated November 13,1891,was granted in New South Wales in March,1892, the gross value of the property in that colony being £11,734. The real estate in this colony is valued at £5,102,and the personalty at £29, or a total of £5,131. The testator leaves the whole of his property to his wife, Emma Augusta Small, of Balwyn. WILLS AND ESTATES. (1893, October 13). The Argus(Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8701002

FOR interest, instruction and amusement combined, the Exhibition trustees are to be congratulated on arranging such a comprehensive representation of the art of photography as practised in Melbourne. The exhibition is not intended to show the gradual development of photography, which anyone can see for himself by comparing the collection of photographs accumulated during the last twenty years, but rather to emphasize the present state of perfection to which photographers have brought their art. In the first section devoted to appliances and materials used in photography, four firms set before the spectators the secrets of the treasure-house. Messrs. Baker and Rouse, Messrs. J. W. Small and Company, Messrs. W. Watson and Sons and Mr. C.B. Howslip. But it is only the cognoscenti-in photography-that this section attracts. A Photographic Exhibition. (1895, February 1). Table Talk(Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article145921174
Right: J. W. SMALL AND CO. (1911, December 14). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 12. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115279115

There was also a John William (J.W.) Small, who was Arthur's elder brother (born 1873). In 1902 Arthur Jabez Small married Jessie Sparks - marriage registered at St Leonards.

SMALL--SPARKS - April 1), at Wimmera Alfred-street, North Sydney, by the Rev. Rodger M'Kinnon, Arthur, second son of Mrs. And late J. W Small, of Manly, N.S.W. and Balwyn, Victoria, to Jessie, eldest daughter of Henry Sparks, Wyrallah, Mount-street, North Sydney. Family Notices. (1902, April 26). The Sydney Morning Herald(NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14465300
 In 1912 Thomas Stephen, Jabez's brother, died. His photograph taking had ceased around 1876, perhaps why the company, still going strong in 1912, was called 'J W Small' can be seen his Family Notice:
SMALL. —On the 1st August, 1912, at Harlaxton, San Remo, Victoria, Lieut. Colonel Thomas Stephen Small, widower of the late Zilpha Burchett Small, eldest son of the late William  Small, surgeon, and the late Elizabeth Jerrems Small, of Boston, Lincolnshire, England, in his 77th year. Landed in Victoria 12th December, 1850, ship Anna Maria. Family Notices. (1912, August 2). The Argus(Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10500560

The Knightley Estate was first advertised in October 1912 - the lithograph shows one block is reserved from sale:

PITT WATER. PITTWATER.

The First Portion of KNIGHTLEY ESTATE, Subdivided into 43 GOOD ALLOTMENTS, with frontages to MAIN ROAD TO BARRANJOEY and CENTRAL-ROAD (to Clareville Wharf), will be Sold on the Ground, at 3 p.m. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9.

Some of these Choice Sites overlook a Surfing Beach. The frontages are 66 feet, with depths up to 200 feet back to lane.

TERMS: 10 per cent, deposit, balance in 32 quarterly payments, at 5 per cent, per annum.

TORRENS TITLE. LITHOS OBTAINABLE AT THE ROOMS.

MOTOR CARS from Auction Rooms; 98 Pitt-street, at noon on DAY OF SALE. Return Ticket only 4/.

And from TRAM TERMINUS, NARRABEEN, at 3.45 and 2.30 p.m. on Day of Sale. Return Ticket, 2/ each.

Messrs. PALMER and McGRECOR are Solicitors of the Owner. Advertising (1912, October 12). The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 - 1930), p. 21. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article239162731


KNIGHTLEY ESTATE Advertising (1912, November 4). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 8. Retrieved from  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117687749


Avalon subdivision plans, Item no. c027560005, courtesy State Library of N.S.W.

On the 9th of January 1913 the 100 acres bought by Mr. Crowley and Mr. Taylor also changed hands, although the Stamp Duty wasn't paid until a little later.

Geoff Searl OAM, President of the Avalon Beach Historical Society, confirms who bought the above Frederick Horning estate from Mr. Crowley and Mr. Taylor- Arthur Jabez Small. 

The gentleman so many associate with Avalon Beach, Arthur Jabez Small, whose father had served as a Councillor at Manly, spent at least a few years when quite young at Manly, and stayed in the valley of Avalon in late 1912 when he brought his young family here for holidays. They stayed at the Scarr home on the road to Paradise Beach - near where it slopes down from Riverview road (Scarrs were also Manly Councillors, father and son). This home was recorded as being the retirement home of Herbert Scarr in 1933.

What is so important about Mr. Small is he didn't seek to sell every single block of land and raze the trees. His was a bigger picture. As part of that bigger vision he ensured parcels of land were set aside as reserves and parks as part of any land sale and thus ensured we have today Palmgrove park, Angophora Reserve, the Avalon Golf Club green area, and even that incline of green overlooking Clareville. In all 10 reserves were set aside so koalas may still have their home among the gum trees too.

Geoff provides:

n 1921 the first subdivisions of land at 'Avalon Beach' took place. These were presented as a 'weekend spot' rather than to be a suburban choice initially. Geoff Searl OAM again provides the document that explains Mr. Small and Alfred Ickerson, Vendors, decided to employ the services of the brother of the gentleman who once owned the land:


Cronulla was, Palm Beach is, and Avalon Beach will be. This is the catch slogan which has been adopted by the vendor of the Palmgrove Estate at Avalon, which is to be sold by Messrs. H. W. Horning and Co., on Boxing Day. Judging by the beautiful panoramic views which appear in an attractive booklet, and which also occupy a conspicuous position in Messrs. Horning and Co.'s windows, Martin-place, the scenery surrounding the estate must be exceptionally beautiful. Avalon is the new seaside resort between Newport and Palm Beach. The Palmgrove Estate is on the main Barrenjoey-road, and is right at the beach. 

The owner has evidently had the public good in mind, as the estate has been well planted with Ornamental shade trees, while a section of it known as the Palm Grove, has been presented as a park. This is a remarkable beauty spot, with a wealth of graceful palms, maidenhair, burrawang, and other ferns. The estate is in every respect a most attractive proposition to those looking for week-end and holiday sites. REAL ESTATE NEWS (1921, December 11). Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123241058

Whatley Watson, Ltd., will hold the first seaside subdivision sale of the season on Monday at Avalon Beach, when they will submit about 60 allotments of the Park Estate.
All these allotments are handy to the surf, and command magnificent views of the new golf links and ocean. Judging by the demand for lithographs a large attendance is anticipated. REAL ESTATE. (1924, October 4). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 20. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16169775

AVALON BEACH. Whatley Watson, Ltd., will sell by public auction on the grounds, Park Estate, Avalon Beach tomorrow. Avalon Beach is 14 miles north of Manly, between Newport and Palm Beach. It is reached by tram from Manly to Narrabeen, thence by motor bus, which runs to a regular timetable to Palm Beach. It can easily be reached by car from Sydney in about an hour and a quarter, and in much less time from the Northern Suburbs, and now the Roseville and Spit bridges are almost completed the journey will soon be considerably shortened. There is also a steamer service from Clareville wharf (handy to the estate)to the Hawkesbury Riverrailway station, which is a very pleasant journey, passing en route through glorious scenery all the time, tennis courts are now available, and excellent golf links are nearly completed. These links have been laid out by one of Sydney's leading professionals, and comprise golfing country equal to, if not better than, any links in the metropolitan area. A club house is shortly to be erected. It is expected that these links will form an immense boon and attraction to golfers, owing to the badly congested state of all seaside links at the present time. FINANCE-COMMENCE-REAL ESTATE. (1924, October 5).Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128144077








Park Estate, Avalon Beach 1924 - front page and back pages 1924 Items No.: c027560033h and c027560034h, Subdivision Plans courtesy State Library of NSW - and sections from to show details


Avalon Subdivisions - The Avalon Estate, Avalon Beach, Item No c027560010h courtesy State Library of NSW


Avalon subdivision plans 'Avalon Beach Central Estate' - Avalon Pde, Barrenjoey Rd, Item No.: c027560002, courtesy State Library of NSW and section from showing A H Grace land on lithograph:

There is a lot more to share as insights and tributes to what was a life filled with service and activity. A few threads of Mr Arthur Jabez Small show this wide range of interests and:

AVALON BEACH. Whatley Watson, Ltd., will sell by public auction on the grounds, Park Estate, Avalon Beach tomorrow. Avalon Beach is 14 miles north of Manly, between Newport and Palm Beach. It is reached by tram from Manly to Narrabeen, thence by motor bus, which runs to a regular timetable to Palm Beach. It can easily be reached by car from Sydney in about an hour and a quarter, and in much less time from the Northern Suburbs, and now the Roseville and Spit bridges are almost completed the journey will soon be considerably shortened. There is also a steamer service from Clareville wharf (handy to the estate)to the Hawkesbury River railway station, which is a very pleasant journey, passing en route through glorious scenery all the time, tennis courts are now available, and excellent golf links are nearly completed. These links have been laid out by one of Sydney's leading professionals, and comprise golfing country equal to, if not better than, any links in the metropolitan area. A club house is shortly to be erected. It is expected that these links will form an immense boon and attraction to golfers, owing to the badly congested state of all seaside links at the present time. FINANCE-COMMENCE-REAL ESTATE. (1924, October 5).Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article128144077

COMPANY NEWS. The following companies have been registered, shares being of the value of £1 each: 'Avalon Beach Estates, Limited,' capital £25,000, to purchase, take on lease or in exchange, or otherwise acquire any lands and buildings, but in particular to acquire a certain parcel of land, containing about 180 acres, situated at Avalon, N.S.W. First directors, G. M. Whitmore, R. N. Randell, and A. R. Macgregor. COMPANY NEWS. (1927, November 4). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16416226

DISTRICT COURT. (Before Judge White.)MORATORIUM ACT.

Australian Securities v Avalon Beach and others. Reserved judgment was given on the application, under the Moratorium Act, 1930,  by Australian Securities, Limited, of Wynyard-street, Sydney, for leave to take foreclosure proceedings in respect of certain mortgage securities to it from Avalon Beach Estates, Limited, of Castlereagh-street, Sydney, over the interests of the latter in certain land bought by it from Arthur Jabez Small, and over purchase moneys under sub-sales by Avalon Beach Estates, Limited, of the same land to various sub-purchasers. It was submitted that Avalon Beach Estates, Limited, still owed certain of the purchase moneys payable to Small, and had also given a mortgage security to Motor Discounts. Limited, of Castlereagh-street, Sydney, over certain of the contracts of sub-sale. Evidence was given that Willmore and Randell, Limited—the company was not made a party to the application—had been appointed by Avalon Bench Estates, Limited, selling agents for the allotments in the sub-division, and that these two companies were now in voluntary liquidation.  George Malcolm Willmore and Reginald N.  Randell, company directors, who were covenantors for payment of the mortgage moneys secured to Australian Securities, Limited, were made respondents to the application.

For the applicant company it was urged that the evidence given should satisfy the Court that as to certain alleged breaches by Avalon  Beach Estates, Limited, regarding securities, its conduct in allowing Willmore and Randell, Limited, to receive from it certain of the purchase moneys under the sub-sales was such as to render Avalon Beach Estates, Limited, undeserving of the benefit or protection of the Moratorium Act, within the meaning of sub-section 4 of section 4, and that, there-fore, the application should be granted.

It was contended on behalf of Avalon Beach Estates, Limited, that the question of conduct under section 4, sub-section 4, could only be taken into account in the case where the mortgagor was unable either to redeem the property in full or to repay any part of the principal moneys. It was further contended that the proviso in sub-section 3 of section4—which prohibited the Court from granting leave to commence proceedings for fore-closure unless the Court was satisfied that, having regard to all the relevant circum-stances, including the ability of the mortgagor to redeem the property out of his own moneys, it would be unjust and inequitable not to grant the application—only applied in a case where the evidence established that the mortgagor was financially able to pay the whole of the mortgage moneys due. Evidence had been given, however, that some of the moneys were still held by the liquidator of Avalon Beach Estates, Limited.

His Honor, remarking that he was not satisfied that he should give leave to take the course proposed, dismissed the application.

Mr. H. V. Jaques (instructed by Messrs. Stephen, Jaques, and Stephen) appeared for the applicant company; Mr. E. F. McDonald(instructed by Messrs. W. S. Gray and Perkins) for Avalon Beach Estates, Limited; Mr.J. M. Sanders (instructed by Mr. R. S. B.Sillar) for Motor Discounts, Limited; and Mr. E. R. Mann for G. M. Willmore and R.N. Randell. DISTRICT COURT. (1931, June 6). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article16783860


POPULAR AVALON. The popular rock baths at Avalon, skirting the (3) Three (3) Beaches Estate. (See advertisement on this page.). No title. (1929, June 30). Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article131640629

MR. C. D. PATERSON. Following a service at St Andrews Presbyterian Church Manly the funeral of Mr CD Paterson late president of the Surf Life Saving Association took place yesterday A striking tribute was paid by members of surf clubs a large number of them marching before the hearse to the Manly Cemetery Th eRev A M Stevenson conducted the services at the church and the graveside. The principal mourners were Mrs Paterson(widow) Mr D Paterson (son) Miss C Paterson (daughter) Messrs G W J Donald and David Paterson (brothers) and Messrs Donald Colin Jack and David Paterson (nephews). Among others present were -Sir Kelso King and Mrs W H Walker (Royal Life Saving Society)Messrs R Murdoch o W Mason J Qarllck CH Hay and J S Cormatk (Premiers Department) N S H Cotts E M V Shemwell (Sydney Harbour Trust) R S Mavnnrd (Advertising Association)S McKellar White APR Simpson B N MissenB W Ford (Town PlannhiR Association), A J Small (Parks and Playgrounds Movement) G P V Cole (Commonwealth Bank; H S Tebbutt ( Sydney Mail) I J C Cocks (Government Tourist Bureau) ...many others ... Among those representing the Surf Life Saving Association Included - Among the surf life saving clubs represented were -North Steyne Messrs A W Whitehead(president) W Allison D Soutar (captain) ... Deewhy W Crisp North Curl Curl H Young North Bondi Col A Hyman Avalon, H Ruskin Rowe A J Small ...AN APPRECIATION (By LIEUT COL A W HYMAN ) The passing of Charles Davidson Paterson is a great blow to many members of the com-munity To be president for 21 years of the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia of which he was one of the founders is in itself an outstanding record of public service. During the 25 years of the associations existence Its members have saved more than 25 000 lives In the surf on the Australian beaches It was Mr Patersons strong character which was largely responsible for the administration of an organisation which has such a stirring and wonderful record It is no exaggeration to say his name in regard to the work has become a household word throughout Australia Mr Paterson s direct and straight dealing made immediate and lasting impressions on all he met He was untiring services in the cause of humanity will long be remembered and the gap which has now been created by his sudden and unexpected death will be difficult to fill. Vigilance and Service Is the motto of the Surf Life Saving Association and it is a fitting In Memoriam to the character of Charles Davidson Paterson  MR. C. D. PATERSON. (1933, December 5). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 10. Retrieved, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17029703

Six unidentified men and women playing golf, Avalon, New South Wales, 1930. Image No.: nla.pic-an24768627, courtesy NLA.

N.R.M.A. GOLF DAY At the invitation of Mr. A. J. Small golfing members of the N.R.M.A. will have a day out at Avalon Links on Saturday, August 22. Tickets entitling members to a free round may be obtained from the association's touring department. The Avalon course, which is situated just inland from the beach, is considered to be 'one of the most picturesque nine. hole courses in the State. Early application for tickers is advised, as the number is limited. N.R.M.A. GOLF DAY. (1936, August 13). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950), p. 16. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article104690232

FINE FOR REMOVAL OF TURF. At the Manly Summons Court yesterday, Thomas William Allston was fined £5 for having damaged maliciously the  property of Arthur Jabez Small at Careel Ocean Beach Estate, Avalon to the extent of £7. Evidence was given that about 900 square feet of turf had been cut from the complainants land. Alliston was also ordered to pay £6/(1 S costs and £7 compensation for damage done.  FINE FOR REMOVAL OF TURF. (1939, September 15). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17627571

ANCIENT RED GUM.
Centre of New Reserve.
BUSH NEAR AVALON.

'Set aside by' the Wild Life Preservation Society of Australia, primarily for the preservation of a giant example of the Sydney red-gum (Angophora lanceolata), the Angophora Reserve, at Avalon, was officially opened on Saturday afternoon by Sir Philip Street. 

The president of the society (Mr. W. G. Kett) said the reserve was a memorial to the line work in the cause of science done by their secretary, Mr. D. G. Stead.

Sir Philip Street said that the society, in preserving this great tree as a natural monument and setting apart the area with its interesting fauna and flora, was rendering a public service. 

The magnificent angophora, on which many axemen must have cast covetous eyes, was, he had been told, about 1,000 years old.

Mr. Kett said that, in the reserve, which contained about six and a half acres, there were many varieties of Australian trees and shrubs, and it was also the rendezvous of some of the most beautiful Australian birds. 

Other speakers were the president of Warringah Shire, Councillor Green, Messrs. R. T. Baker, and D. G. Stead.

The reserve is a fine example of Australian bush land, rising from a small valley to the top of a hill overlooking the coast and Broken Bay. About 150 persons attended Saturday's function. 

After the function, the visitors were entertained at afternoon tea by the society at the Avalon Golf House. 

ANCIENT RED GUM. (1938, March 21).The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), , p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17450337 

Beautiful, isn't it? 
A magnificent redgum, probably 1000 years old, has been "dedicated" in the six-acre Angophora Reserve at Avalon. We wonder who will sit in the shade of this big tree after another 1000 years? What color will he be, and in what language will they whisper? One thing, will, endure.  The tree is close to the Avalon Golf Links; and whether Redgum lives to be 2000 or 3000 years old; the world will still talk golf. A WINDOW ON THE WORLD (1938, March 22). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 4 (LATE FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229877986


THE "ANGOPHORA" RESERVE
Preserving Australia's Fauna

The Angophora Reserve, which is the Wild Life Preservation Society's new Bushland Sanctuary at Avalon, N.S.W., was officially opened and dedicated by the Hon. Sir Phillip Street, K.C.M.G., on Saturday last, March 19th. This reserve had been set aside primarily for the preservation of a giant 'example of the Sydney Red Gum (Angophora lanceolata) as a national monument. Owing to the junction of two great geological forms (Hawkesbury sandstone and Narrabeen shales) at this spot, the trees and shrubs present many features of interest to the botanist, field naturalist and bush lover. 
THE “ANGOPHORA” RESERVE (1938, March 23). Construction and Real Estate Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1930 - 1938), p. 7. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222925110 


This photo shows the official opening of the Angophora Reserve on 19 March 1938 by Sir Phillip Street (KCMG). Much of the groundwork to enable the purchase of the land by the Wildlife Preservation Society in January 1937 was done by Thistle Harris. The reserve cost the Society 364 pounds 19 shillings and 7 pence (which converts to around 730 dollars!). The volunteer bush care group meet on the 3rd Sunday of each month usually at the Palmgrove Road entrance. – Geoff Searl, President of the Avalon Beach Historical Society - photo courtesy ABHS


The Birds Laughed!
A PARTY of our C.P. girls accompanied Cinderella to Avalon on March 19 to attend the official opening of the Angophora Reserve, a forest sanctuary purchased by the Wild Life Preservation Society and dedicated to the conservation of Sydney's largest redgum (Angophora Ianceolata), a giant possibly 1000 years old, but still in his prime. As the different speakers addressed the guests scattered over the grass, on the importance of preserving our beautiful bush and teaching the young generation to reverence such splendid national treasures as our forests contain, loud applause came from an unexpected quarter. A group of kookaburras had accepted the invitation for all forest-lovers to celebrate the day, and shouted their glee from the branches overhead. It was the mast eloquent of all the tributes paid that day to the value of tree-conservation. Who says that birds can't understand?
The Birds Laughed! (1938, March 30). Sydney Mail (NSW : 1912 - 1938), p. 63. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166229598 


Searle, E. W. Red gum, angophora lanceolata, Avalon, New South Wales, circa. 1935 Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-142184682 

THE OPENING CEREMONY, ANGOPHORA PARK, AVALON, 19th MARCH, 1938

The ceremony took place beneath the giant Angophora (Red Gum) which is estimated to be 1,000 years old. In this native bushland, only one hour's run from the city, flora and fauna will find sanctuary for all time, thanks to the enterprise of Mr. David G. Stead, the Wild Life Preservation Society and Mr. A. J. Small who released the land at a tithe of its value.
THE OPENING CEREMONY, ANGOPHORA PARK, AVALON, 19th MARCH, 1938 (1938, April 6). Construction and Real Estate Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1930 - 1938), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222925313 

AVALON
Another Contribution By A. J. Small

When the history of Avalon is written, one man's name in particular will be outstanding. It is that of Mr. A. J. Small. Not only has he given headlands and parklands to the people to preserve for them vantage points from which ocean views can be seen for all time, but he is still giving. His last act of graciousness was when he gave an area of seven acres of land at half value in order that the Wild Life Preservation Society could acquire its Angophora Park. Mr. Small also erected the fence and iron gates, made the approach, built the steps, and cleared the paths so that the giant Angophora (sometimes called Red Gum) which is said to be 1,000 years old and of immense girth, may be viewed in its natural surroundings. At the time of the opening (by Sir Phillip Street on March 19th) there was an improvised orchestra of birds — butcher birds, soldier birds, warblers, and jackasses, in fact a representative from practically all the feathered families — which came down to look curiously on the people who attended the opening and to contribute, to the scene. Afterwards, 100 invited guests accepted Mr. Small's hospitality to afternoon tea at the New Golf House at Avalon. The fine golf course there has not a club. All visitors can play there on an equal footing, and in this respect it occupies a unique position among the metropolitan golf courses. The new building, illustrated herewith, is of white sandstone with buttressed corners. The internal walls are of brick. In the lower storey are locker and retiring rooms for golfers with hot and cold showers for both sexes. The upper walls are shingled and the roof is covered with semi' glazed brown tiles. It is mainly occupied by a large combined lounge and dining room about 60 feet in length. The flooring is of tallowwood designed for dancing. For log fires in winter, an open fireplace, framed in 9in. x 2in. briquettes, has been provided, with a hearth of 9 feet wide. Manchurian Ash of exceptional figure lines the lounge artistically furnished in autumn tints. The architect for the golf building was E. Lindsay Thompson, and F. C. Fripp, the builder. AVALON (1938, April 6). Construction and Real Estate Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1930 - 1938), , p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222925312 


Holiday group on front of house named Avalon - photo by Rex Hazlewood, Image Courtesy The Mitchell Library, State Library of NSW, No.: c046220007h - Mr. Small andhis family outside 'Avalon' - The Avalon Golf Club manager’s residence was first occupied by Mr. Pollard, who worked for Mr. Small as a labourer. He helped build Mr. Small’s house, ‘Avalon’, in Bellevue Avenue in 1920 and helped build the golf course.


Mr. Harry Pollard, 73, a former well known resident of the Bellinger, who died at Campsie recently, was a link with the past. His grandfather arrived in Australia in the year 1800, and his marriage, in 1827, was the first conducted in St. Anne's Church, Ryde. Deceased 's mother was a daughter of Major Duffy of the Third Irish Fusiliers,  in charge of convicts under the command of Governor Bourke. For services rendered he received a grant of land at Thornleigh, on the Bellinger, where deceased was born. On the Bellinger deceased was engaged on roadwork, and then in the timber industry, and after moving to Sydney was employed for 15 years by Mr. A. J. Small on the subdivision of various estates, including Avalon Beach. Mrs. Pollard, who survives her husband, was born on the Manning; River 74 years ago.  She was  a daughter of the late Mr. Hector McKenzie, one of the earliest settlers, on the Bellinger., When the family were on the way up the coast on the old ship Eliza the ship went aground on the Bellinger bar. OBITUARY. (1938, June 10). The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126113171

Panorama of beachgoers at Avalon Beach', New South Wales, ca. 1925 (1920; no mid-beach dressing sheds in picture as per 1921/22 photos from sales plans/advertisements) -  section enlarged to show North Avalon 'Careel Ocean Beach Estate 's first holiday shacks and homes. Image No.: nla.pic-vn6217968 by EB Studios, part of the Enemark collection of panoramic photographs, courtesy National Library of Australia.


Photo courtesy Geoff Searl OAM, Avalon Beach Historical Society.

ON PITTWATER

TUESDAY'S PICNIC SALE

Scenic charm which is a rare blend of sea and bush, an Insurance of beauty by a generous reservation and park, and a situation which makes it a normal week-end resort ono of the attractive points of the Pearl of Pittwater Estate, which Messrs. A. Richard and Co., will sell on the land next Tuesday. The wide magnificence of Pittwater fronts the estate, while a belt of beautiful trees thrusts down to the edge of the wide sandy beach. This long strip of timbered land has been reserved permanently for recreation, and another, a park of 30 acres, straddles the ridge at the rear of the estate. Situated Just past Taylor's Point, and about two miles north of Newport, the estate Is easily reached by road. Motorists, to whom it is more accessible, should turn left at the cross roads at Avalon, and keep to the left. The whole Barronjoey peninsular Is one big holiday resort. And the Pearl of Pittwater Estate has many attractions. to offer. Fishing, swimming, sailing, boating, all the aquatic sports are at the door. Across the peninsular are the surf beaches. By arrangements . with Messrs.. Rickard, a de luxe 'bus service will carry picnickers from Manly wharf to the estate and back at a reduced fare. It Is' to be a picnic sale, as befits a holiday. ' Motorists arc expected to join in at any time of the day for lots will be sold privately, not by auction. ON PITTWATER (1926, January 22). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 12 (FINAL EXTRA). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224062005

MAIN ROADS ACT, 1924-29.
PROCLAMATION,
I (L.S.) PHILIP GAME, Governor.

Sir Philip Woolcott Game, Governor of the State 9 of New South Wales, with the advice of the Executive Council, and in pursuance of the provisions of section 8 of the Main Roads Act, 1924-29, do hereby repeal the proclamation of the Main Roads numbered in Schedule "A" attached hereto, and proclaim these roads as Main Roads in accordance with the numbers and descriptions set out in Schedule "B" attached hereto.

Signed and sealed at Sydney, this twenty-third day of June, 1931.

By His Excellency's Command,

W. J. McKELL. GOD SAVE THE KING!

Schedule "A."

No. of Road and Gazette No. and date.

11, 33, 64, 101, 104, 107, 110, 112, 113, 116, 118, 119, 144, 145, 147, 153, 161. 191, 192, 198, 225—110 of 37th August, 1928.

297—168 of 28th December, 1928.

188, 304—25 of 22nd February, 1929. 289—50 of 12th April, 1929. 306—91 of 12th July, 1929.

12—121 of 13th September, 1929. 302—142 of 1st November, 1929.

223—15 of 14th February, 1930. * 164-117 of 22nd August, 1930.

166—160 of 24th October 1930.

142, 325—26 of 27th February, 1931. 65—65 of 29th May, 1931.

No. 164. From the intersection of the Pacific Highway (Main Road No. 10), Lane Cove road and Mount street, North Sydney, via Miller-street (with branch from Pacific Highway, via Falcon-street to Miller street), and Falcon-street, Merlin-street, Military road (with branch from Merlin-street easterly and northerly via Falcon-street, and Laycock-street to Military-road), Spit-road, Upper Spit road, Spit Bridge, Sydney-road, Condainine-street, Pittwater road, Barrenjoey-road and Avalon-parade to the intersection of Avalon-parade and Old Barrenjoey road.  MAIN ROADS ACT, 1924-29. (1931, July 10). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2370. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220365531

MAIN ROADS ACT, 1924-1931.
PROCLAMATION. (L.S.)

PHILIP GAME, Governor.
I, Sir Philip Woolcott Game, the Governor of the State of New South Wales, with the advice of the Executive Council, and in terms of the provisions of section 8 of the Main Roads Act, 1924-1931, and in pur suance of the Transport (Division of Functions) Act, 1932, do hereby repeal the Proclamation of Main Road No. 164 published in Government Gazette No. 88 of 10th July, 1931, and proclaim the road numbered and described in the Schedule hereto as a main road.
Signed and sealed at Sydney, this twenty-first day of February, 1933.
By His Excellency's Command,
MICHAEL F. BRUXNER. GOD SAVE THE KING!

Schedule.
No. 164
. From the intersection of Pacific Highway (State Highway No. 10) and "Mount-street, North Sydney, via Miller-street (with branch from Pacific Highway via Falcon-street to Miller-street), Falcon street, Merlin-street, Military-road (with branch from Merlin-street easterly and northerly via Falcon-street and Laycock-street to Military-road), Spit-road, Upper Spit road, Spit Bridge (with branch via Battle-boulevarde, Edgecliffe-esplanade, Palmerston-place and Ponsonby-parade, to Sydney-road), Sydney-road, Condamine-street, Pittwater-road, Barrenjoey-road and Avalon-parade, to the intersection of Avalon-parade and Old Barrenjoey road, in the Municipalities of North Sydney, Mosman, Manly, and the Shire of Warringah (M.R. 279-57).
MAIN ROADS ACT, 1924-1931. (1933, March 3). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 884. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223045529

SHIRE OF WARRINGAH.
Special Loan, £21,000—"A'' Riding.

WARRINGAH Shire Council hereby gives notice, in accordance with the provisions of Local Government Act, 1919, that:—

1. The Council proposes to raise a Special Loan of twenty-one thousand founds (£21,000) for the purpose of carrying but in Riding "A" of the Shire certain public works, the acquisition of certain lands for public recreation purposes, and the acquisition of certain lands for road purposes; and for the purpose of paying expenses incidental to the carrying out of such works and acquisitions.

2. The Council proposes to expend the loan money as follows, but reserves the right to utilise the surplus or saving on any one item in paying the excess cost of any other:—

(a) In Palm Beach-Whale Beach District: £

Public Reserve on shore of Pittwater, Palm Beach — Filling, levelling, and construction of retaining wall 1,000 

Ocean Beach Reserve, Palm Beach—Making parking area and constructing pipe-line in southern portion 250 

Governor Phillip Park — Erection of public lavatories 500

New Wharf—Construction of, at Palm Beach, Pittwater side 500 Improvements to roads, viz.—Florida-road, £1,000; Pacific-road, £405; Palm Beach road, £500; road from Barrenjoey-road to Whale Beach, £500; road from Whale Beach to Palm Beach, £500 2,905 

(b) In Avalon-Bilgola-Clareville District:

Public rock-bath at Avalon Beach—Enlargement of 250

Avalon Flat Drainage—Construction of concrete culverts 700 

Avalon Beach Reserve, Extension, etc.— Acquisition of lot 26, Pittwater Estate, with exception of small portion at south western corner 2,750 

Bilgola Beach Reserve—Construction of retaining wall 100 

Improvements to roads, viz.—Central-road, £600; George-street, £300 900 (c) In Newport District: 

Newport Ocean Beach Reserve — Levelling sand, and top-dressing, on northern portion 700 

Newport Recreation and Sports Ground— Fencing and other improvements BOO Queen's-parade drainage 300 

Improvements to roads, viz.—Ocean-avenue, £400; Foam Crest avenue, £220; Myolaroad, £270; Bungan Head road, £400; Beaconsfield-street, £200; Karloo-parade, £200; Robertson-road, £150; Bardo-road, £300; King-street* £150; Queen's-parade and Stuart-street, £250 2,540 

(d) In Mona Vale-Warriewood District:

Mona Vale Park—Culvert across park from Park-street to Newport-road 200 Drainage works, Bassett-street, at eastern end 600 

Footpath formation—Gravelling footpath on Pittwater-road, Mona Vale 100 Improvements to roads, viz. — Da rley-street, £400; Bassett-street, £220; Noble-strfeet, £100; Bungan-street, £320; Allen-street, £160; Rickard-avenue, £100; Mona-street and Waterview-street, £250; Vineyard street, £150; Seaview-street, £126 Hill crest-avenue, £200 : 1,826

(e) At Bay View—Church Point:

Bay View Park Construction of pavilion and boat-shed 750

Church Point-—Reclamation and parking area near public wharf 200

(f) In North Narrabeen District:

Lake Park Extension, and new road—Acquisition of land for enlargement of Lake Park and for new road connecting Narrabeen Park parade and Collins-street ... 1,075

Improvements to roads, viz. — Kobado and Elanora Estate roads, £750; Powderworks-road, £200; Deep Creek road, £200;- Warraba-road, £120; Gardenstreet, £200; Taiyul-road, £200; Collins avenue and Walsh-street, £250 1,920 

(g) Incidental and contingent expenses 634

Total £21,000

3. The Council proposes to carry out most of the abovementioned works under the Government's Emergency Relief Scheme. The proposed allocations to those works as set out above, are consequently allocations of loan money only and do not include the wages of the relief workers payable from grants receivable from the Government.

4. Plans and full details of the works to be carried out and of the lands to be acquired by means of the loan money may be inspected at the Council's office during the ordinary office hours.

5. The rate of interest on the loan will not exceed four per centum (4%) per annum, and the loan will be issued at par.

6. It is proposed to repay the loan over a period of twelve (12) years by 24 equal half-yearly instalments of principal and interest combined. The amount of each such instalment will be £1,110 os. 10d., or thereabouts.

7. For the purpose of repaying the loan and paying the interest on the loan the Council proposes to levy a rate of two-fifths of a penny (2/5d.) in the £ on the unimproved capital value of all ratable lands in the "A'' Biding of the Shire. (Total u.c.v., £1,326,723.) Should the proposed rate not provide sufficient for the purpose the deficiency will be paid from the General Fund of the Shire and charged to "A" Hiding's portion of that fund. (Nom—The loans of £28,200 and £3,500 raised ten years ago or thereabouts for the carrying out of public works in "A" Biding will be entirely repaid this year, and the present loan rate of 4/5d. in the £ levied in respect of them will not be levied after this year, but will be replaced by the proposed rate of 2/5d.).

8. Within one month of the date of the publication of this notice any number not less than twenty-five per centum (25%) of the ratepayers enrolled for "A" Riding may petition the Council to take a poll of the ratepayers, either as to whether the ratepayers approve of the loan or as to whether the loan rate shall be on the unimproved capital value or improved capital value, or on both questions. The number of ratepayers on the Roll of Electors for "A"' Riding is 5,421.

A. H. HUGHES, President. R. G. Jamieson, Shire Clerk. Shire Hall, Brookvale, 20th July, 1936. 358 £7 10s. SHIRE OF WARRINGAH. (1936, July 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3236. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223038435

NB: £2,750 in 1936 is equivalent in purchasing power to about £195,635.58 today, an increase of £192,885.58 over 84 years - or  $349,997.73 in Australian dollars - bargain!

Water was laid on to Avalon's valley later in 1936 and owners required to have their own pipe made available to connect - a hard task for some during the 1930's depression era when many were lviing in cars, caves and camps to get by:

Metropolitan Water, Sewerage, and Drainage Board, Sydney. 23rd October. 1936.
NOTICE TO LAY SERVICE PIPES. 

Notice to the Owners op Tenements and Premises IN—

Warringah: Avalon-parade, from Barrenjoey-road to Riverview-road 5,089 feet. P.N. 3,029f, 3,029h. Beach-parade, from Avalon-parade to Hudson-parade; Hudson-parade, from Beach-parade to end of Hudson-parade 7,377 feet. P.N. 3,029h, 3,029g. Central-road, from Avalon-parade easterly 1,443 feet. P.N. 3,029f. Riverview-road, from Avalon-parade north-westerly 293 feet; Delecta-avenue, from Hudson-parade northerly 970 feet. P.N. 3,029h.Central-road, from Barrenjoey-road westerly 1,558 feet; Kevin-avenue, from Barrenjoey-road northwesterly 483 feet; Wollstonecraft-avenue, from Barrenjoey-road north-westerly 630 feet. P.N. 3,029k. Careel-road, from Barrenjoey-road to Tasman-road 621 feet; Careel-road, from Tasman-road easterly 114 feet. P.N. 3,029r. Atunga-road, from 12-inch main easterly 400 feet; Bilgola-avenue, from Old Barrenjoey road to Allen-avenue 515 feet; Allen-avenue, from Bilgola-avenue northerly 357 feet. P.N. 3,029d. Dress Circle road, from Old Barrenjoey road to Bellevue-avenue 669 feet; Bellevue-a venue, from Dress Circle road northerly 625 feet. P.N. 3,029e. Avalon-parade, from Barrenjoey-road easterly 553 feet; New Barrenjoey road, from Avalon-parade south-easterly 1,509 feet; Bellevue-avenue, from Avalon-parade to Dress Circle road 877 feet; Dress Circle road, from Bellevue-avenue south-westerly 312 feet; Sea View avenue, from Bellevue-avenue to Palm Grove road 1,236 feet; Palm Gro<'e road, from Sea Ariew avenue south-westerly 897 feet. P.N. 3,029f. Barrenjoey-road, from Cecil-road to Beaconsfield-street 2,085 feet; Barrenjoey-road, from Queen'savenue to Palm-street 777 feet; Barrenjoey-road, from Neptune-street to the intersection of Old Barrenjoey road and New Barrenjoey road; thence along Old Barrenjoey road northerly to an easement through Village Reserve No. 18,805 and along the western boundary of lot 122; thence across New Barrenjoey Toad to Old Barrenjoey road, Bilgola, northerly along Old Barrenjoey road to the intersection of New Barrenjoey road at The Serpentine; thence along Old Barrenjoey road to Avalon-parade 6,686 feet. P.N. 3,029a. Tasman-road, from Careel-road to Cooranga-road 934 feet; Cooranga-road, from Tasman-road to Marine-parade 861 feet; Marine-parade, from Coorangaroad northerly 589 feet; Harley-road, from Cooranga-road to Marine-parade 913 feet; Marine-parade, from Harley-road to Tasman-road; Tasman-road, from Marine-parade northerly 766 feet; Marine-parade, from Harley-road easterly 601 feet. P.N. 3,029i. Careel Head road, from Barrenjoey-road to Burrowong-road 343 feet; Etival-road, from Barrenjoey-road to Careel Bay 559 feet. P.N. 3,029j.Barrenjoey-road, from Avalon-parade to access road to Whale Beach 9,361 feet (W/O 82,399). P.N. 3,029b.

And the various private streets, lanes, courts, and alleys opening thereunto.

THE main pipe in the said streets having been laid down, the owners of all tenements and premises situated at above, are hereby required to cause a proper pipe and stop-cocks to be laid, so as to supply water from the main pipe to such tenements and premises, within three weeks from the date of this publication.

(7878)

F. J. HENRY, Secretary. NOTICE TO LAY SERVICE PIPES. (1936, October 23). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4420. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223041288

AVALON GOLF LINKS

Sir,-The playing fields of Sydney are steadily being taken for Governmental and developmental purposes, and no provision is being made for their replacement.

The latest threat is to the golf course at Avalon Beach, through which Warringah Shire Council is contemplating making a road. The closing of this popular 9 hole public course would be a serious loss.

Bonnie ' Doon and North Brighton courses have been taken for Mascot Aerodrome, and The Lakes, Eastlakes, and Rydalmere links are still threatened.

There is a strong body of opinion against the proposed route, and it is hoped that, before the matter is finally decided, the value of the golf links as a recreation area will be taken into full account.

W. L. HUME,

Hon. Secretary, Parks and Playgrounds Movement of N.S.W. AVALON GOLF LINKS (1947, June 2). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18028473

LOCAL Government (Amendment) Act, 1951.—COUNTY OF CUMBERLAND PLANNING SCHEME ORDINANCE, Clause 12.—Notice is hereby given that, m accordance with the provisions of Clause 12 of the County of Cumberland Planning Scheme Ordinance, the Cumberland County Council, being of opinion—

(a) that the development which has taken place in the immediate vicinity of each of the parcels of land or parts thereof referred to in the Schedule hereto renders those parcels or parts thereof unsuitable for the purpose of parks and recreation areas (for which purpose they were reserved by the said Ordinance), and

(b) that such purpose will not be substantially prejudiced by the erection of a building on each such parcel or part thereof has approved the erection of a building on each such parcel or part thereof.

2. It is further notified that such parcels or parts thereof are not required for parks and recreation areas being the purpose for which they were reserved under the County of Cumberland Planning Scheme Ordinance and that upon publication of this notice such parcels or parts thereof shall cease to be reserved for the purpose of parks and recreation areas.

Schedule.

Lot 16, d.p. 10,000, Monash-avenue, Great Mackeral Beach— Shire of Warringah.
Lot 38, d.p. 13,449, Wirringulla-avenue, Elvina Bay—Shire of Warringah.
Lot 41, d.p. 21,259, Park-avenue, Avalon Beach—Shire of Warringah.
Lot 15, d.p. 21,8S0, 'fowler's Bay, Pittwater—Shire of Warringah.
Lot 105, d.p. 11,052, Diggers-crescent, Great Mackeral Beach —Shire of Warringah,
Lots 39 and 41, d.p. 13,449, Wirringulla-avenue, Elvina Bay —Shire of Warringah.
Lot 128, d.p. 31,052. Monash-avenue aiul Diggers-crescent. Little Mackeral Beach—Shire of Warringah.
Lots 5 and 6, d.p. 5,204, re-sub. portion 73, parish of Broken Bay, Ku-ring-gai Chase and Cowan Creek, Warringah—Shire of Warringah.
Lot 93. d.p. r»,152, Elanora-road, Narrabeen—Shire of Warringah.
Lot 326, d.p. 13.052, Diggers-crescent, Mackeral Beach— Shire of Warringah.
LOCAL Government (Amendment) Act, 1951.—COUNTY OF CUMBERLAND PLANNING SCHEME ORDINANCE, Clause (1954, August 13). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2522. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220292417

Lot 27, d.p. 22,275, Binburra-avenue, Avalon—Shire of Warringah.

Lot 29, d.p. 22,275, Bmburra-avenue, Avalon—Shire of Warringah.

Lot B (resubdivision lot 104, d.p, lj.,052), Diggers'-crescent, Mackeral Beach—Shire of Warringah.

H. E. MAIDEN, Coynty Clerk, 3601—£4 Ss. 6d. COUNTY OF CUMBERLAND PLANNING SCHEME ORDINANCE (Clause 12).—Local Government (Amendment) (1954, December 3). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3727. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220241560

Lot 52, d.p. 13,620, Barrenjoey-road, Palm Beach—Shire of Warringah.

Lot 30, d.p. 22, 275, Binburra-road, North Avalon—Shire of Warringah.

Lot B (resub. lots 1 to 3, pt. portion 1,217), Edgecliffe Boulevarde, Collaroy—Shire of Warringah.

Lot 109, d.p. 11,162, Kirkwood-street, Seaforth—Shire of Warringah.

Lots 40, 41, 42, d.p. 10,000, Monash-avenue, Mackeral Beach —Shire of Warringah.

Lot 9, d.p. 8,013, Sturdee-lane, Pittwater—Shire of Warringah.

H. E. MAIDEN, County Clerk. COUNTY OF CUMBERLAND PLANNING SCHEME ORDINANCE, Clause 12.—Local Government (Amendment) (1954, December 24). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 3963. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220242331

COUNTY OF CUMBERLAND PLANNING SCHEME ORDINANCE, Clause 12.—Local Government (Amendment)  Act) 1951.—Notice is hereby given that in accordance with the provisions of clause 12 of the County of Cumberland Planning Scheme Ordinance, the Cumberland County Council being of opinion—

(a) that the development which has taken place in the immediate vicinity of each of the parcels of land or parts thereof referred to in the Schedule hereto renders those parcels or parts thereof unsuitable for the purpose of parks and recreation areas (for which purpose they were reserved by the said Ordinance) ;

and

(b) that such purpose will not be substantially prejudiced by 'the erection of a building on each such ' parcel or part thereof has approved the erection of a building on each such parcel or part thereof. 

2. It is further notified that- such parcels or parts thereof are not required for parks and recreation areas, being the purpose for which they were reserved under the County of Cumberland Planning Scheme Ordinance and that upon publication of this notice such parcels or parts thereof shall cease to be reserved for the purpose of parks and recreation areas.

SCHEDULE.

Lot 88, d.p. 1,169 (L), Euston-road, Auburn—Municipality of Auburn.

Lot 133, d.p. 8,700, Jellicoe-street,, Bankstown—Municipality of Bankstown.

Lot 127, d.p. 8,700, Jellicoe-street, Bankstown—Municipality of Bankstown.

Lot 4, d.p.. 22,306, cnr. Fullagar-road and Lytton-street, Wentworthville—Municipality of Holroyd.

Lot 68, d.p. 10,403, Peat's Ferry road, Cowan—Shire of Hornsby.

Lot 78, d.p. 23,742, Wakehurst Parkway, North Narrabeen— Shire of Warringah.

Lot B, resub. lot D and lots 3/2, sec. 24, Goodwin-street, Narrabeen—Shire of Warringah.

Lot A, resub. part lot 26, Avalon-parade, Avalon—Shire of Warringah.

H. E. MAIDEN, County Clerk. 1882—£3 3s. COUNTY OF CUMBERLAND PLANNING SCHEME ORDINANCE, Clause 12.—Local Government (Amendment) (1956, June 22). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1759. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220304834

SHIRE OF WARRINGAH—Naming of Road.—Ordinance 30, clause 53, Local Government Act.—Notice is hereby given that the undermentioned road has been renamed in accordance with section 249 (a) of the Local Government Act Past name or location,—Section of Old Barren joey road between the Serpentine and southern junction of New Barrenjoey road. New name,—The Serpentine. J. MORGAN. Shire Clerk, Shire Hall, Brookvale, 19th December, 1957. 2095—12s. SHIRE OF WARRINGAH.—NAMING OF ROAD.—Ordinance (1957, December 27). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4289. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220360671

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919.—PROCLAMATION
(L.S.) E. W. WOODWARD, Governor. 12th March, 1958.

ORDINANCE No. 80, as proclaimed in the Government Gazette of 22nd September, 1922, and subsequently amended, is hereby further amended

(1) in clause 1 by inserting at the end thereof the following new subclause:—

(k) This Ordinance shall apply to the Golf Links at Avalon vested in the Council of the Shire of Warringah as described in Schedule K hereto.

(2) by inserting after Schedule J the following new Schedule:—

Schedule K

Land at Avalon vested in the Shire of Warringah as Golf Links Commencing at the intersection of The Crescent and Barrenjoey-road, Avalon; and bounded thence by that road generally south-easterly and south-westerly to the north-eastern corner of lot 16, d.p. 27,698; by the north-eastern boundary of lots 6 to 16 and the south-eastern boundary of lots 1 to 6 north-westerly and north-easterly; by the north-eastern boundary of lot 1, northwesterly to Old Barrenjoey road; by that road north-easterly to The Crescent; and by The Crescent -generally north-easterly to the point of commencement. (S. 58-1,233) By His Excellency's Command, J. F. McGRATH. (1085) GOD SAVE THE QUEEN! LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919.—PROCLAMATION (1958, March 28). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 816. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220278543

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919

Warringah Shire Council: Proposed Resumption of Land at Avalon

HIS Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, and in pursuance of the Local Government Act, 1919, has approved of the Warringah Shire Council's causing a notice of resumption of the land described in the Schedule hereto, together with a description of such land, to be published in the Government Gazette and in a newspaper circulating in the area in which the land is located, such land being required .by the Warringah Shire Council for the purpose of providing, controlling and managing grounds for Public Recreation. (S. 58-3,720)

J. B. RENSHAW, Minister for Local Government. Department of Local Government, Sydney, 12th June, 1959.

Schedule

All that piece of land situate in Barrenjoey-road, Avalon Beach, parish of Narrabeen, county of Cumberland, being Lot 15, D.P. 9,151, and being the whole of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, volume 3,218, folio 230, and containing an area of 1 rood 3 1/2 perches or thereabouts,—said to be in the possession of Inez Dorothy White and shown on plan with the Department of Local Government, Sydney. LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919 (1959, June 12). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 1752. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220269493

WARRINGAH SHIRE COUNCIL.—Notice is hereby given that the Council of the Shire of Warringah in accordance with section 249 (a) of the Local Government Act, 1919, as amended, has renamed that section formerly known as New Barrenjoey Road, between Newport Beach and Central Road, Avalon—Barrenjoey Road; and has renamed that section of Barrenjoey Road known locally as Old Barrenjoey Road, between Plateau Road and the Fire Station at Avalon, Old Barrenjoey Road, in accordance with details on a plan which has been exhibited at the Shire Hall, Brookvale. J. MORGAN, Shire Clerk, Shire Hall, Brookvale. 6694—$2.40 WARRINGAH SHIRE COUNCIL.—Notice is hereby given (1966, May 20). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2044. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220017694

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919 

Warringah Shire Council: Proposed Resumption of Land at Avalon

HIS Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, and in pursuance of the Local Government Act, 1919, has approved of the Warringah Shire Council's causing a notice of resumption of the land together with all mines or deposits of coal, ironstone, kerosene shale, limestone, slate, or other minerals under the said land (excepting any such mines or deposits as were reserved to the Crown in the original Grant of the said land), described in the Schedule hereto, together with a description of such land, to be published in the Government Gazette and in a newspaper circulating in the area in which the land is located, such land being required by the Warringah Shire Council for the purpose of widening a public road. (S. 67-1,317)

P. H. MORTON, Minister for Local Government. Department of Local Government, Sydney, 30th June, 1967.

Schedule

All that piece or parcel of land situate in the Shire of Warringah, Parish of Narrabeen, and County of Cumberland, being part of lot 17, Deposited Plan 13,975, and being also part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, volume 3,947, folio 243, commencing at the northwestern corner of the aforesaid lot 17 and bounded thence on the northeast by part of the northeastern boundary of the aforesaid lot 17 bearing 106 degrees 20 feet and bounded thence on the southeast by a line bearing 196 degrees 50 feet to a point on the southwestern boundary of the aforesaid lot 17 and bounded thence on the southwest by part of the southwestern boundary of the said lot 17 bearing 286 degrees 20 feet to the southwestern corner of the aforesaid lot 17 being also a point on a southeastern side of Old Barrenjoey Road and bounded thence on the northwest by part of the aforesaid southeastern side of Old Barrenjoey Road, bearing 16 degrees 50 feet to the point of commencement having an area of 3 i perches or thereabouts, said to be in the possession of Peter James Pty Limited and shown on plan with the Department of Local Government, Sydney. (6353)LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919 (1967, June 30). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2312. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219986085

Commonwealth of Australia.
Lands Acquisition Act 1955-1957.
NOTICE OF THE ACQUISITION OF LAND BY THE COMMONWEALTH.

IT is hereby notified that His Excellency the Governor-General acting with the advice of the Federal Executive Council has authorized pursuant to the provisions of the Lands Acquisition Act 1955-1957, the acquisition by compulsory process of the land hereunder described, and I hereby declare that the said land is acquired by The Commonwealth of Australia under the said Act for the following public purpose approved by the Governor-General:— Postal services at Avalon in the State of New South Wales.— (62/315)—(Ex. Min. No. 740.)

Dated this eighth day of January, One thousand nine hundred and sixty-four.

J. G. GORTON

Minister of State for the Interior.

Description of Land.

All that piece of land situate in the Shire of Warringah containing an area of 1 rood 3i perches more or less being Lot 1 of Deposited Plan 11462 Parish of Narrabeen County of Cumberland State of New South Wales and being Lot 97 on plan catalogued in the New South Wales Branch of the Department of the Interior Negative No. 12728 N.S.W.; commencing at the southernmost corner of Commonwealth Property acquired by notification in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette No. 58 dated 11th August 1949 and bounded thence on the southeast by part of a northwestern side of Old Barrenjoey Road bearing 198 degrees 29 minutes 66 feet (H inches thence on the southwest by a northeastern side of Sanders Lane bearing 286 degrees 27 minutes 35 seconds 177 feet 8 inches thence on the northwest by part of a southeastern side of Wickham Lane bearing 16 degrees 27 minutes 65 feet lli inches thence on the northeast by the southwestern boundary of the aforesaid Commonwealth Property bearing 106 degrees 27 minutes 180 feet to the point of commencement. Commonwealth of Australia. Lands Acquisition Act 1955-1957. NOTICE OF THE ACQUISITION OF LAND BY THE COMMONWEALTH. (1964, January 23). Commonwealth of Australia Gazette (National : 1901 - 1973), p. 376. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article241005768

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919
Suspension of the Provisions of the Shire of Warringah
Planning Scheme in Respect of Certain Land Within the Shire of Warringah and Notification of Interim Development Order No. 50—Shire of Warringah Made in Respect Thereof

IN pursuance of section 342y of the Local Government Act, 1919, I, the Minister for Local Government, having considered a report furnished by The State Planning Authority of New South Wales, do hereby notify that the provisions of the Warringah Planning Scheme are suspended as respects such part of the land to which such scheme applies as is described in Schedule "A" hereto and do, by this my notification, make an interim development order as set out in Schedule "B" hereto. (7/45 D 3458)

C. B. CUTLER, Deputy Premier and Minister for Local Government. Department of Local Government, Sydney, 5th October, 1973.

Schedule "A"

All that piece or parcel of land situate in the Shire of Warringah, being lot 2, Deposited Plan 213860, having frontage to Old Barrenjoey Road, Avalon, as shown by red edging on plan catalogued number 245:2069 in the office of The State Planning Authority of New South Wales.

Schedule "B"

1. This Order may be cited as "Interim Development Order No. 50—Shire of Warringah".

2. The provisions of clauses 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 contained in the set of standard or model provisions adopted by the Minister for Local Government on the recommendation of The State Planning Authority of New South Wales, and published in Government Gazette No. 88 of the 17th July, 1970, are adopted, by reference, for the purposes of this Order.

3. (1) Interim Development may be carried out only with the consent of the Council for the purposes specified in Columns in and IV shown opposite Zone No. 3 (a) in Column I, which columns are contained in the Table to clause 26 of the Warringah Planning Scheme Ordinance.

(2) For the purposes of subclause (1) the purposes specified in the said Table shall have the meanings respectively ascribed to them by clause 4 of the said Ordinance. (6266) LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919 (1973, October 5). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4349. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220150642

STATE PLANNING AUTHORITY ACT, 1963
Notification Placing Land Under Care, Control and Management of the Council of the Shire of Warringah

IN pursuance of the provisions of clause 20 (2) of the Warringah Planning Scheme Ordinance and by virtue of the provisions of the State Planning Authority Act, 1963, the New South Wales Planning and Environment Commission by this notice places the land described in the Schedule hereto under the care, control and management of Warringah Shire Council for use only as a public park, public reserve or public recreation area for passive recreational purposes: Provided that the Council of the Shire of Warringah shall not erect or permit to be erected on the said land any building or structure without the prior consent of the Commission: Also provided Council shall demolish all existing improvements on the said land at the earliest possible date thereafter.

Dated at Sydney, this 22nd day of September, 1977.

G. H. COE, Acting Chief Administrative Officer.

Schedule

All that piece or parcel of land situate at Marine Parade, Avalon, in the Shire of Warringah, Parish of Narrabeen and County of Cumberland, being lot 1 in Deposited Plan 588436, containing approximately 561 square metres, and being part of the land in Certificate of Title, volume 12380, folio 133. (File No. 76-578) (410) STATE PLANNING AUTHORITY ACT, 1963 (1977, October 21). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 4631. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220125265

ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING AND ASSESSMENT ACT 1979

Warringah Local Environmental Plan 1985

(Amendment No. 6)

I, the Minister for Planning and Environment, in pursuance of section 70 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, make the local environmental plan set out hereunder. (8511277)

BOB CARR,

Minister for Planning and Environment. Sydney, 14th September, 1987.

Citation

1. This plan may be cited as "Warringah Local Environmental Plan 1985 (Amendment No. 6)". Aims, objectives, etc.

2. This plan aims to permit the carrying out of development for the purposes of a baby health centre. Land to which plan applies;

3. This plan applies to land situated in the Shire of Warringah, being lots 15-19, D.P. 9151, and lot 201, D.P. 636526, having frontage to Old Barrenjoey Road, Avalon, and known as Dunbar Park, as shown edged heavy black on the map marked "Warringah Local Environmental Plan 1985 (Amendment No. 6)" deposited in the office of the Council of the Shire of Warringah.

Relationship to other environmental planning instruments

4. This plan amends the Warringah Local Environmental Plan 1985 in the manner set out in clause 5.

Amendment of Warringah Local Environmental Plan 1985

5. The Warringah Local Environmental Plan 1985, is amended by inserting at the end of Schedule 10 the following matter 

Lots 15-19, D.P. 9151, and lot 201, D.P. 636526, having frontage to Old Barrenjoey Road, Avalon, and known as Dunbar Park, as shown edged heavy black on the map marked "Warringah Local Environmental Plan 1985 (Amendment No. 6)"—baby health centre. ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING AND ASSESSMENT ACT 1979 (1987, September 25). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 5487. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article231371174 


Avalon Community Library and Centre, circa 1990. Photo courtesy ABHS

MOONLIGHT GOLF.
AVALON PAR EQUALLED.

'Ted' Hock was responsible for a wonderful performance at Avalon links on Sunday night. When playing in the moonlight, he equalled par for the nine holes. The four-ball match in which he took part started at 8 p.m., and finished at 10. Hock's card for the nine holes with a par of 32 read: 2, 4, 4, 5, 4, 3, 4. 3. 3. The yardage was 2080, with the seventh hole the longest at 405 yards, and the eighth (90 yards); the shortest. Another of the party, P. J. Small, despite an 8 and a 6, had a score of 41. An astonishing feature was that only one ball was lost by the fourball, but four others were found. There have been other cases of moonlight golf in Australia. Rufus Stewart played an exhibition at Koonyonga course, Adelaide, at night, without losing a ball. He was round in 77. C. Campbell, the former Leura professional, was also in the seventies in a round at night on the Leura course, while more recently the younger professionals, R. Shadforth and A. Keane, met C. Byrne and C. Gaffney, in a moonlight match at the Manly district public course. MOONLIGHT GOLF. (1937, May 26- Wednesday ). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 19. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article17371166 

Golf history made a night series - Cremin and Hock at Avalon, 17th of December 1937 
photographed by Ray Olson – courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales and Courtesy ACP Magazines Ltd.










PROFESSIONAL GOLF
Cremin Now Holds Two Titles

E. Cremin proved himself an outstanding golfer yesterday by winning the Professional Championship of N.S.W. from V. S. Richardson.

Cremin now holds the Australian and N.S.W. professional titles. Yesterday's championship final was played at Manly. The weather and condition of the course and greens were ideal for low scoring. Cremin and Richardson both are remarkably fine golfers, Richardson being considered a model stylist. Both, however, drove very wildly and visited many bunkers at the start. Richardson was six down at the ninth. This was due not so much to good golf by Cremin, who was out only in par 37, but to Richardson's own indifferent play. The first nine holes cost him 44, Which is a poor total for such a fine golfer even under the most adverse conditions. Commencing at the 15th hole, Richardson had a nice run of 4 4 3 (par 4 5 4) to Cremin's 5 5 4. At the last hole Richardson landed his bail from the tee 18 feet from the hole, while Cremin was wide about 25 feet on the right. 

Six-Foot Putt 

He chipped, and left a six-foot putt. Richardson then putted wildly and knocked Cremin's ball two feet nearer the hole, while Richardson again had to play. He holed, and Cremin had an easy putt. Cremin .was two up at the 18th. In the afternoon Cremin played far the better golf, and reached the turn in 433 3 5453 4—34, while Richardson, with good golf, was out in 36. Richardson was now three down. The ninth (560 yards) was halved in birdie fours. Each almost reached the green in two shots. Cremin was bunkered to the right of the green, from where lie exploded to four feet of the pin and holed in four. Richardson was just off the green to the left, but chipped to five feet of the pin and also holed. -At the 10th, Cremin landed two balls out of bounds and gave up the hole, which left him two up. The next two holes were halved in par fours. Cremin hooked a very long ball at the 13th into the creek, and. after picking out, pulled to the left. 

Found Bunker 

Richardson played his second into the bunker and Cremin, taking two to got out, gave up the hole. Richardson was bunkered on the right at the 217-yards 14th, and Cremin was about 20 feet from the pin, leaving an easy putt. He holed, leaving Richardson three down. Cremin was 12 feet from the pin at the 14th. Richardson's second just trickled over the far bank of the green. Cremin won the hole and match by 4 and 3. Cremin was sound in all departments of the game, while Richardson's pitching and putting were very faulty. During the week, he was playing these shots beautifully. Discussing an incident during the game, when it appeared that he threw his putter to the green, Richardson later said that It dropped accidentally. PROFESSIONAL GOLF (1937, October 24). The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), p. 12 (SPORTING SECTION). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229452880 

Sydney, 21st September, 1956.

LAND SALE.

IT is hereby notified that, in pursuance of the provisions of the Crown Lands Consolidation Act, 1913, the following lots of land will be offered for sale by public auction on the grounds on 3rd November, 1956, at 10.30 o'clock in the fore-noon.

ROGER NOTT, Minister for Lands.

AT NEWPORT BEACH.

Within the parish of Narrabeen, county of Cumberland, Warringah Shire, Metropolitan Land District fronting Old Barrenjoey Road.

Allotment 2, section 1, 1 rood 1 1/2 perches. Allotment 3, section 1, 31f perches. Allotment 4, section 1, 22 perches. Allotment 5, section 1, 22 perches. Allotment 1, section 2, 22 perches. Allotment 2, section 2, 22 perches. Allotment 3, section 2, 22 perches. Allotment 4, section 2, 22 perches. Allotment 5, section 2, 22 perches. Allotment 6, section 2, 22 perches. Allotment 7, section 2, 22 perches. Allotment 8, section 2, perches. Allotment 10, section 2, 22i perches. Allotment 11, section 2, 22\ perches.

The sale will be under the direction of the Agent for the sale of Crown lands in the Metropolitan Land District in conformity with the Crown Lands Act and existing regulations, of which those more particularly necessary to be noticed are as follows:—

1st. Any person who, being a male, is under the age of 16 years, or who, being a female, is under the age of 18 years, shall not be competent to apply for or otherwise acquire from the Crown any of the lands offered for sale.

2nd. Each Lot will be put up for sale and the highest bidder will be declared the purchaser, provided he shall immediately pay down a deposit of not less than ten per cent, on the amount of the purchase money, and ad valorem stamp duty and sign the Sale List, thereby binding himself to the observance of all the Conditions of Sale. Should the purchaser or his agent refuse to pay the required deposit and stamp duty, the lot shall be forthwith put up again to competition, when the bid of the person so refusing to pay shall not be accepted for the lot in question.

3rd. The balance of the purchase money is to be paid to the Under Secretary for Lands in Sydney, within three calendar months from day of sale; or in ten equal annual instalments of ten per cent, together with interest at the rate of four per cent, per annum on the total outstanding balance; and in the event of any annual instalment, and interest accrued on. the outstanding balance, not being paid within thirty days of the due date, the Minister may declare forfeited all moneys paid and the sale void.

4th. If the officer holding the sale, or other person acting on behalf of the Government, shall have reason to believe that any lot will not obtain its fair value, or shall otherwise have just cause to withdraw the same from the sale, he shall have full power to do so any time previously to its being actually sold.

5th. Immediately after the biddings on each lot are concluded, and before another lot is put up, the name, place of residence, and calling of the purchaser will be entered by the Agent in the Sale List, and any person declining to state the purchaser's name at once will be held to have failed to comply with Article 2, and will not .be allowed to sign the list, but the lot will be put up again. If, previous to such entry, any question or dispute arise between the seller and bidders, or amongst the bidders themselves, the lot in question shall be put up again; subsequently to such entry no dispute whatever can be admitted.

6th. If at any time before the issue of the Deed of Grant it is found that at the time of the sale the land, or any part thereof, was legally occupied under the provisions of the Mining Acts and Regulations then in force, the Minister may annul the sale, and the purchaser shall not be entitled to any compensation other than the refund of any money paid by him to the Crown in connection with such purchase.

7th. No resale or dealing of any kind will be recognised by the Department, nor will any alteration of the Sale List be allowed, and the Deeds of Grant will issue in the names of the purchasers entered as such in the Sale List at time of sale.

8th. Deeds of Grant will be completed ,and issued in each case as soon as practicable after payment in full of the purchase money, deed fee at the prescribed rate for the deed, and fixed stamp duty, and will be delivered to the Grantees by the Registrar-General. Each lot will granted to the purchaser by Deed Poll under the hand of His Excellency the Governor and the Great Seal of the State, subject to such reservations as may be deemed expedient for the public benefit.

9th. Persons having affixed their signatures to the Sale List in token of their having become purchasers (or agents for purchasers) of the lots to which their signatures are respectively so affixed, will be held to have previously obtained all necessary information, and will not be entitled to allege ignorance or any other cause for their not fulfilling all and every obligation incumbent upon them by these Articles and Conditions.

10th. Sale of the lands offered is limited to the surface and a depth of fifty feet below the surface only, and no purchaser shall be entitled to a grant in excess thereof. Mining operations may have been and may be carried on upon and in the lands below the lands offered, and. upon and in the lands adjoining the lands offered, and the lands below the same, and metals and minerals may have been and may be removed therefrom, and Her Majesty the Queen and the Government of New South Wales and any lessee or lessees under any Mining Act or Acts of the said State shall not be subject to any proceedings by way of injunction or otherwise in respect of or t>e liable for any damage whatsoever occasioned by the letting down, subsidence, or lateral movement of the lands offered or any part thereof or otherwise howsoever, by reason of the following acts and matters, that is to say, by reason of Her Majesty or the said Government or any person on behalf of Her Majesty or the said Government, or any lessee or lessees as aforesaid having worked or now or hereafter working any mines, or having carried* on or now or hereafter carrying on mining operations, or having searched for, worked, won, or removed, or now or hereafter searching for, working winning, or removing any metals or minerals under, in, or from the land lying beneath the lands offered or any part thereof, or on, in, under, or from any other lands situated laterally to the lands offered or any part thereof, or the lands lying beneath the same, and whether on or below the surface of such other lands, and by reason of the acts and matters aforesaid or in the course thereof Her Majesty the Queen reserves the liberty and authority for herself and the Government of the said State, and any person on behalf of Her Majesty or the said Government, and any lessee or lessees as aforesaid, to from time to time let down without payment of any compensation whatsoever, any part of the lands offered and/or of the surface thereof. These provisions shall in effect be emlfodied in any grant issued in respect of the lands  offered.

11th. It shall be and is a condition of sale of the lots offered that no person shall purchase or hold, except as a mortgagee, more than one of such lots; and any transfer or agreement or contract, whether before or after grant, and made within five years from the date of the auction sale, which would contravene or would have the effect of contravening this condition shall be void. For the purposes of this condition, a husband and wife not living apart under a decree for judicial separation made by a Court of competent jurisdiction shall be deemed to be one person.

12th. It shall be, and is, a condition of sale of the lots offered, that within a period of twelve months from the day of sale or such further period as the Minister may approve, the purchaser shall satisfy the Minister that he has erected, or is erecting a dwelling on the land purchased by him or that he has arranged for the borrowing of any money which he may need to borrow to enable him to erect a dwelling as aforesaid; and in the event of the non-fulfilment of foregoing provisions of this condition the Minister may annul the sale, and the purchaser shall not be entitled to any compensation other than the refund of any money paid by him to the Crown in connection with the purchase. The Deed of Grant of the land purchased will not be issued until the purchaser complies with this condition.

(Papers: Tenure 55-5,914. Plans C. 7,483 and 7,484-2,030) LAND SALE. (1956, September 21). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2754. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220390672

Sydney, 11th March, 1960.

LAND SALE

IT is hereby notified, in pursuance of the provisions of the Crown Lands Consolidation Act, 1913, that the following allotments and portions of land will be offered for sale at public auction in the Real Estate Auction Rooms, 30a Martin-place, Sydney, at 10.30 o'clock in the forenoon on Saturday, 30th April, 1960.

JOHN McMAHON, Minister for Lands.

AT NEWPORT

Within the parish of Narrabeen. county of Cumberland, Shire of Warringah. Metropolitan Land District. The allotments have frontage to Old Barrenjoey road and all have ocean views.

Allotment 1, section 1, area 1 rood 15 perches, upset price £1,650 (including easement).

Allotment 2, section 1, area 371 perches, upset price £1,600. Allotment 5, section 1, area 22 perches, upset price £1,800.

Allotment 2, section 2, area 22 perches, upset price £1,850.LAND SALE (1960, March 11). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 694. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220307341

THE Companies Act, 1936-1960 (Section 98).—OLD BARRENJOEY SHOPS PTY. LIMITED.—At an Extraordinary General Meeting of shareholders of the abovenamed Company duly convened and held at 659 Old Barrenjoey road, Avalon Beach, on Monday, the first day of August, one thousand nine hundred and sixty, at thirty minutes past five o'clock in the afternoon, the subjoined Special Resolution was duly passed:— Special Resolution: That in view of the Warringah Shire Council having approved of a plan of subdivision of the Company's premises, being the residue of lot 9, d.p. 9,151, in Old Barrenjoey road, Avalon Beach, under the cover of Shire Clerk's Certificate No. 4957 of the 4th May, 1960, the Company be wound up voluntarily and that Harold William Gow, Chartered Accountant, be and is hereby appointed Liquidator for the purposes of such winding-up.—Dated the second day of August. 1960. W. J. METCALFE, Director and Chairman of the Meeting. 8384—£1 8s. 6d. THE Companies Act, 1936-1960 (Section 98).—OLD BARRENJOEY SHOPS PTY. LIMITED.—At an Extraordinary (1960, August 5). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2457. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220314920

NOTICE OF RESUMPTION OF LAND BY WARRINGAH SHIRE COUNCIL.—Local Government Act, 1919.—Form 3a (Ordinance No. 77, Clause d).—Whereas on the tenth day of October, one thousand nine hundred and sixty-six, the Warringah Shire Council (hereinafter called "the Council") resolved, in pursuance of the Local Government Act, 1919, to resume the land described in the Schedule hereto and mines or deposits of minerals under such land as follows: 

All mines or deposits of coal, ironstone, kerosene shale, limestone, slate or other minerals under the said land (excepting any such mines or deposits as were reserved to the Crown in the original grant of the said land) for the purpose of widening a public road; and whereas the Council further resolved to make an application for the approval of the Governor to cause a notice of the resumption of such land and such mines or deposits as aforesaid together with a description of such land to be published in the Gazette and in a newspaper circulating in the area in which such land is located; and whereas on the twenty-first day of June, one thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven, upon the application of the Council, His Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, approved of a notice of the resumption of the land described in the said Schedule, and such mines or deposits as aforesaid for such purpose, together with a description of such land, to be published in the Gazette and a newspaper circulating in the area in which the land is located: Now, therefore, the Council, with the approval of His Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, as aforesaid, doth hereby give notice that the land described in the Schedule hereto and such mines or deposits as aforesaid are hereby resumed by the Council under the provisions of the Local Government Act, 1919, aforesaid, and the Council doth hereby also give notice that a plan of such land has been filed in the office of the Warringah Shire Council, at the Council Chambers, Brookvale, and with the Surveyor-General at the Department of Lands, Sydney, which plans are open for public inspection; and the Council doth hereby also give notice that upon the publication of this notice that the description in the Schedule hereto the land therein described and such mines or deposits as aforesaid for the purposes and subject to the provisions of the said Act vested in the Council for an estate in fee simple in possession freed And discharged from all trust, obligations, estates, interests, contracts, charges, rates, rights of way or easements whatsoever,

C. J. BARNETT, Administrator.

The Common Seal of the Council of the Shire of Warringah was hereunto affixed this 18th day of July. 1967, in pursuance of a resolution of the Council pasted on the 17th day of July, 1967.

J, MORGAN, Shire Clerk.

SCHEDULE

All that piece or parcel of land situate in the Shire of Warringah, Parish of Narrabeen, and County of Cumberland, being part of lot 17, Deposited Plan 13,975, and being also part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title, Volume 3,947, Folio 243, commencing at the northwestern corner of the aforesaid lot 17 and bounded thence on the northeast by part of the northeastern boundary of the aforesaid lot 17 bearing 106 degrees 20 feet and bounded thence on the southeast by a line bearing 196 degrees 50 feet to a point on the southwestern boundary of the aforesaid lot 17 and bounded thence on the southwest by part of the southwestern boundary of the said lot 17 bearing 286 degrees 20 feet to the southwestern corner of the aforesaid lot 17 being also a point on a southeastern side of Old Barrenjoey Road and bounded thence on the northwest by part of the aforesaid southeastern side of Old Barrenjoey Road, bearing 16 degrees 50 feet to the point of commencement having an area of 3± perches or thereabouts and said to be in the possession of Peter James Pty Limited. 3446—$14 NOTICE OF RESUMPTION OF LAND BY WARRINGAH SHIRE COUNCIL.—LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT, 1919.—FORM (1967, August 4). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), p. 2891. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article220027104

Pittwater Council To Purchase Avalon Beach Bowling & Recreation Club’s Green 3 - Keeping Our Community’s Future 'Fitting'

Avalon Beach Bowling & Recreation Club members with Pittwater Councillors Bob Grace, Alex McTaggart and Deputy Mayor Kylie Ferguson and Mayor Jacqueline Townsend at Avalon Beach Bowlo yesterday.

 Pittwater Council to Purchase Avalon Beach Bowling & Recreation Club’s Green 3 - Keeping our Community’s Future 'Fitting'

April 20, 2015: Avalon Beach Bowling & Recreation Club, Bowling Green Lane, Avalon - Purchase of Green 3 by Pittwater Council

On Monday 20th of April 2015 at the Council Meeting held at Mona Vale Memorial Hall, Village Park, Mona Vale, Pittwater Council voted unanimously to purchase Green 3 of Avalon Beach Bowling and Recreation Club.

Prior to Monday’s decision there were concerns the land may be bought by a private owner or developer and open to development in accordance with its current RU2 zoning. This in turn would have resulted in a significant environmental and social change for the Club and all in the community who use the open outdoor appeal of the locality for meetings, events or just a late afternoon slow down. As Green 3 is ‘land locked’, vehicle access may have been via the internal access aisles of the public car park,  involving an increase in ‘private’ traffic movements through these car parks on adjacent residential properties.

Avalon Bowling Club members credit Councilors Bob Grace and Alex McTaggart with bringing the matter forward and those attending Monday’s Council Meeting stated they were very happy all Pittwater Councillors supported the proposal. 

This way forward, and the way in which it is planned, is further proof Pittwater is more than ‘Fit for the Future’, and that Pittwater’s elected representatives keep one eye firmly on the COMMUNITY STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVE:

To create a sense of place and enhance the village experience

To improve the streetscapes and recreational qualities of the centres

To ensure that Pittwater's villages remain vibrant as social, cultural and economic hubs

The ‘Bowlo’, as it is popularly known, is a community gathering place where many a great band plays to residents on Sunday afternoons, is the venue for the ever popular ‘Creative Creatures’ Film Festival, where Avalon Beach Historical Society hold their meetings and Talks, the venue for the most recent International Surf Day Event and where Living Ocean often hold their fundraising events or Film Evenings – it’s a community club, small enough to make it feel like you’re still in Pittwater and large enough to keep those broad blue skies Pittwater is famous for above you.

Avalon Beach Bowling & Recreation Club was built in 1961 and retains much of its original charm and character. Bowls, croquet or petanque are played and as they say on their website;

“It’s a step-back in time, “hidden” from today’s hectic pace … the best-kept secret on the northern beaches! “

And invite people to “Join us in the sunniest beer garden north of the bends for a drink, a game of barefoot bowls or live music & a sausage sizzle on Sunday afternoons.  Kids are welcome and dress is casual.”

The Club had been exploring funding options to secure its financial future and fund the renewal of parts of the clubhouse premises. They approached Pittwater Council as a party potentially interested in the purchase of their Green No 3.

On the 30 March 2015, Avalon Beach Bowling & Recreation Club submitted a proposal for the consideration of Pittwater Council and this week found out the Green shall remain green.

The agreement means the Club can follow through with internal and external refurbishment of the building. The initial plan raises the funds required for this through rental fees being waived for both the Clubhouse and Green No. 2 for the remaining ten years of the lease, the purchase of Green No.3 being paid over 10 years in $50,000 annual payments and $100,000 to be allocated to Clubhouse repairs and upgrades in the 2015/2016 financial year.

Avalon Beach Bowling & Recreation Club doors are open 7 days a week from 2pm till late. Find out by visiting and at: www.avalonbowlingclub.com.au


Pittwater Council Invests In Our Community: Avalon Bowlo To Bowl On

Avalon Bowling Club Members at Saturday afternoon bowls Competition - March 19th, 2016 

 Council bowls a win for Avalon

18 March, 2016: Pittwater Council

Avalon is the beneficiary of a great win-win agreement between Pittwater Council and Avalon Beach Bowling and Recreation Club through a recent purchase of land at the Club.

General Manager Mark Ferguson said that Council had secured valuable open space for Avalon and helped secure the financial future of the Club.

“Council has purchased one of the greens at the club which will become an extension of Avalon’s Dunbar Park,” he said.

Mr Ferguson said Council had been in negotiations with the Club over the last few years looking at ways to secure the Club’s long term viability.

“We wanted to ensure that the Club could continue operating successfully into the future.

“The purchase of the land also means that the broader community will gain an asset in the centre of Avalon village by having more open space at Dunbar Park,” he said.

The recent signing of the agreement by Council’s General Manager Mark Ferguson and the Club President Maurie Altman will see the land reclassified as community land and rezoned from low density residential to public recreation.

Mr Altman said he and members of the Club were delighted with the outcome.

"This agreement means that the existence of the Club is assured into the foreseeable future and it is great to have the support of Pittwater Council to achieve this outcome,” he said.

The agreement will see the two parties enter into a new consolidated lease comprising the Clubhouse and two of the greens.

Avalon Beach Women's Bowling Club Koala Day Carnival 2019: The 45th All Womens Event

The ABBC Ladies Hosts
'Koala Day' 2019, held on Monday September 9ththis year being the 45th Koala Carnival, is an annual early Spring competition hosted by the Avalon Beach Women’s Bowling Club that brings together Ladies from all over the peninsula and further afield.

"We have 96 women playing this year," Bo Hanmer, President, Avalon Beach Women’s Bowling Club, explained on Monday. " The Koala Carnival raises funds for the Club and its a lovely day, a great get together for Women Bowlers."

The Carnival, sponsored by Ann Wilson Funerals for the past few years, has a morning session, an afternoon session, and a lovely lunch in the Club House with great raffles and prizes provided by local businesses. 

Avalon Beach Bowling Club is situated on Bowling Green Lane, just behind the RSL club. The Club was formed from the nucleus of Palm Beach Bowling Club which had ceased in 1957.

The Inaugural Meeting was held on September 11th 1957, 62 years this week. The Chairman present was H.G. Cooper, Acting Secretary N.H. Cook, with H.S. Rice as Acting Treasurer. At the Meeting Mr. Rice was appointed President, Messrs. Rawson, Cook and Froggatt Vice Presidents, C. Hornsby Hon. Secretary, L. Giles Hon. Treasurer with a Committe comprised of 7 others. The Patron was Mr. F. G. Spurway.

It was resolved to build a green on land offered by the then Warringah Shire Council in Dunbar Park. The lease for lots A & B re Sub Lot 66 D.P. 9151, Avalon Parade were granted for construction of bowling greens, Club House and parking area. Variations to this original lease were made but finalised with council in October 1958 on a 20 years lease with option for extension.

Work commenced don the No. 1 green in November 1957. Plans for the Club House were drawn by Mr. J. Wardell, with a few modifications an then built under supervision of Wardell & Whitting, the estimated cost exclusive of fittings being £6,000.

Mature readers know well of the flooding problems much of Dunbar park was prone to during this first ear of Avalon Beach Bowling Club - drainage was approached through adding sand to a clay site. Grass for the first green was obtained locally and after processing was planted - the first greenkeeper was appointed on December 5th, 1957.

The first game of bowls was played on No.1 green on April 25th, 1958 and named the "Herb Rice" Green by the District President Mr. Tom Shakespeare, who attended the opening ceremony.

On May 1st 1958 it was resolved to give permission to the Ladies to use the green on a Wednesday. The agreement, drawn up and submitted to the Committee was signed by Presidents Mr. Rice and Mrs. Wickham and Hon. Secretaries Mr. Welch and Mrs. Tallis.

Affiliation with the Women's Bowling Association was made in June 1958.

It was also in 1958 that council notified the Club that their request for the name of "Bowling Green Lane" had been granted.

On February 6th 1959 a Motion was adopted that women be admitted as Restricted Members,under certain coniditons of the rules of the R.N.S.W.B.A. This was submitted to the Women's Bowling Club and acknowledged in April 1959.

The Official opening of the Club House by Mr. Tom Shakespeare took place on Saturday March 7th, 1959.


Approval for a proposed second green was granted on January 5th, 1959 and when officially opened on June 26th, 1960, was called the "Norman Cook" Green by Mr. Tom Shakespeare.

The third green, the "Keith Davidson" Green was officially dedicated by Mr. E. Downie, President of the R.N.S.W.B.A. on Sunday July 21st, 1968. This green was freehold land owned by the Club.

Today the club hosts great events such as the annual Koala Day, is the home of the Avalon Beach Pentaque Club, and the place where you can hear superlative Jazz musicians on a Wednesday evening and the best of local rock and roll and blues bands every Sunday afternoon. The grounds are also utilised for community events, including the annual WillBes short film festival.

Ladies Bowling was the star this week though.

Umpire for Koala Day 2019

The 10th Avalon Tattoo - Saturday June 13th, 2015 - A 10/10 Community Event

 Lead Pipe Band for 2015 Avalon Tattoo- the Burwood RSL Sub-Branch Pipe Band

The 10th Avalon Tattoo - Saturday June 13th, 2015 - Set To Be A 10 Out Of 10 Community Event

May 24, 2015

What commenced in 2006 as an Expo to showcase the roles of ADF Reserves and Cadets in the community has continued to expand as a mini Edinburgh Tattoo. Free to the community, the Avalon Tattoo celebrates its 10th event this year.

The Avalon Tattoo, the only annual suburban Tattoo in Australia, combines community groups and local music with the music and displays of traditional Pipe Bands in an all ages family event. Great food, wonderful and educational displays and insights into the self empowering cadets services are on offer along with special throughout the day dynamic displays such as the Barrenjoey and Marta Maria High School bands on stage during the morning, the landing and taking off  of  Huey Helicopters RAN UH-1B and ANL UH-1H (ANL).

The midday Street Parade through Avalon is spectacular and this year there will be an early afternoon Aerobatic Displays by A37B Dragonfly (Criddle Group)- CAPT Dunn and Wolf Pitts Pro biplane - Paul Bennet Airshows. 

The moving Ceremonial Sunset will be followed by a brilliant fireworks display, sponsored  in 2015 by RSL Sub-Branches Dee Why, Seaforth-Clontarf-Balgowlah, Forrestville and Palm Beach, while Johnson Brothers Hardware have again contributed to this favourite part of the Avalon Tattoo.

New this year is the Karinya A Cappella Choir, while the RAN Band, Australian Air League Band and the Pipe Bands are also attending again. The lead Pipe Band this year is the Burwood RSL Sub-Branch Pipe Band, who, having formed in 2005, are celebrating their 10th year as well. 

Burwood RSL Sub-Branch Pipe Band is mostly members who were formerly part of the Sydney University Regiment while other members were Reserves as part of the Regimental Band of Reserves.  With the support of the Burwood RSL Sub-Branch they were able to form this relatively new pipe band. The age of musicians ranges from High School through to retirees.

Yesterday we spoke to Graham Weeks of the Burwood RSL Sub-Branch Pipe Band who stated the Avalon Tattoo is a great favourite of their members and a good get together for pipe band members from all over Sydney. Burwood RSL Sub-Branch Pipe Band is a competition band who, apart from doing two stand alone items this year will be part of the Mass band display.

As part of the Centenary of ANZAC Commemorations their programme for this year's Avalon Tattoo will also include WWI songs ‘It’s Long Way to Tipperary’, ‘Kiss Me Goodnight, Sergeant Major’ and ‘Keep The Home Fires Burning’. 

In 2016 the Burwood RSL Sub-Branch Pipe Band is one of several Australian Sub-Branch Pipe Bands who will be travelling to Europe top take part in events in Belgium and the Netherlands to commemorate the Centenary of Conflict in these places – fields far from home where Australians served.

During the First World War pipers were amongst the first to leave the trenches, leading fellow service people into battleand were those whose ranks were decimated during the fighting. Cinema paid tribute to this in the famous film The Longest Day, which was set during the Second World War. Historic records indicate that after the First World War pipers were banned from conflict zones.

Pipers still play in remembrance of all soldiers, whatever their nationality and many Scottish and European pipe contingents have organised their own remembrance trails where they play at German, French and Commonwealth sites of remembrance. 

2016, which has many dates and places where Australian soldiers entered this conflict - The Battle of Fromelles, where the First Australian Imperial Force (AIF) first saw action on the Western Front in France, the 5th Division, positioned on the left flank of the salient, being the first to see action on 19 July 1916, and suffering a staggering 5,533 casualties in a single day , or the horror now known as the Somme, where Australians, within three weeks of the beginning of the Allied offensive, in four divisions of the AIF, had been committed to the battle.  

The term ‘tattoo’ dates from around 1600 during the Thirty Years' War in the Low Countries (Belgium and the Netherlands). The Dutch fortresses were garrisoned with mercenary troops that were under federal command since 1594. The Dutch States Army had become a federal army, consisting mostly of Scottish, English, German and Swiss mercenaries, but commanded by a Dutch officer corps. Drummers from the garrison were sent out into the towns at 21:30 hrs (9:30PM) each evening to inform the soldiers that it was time to return to barracks. The process was known as doe den tap toe (Dutch for "turn off the tap"), an instruction to innkeepers to stop serving beer and send the soldiers home for the night. The drummers continued to play until the curfew at 22:00 hrs (10:00PM). Tattoo, earlier tap-too and taptoo, are alterations of the Dutch words tap toe which have the same meaning. (1.)

The term also refers from earliest times to a ceremonial form of evening entertainment performed by Military musicians that extended into events such as the world famous Royal Edinburgh Tattoo, where some of the pipe bands that have played at the Avalon Tattoo have also performed.  The Royal Edinburgh Tattoo is an invitation only event, and some indication of the standard of music you will experience at the Pittwater counterpart - the Avalon Tattoo. 

The piper and bagpipes are ancient musical instruments and musicians, although associated strongest with Scotch-peoples, or the Scottish, the Oxford History of Music states a sculpture of bagpipes has been found on a Hittite slab at Euyuk in the Middle East, dated to 1000 BC. Some have suggested that bagpipes were first brought to the British Isles during the period of Roman rule, although, considering historical references of the Picts triumphs over the invaders, which eventually resulted in the building of Hardrian’s Wall, people of Scotch blood may be right in paying little heed to such a notion.

The first clear reference to the use of the Scottish Highland bagpipes is from a French history, which mentions their use at the Battle of Pinkie Cleugh in 1547. George Buchanan (1506–82) claimed that they had replaced the trumpet on the battlefield. This period saw the creation of the ceòl mór (great music) of the bagpipe, which reflected its martial origins, with battle-tunes, marches, gatherings, salutes and laments. The Highlands of the early seventeenth century saw the development of piping families including the MacCrimmonds, MacArthurs, MacGregors and the Mackays of Gairloch. Typical pipe bands forms today include marches, slow airs, up-tempo jigs and reels, and strathspeys. (2.) 

With such precedence, and an extensive and extended range of events regeared to run at times to suit families, the 10th Avalon Tatto is set to be ten out of ten in 2015!

Schedule of this years Avalon Tattoo programme and times listed below - the 10th Annual Avalon Tattoo will be held in Dunbar Park, Avalon Beach on Saturday 13th of June from 9 a.m.

__________________________________

References

1. Military tattoo. (2014, November 18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Military_tattoo&oldid=634305664

2. Bagpipes. (2015, May 21). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved  from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bagpipes&oldid=663365655

Dunbar Park at dusk - 2016:


Photos of Dunbar Park and ABBC activities within 'Extras' by A J Guesdon.

Dunbar Park as it is in 2021 + Toongari Reserve and Catalpa Reserve: still Remnant green spaces from original public lands set aside

Taken at a recent Car Boot Sale and Anzac Day and on May 1, 2021

Photos by A J Guesdon

Dunbar Park was originally set aside as 'Avalon Park' and measured 4 acres or 1. 6 hectares - Toongari was originally 9 acres or 3.6 hectares - Catalpa was originally 2 acres, 2 roods and 27 1/2 perches or just over 1 hectare.

Toongari - is an aboriginal word 'Toon-gari (Orara), "native bear." - meaning the koala - this park and its surrounding hills were once home to koalas. A community bushcare group, commenced under and supported by Pittwater Council, are still working to maintain the remnant of original Swamp Mahogany Forest in Toongari Reserve, in the heart of Avalon, now supported by the Northern Beaches Council. Toongari Reserve Bushcare occurs on the 3rd Saturday 9 - 12noon (8 - 11am in summer) of each month.

In 2016 the Avalon Preservation Association stated it was alarmed by a Council proposal to create water detention structures in Toongari Reserve. In their submission they stressed a concern that a detention basin 0.5-1.5 m deep over an area of approximately 9000m2 would have a disastrous impact on what is left of the natural environment of the reserve and would have marginal benefit in mitigating flooding. 

''In light of the ever increasing push for development and resulting pressure on the natural environment, Toongari reserve is an area to be valued and preserved. Dedicated volunteer bush carers, some of them members of the APA, have worked in the reserve’s Coastal Flats Swamp Mahogany Forest EEC for many years, propagating local plants for revegetation, and regenerating the bushland areas. The trees represent a precious remnant of the original vegetation of that area. We urged the then Pittwater Council to consider some other alternative to this proposal and seek to protect rather than destroy this unique area.'' - Avalon Preservation Trust incorporated as Avalon Preservation Association, Bulletin no 91, June 2016

Catalpa, commonly called catalpa or catawba, is a genus of flowering plants in the family Bignoniaceae, native to warm temperate and subtropical regions of North America, the Caribbean, and East Asia. The name derives from the Muscogee name for the tree, "kutuhlpa" meaning "winged head" and is unrelated to the name of the Catawba people. The spellings "Catalpa" and "Catalpah" were used by Mark Catesby between 1729 and 1732, and Carl Linnaeus published the tree's name as Bignonia catalpa in 1753. Botanical name for a small genus of deciduous northern hemisphere trees with common names Indian Bean, Cigar Tree.
















view west towards Clareville end



view east towards Toongarrie Reserve and Avalon Beach end




This new concrete path was installed by the Northern Beaches Council after feedback ['have your say' September 11 to October 11 2020] that on the whole, rejected the use of this material in this space and pointed out that council's reason for doing so, 'to allow greater accessibility for prams and wheelchairs' does not reconcile with the 15 steps that connect to the Appian Way and that this path would exacerbate water run off and the deterioration of the surfaces alongside it. Others responded that concrete is needed to fix the crumbling footpaths within Avalon retail centre where elders are regularly being tripped up by broken cement first and they would prefer green spaces to be left as they are. Council went ahead with the concrete ('eco-concrete') path and installed sandstone blocks at the entrance as well.

















Looking westwards towards Clareville end




Heading south towards Dunbar Park and path alongside the retirement village - above and below are what Catalpa looked like prior to its concreting



To the right (heading east) of this is the remnant creek:









still heading east





the commencement of the path alongside the retirement village that leads to Dunbar Park - Below: NB the drain where the creek has been enclosed in cement and pipes


Avalon's Village Green: Avalon Park Becomes Dunbar Park - Some History + Toongari Reserve And Catalpa Reserve - threads collected and collated by A J Guesdon, 2021