March 5 - 11, 2017: Issue 303

Emile Theodore Argles


Portrait of Harold Grey (left) and Victor Daleycirca 1880-1895 Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-146669281 , courtesy National Library of Australia
“Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.” - JOHN 8:7 - Holy Bible

Satire is a genre of literature, and sometimes graphic and performing arts, in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement.

The gentleman referred to in Victor Daley’s ‘Some People’ as Harold Grey when he and ‘Harold’ were gallivanting at Manly in the cooler months of 1882, was in fact Emile Theodore Argles, one of the first real critics Australia had, who wrote under the nom de plumes 'A Pilgrim',  ‘The Pilgrim’, ‘Harold Grey’ and ‘Pasquin’ and also gave ‘Lectures’ under his own name when he first arrived in Australia, as well as under ‘Talbot Marshall’ later on, as well under as the pen names he became famous for. His was a crusade to look after the voiceless and shine a spotlight on the abused, a crusade he succeeded at in many instances, but not without personal cost.

Credited by many as the man who ‘made’ The Bulletin through a characteristic voice that styled the criticism levied with a good dose of humor of that paper during its formative years, Theodore, ‘Theo’ as he would on occasion sign his name, displayed all the true characteristics of the critic who can be cynical in being a true romantic at heart. He also seemed to love the water, had to be near or be able to see it, wherever he was during his ‘Pilgrimage’.

In holding up a mirror to society in order to address what is clearly wrong, and not spoken of, critics often come in for a lot of ridicule in the least and vilification, at worst. Ways and means to silence them are sought and practiced, and Mr. Argles certainly experienced this. As one of our favourite New York Times writers said just a few months ago, "A truly independent press is not stocked with political acolytes but political adversaries." and " ...members of the press ..., when properly performing, ...are truth seekers rather than ego-strokers.."

Theodore seems to have had a healthy ego himself but this didn't fill his words in ways that detracted from them, in fact that seemed to be part of the jokes he would pull - in this case, on himself. 

His work lay at the centre of two of our earliest libel cases when a writer for the then fledgling The Bulletin. He was also an entrepreneur of sorts in starting his own publications when removed from larger papers and instead of being silenced, seemed only to sing louder during a time when those who sang the right tune profited thereby.

His story is one that’s still relative to today, especially today when so many seem to be hesitating to speak their minds or the notion of a Free Press evaporates through the endless stream of news devoid of threads attached to those who hold purse strings and merely parroting what’s been paid for or what will suit. Mr. Argles seemed of the permanently opposed to this ilk, although he clearly kept an eye on making money, quickly squandered, from wielding a pen. While he was here though he did much to speak out against what was wrong and could be righted, championing the maligned, thumbing his nose at those who would publish platitudes through the Press to suit their own agendas or the prevailing wishes of those in charge. His actions, and the way he did it what he did, could be a first instance of anyone speaking out in our Press years before he joined The Bulletin.

He left the salons of Europe to come to Australia and invested all he had into this place when our nation was coming of age. It is solely through the great work of the National Library of Australia in continuing to add our newspapers of those times to the great font of TROVE that we are able to restore the paths he trod during his short time here and hopefully make one who had become invisible visible again. 

He died too soon from tuberculosis, a disease that was to take his fellow wordsmiths around him before and after his time and is still rated the highest infectious disease killer, taking more than HIV/Aids worldwide every single year. 

Did he spend much time in Pittwater?
He certainly loved the water – always tried to live in sight of it. 
He certainly sought refuge and respite at Manly with Daley, Archibald and certainly championed peoples on the Hawkesbury as well as further afield. 
There was not one eastern state he did not travel through and live in – he also spent a fair amount of time in South Australia. 
It seems likely he did visit here, writing under yet another nom de plume, while travelling through Pittwater on the way to a tourist excursion on the Hawkesbury during that ill-fated one time (!?) the engineer of the Florrie was drunk. The voice/s that recounts this episode is very alike his own and display his humour, even in what may have been trying circumstances.

There are also records of Henry Lawson being given the use of a yacht close to Manly Wharf - and this too seems to confirm certain aspects of these formative and, as some state, writers and artists of the first 'Golden Age of Australian Literature' gallivanting about here and there (at Manly) in between other escapades and providing us with wonderful words strung well together:

Then there were memories of Lawson and his friends in The Village, as they called Manly. Lord Beauchamp lent them his yacht the "Vesta," which was moored close to Manly Wharf. Roderic Quinn, Victor Daley and E. J. Brady were among those who joined Lawson. For many years, I kept a few verses written by Daley, leaving instructions for Lawson what to do after they had gone to the Village for further supplies. The verses were good, although the subject matter was very crude. They didn't mind living like toffs, even though they could see through it all. Harry was no man for family life. He drifted out of it, as he drifted out of other things. Back came memories of Harry's accounts of his tussles with the Bulletin. They would go up and see J. F. Archibald, the editor. He would give them a voucher. Then they would try to collect from "that so-and-so Scotsman, Mac-leod." "It was like trying to get blood out of a stone," Lawson would moan. But they invariably collected just the same. Or the time that Bland Holt, the theatrical manager of the day, commissioned him to localise the "Mystery of the Hansom Cab." Bland said he would not pay until Lawson did the job. 
THEY BURIED HARRY LIKE A LORD.
INSIDE POLITICS
by Jack Lang
THEY BURIED HARRY LIKE A LORD (1954, September 5). Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), p. 40. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article168409933 

George Augustine Taylor also recounts in his Those Were the Days (1918) a trip to Gosford as 'an adventure' by The Bohemians of Sydney, of which Argles was a core member, although this is reported in his reminisces as set later than the actual articles then run, which are also after that incident of September 1882, the 'voices' of those writing under other names are too familiar and too alike Theo Argles and Victor Daley to not have had their hand (or pen) in them. Many of the reports found and run in a timeline below state they were firm and fast friends, along with Caddy, Melville (the Manly wordsmith who would also delve in poetry) and a host of 'scribes' that dazzle us still.

That Daley and Argles were firm friends when 'still bachelors' appears in one recounting after another; including their exhorting other publications to show more of the same kind of spine that speaks opening, truthfully - Daley may have done this in gentler terms, Argle with a joyous glee still communicated. One such 'story' is of their poking fun at the Sydney Morning Herald, considered a little to dour and sober in their reign of the streets. The legend states that one day during the early 1880's they drove around the Herald office in a hearse calling to those indoors;

"Bring out your dead! Bring out your dead!" 

That would have livened things up! 

Daley is also supposedly to have addressed this few stanzas to younger Herald reporters and may have had his then dear departed friend in mind:

'Be safe, be slow, be sure;
Take nothing upon rumor.
And ever more be pure
And wholesome' in your humor.

'Be sparinig in your jests,
'Tis safer to be solemn,
For Vested Interests
There is no Funny Column'."
LETTER FROM LESLIE HAYLEN (1948, March 23). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article105736336

Another oft repeated story, even decades after both had passed:

MORE BOHEMIAN MEMORIES
By W.H.E.
THE writer in his previous article mentioned the Saturday night beer and saveloy supper as the weekly consummation dear to the heart and stomach of every true-begotten freelance journalist in the dear days of local Bohemia. Relevant is a good story, the truth of which he can vouch for, having fraternised with the principals. The venue of our comedy-tragedy was Sydney. The principals were the late Mr. Archibald (kindly patron and father-confessor of all the literary and journalistic hacks of the day), the late Victor Daley (already mentioned), and the late Howard Gray (a clever paragraphilitst). It was customary for the Illustrious fraternity to mobolise at Power's Hotel Victoria, In George-street, when arrangements were made for the weekly beer and saveloy orgy on the fateful Saturday. Alas ! on one unforgettable occasion It was found that the exchequer (a Joint and several affair) was depleted, nay, non-existant. Gloomy despair descended upon the august assembly, where, bravely and unconsciously, were being moulded the painful beginnings of Australia's literary history. What was to be done ? Never before, even during the worst periods of the brotherhood's chequered history had occurred such a gastronomic cul de sac. Always, somewhere or somehow, the weekly banquet had been made possible. 

Eventually a stuttering, tentative proposal was half-Jokingly preferred, that one of the craft should Interview Mr. Archibald and, tearfully informing him of the untimely demise of one of them, Inveigle a cheque for the honorable purposes of decent interment. It was noticeable, in the light of after events, that following on a profound silence the gloomy assemblage suddenly dispersed in twos and threes. 
The next scene is laid in the kindly magnate's newspaper office in George-street. He was exceptionally busy on that fateful Saturday morning, but when a timorous knock sounded on the door he, as was his wont, invited a courteous entry. Enter Victor Daley. "Hullo, Victor, what brings you hence at this unusual hour ?" Daley, with a sepulchral sigh and a lugubrious leer beneath his handsome whiskers:
"I've come along to break sad news to you, Mr. Archibald." "I'm sorry to hear that, Victor. What's the trouble ?" "Poor Howard Gray died last night." "What ? Is It possible ? Dear, dear, how Inexpressibly sad ! What a loss ! — what a loss !", . "Yes, Mr. Archibald, a big loss to us all. I've— er— just come from the boys. They — er — asked me to break the news to you." "Extremely thoughtful of them !" "And " "Yes, Victor, what is It ?" "They— er— thought that you may be inclined to help us do the last honors decently to poor old Gray. We’re all anxious to do the thing properly, but the trouble is, Mr. Archibald, that there's no money in the camp this week." "I'm pleased that you came along, Victor, Here (diving into a drawer of his desk), I'll give you a cheque for £10. If you want any more, command me. Dear, dear, poor Gray !" Hurriedly exit Victor Daley. 
Scene, the same. Mr. Archibald saddened, but increasingly busy. A knock. "Come In." Enter Howard Gray. One glance and the whole story is Illuminated as with a searchlight to the shrewd but kindly mentor, who carries on with his work. A precipitous sigh from Gray. (No response.) A groan. (Continuation of silence). A desperate appeal — "Surely, Mr. Archibald, you’ve already heard the bad news." (Aforesaid silence more profound.) "I — I hope that It's not my beastly Job to break the news, but — I — I'm sorry to say that poor old Victor Daley died suddenly last night." 
To Gray's astonishment Mr. Archibald continues his work, unperturbed by the carefully rehearsed tidings of I doom. "As a matter of fact I've Just come along from the boys, as a committee of one so to say, to ask if you— uh I might advance us something on account so as to inter poor old Victor decently" 
A stern, but twinkling, Archibald swivels around in his chair and confronts the suppliant, with a threatening gesture, which somehow has no menace behind it, he roars: "Get out of this, you blighter. If you hurry you'll just about catch up with Daley. I've given him enough to bury the two of you !."

That night the fraternal get-together was voted sans parallel. ... MORE BOHEMIAN MEMORIES (1937, September 4). The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article206720801 

There is evidence Emile Theodore Argles lived at Manly before his fun weeks with Victor Daley, and perhaps was the earlier 'Poet of  Manly:

From My unnatural life / by H. Grey.
Harold Grey 1878-1879 - 30 pages

Also, from the same 'book' 9 pages 6-7), although some termed them 'pamphlets': 
....'Mr. Stace, then is, as I have said, singularly prepossessing in appearance. He is tall, well formed, and as straight as a young sapling or—or—dear me! I’m quite at a loss for another simile—well—straighter than Henry Ward Beeeimer’s morals, anyway. Deep blue his eyes, and very lustrous, the kind, of eyes I shouldn't care to have looking expressively into those of my love some evening at Manly when I, having missed the boat was standing forlornly on Woolloomooloo pier, hiding my streaming eyes in a three-penny check handkerchief....'

From materials listed at the end of this small book it would date this as 1878 as well.


Pier at Manly, New South Wales, ca. 1876 [picture] Image No.: nla.obj-141520962-1, courtesy National Library of Australia

Frank Molloy's excellent work on Victor Daley, Victor Daley: A Life. (2004), states one of the many reasons writers of this era chose to write under nom de plumes was they wrote for rival papers and did not want one or another boss to know. Their social activities, unless at war in words with each other, show those who worked on these papers would have known as they were all mates. Another reason, that a paper only had a handful of writers, or even just one or two, would be a better solution in using other names so readers would not think this was all just one person. 

In Mr. Argle's case his dealings with courts and laws due to what he said and they way he said it meant any 'nom de plume's he wrote under were notorious, and he with them.  This would indicate the one chosen to publish under for each piece cast especial meaning on that story. More importantly, in Theodore's choice of the pseudonyms he most frequently employed are high literature or high ideals, or simply the summoning of remembrance of these, and these were the songs favoured by a well-educated, well- travelled young man. In 'A Pilgrim, 'The Pilgrim' and 'Harold Grey' you are instantly reminded of Byron's Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage

Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, written by Lord Byron, and published between 1812 and 1818 is a poem that describes the travels and reflections of a world-weary young man who, disillusioned with a life of pleasure and revelry, looks for distraction in foreign lands. In a wider sense, it is an expression of the melancholy and disillusionment felt by a generation weary of the wars of the post-Revolutionary and Napoleonic eras. The title comes from the term childe, a medieval title for a young man who was a candidate for knighthood.

The work provided the first example of the Byronic hero, who must have a rather high level of intelligence and perception as well as be able to easily adapt to new situations and use cunning to his own gain. It is clear from this description that this hero is well-educated and by extension is rather sophisticated in his style. Aside from the obvious charm and attractiveness that this automatically creates, he struggles with his integrity, being prone to mood swings. Generally, the hero has a disrespect for certain figures of authority, thus creating the image of the Byronic hero as an exile or an outcast. The hero also has a tendency to be arrogant and cynical, indulging in self-destructive behaviour which leads to the need to seduce men or women.

In the meaning of ‘Pasquin’ (1877, then again in 1880 to 1886 inFreeman’s Journal and others) is found – Pasquino or Pasquin (Latin: Pasquillus) the name used by Romans since the early modern period to describe a battered Hellenistic-style statue dating to the third century BC, which was unearthed in the Parione district of Rome in the fifteenth century. Located in a piazza of the same name on the southwest corner of the Palazzo Braschi (Museo di Roma); near the site where it was unearthed. The statue is known as the first of the talking statues of Rome, because of the tradition of attaching anonymous criticisms to its base.

Right: Pasquino Rome, August 2006- photo by Peter Heeling

The statue's fame dates to the early sixteenth century, when Cardinal Oliviero Carafa draped the marble torso of the statue in a toga and decorated it with Latin epigrams on the occasion of Saint Mark's Day. The Cardinal's actions led to a custom of criticizing the pope or his government by the writing of satirical poemsin broad Roman dialect—called "pasquinades" from the Italian "pasquinate"—and attaching them to the statue "Pasquino". Thus Pasquino became the first "talking statue" of Rome. He spoke out about the people's dissatisfaction, denounced injustice, and assaulted misgovernment by members of the Church. From this tradition are derived the English-language terms pasquinade and pasquil, which refer to an anonymous lampoon in verse or prose. 

The actual subject of the sculpture is Menelaus supporting the body of Patroclus, and the subject, or the composition applied to other figures as in the Sperlonga sculptures, occurs a number of times in classical sculpture, where it is now known as a "Pasquino group". The actual identification of the sculptural subject was made in the eighteenth century by the antiquarian Ennio Quirino Visconti, who identified it as the torso of Menelaus supporting the dying Patroclus; the more famous of two Medici versions of this is in the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence, Italy. The Pasquino is more recently characterized as a Hellenistic sculpture of the third century BC, or a Roman copy.

The origin of the name, "Pasquino", remains obscure. By the mid-sixteenth century it was reported that the name "Pasquino" derived from a nearby tailor who was renowned for his wit and intellect; speculation had it that his legacy was carried on through the statue, in "the honor and everlasting remembrance of the poor tailor" [2].

It should be noted that a former 'Pasquin' seemed to author insights on matters in South Australia prior to Theodore's landing in Australia and others took on this namesake after and during his time in other states. Theodore's adoption as one of his writing names of 'Pasquin' may, in part, be his honouring one such wordsmith in South Australia's forerunner of the same pen-name - Eustace Revely Mitford.

Those Mr. Argles made use of when writing the 'Sundry Shows’ (theatre review) column in the ‘Sans Culotte’ signature commenced on 26 March 1881, the evolved tone is continued. The signature is originally spelled ‘Des Sans-Culottes’, later ‘Un Sans Culotte’. [3]
He would also resort to feminine 'guises' in some works, although these, from what records could be found, and bear in mind there must be scores missed, were utilised to suit the subject, or column. Researchers into the early Bulletin years state some of these columns were penned by Daley and Argles together.

The flip side of this coin is there are few images to be found of Mr. Argles. Those tracked down seem to be related to publications he had a long association with - the Bulletin taken with his boon companion Victor Daley, and that run in a celebration of its great authors and publication Freeman's Journal

Picture – photo from: JUBILEE JOTTINGS (1900, June 30).Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 14. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111313994 

What is not widely acknowledged is that many took the tone of the Bulletin during Argles lifetime  as to be all his own:
"The Bulletin, he said, had really been “made” by a dissolute but very clever Frenchman named Argles, who wrote the dramatic criticism, and originated the present characteristic style of the whole paper. But Argles worked through Archibald the principal editor, on whom he had a great influence until his (Argles) death from consumption. Now Archibald had gathered round him a brilliant staff of young Bohemians." - From The Diaries of Beatrice Webb (1898) – October 5th.

It was through the existence of the Bulletin alone that a purely Australian school of art and literature became possible,’ wrote Henry Lawson, adding: ‘The Australian atmosphere is in the Bulletin, and the Bulletin is the spirit of Australia.’- Henry Lawson, Autobiographical and Other Writing 1887-1922, Sydney..

Theodore's attention to detail, in citing reports, in putting himself in the places he speaks of, not only conjures brilliantly the Sydney, and Pittwater, he speaks of, they also give us details of these places not recorded so well elsewhere - further adding to the many reasons we should make some accessible record to this denizen of all things good about Australia and his determination to ensure the good prevailed here. 

A typical example that underlines his kind of voice and attention to detail, while employing humour that can still make you laugh over a hundred years on is this little piece on the Debtors Prison in Darlinghurst:

THE SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPE.
By Pasquin.
No. 19. The Humours Of The Debtors' Prison. Section I.

Meo sum pauper in uere. — Horace. 
My business in this state 
Made me a looker on here. Shakespeare — Measure for Measure. 
Yo bayiiixe bouldo strode up ye streete, Close eyein^o alio heo chanced to meete, 'When suddenlie he gave a chappo Upon ye shoulder blade a tappe. — Tussito.

I COMMENCE this, my first exhilarating sketch upon the Debtors' side of Darlinghurst prison, in the awful precincts of the gaol itoelf. The room in which I am writing is the salle a manger of the establishment, and I will treat my readers to a description of it just by way of putting them (and myself) into a good humour at the commencement of the narrative of my experiences. An apartment, some twelve feet by twenty-four, with a little closely-barred dormer window, and a small door, the centre panels of which are of glass. The walls are of stone and whitewashed, but the floor is boarded, and the ceiling also is of painted planking. The fittings are of parochial primitiveness. They consist of a narrow deal table, and a couple of forms, a shelf with a curtain of green calico, four hooks, a gas bracket, and a spittoon. There is a certain club-house splendour lingering about the last article, which tends to make it out of keeping with the rest of the things ; and I rather incline to the belief that it was not originally included in the furnishing contract, but was added by Mr. Read for necessary purposes during the temporary incarceration of an American book canvasser. 

It is evening and we have just had tea. When I say 'we' it must not be thought ' we are seven,' for we are not. There are only three of us — Mr. G. R. Dibbs, a Mr. Vavasour, and the distinguished popular educator who pens these lines. As we all ' keep ourselves,' the tea table (which will not be cleared away until to-morrow morning, our prison servant being locked up) presents quite a luxurious appearance. There is cold beef, and ham, and half-cold chops ; not to mention jams of various kinds — the whole life up and embellished by Mr. Dibbs's silver-teapot, upon which the rays of the gas-jet play fantastically. Looked at as imprisoned debtors, we are all three comparatively wealthy. Although George Richard has assigned his estate, his name is good at the cookshop over the way, and Mr. Vavasour is a young gentleman of independent means, in merely a temporary condition of embarrassment. I know he is a gentleman of independent means, because he told me when I first arrived that he couldn't live under a thousand year : — upon which I immediately borrowed a pipe of tobacco. With regard to myself, I can ruminate upon my financial position without being seized with a desire to commit suicide. I could satisfy my detaining creditor with the handful of loose silver in my trousers' pocket. Indeed, after paying him in full, there would be sufficient change remaining to purchase intoxication for a couple of baliffs ; and, mark you, making a Sydney bailiff drunk is by no means an inexpensive proceeding. 

I have selected the dining-room for a writing den for several reasons. And that they are unanswerable ones may be inferred from the fact that besides being as gloomy as a sepulchre, my present quarters are as cold as an Arctic ruin. The fact is, not being of a literary turn himself, Mr. Dibbs resorts to many expedients for whiling away the time of an evening, which renders original composition in his immediate vicinity a matter of some difficulty. For half-an-hour perhaps he will perform on his lathe, turning ornamental articles of gun-metal, with a noise resembling the growling of five hundred Polar bears. Tiring of this, he, will 'put his tools to rights,' and as in this process he lets a 6lb. chisel fall about three times in every five minutes, the effect is a very tolerable imitation, on a small scale, of Nelson's bombardment of Copenhagen. It is, however, when he sits down to talk political economy, and compliments certain judges upon their legal acumen, that things get the most unsettled. His voice (which I should say was originally manufactured for a giant, who for some reason or other neglected to call for it) possesses a depth and volume sufficient to fill Wynyard Square on a windy morning. When therefore he becomes carried away by his subject (his chronic state) his tones vibrate through the prison until they make all the padlocks rattle, and the people in Burton-street, over the way, hide their fire-irons under their hearth-rugs until the thunderstorm shall have blown over.' And, when, in addition to all this, I add that us, Mr. Vavasour has a passion for 'fives' and a turn for singing operatic music with a voice of which a quavering falsetto is the principal ingredient, the reader will understand that the sitting-room is hardly a place for a man to write effectively in. And thus I have descended below, relinquishing many comforts, to manufacture my copy amongst the debris of the feen-equipage. 

Now for a slight retrospect. When some little time ago I had made up my mind to ventilate the workings of the clause in the Insolvency Act which provides for imprisonment of debtors, I consulted a friend as to the easiest and most expeditious way of obtaining admission to the prison, and staying there until such time as I should have gathered sufficient material for a series of articles — ' Oh,' he said, ' it's the simplest thing in the world. Get the District Court Judge to make an order for you to pay a certain amount on a certain day, and don't pay it. Then you'll be arrested soon enough, never fear.' Also for the ignorance of mankind  I took his advice ; was served with a summons appeared at the Court ; was ordered by Judge Dowling to pay a certain amount on a certain day ; didn't pay it : — and what resulted ? — very little. When the day came I walked, about waiting to be arrested. The day growing old, I ||a hunted up the plaintiffs solicitor and entreated him to carry out the law. He said he had done all he could, but recommended to hunt up a bailiff. So until evening with its ' twinking vapours' arrived, I careered over the city screaming for an officer — but without avail. At all the hotels where I am known I left messages calculated, as I thought, to ensure my almost immediate capture. Here is a sample : — 

'If man comes in and asks for me, saying his name is Lavish Sholomon Aaronsh, tell him I will be back at three.' But it bore no fruit. Not one bailiff turned up. So the next morning I went up to the Local Court, resolved that if I did not find an officer, I would call at the office for the warrant, and take it up to the gaol myself. But its luck favoured me that morning. While I was hanging about, I heard my name pronounced from behind. In a moment I was round and faced my interlocutor. He had no need to say a word! —to make a gesture. His identity rushed upon me immediately. He was the executive administrator of the law under civil process. 

Tap, tap! against; the nail-studded gate with the knocker. With a clash and a groan the huge portal swung upon its hinges, and we entered. The bailiff produced a paper and pointed to me; the gate keeper read the document, and I was a prisoner. The place was a square enclosure, railed at the front and back and enclosed by the two lodges on either side. A number of warders were lounging about warming themselves at fires, and reading very dirty looking newspapers. The ceremony of my reception occupied only about two minutes. 


Entrance to Darlinghurst Gaol, date: 3/1871, Image No.: d1_05678, courtesy State Library of New South Wales


Entrance to Darlinghurst Gaol, 1887 - by New South Wales. Government Printing Office, Image No.: a089169, courtesy State Library of New South Wales (see under Extras below).

Being given into the custody of a mild-faced warder, I was taken through the inner gate, across the court-yard, down some stone steps into a passage dimly lighted by a gaslamp. We then entered a subterranean chamber on the left — a gloomy place likewise lit with gas. This was the office. Here my name was taken by a warder who was sitting down, and echoed by a warder who was standing up. I was asked no questions of any kind, and was told nothing — not even to sit down. I made a remark upon the inclemency of the weather, but it elicited no reply; neither when I made a request that my portmanteau should be looked after, did any of the figures ' yapp ' out a rejoinder. 

It was a dark, mysterious-looking place, fitted with a large table upon which loomed huge ledgers, and to the right was a high desk at which stood a man of careworn aspect, who was rapidly totting up columns of figures. The room reminded me of a description I had once read of a cellar occupied at night by a section or the Florentine carbonari, and in which they planned little nose-slittings and assassinations for the especial behoof of people who annoyed them ; and so strong was the impression that I almost expected the warder who was standing to momentarily produce a skull and a beef-bone, and enrol me as a member of the society. My name having been entered in the book, I was led out into the fresh air, and taken away to the quarters assigned to me by Government.. The debtors' prison at Darlinghurst is a large, square, one-story freestone building, one side of which is occupied by warders of the gaol, and the other by such unfortunates as are compelled to undergo imprisonment under civil process. It stands inside the walls, at the intersection of Burton and Forbes streets, and the windows of 'the debtors' sitting-room command quite a lovely view of the windows of the houses in those picturesque and salubrious thoroughfares, The ward comprises six separate apartments — a day room, a dining-room (already described), a kitchen (which contains a bath), and three bedrooms, two of which lead out of the day room, and one of which is in the basement. 

The ward is approached through a small garden, which fronts the warders' quarters, and in turning the corner you come into a small floricultural patch sacred to the 'Hard-up Club.' Both gardens are, however, common to the debtors, who, indeed, are allowed to stroll as far as the front gate, but are not permitted to hold any converse with prisoners on the criminal side. Our garden, it being winter time, has rather a dreary appearance, the most flourishing object it contains being a pomegranate tree in the centre bed, upon which forlornly dangles a solitary pomegranate. The only living thing that seems to take the faintest interest in the garden is a large black and tan terrier that belongs to one of the warders. This animal, it would seem, has taken to amateur gardening merely as a pastime, and without any serious idea as to the general embellishment of the prison grounds. Every morning he trots in about nine, surveys all the geraniums with a critical eye, and usually, before departing, scratches up a particularly fine plant and lays it carefully in the centre of the principal walk. One day he brought another dog — one of Mr. Read's greyhounds — to show him the improvements. But the visitor didn't seem to think much of them ; for the interview ended in high words, which culminated in a pitched battle, in which the greyhound was signally worsted. 


Darlinghurst Gaol and Court House, Sydney, 1870 / attributed to Charles Pickerin. Date: 1870. Image No.: a089253, courtesy State Library of NSW.

On being introduced into the prison I was shown straight up stairs into the sitting-room, in order, as the warder jocularly observed — ' To be made free o' tho premises.' On the door being opened a very strange sight presented itself — one which will live for a considerable time in my memory. The room itself was large and lofty, and well ventilated, notwithstanding that the air was rendered somewhat oppressive by the fumes of a gas-stove which burned at one end of the apartment. A large table covered with American cloth stood in the centre of the room. ' Upon it were scattered about a number of law-books, papers, novels, pipes, tobacco jars-cigar-boxes — every conceivable kind of litter the mind of man could imagine. At the end nearest the stove were a couple of exquisitely executed photographs of a very beautiful little girl. These were framed in handsome leather cases, and were flanked by two glasses filled with flowers. Three or four polished cedar chairs were scattered about the room, and the wall was lined with forms. Near the fire, however, were a number of cane lounges, and one American sofa. The floor was covered with cocoa-nut matting, and, although the wails were only roughly whitewashed, the place had a comfortable aspect. The most striking object in the room was a large iron lathe, fitted in work man-like fashion close up against the window. Upon the racks near the machine, and upon a form running at right angles with it, were arranged tools without number ; and a considerable quantity of material in the shape of myall logs, sawn cedar planks, and bags of vegetable ivory (of which more anon) were heaped pell-mell in an adjacent corner. 

With the exception of the regulation boards, the only relief to the white stone walls was a large print of the Prince and Princess of Wales. I may remark, en passant, that this picture gives great offence to Mr. David Buchanan, who is a frequent visitor to Mr. Dibbs. Whenever David enters and his fiery eye alights on the engraving, his soul is immediately in arms. 'Tak doon tharr-t thung,' he cried, ' tear doon tharrt half-bred Garman and his missus, and let am noot disgrace the room.' It is a very fortunate thing that the Prince, living so far away, is comparatively unlikely to be affected in any serious degree by Davie's dislike. I hope no one will tell him that David is antagonistic to the line of the Guelphs. It would, in any case, make him seriously uncomfortable, and possibly tend to make him abandon his project of visiting the colonies. 

There were three persons in the room when I entered. One of these was a very tall man, who was sharpening a small tool on a hone upon the shelf of his lathe. A remarkable figure this. Upon his head he wore a blue-velvet skull cap, embroidered with yellow silk. His attire consisted of a shabby tweed vest and trousers, and long brown double-breasted overcoat of exceedingly ancient appearance. This garment brought to one's recollection the 'Father of the Marshalsea,' it was so thread-bare and dilapidated. All the clothes hung loosely about him, and his shoes were but lightly laced; an infirmity of the feet being perceptible when he moved. But, despite the ragged coat and shapeless inexpressibles, you had but to look at the man's face and you would at once see that he was a person out of the common order of mortals. It was in truth a most remarkable face — not remarkable for any peculiar or striking trait of personal beauty — but on account of its general expression. The head was the head of a lion; the features bold and striking — more especially the eyes, which were of a light blue, and singularly bold and restless. Both his hair and beard were thick and curly and very much grizzled, and being unkempt, rendered his appearance fiercer than it would otherwise have been. He wore gold spectacles, and was smoking a long pipe, blowing forth clouds of smoke with an evident relish. 

He looked around at me as I entered, with a loud — ' Hullo ! what's up now ?' and laughed in such a loud key that all the tools in his rack were set a-jingling. As doubtless the reader will have guessed, the gentleman I have described was none other than the redoubtable Mr. G. R. Dibbs. For a sketch of the other occupants of the room, I must refer my readers to the forthcoming number of the Freeman. THE SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPE. (1880, July 24). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133488528 

Although we have listed in the timeline beneath a fair portion and examples of Theodore's works, this really is only a smidgen of the materials available - what the denseness of these underlines is this was a man who worked hard all the time. 

There is in his story, too, evidence of what was becoming prevalent in society - that of sons not born first but of good and well-off or wealthy families, taking issue with the 'powers that be' through inheritance laws etc., of speaking out against any laws that denied any citizen the same rights given only to a few. These were not 'convicts', these were well brought up and well-educated young men who sought places overseas, like Australia, and began a shift, in the generation prior to Theodore's, and his, and after him, that has made what anyone may 'inherit' today of equal standing and in many cases of 'worths' that cannot be attributed solely to goods and chattels.

Prior to this timeline are the 'Pittwater stories', varying slightly in tone, which let us hear voices from the past that could still be speaking today - and with one paradox here as Mr. Argles was said, by many of his contemporaries, to be fond of a drink.  Also bear in mind that Charles Jeanerrett was investing heavily in Newport, developing the mail line via his steamer the 'Florrie' and had much to gain in attracting or even 'cultivating' very favourable reviews- for one thing this would allow him to install a permanent steamer (ferry) to Brisbane Water - something now very popular again.

Visit: 
Newport Wharf - history page

References 
1. A Lie by Any Other Name, Charles M. Blow JAN. 26, 2017, New York Times.
2. Pasquino. (2017, February 8). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved from  https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pasquino&oldid=764289318
3. Kelly, Veronica. 'Un Sans Culotte': the Bulletin's early theatre criticism and the masculine Bohemian masquerade. [online].Australian Literary Studies, 19, 3 (May), 2000, 254-268. Also available at The University of Queensland - UQ eSpace

The Tourist.
Our Pleasure Trip To The Hawkesbury.
By Grandmamma.

' If, sick of home and luxuries, you want a new sensation, 
And sigh for the unwonted ease of unaccommodation— 
If you would taste, as amateur and vagabond beginner, 
The painful pleasures of the poor, get up a picnic dinner!' 

Such was the advice of Horace Smith in days of old, when we were young, and rather failed to appreciate his pleasant sarcasm. But as years go on, and the romance of youth goes off. in company with lissomness of limb and elasticity of spirit, his words of wit and wisdom find readier echo in our thoughts, and 'The days when we went gipsying, a long time ago.' assume a somewhat fabulous halo —even a lunar halo— as they are pictured in our sane and sober elderly memories. A recent experience of our own suggests a variation on the above-quoted verse : 
If, sated with the loveliness of Sydney's peerless haven 
You covet sight of other scenes more rugged and unshaven— 
If steamers swift and clean and trim you value not a stiver. 
But like them slow, and black and grim, go up the Hawkesbury River! 
We did, and as a member of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals I am constrained to say to all who may think of doing likewise, 'Don't' — until a thorough reformation and rearrangement in the modes of transit be effected. On last Friday afternoon, our small party of three, viz., Mr. and Mrs. B ? and 'Grandmamma,' steamed pleasantly to Manly Beach in the Fairlight, in time to 'catch the coach' for Newport, as prescribed in our sailing directions. These assured us that the trip was always accomplished in the easiest and pleasantest manner, and that we should arrive in town on Saturday evening. How delusive these promises proved will be seen hereafter. Two rough vehicles were in waiting at Manly, and we scrambled into the better looking of the twain, drawn by four horses, to be immediately taken to task and roundly rated in no measured terms by the driver of the two-horse machine for not going in his coach and to his 'hotel,’ he seeming to claim a monopoly of all Hawkesbury-bound passengers, whether he had room for them or not. Dire and dismal were the threats he hurled at us, and which rumbled in our rear as our good-humoured 'whip' drove off with us. The road was good, and glimpses of grand shore cliffs and headlands, and bits of lovely unspoiled ' bush,' bright with exquisite native flowers (which, alas, we might not stay to gather and delight in), pleasantly beguiled the way, and softened many a jolt ; whilst the discovery that two other lady passengers (visitors) were friends of mutual friends in various parts of Australia made a cheery, chatty quintette of the performance which had begun as a trio. 'Crack went the whip, round went the wheels, Were never folks more glad. They told the deeds of long ago, And merry tales and sad.' 

Presently we splashed through a wide lagoon, looking, or at any rate intending to look, as though we found it quite an agreeable incident, but holding on tightly all the same, and hailing our return to dry land again with little gasps of satisfaction. The appearance, not far from the roadside, of a plant of the panoanus was a sensation. We greeted it with a cry of joyous welcome, as the advanced guard of those tropical glories which previous visitors to this region had glowingly described. The graceful plumy crowns of the cycas, too, were abundant in parts of the bush as we neared Newport, and we revelled in rich anticipation of the wealth to come. 

Our conveyance brought us to the steps of the only visible house, a new-looking abode, of the usual country inn type, where, after considerable delay, a rough (very rough) meal was served; chops, coarse and nearly raw, over which the contents of the frying-pan had been liberally bestowed, and a piece of beef, which seemed to have been just introduced to a fire, but not permitted more than a brief acquaintance therewith. 


 Scott's Hotel from Broadhurst image 1900-1927 106124h Courtesy State Library of NSW.


Henry King Photographs, courtesy National Library of Australia and Pittwater Image Library Mona Vale, c. 1900-1910. Top: Bay view House, Newport NSW.  Below: Pittwater from BayView House.


But appetite for even a more luxurious repast was destroyed by the announcement that the engineer of the steamer which we expected to take us on the morrow was very drunk at the other 'hotel' (kept by the opposition driver whom we did not patronise), and that he declared the vessel out of repair and unfit for the voyage, whilst darker rumours were soon afloat that he said she would 'blow up.' One version was that he threatened he would blow her up himself, as 'he could swim if others couldn't.' The roseate hue began to fade from the complexion of our hopes, and we spoke of returning to Manly in the morning; but a promise that the tipsy engineer should be well watched, and kept sober when he became so, allowed us still to dream of pursuing our intended course. 

Our rooms, though small and scant of comfort, were clean; and our rest undisturbed by any entomological specimens. After a very early breakfast, we were summoned to go on board the steamer, which lay half a mile off, at a rude sort of landing place near the other 'hotel.' With great difficulty and fatigue we made the descent of the steep bank, some 50 feet in height, by means of logs laid at uncertain distances, making a species of stairway, some steps being thrice the depth of others, and all slippery. The captain — whose civility and kind attention throughout we all gratefully appreciate— assured us that the engineer was 'all right,' so, on arriving on board, we picked the least dirty spots to sit in, the deck being strewn over with coal, and off we steamed down Pittwater, at a very moderate rate, but fast enough for one of the party, who, pencil in hand, took rapid notes, rather than sketches, of the ever-changing and most picturesque headlands and islets as we proceeded. A pretty stiff breeze was blowing, and through the broken waters of Broken Bay the little steamer puffed and groaned and rolled horribly. 

Elliot Island was long: the central point in our view, and its isolated position seemed, in our perhaps superficial judgment, to point it out as a suitable spot for the storage of at least a portion of the 900 tons of mischief in the shape of dynamite and powder, the expected explosion of which is now so sorely exercising the fears of many a worthy resident in and near Sydney. 

The absence of nearly all evidence of population, so far as we could see, and the barren nature of the land around, seem to render it improbable that even in the future any number of inhabitants would occupy the neighbouring shores to be endangered by the proximity of a magazine on Elliot Island. The discovery that two passengers who had come by the other coach to the other hotel were friends from Melbourne, also, like ourselves, 'on pleasure bent,' was an agreeable surprise, and conversation, in often varying knots of twos and threes, went on with animation. As the channel narrowed, the shores gained in picturesqueness, and we understood the comparisons which have been drawn between the scenery of the Rhine and that of the Hawkesbury, but surely they were made by enthusiastic Australians of die 'Marchioness' persuasion, prepared to 'make believe a great deal' on patriotic grounds ! 
The towering heights, crowned and bristling with fantastic rocks, resembling in many places the ruined fortresses and castles of the old world, are most striking, and we gazed, in keen enjoyment, as cliff after cliff, and crag on crag appeared. But, alas for the imperfections of humanity ! We found that, after doing some 20 miles of ecstasy, the old story of 'Toujours perdrix!' made itself remembered; for there is, it must be confessed, considerable monotony in the general aspect of the wall-like barriers of cliffed and caverned rocks, although, if considered in detail, nature's inexhaustible variety gives to each some special feature. 

The few habitations near the river are of a very humble character, and our expectations of seeing orange groves were but scantly realised. The native fig and a graceful pine in some spots gave a pleasant relief to the too common forms and sombre hues of the universal gum trees, but the prevalent browns and dim olive tints of the general masses were most aesthetic combinations, and ' tropical vegetation' was conspicuously absent. Long before we arrived at Wiseman's Ferry the condition of the delinquent engineer had again become critical, and our apprehensions as to progress and safety anything but pleasant. Our landing was effected in very primitive fashion, no attempt whatever had been made to cut down the bank, or to make the most rudimentary stepping-places, but we all had to scramble and claw our way up, clinging to projecting roots or hanging boughs, as we best might. 

A walk of half a mile to the inn followed, and then succeeded luncheon, roughly served, but clean and abundant. On returning to the bank where the boat lay, the engineer was found lying on the deck in a hopeless state of intoxication, inert and insensible, he having, as was ascertained, brought with him a bottle of gin which he had finished. The captain said he did not understand working the engine himself, and that he could not take us further. The result of a council of war held on the spot was the decision that we must perforce return to the inn for the night, and that the captain should obtain the services of a sober engineer he knew of, and to whom he went forthwith; and  our party, disgusted and disappointed, crawled wearily back again to the welcome shelter of the inn, and severally disappeared from public view for a 'siesta.' After tea we adjourned to the wide balcony to look at the brightly blazing bush fires on the neighbouring hills. 

Next morning, Sunday, after breakfast we again walked down to the boat, and found the difficulties of re-embarkation greatly increased by the low tide. A large space of black mud now intervened between the steep bank and the vessel; over this some bits of firewood had been flung down for us to step upon and only the aid of strong and kindly hands enabled the elders of our party to escape being bogged, but no serious disaster happened, and we went on, under the care of the new sober engineer, the semi-sober one frequently and vainly endeavouring to interview the passengers, who very naturally declined to have aught to do with him. Parts of these higher reaches of the river were beautiful, even though but partially discerned through the thick veil of vapour — a most provokingly opaque combination of smoke and fog — and we were pleased and hopeful until, on reaching the end of our voyage at the landing place at Sackville Reach, it was found that the conveyance which had come to meet us the previous evening, and brought a number of passengers to go down the river, by the steamer that brought us up it, had returned to Windsor with its cargo of deluded tourists; and we were left without any means of proceeding, as arranged, to the railway. Another council was held. One passenger, not of our party, a young man, Winded, to walk the 10 miles; but we were (some of us) not young, and not able to be so independent. To land was simply absurd. We could not sit starving on the shore till on some future day (date uncertain) we might be picked up, and returned to our friends. The inn at Wiseman's ferry seemed our inevitable destination once more, and thither we steered, as vexed, humiliated, and indignant a group of grumblers, justified in the very strongest Utterances of our grumblings, as ever had the cup of pleasure embittered and spoiled by unpardonable negligence in those on whom the arrangements depended. 


Sackville Wharf, Hawkesbury River, from Scenes of Hawkesbury River, N.S.W. ca. 1900-1927 Sydney & Ashfield : Broadhurst Post Card Publishers Image No.: a105344, courtesy State Library of NSW. 
On arriving at Wiseman's, the new engineer positively refused to take us any further, and we as positively refused to put our lives in peril by going in charge of the drunkard. Meanwhile, dinner was an imperative necessity, and all of the passengers, save two, went up to the inn, a buggy having been sent down to convey them in relays. The two who remained, feeling unequal to any exertion, in their weary and hungry condition (having breakfasted at 7, and it was now nearly 4 p.m.), begged that some food might be sent down to them. 

The indefatigable sketcher beguiled the first half-hour with a pencil; then the cravings of Nature conquered even love of art, and eyes were strained in the direction of the inn. Poor Mrs. Bluebeard herself could scarcely have uttered in more plaintive accents, 'Sister Ann! Sister Ann! do you see anybody coming?' than our pair of expectants might have been heard to faintly exclaim in turn : — ' Look ! there's something moving. Is it a man? No, its only a cow.' 'Surely that's a human shape. No, it's a stump.' 'There's another figure ; yes, it really moves this way. Is it carrying anything ?' 'I think I see a bundle— perhaps a plate in a handkerchief!' 'Yes, he sets it down as he climbs die fence.' The excitement grew too intense for words. It teas a man!— he had a bundle! There was a plate inside with chicken and bread upon it! Knife and fork came not; but that chicken's bones were picked with a relish that rarely comes to mortal lips in civilised lands, and those two poor sufferers, restored and comforted, could listen calmly to the plans discussed. 

At the price of five guineas extra, the sober engineer undertook to see us back to Newport that night. Our Melbourne friends, fearful of the rough, sea and the lateness of the hour, and being utterly weary of the dirt and discomfort of the wretched little boat, resolved to sleep at the Ferry Inn and hire a vehicle to take them to Parramatta (39 miles) next morning. But our party of five remained on board. The return voyage was slow, and after sundown the seabreeze blew very cold. The wooden gridiron-seats were not couches to satisfy a sybarite, however one might twist and turn and ingeniously feel for a batten softer than the rest. Broken Bay was what an old non-nautical Scotch servant of ours in the old days termed 'vary lumpy,' and the little vessel tossed and rolled amongst the lumps in so unpleasantly active a fashion that, had the exercise continued long, it would have had serious results; but we fixed our gaze either on Venus, brilliant above us, or on the bright red lighthouse star on Barrenjoey, and came safely into smooth water, going, I should think, about two knots an hour. Remembering vividly the terrible steps at the Newport landing, grandmamma had determined to roll a sail about her and lie on the deck till daylight, but the good captain pledged himself that we should be helped safely up, and well redeemed the promise, with the ship's lantern carried in front, to show the 'course' to be steered. 

The time being nearly midnight, the people of the inn had been long in bed, when the yelling steam whistle, telling of our approach, aroused them to prepare supper and beds. It would be hardly fair to criticise preparations so hurriedly made, however many their shortcomings. We had this and a half hour's rest, and rose at 5 on Monday morning. It was the opposition inn to which we had come, as being the nearest to the landing, and in the opposition conveyance, which exceeded, in ragged roughness of form and material, any other conveyance we ever beheld, we reached Manly, very thankful that our expedition had safely ended; and resolved to give friendly warning to others: that, until sober and civil persons are employed by the proprietors of all conveyances concerned, and punctuality, safety, and passable comfort assured to passengers, the grand scenery of the Hawkesbury had better remain unvisited. The Tourist. (1882, October 14). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 638. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161925522 


Wiseman's Ferry, N.S.W. circa 1900-19127 - Sydney & Ashfield : Broadhurst Post Card Publishers, Image No.: a106388, courtesy State Library of NSW

This is one of  many retorts, over many years, to an Argyle style report:

A Pleasure Trip on the Hawkesbury,
TO THE EDITOR OF THE SYDNEY MAIL.
Sir, — We notice in your issue of the 14th instant, under the nom de plume of 'Grandmamma,' a long and plaintive story, commencing with the flourish of a poetical pen. Judging from, the manner in which this story is told, we should think that 'Grandmamma' possessed one of those super-poetical natures easily disturbed by common occurrences, and certainly unfitted to give to the pleasure-seeking public a fair idea of a trip on the Hawkesbury, under ordinary circumstances. The drunken engineer threatened to blow up the steamer, but 'Grandmamma' was Ices ambitious and contented herself by ' blowing up ' everybody in connection with buggies, coaches, steamers, and hotels en route. Now we have done the Hawkesbury, and although not wishing to assert ...we have, however, succeeded in enjoying ourselves thoroughly. We did not notice the roughness of the vehicles at Manly, neither the necessity to 'scramble' into them. We did not find the slightest cause for nervousness in crossing the lagoon— entre nous,' Grandmamma' must have been asleep when passing the stranded Collaroy, and the awaking -when in the proximity of the pandanus must have been the 'sensation ' referred to. 

We happened to stay at the opposition house at Newport, and without delay were served with dinner, consisting of fowls and roast beef, the latter a little too well done, if anything. 

Picture of Newport hotel above is dated 10.7.1884 by Robert Hunt and courtesy Pittwater Local studies - Historical Images, Mona Vale Library.

After breakfast next morning, at the very early hour of 6, we made for the steamer, much fearing the descent of the steep bank. It is true we did not find marble steps, but very convenient ones, and were at a loss to know how other than a confirmed cripple could complain of the fatigue and uneasiness of their descent. We found the steamer all that could be desired, even to having carpets spread on the 'gridiron' seats, so particularly noticed by ' Grandmamma,' and the engineer was perfectly sober. After passing through beautiful scenery on either side, we arrived at Wiseman's Ferry — a distance of some 50 miles — at 12.30 p.m. Here we found a substantial stone wharf, upon which the passengers stepped directly from the steamer, even at low tide. As the steamer could not go alongside the hotel, and there were no rails laid for the hotel to run down to the steamer, we were obliged to walk some half-mile to the latter. A well served good, substantial lunch was ready, and we were attended during the repast. Finding also the hotel very clean and comfortable, and being informed by the landlord that he drove folks to or met them by appointment (by telegram, as there is only twice a week delivery of mail) at Windsor gratis, if they wished to stay here a few days, and not a week, as the steamer service would oblige them, we readily took the opportunity, especially when considering the rest of the river was more or less indifferent in respect to scenery. In this we had no cause for regret. We stayed some four days, during which time we had a boat and buggy at our disposal, and were able to make very pleasant excursions inland and down the river. After paying a very moderate reckoning, we were driven into Windsor and thence caught the train to town, having firmly made up our minds that, with your kind permission, we would first challenge ' Grandmamma's ' disparaging comments, and then give friendly warning to others that, if a few days are no object, by far the best (and also the cheapest) way of seeing the Hawkesbury is to adopt our plan and make Wiseman's Ferry the base of operations. — We remain, Sir, yours truly, COMMONPLACE YOUNG MEN. 
A Pleasure Trip on the Hawkesbury. (1882, November 4). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 816. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161926043 


A Round Holiday Trip.
By “IBIS”

I had often heard of the beauties of the Hawkesbury, the afore irresistible charms of Kurrajong, so resolving to make a round trip of it, we arranged a party and started one fin morning in spring. I give my experiences with the charges or cost of the flying visit, hoping it will be valuable information to my readers, and that many may be enabled to do as we did in the coming Christmas holidays.

We reached the Royal Hotel, Richmond, at 11 o'clock, where, after being kindly attended to by the excellent lady of the house- we were thankful to lounge on the balcony and rest after the tiring events of the day. ' The next morning at half-past 9 we started by coach, Powell's Royal Mail; for the Kurrajong. This drive takes two hours and is a very pretty, pleasant road. The charge is moderate, about 2s, and the coach stops at  Powell’s homestead, where you can have a good dinner, cleanly served and not expensive, and any amount of any fruit in season, English or tropical. 

When you reach the heights of the Kurrajong the view of the lowlands is very fine. You see Richmond and Windsor lying little patches in a field; the Nepean winding through the plain like a twist of macaroni — no larger, so you may guess the distance you see Parramatta and the adjacent little settlements, and (the 'Railway Guide' informs me) 'even the locality of the metropolis itself”, for this I cannot vonch, as I did not observe it. As I stood upon the height gazing at the vast stretch of country before me, I was forcibly reminded of the temptation of our Saviour on the Mount. The most beautiful large tree ferns grow at the Kurrajong, and are easily procurable. Also the waratah, or so-called native tulip.

The next day we wandered about Richmond. This is quiet little place, whose-growth appears to have suddenly, stopped some thirty or more years ago. And the present inhabitants seem quite content to leave well alone. Business seems stagnant, and quiet content reigns over all. The park, or cricket and sports ground, lies in the centre of town and is a goodly square of ground, with a large ring like a mammoth circus fenced off from the trees and seats. The ground here is smooth and the grass green. There is not much in Richmond for sightseers to see, for it is built on a portion (very small) of the immense plains. Windsor also'is built on the same a few miles on — three or four, I think; but, then, Windsor is worth anyone's visit, if it is only to see the fast-falling old records of the past days of this colony. Windsor is one of the very oldest settlements, ranking almost with Sydney and Rose Hill, or, as they call-it- now, Parramatta. 

We left Richmond for Windsor on Saturday afternoon by the 4 o'clock train,, and reached there a few minutes later. At the station waiting the arrival of the train were two omnibuses; and some safety cabs. I felt we were in a recognised town again, and felt sorry as I looked around and saw the substantial buildings as far up as eye could see. I was somewhat astonished too; for after Richmond with its placid quiet air, which put me in mind of a boy dozing at his work on a Summer's day, or a bullock driver asleep in his dray while the team pulled lazily on, the little town is there, but everything is green — grass even growing in its principal street; it seems dozing under the heat of the summer's sun. Now, Windsor, although so near; is entirely different ; life here strikes one as life — not existence only, but work. The very women who stand at their door to see you pass are busy — either with nursing or sewing. Sister towns, Windsor appears like a hungry ratter looking for his food; Richmond like a pampered overfed pet sleeping on his cushion. As we drove up the street I saw that most of the buildings were old. I felt a feeling akin to awe possess me as we went on. Up the old street on either side the old houses stood, thickly interspersed by the bright fresh ones, some with every pane of glass out and only the sash in the windows, others with the shutters hanging by one hinge, others in order but still unmistakably old. There seemed a forlorn air of neglected old age about them that appealed to the sympathies. They seemed to say, 'See, here we are ! standing still ; and each one us could tell many a tale if we chose.' 

The people of to-day vanished, and I saw the inhabitants of the past once more come and go in the streets. The phantom faces looked out of the glassless windows at rue. A detachment of the old 109th marched down the street. I heard a clanging sound. Lo ! a body of convicts, with their grey or yellow dress, with the broad arrow-branded on the back, chained together, moved past with their armed guard. Yet another came on-. This time they took the place of four footed animals, and were drawing up a dray and its load. Now a prancing, champing horse came up the road, its trappings and its rider's dress glittering in the sun. He was an officer of the regiment sitting firmly upright in his saddle in all the pomp and glory of fall regimentals. Oh! people of the past ! Oppressed and oppressors, sinners and stoned against, how paltry and fleeting your sorrows and chains appear now ? 'Twas but a little time even at the best. You have passed away, and the earth knows you no more. Only the effects of your works remain. You have passed, even as we are doing, like a shadowy panorama. 

The coach stopped at the Royal Hotel. This is a square brick building, still good, with a verandah round two sides, it ends the street, and was aforetime the officers' head mess-quarters. The old barrack and gaol are just round the corner of the opposite side, and would have been, I conclude, in sight of this house when the officers had it. 

Opposite one side of the verandah is a smallish green field, fenced in by a white fence. Here stood the whipping post, the call bell, and the stocks of old memory. The present holders of the hotel remember all three standing, and of being in use.

 Just below this is a branch of the river, almost dry as I saw it, edged on each side by large old weeping willows, brilliantly, brightly green. I have never seen such a multiplicity of weeping willows as I saw here, and on the Hawkesbury large graceful trees. 
' 'I wonder' I wondered aloud, 'why they planted so many willows ?’
‘Because thems the weeping willows,’ returned a voice at my back. I looked round, and leaning against the inside fence was a little, dried-up looking old man. 
'But what good do they do ?' 'Why, they show to the world the sorrows of ‘em as planted ‘em living momenters of tha old times.’
'But they weren't all sorry.’
' Every man Jaek on 'em, mum, frees or lags. Everyone on 'em.' 
He said this with an uncompromising firmness that forbade argument. 
'Why, the officers who lived here were not sorrowful? What had they to be sorry for ?' 
'Most o' them tress were planned by the hoffisers. Out o' that werry door as fine a young gent as ever lived was carried in his coffin wi' a broken heart. Not sorry ! Why, sorrow an' New South Wales camped at the same fire, in them days! ' 
' So you remember them ?  I asked, 
'Remember 'em? I should think I did! I onghter when I lived in 'em!’
'I feel much interested in the past, and would be very happy if you would tell me something of it, but not all of suffering.’ 
‘Why, twas the time of suffering. If that there piece of ground opposite could 'up and talk it could tell of suffering. Often the flogger has dyed the grass with the blood of man. Talk of suffering, why, if all the tears that were cried in Windsor could flow down together, they’d make as big a flood as ever swamped the town, or overflowed the banks of the Hawkesbury.' 
….

Just then the tea bell sounded, and I was reluctantly forced to leave this entertaining fellow. I found out that the coach, for the Hawkesbury left at 7 o’clock on the following morning and if I didn't take that I would have to wait till the following Sabbath morning, as it only went once a week. We decided to leave in the morning. Intimating our desire to our hostess, she informed us that punctually at 7 the following morning we would have to be standing in the verandah, ready to mount, when the coach drove round ; for its driver was a very irrascible man, by the name of Paddy, and known far and wide for the hotness and strength of his temper, having frequently driven off without his passengers, loudly and often expressing his resolve to ‘wait for nobody’, even if this 'nobody should be the Governor of Australia’. At a few minutes before 7 the following morning we were standing on the verandah, awaiting the coach, and certainly lost no time in scrambling up into our seats. This was agreeable to the driver, so he greeted us by glancing round and giving us a grunt. This the hostess of the Hotel informed me, in a whisper, was a great unbending on Paddy's part. We were off, and crossing the bridge passed down-a very pretty road, still plentifully besprinkled with weeping willows. This drive is one of 10 miles, and was done by Paddy in fine style, and well within the two hours. He very politely came and helped us down, carried the box on board the little steamer that waited alongside the bank and returning, escorted us on board.. This unwonted conduct caused the captain of the steamer and his wife to stand aghast; they stared open mouthed at us. 
But Paddy soon brought them to their seinses by telling them if they were one minute behind next time next trip they could stay away altogether or let the passengers find some other means of going over the 10 miles to Windsor; they wouldn't, get his car. The captain mildly explained that last trip the engineer had been under the potent power of ardent spirits. ‘I don't care, drunk or sober, if yer not here to the minit you don't get me, so mind’. With this parting 'warning Paddy took himself off. 

The little steamer lay against the log that does duty for the quay. There was on board, besides, 'our party.' the captain's wife, the captain, and his one solitary help. This person was A.B., engineer, steward, cook, and first mate rolled into one. Like a generally useful help, he was remarkably dirty and greasy. He was sitting forward with his arms' folded, dozing, when we came on board. He looked out at us with one eye, but immediately closed it, and his head fell on his chest, again. His appearance was very warmly received by one of our party, who fondly hoped there might be some after dregs of drunkenness left in him sufficiently strong to cause him to play some tricks. This wish, I am glad to say, was not gained, as the present party was not the one who had so enlivened the trip of the preceding voyage. He was sleeping off the effects of his alarming carovsal in the little slab hut on the bank, and the captain's lady informed me she had not yet recovered from the frights she had received, nor did she expect to for an indefinable period. 

Be it known, the Hawkesbury River is one continuous chain of bends and curve. You appear floating down a beautiful lake all the way; every twenty yards or so you turn a sharp, corner, and, lo! a more beautiful spot than the last. These sharp turns are dangerous to careless steering, and require not only a keen knowledge of the river, but steady steering. If the steamer ran aground, there you might stay for days; for she is the sole disturber of the water, and the banks are but very thinly populated. Consequently the vagaries of this intoxicated engine driver caused considerable alarm to the captain and unbounded fright and horror to the passengers, who were mostly ladies — about 18, I hear — and who got entertained in a manner they did not expect in this their trip up the beautiful Hawkesbury. The captain could not steer and manage the engines, small as the vessel was. The gentlemen there were nervous— besides, they were landsmen in every sense, and understood neither ; besides, the help did not appear very drunk on starting. He had the signs of licker but he had a bottle of brandy by his side, and a frequent application of his lips to this soon began to tell upon him. The first intimation they had of this was when, the captain politely desired him to 'clap on a little more speed.'; He turned it on with such a will that they had sharp work to clear the corner in safety. The captain expostulated, and said 'slower’, whereupon he nearly stopped the engine, and they scarcely moved through the water. By-and-by the captain mildly remarked a little more speed-would meet the wishes of the company better; hearing which the engineer sprung up, saying they didn't know what they wanted. He clapped on full steam, and the little boat positively flew up the river, emitting ever and anon an unearthly screech. This screech soon became a duet, for the fellow seeing the alarm around him, joined his voice to the whistle, and enjoyed amazingly the state of affairs. He kept possession of the engine, and the captain dare not leave the helm. 

The ladies began to scream, the scenery was forgotten, terror and alarm took possession of all, and confusion reigned triumphant* ' Ye want speed do ye ? I'll give yon speed; I'll race the whole wurruld. Whoop ! twenty to one on the 'Florrie.' Look out for the banks, Cap'n.. Ha ! ha ! Isa ! be me sowl, but yo'll run uz aground if ye don't look sharp, an' thin tbira lovely crafchers forrard'll git drowned. 
Och I sura 'twould amaze yiz,
How one Misther Theseas, 
Desarted a. lovely young lady iv ould, 
On a dissolute island 
All lonely and silent 
She sobbed herself sick as she sat in the cowld, ' 

“Take care Capt'n. Begorrah ye nearly done for us that time ; faith I never thought ye war such a poor steerer.- Its soon ye'll have us all on a “Dissolute island” if ye don’t take care. But I'm not a miserable ould hathin. I'll not desart the ladies. I'll stick be ye darlings.' 

Here the drunken fellow gave a long wink and leer at the crowd of terrified females and continued his song. The echos on the many hills around caught up the refrain and threw back the discordant sound in many voices. Presently he got tired and appeared to be dozing, and a consultation was held on board as to the best means of ensuring the safe termination of their journey. It was decided that the man should be taken from his present position and safely bound aft. This was quietly arranged, and two gentlemen were told off to bind the unruly delinquent, and then take his place under the captain's orders. It was a very easy arrangement, but scarcely so easy to do as to say. No sooner did they lay their hands on him than he sprung up and soon laid them both on the deck. 

‘Ha! ye divil's imps, would you take the engineer from his duty. What d'ye mane, ye pair iv igaorent savages be layin' yer claws upon rne ? Begorrah ! if ye attempt to get up from there I'll throw you both into the say. Where 'id ye be ye pair of lawyer's clerks — process servers may be for all I know, where 'id ye be, ye miserable haythins if ye tuk me from the works ? Stop yer screetchin ' he added, angrily, turning to the ladies, who were clinging together screaming, ' Ye set iv paycocke, or I'll blow ye all up, every one iv yez. Begorrah! I'll have ye in the nest world afore ye can say an ' Ave' if ye go on screetchin, ye unruly numbers iv society. I think ye've all come on boord drunk!’

Thus the up trip was made, the steamer arriving at the end of her journey a good hour or more late, where the passengers were received by ‘Paddy ' the whip, on the bank. If the waiting had cooled his horses and his feet it had warmed his temper, for he was in a very fiery mood, and made his horses and passengers suffer in consequence. The excursionists, sightseers, and pleasure seekers will not forget their visit to the Hawkesbury in a hurry. 

The intoxicated engineer was brought up in Sydney and accused before a jury of his 'countrymen, of riotous behaviour, being drunk and incapable at his post, and of endangering and threatening the lives of 'so many of her Majesty's subjects. But these enlightened body of men found a trace of spite and animosity on the captain's part, and the worthy engineer was discharged, leaving the court with an aggrieved air, Verily, trial by jury is a wondrous and fearful thing. Justice is Hindi and law is as uncertain a thing as a woman's mind, of betting a hundred to one on the favourite. 

We all watched the engineer's every move with expectant delight, trusting to see some drunken vagary, but we moved uneventfully down the stream, passing from one bend into, another, each beautiful enough for fairy land. The banks on both sides were almost continuously edged with the graceful weeping willow, their dropping branches trailing in the water.' I have never seen any scenery in Australia to compare in the remotest degree with that of the Hawkesbury. Nor had I connected any such grandeur with the name of Australia. Take it where you will, the river is splendid? On one side a steep hill rising immediately from the water's edge, covered with lovely tree-ferns, cabbage-trees, large trees covered with brilliant scarlet blossoms, another yellow, a third pure white* with here and there a huge grey rock showing. On the opposite bank, about a hundred yards of level ground, upon which a homestead, perhaps, is built, then the ground gently rises into a hill, with more and more behind. Sometimes you get a glimpse far away up a beautiful glen, with little, and large hills rising on every side. This goes on all the way down. 

By 1 o'clock we stop at Wiseman's Ferry, and see the telegraph wire and Sydney-road going up the hill. There stands the ruins of the old church, roofless, doorless, and all gone the way all things earthy, excepting the walls, it is built strongly of stone, so possibly the walls will stand till the stones are taken away. Within this church is a vault, also roofless, wherein lie the remains of Mr. and Mrs. Wiseman, and others. No more. The leaden coffins lie on their ..exposed to view and the weather. I wondered if really no person was left with sufficient Interest in these coffins to cover the vault, and so let them rest is peace. As we stopped at the stone wharf that Sabbath day, the place looked one of silence…


Wisemans Ferry, Hawkesbury River, N.S.W. Image No.: c026780132, from Album: Photographs of Sydney and New South Wales, ca.1892-1900 / N.S.W. Government Printer, courtesy State Library of NSW.

Old Church, Wisemans Ferry, Hawkesbury River by John Black Henderson (1827-1918) St. Mary Magdalene's Church (Wisemans Ferry, N.S.W.). Image No.: a1528498, courtesy State Library of NSW.

…was the dip of the' puntsman's oars and a Voice as he sang at his work. I thought it a beautiful picture as I watched his form bend with the strokes, and his punt move on. The horseman got out, and after a friendly leave taking, went up the opposite bank, had the punt cams towards our side. I pictured the man judging partly by the thin quavering voice— a little old shrivelled man bent with his work, but happy and content. I was envying him his disposition, when the punt drew near, and I saw the man was young, with a face swollen and distorted either with drink or insanity. He began cursing and swearing at the unfortunate captain, who really seemed a butt for all their anger, and flew to the rope vowing to cut it adrift as we were Secured a yard or so more to one side. He soon cooled down and began to make himself more pleasant by ridiculing our steamer's build, &c. He came on board, and depreciated every particle of her from the wheel down. This party's name is 'Jack’ and he has plentifully bedaubed the fence with hid name and initials in tarry letters. He became quite friendly with us, and volunteered to show a trial and exhibition of his pulling capabilities This he quickly did by getting into a boat and pulling strongly Up the river, crying out as he did so, 'There's Bush for you. Ha ! Laycock, where are you now? Here's Wiseman's ferry style. Here's muscle. Come on Trickett. Come on, be beaten by Wiseman's ferry. Heap's Hanlan.’ As he swept by he glared at me, inquiring ' what I thought of Wiseman's ferry style.' We all cried out 'lovely.’

This favourable opinion he received pleasantly, and he informed us of the nature of the river, the fish it held, all particulars, saying sharks abounded 16 or 20ft long. I expressed astonishment, when he said he didn't care, he'd swim across the stream at A swinging rate this minute. The arrival of two gentlemen from the Inn put a stop to his executing this feat, and we put off, Jack waving us a good-bye, and assuring us of a welcome on our next visit. As we had no dinner we made a meal of biscuits, oranges and sweets; the captain's wife very kindly gave me an excellent cup of tea, for which I felt grateful. She would take no money for it, but said she intended to begin and have tea, coffee, or chocolate for any who chose to take at so much a cup ; this will prove an additional comfort to this most lovely trip. The elder gentleman got out some sketching materials and began to sketch some of our party, very soon I followed his example and I was, glad to see their neglected blocks and pencils come out and be used. Thus example was better than preaching. The younger fellow-passengers in passing bowed; and we were soon, like most travellers in a small space, upon friendly terms. 

Although Wiseman's Ferry looked uneventful quiet and peaceful, it sees some funny scenes at times. For example, a few days before a travelling Bible distributer had come to the river's bank with a buggy full of Bibles. The buggy_ was drawn by a horse that had had no drink for over 24 hours. (This treatment of the poor animal seems at variance with the load on the baggy.; Upon seeing the water it rushed into it and was drowned. The dismay of the owner was extreme, as he saw his possessions swallowed up by the water. He called upon Jack to help, but his ludicrous antics and words caused Jack to be powerless of anything but wonder at himself. The buggy had been rescued, and a few of the Bibles, the missionary had them all spread out on the grass in the orchard of the hotel, in the sun to dry, and was kneeling in the centre, crying and praying, asking the Father to come down and get him out of his trouble. Then he-, would sit down, hugging his knees up to his chin and stare stonily before him, crushed with sorrow. Again he would pray and cry. He diversified this by going- over his books turning and straightening them. He had been like that for the last three days, sitting helplessly crying aloud upon the Lord-to come down and help him, apparently forgetting that God helps those that help themselves. These fellow travellers of ours had subscribed .£2 10s towards his relief and gave it to him, but he still sat like Niobe of old in tears, and refused to be comforted. I have often wondered if he is there still, or if he has procured a horse to take his buggy, Bibles, and self back to Sydney. We still sailed on, the banks on either side still as beautiful; they widened as we reached the mouth, and the foliage upon the hills grew darker. 

At last we turned into Broken Bay, and we looked an admiring farewell at the beautiful river behind us. 

I had been often wishing to visit the Hawkesbury, for I had heard two opposite opinions as to its claims for beauty: one was the laudatory encomiums of Anthony Trollope ; the other the condemning, disappointed opinion of a whilom friend, also an author and a traveller. But then he very naively remarked that his mode of travelling was rougher than he expected, and the creature comforts offered not up to his expectations or custom. He thus stood a living example that he saw through his palate, and proved the savine true that man may be governed by his stomach. He certainly has more of the animal than spiritual in his composition, else he never could have passed so much of the beautiful in nature without acknowledging its power. We stopped, at the inn at Newport all night; in the morning drove along the lovely road into Manly Beach, passing the poor old Collaroy lying high and dry up on the sands near Narrabeen Lagoon. 

The country around was brilliant with the bright hues of wild flowers at this season. The stately cabbage tree waved its fan-like leaves, and a flock of black swans were visible on the waters of the lagoon. A wallaby hopped across the road, much to the children's delight. We took the steamer at Manly, and so home, sunburnt, tired and happy and as Buttercup sang; ' Not a penny in our pockets, la-de-dah !' This trip I would urge upon the notice of youne people, shut up in the city at business all the week, and highly recommend it. You could leave Sydney by the 9 o'clock train for Richmond on Saturday morning j on arriving there take Powell's coach to the Kurragong, dine there ; go on to Windsor by the train, sleep all night there, down the Hawkesbury on Sabbath morning, and back in Sydney on Monday morning by the first boat from Manly in time for office, school, or shop. The probable expense would be between £3 and £4 possibly less. A Round Holiday Trip. (1882, December 30). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108000733 

Michael Maher, the former engineer on the steamship Florrie, was summoned, by Mr. C. E. Jeannerett, the owner of the vessel, for having, on the Hawkesbury River, on the 30th September, by drunkeness, so neglected the engine of the vessel as to endanger her. The vessel was at Newport, Pittwater, on the 30th September, having onboard the Hon. W. A. Brodribb and eight other passengers. The speed of the vessel was very irregular, sometimes being very fast, at other times only two or three knots an hour, and occasionally the engine stopped working ; at times there was only 40lb. of steam, and at other times there was 70lb. ; the engineer was observed to frequently go up and down  from the engine-room to the deck ; a stoppage was  made at  Wiseman's Ferry, and as the passengers after going ashore came aboard the engineer was found lying on the deck helplessly drunk. The party were going to Sackville Reach, but a consultation was held, and it was decided not to proceed until the services of another engineer were obtained. The passengers stayed at Wiseman's Ferry that night, and next day an engineer named G. Brooks was engaged to look after the engine of the vessel. The prisoner was committed for trial. Bail was granted, the prisoner being required to enter into his own bond of £80, and to find two sureties in the sum of £40 each. WATER POLICE COURT. (1882, October 10). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved from  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13524784

October sittings of the Metropolitan Quarter Sessions commenced yesterday, before Mr. District Court Judge Josephson, Mr. I. J. Healy prosecuted for the Crown. The only case of importance was one in which a man named Michael Maher was charged with endangering the safety of the steamer Florrie of which vessel he was the engineer, and the passengers on board of her, while on a passage from Newport, Pittwater, to Wiseman's Ferry, on the Hawkesbury River. Not withstanding that the evidence was very strong against the defendant, the jury found him not guilty, and he was discharged.NEWS OF THE DAY. (1882, October 31). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13527380

Death of the Hon. W. A. Brodribb, M.L.C.
[By Telegraph]
From our Correspondent
Sydney. Wednesday.
The Hon. William Adam Brodribb, M.L.C., of New South Wales, is dead, aged 77. The deceased gentleman, who was the son of an English attorney, was born on May 27th, 1809, and came out to the colonies when only 7 years old, arriving at Hobart in 1816. He came to New South Wales in 1836, and at once engaged in squatting pursuits, being one of the pioneers of the Murrumbidgee, establishing a cattle station in the Maneroo district, and subsequently a sheep station near Gundagai. Thence Mr. Brodribb proceeded to the Goulburn and Port Phillip districts, and he there embarked upon an eventful and important exploring expedition in Victoria, which resulted in the opening up of the Gippsland lakes and the formation of the port now known as Port Albert, and named by his party. After many similar exploring expeditions, marred by much difficulties and hardship, Mr. Brodribb returned to New South Wales and again engaged largely in squatting undertakings. He crossed the Australian Alps with a herd of cattle and horses and a flock of sheep, and established a station at Wangaratta, but sold out on the approach of free selectors and went to Victoria, residing at Brighton, for which electorate he was returned to Parliament. He then went home to England, and returning to the colonies established some stations in the Lachlan district, New South Wales, somo of which he retained until his death. During a second visit to England Mr. Brodribb was elected F.R G.S. and F.R.C.I., and proved instrumental in bringing about some important reforms in the wool trade in association with Sir Daniel Cooper. Coming back to the colonies, Mr. Brodribb purchased Buckhurst, near Sydney, in 1876, and remained there till he died. He was called to the Legislative Council of Now South Wales in 1881. Death of the Hon. W. A. Brodribb, M.L.C. (1886, June 2). The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), p. 5. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article174701998 


Alfred Milson's holiday house, Milson Island, Hawkesbury River - Dr R.D. Ward, amateur photographer, on the veranda of Alfred Milson's cottage, Milson Island, Hawkesbury River- Digital Order Number: a282009 from Collection ; Millers Point, Sydney ; Residences at Hunters Hill, Milson Island & Nattai ; Ships, China, Eastern Light, & Parramatta, courtesy State Library of NSW

The Sketcher.
A Trip To Gosford.

Leaving Sydney by the 7.15 a.m. steamer for Manly, one discovers how pleasant and refreshing a trip down the harbour may be on a crisp September morning, and regrets on reaching Manly that there are but some 15 or 20 minutes allowed for satisfying the sharpened appetite before the Pittwater coach gets under way. Bowling round the corner, the team, fresh as two-year-olds, takes us at a merry pace along the level road, past the lagoon, and into the bush, continuing amid rock and scrub that grows so prolifically in this sandy soil. A fairly good road gradually ascends for several, miles, the left being a mass of rough broken country, and the right, some high ground shutting us off from the sea, till presently we come almost on to the sea-shore, and every hill we top gives as a view of the continuous bay and headland coast-line stretching ahead for miles. 
After some six or seven miles, descending a sharp decline, we almost ran on top of the Collaroy, high and dry on the beach. The bizarre object startles one as it is so absurdly out of place; but the Company's balance sheet still reckons her an asset. 
The road seems to end here, and the coach enters upon a level strip of sward overawed by a straight range of steep, rocky hills, with a cabbage tree on top, limned against the sky. Here, meeting the fresh north wind that lifts the horses' manes, the leaders put their heads down and stretched themselves for a canter. I had been especially directed to select this route on account of the beauty of its scenery, so closely resembling, at times, that of the Rhine. But although one part of Europe may frequently recall another to the recollection, yet in Australia nature has assumed such distinct characteristics, that all comparison is rendered out of the question, nor could any effort of the imagination convert the old stone ruins on the rise at the end of the flat into the remains of some castle of romance. We could not elevate oneself above the conviction it was but a settler's or free selector's home-stead. Recently the land about here was sold, fetching prices up to £10 for quarter-acre blocks. 
A little further on we entered Narrabeen Lagoon, when the water came over the bottom of the coach. For three quarters of a mile the coach struggled along through marsh and water, not daring to stop lest the wheels sink in the sand. However, it is understood the Government will call for tenders next month for the construction of the bridge. Coming out of Narrabeen the coach passes round a finely formed hill abundantly clothed with tree and fern, including quantities of the Burrawang species. On the left arises a cleared eminence with two red cattle; beyond, a half-cleared flat, with a mass of low gnarled gum trees in front, through which the road leads ; on the right are some stretches of white sand, with a reddish-brown bluff rising above, and splashes of spray dashing up against it ; a few light clouds above break the sunshine. It is a good specimen of natural Australian landscape, and these are to the picture the finishing touches of the artist's master hand. As a centrepiece of such a scene, none but a painter knows the value of a lumbering coach and four, axle deep in water, slowly dragging its way along. 
From Narrabeen to Pittwater is a succession of hills and gullies, the views, and retrospect from each becoming finer and finer. The aspect of the coast, which is now continuously in sight, suggests somewhat the snapped off red clayey cliffs of Devon ; while two or three miles beyond are seen the deep gorges among the hills that hide the lake of Pittwater. From a distance, the rugged boldness of the hills bear many of the characteristics of mountainous parts of the Black Forest, although when close the vegetation and the general appearance of 'unfinishedness' effectually dispels the illusion. 
Presently we approach a promontory with rounded top and sides, smooth shaven like a lawn, and interspersed with scrub like the soft buxom furze of a Cornish hillside. It is remarkable besides for its massiveness, and one feels on reaching the summit as though he had overcome one of the obstacles of life. At length, reaching the eminence above Pittwater, we take our last view of the ocean with its half score of white sails dotting its wide surface in an aimless sort of way, and call each other's attention to the dignity waves can assume as they come rolling in with a slow lazy sweep and curl and break on the curved sandy stretch that connects the protruding frowning headlands. Turning inland, we enter, as it were, the top rim of the basin of the lake, and suddenly come upon the loveliest spot between Sydney and Brisbane Water. On the left one looks down a gorge ever so steep down : down through the stems of several species of gum, ironbark, mahogany, forestoak, turpentine, and cabbage tree, their tops netted into a dense mass of foliage, their bases buried in a profuse overgrowth of fern, bracken, clematis, and the graceful burrawang, a species of palm-fern, while in the mid-distance between the tree stems one can trace the stream at the bottom. The scene is rich with the luxuriant beauty of a New Zealand pass. Coming round the shoulder of the hill, openings in the trees betray glimpses of the deep blue waters of the lake, while the scene stretches away beyond to the high enclosing hills, in all their deep colouring, like one of Conrad Martens' pictures. 
A few minutes more, and the coach stops at the Newport Hotel, having accomplished the 14 miles in about two hours. At the waterside awaits the steamer Florrie. A little to the right, in a small bay, is another wharf, with a large house close by approaching completion, and destined for a boarding-house. As we steam out, we wonder which way we shall take, for the lake is completely landlocked by huge bluffs rearing themselves up above us like so many 'Ball's Heads,' and suffering rough jagged gorges to penetrate their way deep into their mass. In several places where the nature of the ground allows settlement, cottages and gardens and orchards have sprang up, and their beauty of situation renders one envious of the owners. 
Bending to the right, we pass between Lord Loftus Point and Scotland Island, while far ahead, near the heads of Broken Bay, is seen the noble island, in shape like a couchant lion guarding the entrance as he faces it. Pittwater forms a magnificent harbour, and, undoubtedly, in due time its waves will reflect the lights of a grand city reared upon its banks. Its entrance, some three miles wide, is wondrously safe. Its waters are deep, absolutely sheltered from every quarter; and as to its size, would float the navies of the world. Pittwater is the southern arm of the estuary, Brisbane Water the northern, while between, straight in from the Heads, stretches westward the grand outlet of the Hawkesbury River, between two enormous banks. Few rivers can match its magnificence of debouchure, as the hills boldly approaching the ocean in all their pride of strength majestically deliver up the waters confided to their charge. At the Barrenjoey lighthouse, whence also a cable is laid to Brisbane Water, we come in sight of the entrance to the harbour, and as we cross have a full view on our left of the estuary of the Hawkesbury. 


The entrance, Hawkesbury River, from Pt. Wagstaffe, Woy Woy from Scenes of Hawkesbury River, N.S.W. ca. 1900-1927 Sydney & Ashfield : Broadhurst Post Card Publishers Image No.: a105348, courtesy State Library of NSW. 

Passing in front of the island, just under the lion's nose as it were, we approach the bar that spoils Brisbane Water as a seaport. It is thought that possibly by blowing up the half tide rocks by dynamite, as was done in Hobson's Bay, the unimpeded rush of water would carry away the sand bar. When the wind is blowing from the south-west the heavy rollers break right on to the bar, rendering it impassable. Before crossing one admires the singularly graceful contour of the high range of ground shutting us of from the ocean, while on the left the eye commands the still higher range that enclose the valley of Brisbane Water, and tempered as to its massiveness by that same deep colouring resting upon its sides that seems to belong to all the Hawkesbury scenery. Safely across the bar we begin to wind about with the river which is much too tortuous, for though numerous huts and humpies perch themselves upon the shore, yet the scene grows monotonous. One misses the rich fields and cornlands, the pasturages, and terraced vineyards that border the (in comparison) tame rivers of Europe. The hills and valleys in their form are beautiful enough, it is the same-ness of the vegetation, the everlasting, unchanging gumtree that tires the eye. 
Mr. Rock Davis' building yard at Blackwall is the only place of interest passed on the way. One boat in the stream is near completion, and another is in process of building. Mr. Davis has been very successful with his boats, which, besides for their soundness and durability of make, are much admired for their grace-ful lines. He uses nothing but local timber. Several of the ferryboats in Sydney harbour come from his yard, and orders are tendered far in excess of his power to fulfil them. it is not very long since that he launched his first steamer as an experiment, and her arrival in Sydney at once gained a reputation for this yard, and at the same time proved the adaptability of the Brisbane Water timber for shipbuilding Just as one begins to grow weary and very hungry, our little craft emerges into the Broadwater, at whose far end, under the shadow of the hills, is discerned the little town of Gosford. Presently, on a point to our left, is noticed the first patch of cultivation. On the right, opposite East Gosford is Green Point, which was lately sold in allotments at such high prices. Drawing near Gosford, after some 25 minutes' run across the Broadwater, one's attention is attracted by the parsonage, with four Norfolk pines, admirably situated on a point. Farther round, lying between the hills that rise to a great height, on either side stretches back from the water the town of Gosford. Still to the left, at the extremity of the Broadwater, begins Nerara Creek, extending in a north-westerly direction. On the right, through East Gosford, runs Erina Creek, watering the magnificently wooded tracts lying between Gosford and the sea. 
Gosford, situated on the bottom slopes of a hill, consists of one street, in which are located the substantial post and telegraph offices, the Police Court, the Mercantile Bank, three hotels (one being a fine two-storey building), some five or six small stores, and a score or so of dwellings. High up on the hill is the Public school, with an average attendance of about 80. The surveyed line of railway crosses the Broadwater, and passes up the valley some 200 yards from the main street Brisbane Water was but little known until the proposal to construct this railway to Newcastle gave it a prominence it never hitherto enjoyed, although being one of the oldest settled districts. But since being brought thus into notice it has been largely visited by interested speculators and business people, who have returned convinced that Brisbane Water will become something of a winter and spring resort, which, added to the fact of its possessing- many undeveloped capabilities, and being, more over, situated between Sydney and Newcastle, will render it by the time the railway is opened an important town. 
Compared with other parts of the colony, Brisbane Water exhibits a lack of energy and enterprise. Its inhabitants, able to earn a fair and regular livelihood by wood getting, have allowed every other industry to fall into abeyance. Even the gardens and orchards, so well known in former years, are now unfenced and uncared for. Even the very homes of the wood-getters are, in most cases, without an enclosure, or, at the most, they grow but a few vegetables to suffice for their own needs. Yet the soil and the climate are well adapted for cultivation and growth, and no place enjoys so mild a winter. But to the visitor the dominant notion of the inhabitants appears to be that it is easier to let the timber grow of its own accord, and content themselves with cutting it when it has reached the requisite size. And these carters and timber-getters do not even attempt to grow their own horse- fodder, preferring to obtain it all from Sydney. To one who knew the place 40 years ago it is saddening to see its retrogression, and naturally one begins to seek the cause. In the early days many of* the best families of the colony either lived there, or owned property. Its natural beauty, fertility of soil, nearness to Sydney, and its accessibility (for in those days a short trip by sea was preferable to one in bullock waggons) rendered it desirable for settlement, and accordingly Brisbane Water acquired a reputation. But the first settlers soon found that timber getting was far more profitable than agriculture, hence, except in a few clearings about each homestead, no attempt was made to cultivate. 
The value of the timber trade may be inferred from the fact that from Erina Estate alone timber to the value of £4000 was sold in one year, and from that day to the present timber getters have been, and are still cutting timber on the same land. But in process of time, as the country became more opened up, and sheep farming took the premier position in the colony's industries, then one by one the old families left Brisbane Water, leaving none behind but the actual wood-getters, lime-burners, fishermen, and their purveyors. And thus remained the district for more than a generation. Bat now a new era has begun. At the prospect of a railway it has bestirred itself. Trade has revived. One steamer for passengers alone makes three trips a week, and two steamers direct make each two trips ; a bank has established a branch, and stores and dwellings are in course of erection. Even the church shared in the general improvement, a bazaar having been held to provide funds for its repair, when £106 were realised. As a final evidence of a better state of affairs, the people themselves admit there is now more money than there used to be. To one who knows anything of country towns this confession means much. 
As to the salubrity of the climate, there can be no question. There is no doctor there. Yet, although the population is considerable, the last resident doctor declared he owed his subsistence to surgical practice. The appearance of the school children is a living proof of the truth of the doctor's assertion. Sitting on the upper verandah of Campbell's Hotel, one begins by admiring the magnificent hill uptowering in front, hiding the westering sun, and ends with an inexpressible longing to climb to the top, a desire which has to remain unsatisfied till the next day. It is useful to go early, for the cool of the morning is absolutely necessary to enable one to tackle the climb. One has positively to cling to the hillside, but it is an exquisite hill, wooded with tall, straight trees, and carpeted with fern, and capped with rock, the very top being a broad, flat rock, charming for a picnic ground, superb hi its loftiness of site., exquisite as to view. Following a first instinct, one seats himself on the edge of the rock and hangs one's legs over. It is a sheer drop of 20 feet to a broken mass of gray lichen and moss grown rocks, lying cosily in a bed of soft green fern. On every ledge rock-lilies have found a foothold. The treetops are 20 or 30 feet below, and one looks over all to the south over the Broadwater, four miles long, with Gosford below on the left, and the tongue of land running far out into the lake, dividing East and West Gosford. Away over the Broadwater, one looks down between the line of hills that opens for the vision, over the flat scrubby land at the river mouth, over the blue waters of Broken Bay itself; one looks, Broken Bay with its lion-like island in its midst more conspicuous now than ever, across the bay with its single white sails, across to the sandy beaches of Barrenjoey, and to the high lands beyond that finally stop the view. Down at my feet lay a true Australian scene of untouched forest, and to the right, round the hill, sweep the graceful windings of Nerara Creek, across whose mouth runs a line of white posts marking the site of the railway bridge. This hill is the great feature of Gosford, being admirable hi every respect, and a remark in its praise always elicits a gratified smile. On the opposite side of the town, delaying the sunrise, is another range of hills even more lofty, but not so fine, either in form, view, or vegetation. West Gosford lies in the valley between. Leaving West Gosford, a walk of a mile or so from the Post Office brings us to semi-deserted, slowly dying East Gosford, once the chief town, where is the church, and formerly the steamer wharf. The church had been built in one town and the parsonage in the other, in order to allay their rivalries. 
In East Gosford the structures are of wood ; but in the other town nearly all the buildings are solidly built of stone. Stone houses in a country town always impress a visitor. They take away the 'mush-room' aspect that distinguishes but too many country places, and evidence, on the part of the inhabitants, a faith in their town. Crossing over Erina Creek by the old punt, still ferried by the same old blind puntman that took me across 20 years ago, we made the best of our way over a horribly bad road (which, however, Government is about to reconstruct) for a couple of miles through low-lying land, bordering the creek, heavily timbered, and with a strong under growth. Having reached a considerable clearing, we are suddenly astonished to behold a ketch, apparently entangled amongst the scrub. The existence of a vessel in the bush reminds one of scenes in Holland, where one is so often startled to see lumbering Dutch crafts in full sail in the middle of a field. Frequently a sail is the only indication one has of the proximity of a canal. At the wharfs of Erina and Wyoming, on Nerara Creek, the ketches chiefly load with timber, laths, &c. The present activity in the building trades in Sydney renders lath-getting unusually lucrative, enabling a couple of boys to earn as much as £3 per week. Bundles of laths, delivered at the wharfs, are sold for 13s. ; formerly they fetched from 6s., and men were glad to get that sum. Beyond the wharf a short distance, ascending a slight eminence, we come to the site where formerly stood Erina homestead (the residence of Henry Donnison, Esq.). 
The half-destroyed orchard and the homes of three or four woodgetters in the vicinity are all that remain to mark where once stood a huge and handsome dwelling, with a village comprising artisans of several trades. A ride hence in an easterly direction for some four miles brings us to the coast. Several clearings are passed on the way, in most of which still stand the lemon hedges and the fruit trees that were once a source of considerable profit, but all now apparently forsaken for the timber trade. At first sight one is led to deplore the utter decadence of energy ; but what I myself saw, and the testimony of the people themselves, proved to me that timber getting in this locality is a substantial and remunerative industry, nor does there appear to be any indication of its languishing. Years ago one heard of most of the heavy timber being cut, but the trade is actually on the in-crease. The soil produces wonderful trees, tail, straight, and solid like a ship's mast, and trees that five years ago were reckoned but saplings are now being cut for beams and rafters— aye, even for the piles for the Circular Quay extensions. The supply between Gosford and Tuggarah appears to be practically inexhaustible. The country is undulating and varying in its character from stony ridges and clayey flats to the rich loam of the brush or scrub land. The chief wood obtained from the higher ground is red and blue gum, red and white mahogany, turpentine, iron bark, stringy bark, blackbut, and forest oak. From the brush land, whence come the finest, logs, are derived the coachwood, maidens' brush, and ash. The brushwood is very beautiful. It is a dense jungle, semi-tropical in its character, and wrapped in impenetrable shade. Roads run hither and hither through its midst like avenues cut out of the foliage ; the gaunt grim stems of mighty trees rear themselves out of the undergrowth; here and there giant logs, moss grown, peep from out the screening bush ; clustering vines and clambering clematis run from shrub to shrub; the lawyer vine weaves everywhere an almost impassable net ; Deep, mysterious fissures to the right and left reveal the wonders of vegetation. This is the very home of the fauna tribe, which seems to have attained its perfection, and the groupings of fernery present a positive artistic arrangement. The tree-fern, and also the much-sought-after Bangalow species grow in abundance. In the profusion of wild beauty and overbrimming luxuriance it seems to laugh at the puny attempts of art, and in the dark rivulets that are no sooner seen than lost again, one thinks he has found the dryad of the scene. 
Ascending again, we presently pass two prosperous looking cottages, and come within sight of Tarrigal lagoon, then the ocean beyond, and some half-mile distant, on a' high bluff, the residence of Thomas Davis, Esq. Below his house, in a little bight well sheltered from every wind by Point Willoughby, axe the sawmills, building yards, and wharfs. The mill is not at present working, on account of new machinery being erected ; but the good order of the different departments, the constantly arriving teams, and the business-like aspect of the establishment greatly impress a stranger with the importance of the timber trade. D uring the whole of Mr. Davis's experience, but one mishap has occurred, when the schooner Wonga Wonga was blown on to the beach and wrecked, and yet this occurred through an accident that might have been easily prevented. The spot where stands Mr. Davis's house one would suppose to have been chosen from the whole coast for beauty. It commands a view of sea and coast line, over the fields on the hillside, over the lagoons, and the deep woods, away to the hills inland. Returning, we took a road that led us past the lagoon and Womberall Lake, meeting the Tuggarah Beach road. This led us through more magnificently timbered country, even richer in variety, and taking us likewise through much land adapted for agricultural settlement. It has been so long-supposed that coal was to be found in this district that Mr. Davis put down a bore at Tarrigal to prospect. He sank as deep as the old-fashioned bore would allow, and obtained such encouraging indications that he hopes to have it properly tested. The value of such a discovery, close to a place of shipment, is beyond estimate. A ride of some seven miles northward from Gosford, past Wyoming, along the surveyed railway track, brings us to Blue Gum Flat, another settlement that is developing in activity. At every turn of the road one encounters horse and bullock teams, for the timber on the flats beyond Blue Gum Flat is considered some of the finest that Brisbane Water produces. The road from Gosford, as might be supposed from the travelling of these teams, is execrable, although in many parts truly romantic. There is one grand avenue where the trees on either hand rear themselves straight up 100 to 150 feet, hiding their stems for 30 feet in brush, and burying their roots in fern. As we rode slowly along, the forest seemed to acquire that majesty that the American poet Bryant loved to tell of in his own great forests. It is grander even than the noble cuttings in the Black Forest. In the gladness of the morn, every bird seemed to have given itself to song, and ever and anon above the rest was heard the clear rare note of the tiny bell-bird. The road is hilly, but the view circumscribed by reason of the bordering growth of wood. In this direction is Wyong, where was recently found three distinct layers of coal de-posits, and for the purpose of working which Mr. Allison is reported to have gone to England to float a company. Not the least pleasant time in Gosford is the evening, when the environing hills early hide the sun, and lengthen out the gloaming. To drift about on the lake is full of that charm that has awakened poetry in every age, and as the hills draw down their shadows for the night, the masses of dark outline towering above the glimmer of the lake recall the solemn stillness of night upon Lake Como where one feels with unaccountable awe, that it is but the darkness that veils the presence of the Spirit that rules the destiny of life. SYDNEY. The Sketcher. (1882, September 30). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 542. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161926095 

Emile Theodore ARGLES Timeline

Born in 1851 to Charles Douglas Argles and Anna Mlle* - sic(nee Samson)
His Birth was registered  at St. George Hanover Square, London - St. George Hanover Square District. There is also a birth registration for Emila Theodore Argles, County: Middlesex, in 1851

His father was born in 1824 to Charles Argles and Elizabeth Thomasine Gibbs. The Alfred Argles that appears in some references was a younger brother of his father who came to Australia, had a son who was named 'Alfred' (born 1850 in South Australia), who also had a son called Alfred Henry. The Alfred Argles that funds the publishing of 'Society' is the first Australian born Alfred Argles, and Emile's cousin. Alfred lived at Neutral Bay - more on him anon...

Emile Theodores parents married on the 7th of April 1845, at St Margaret’s, Westminster, London. His father, a clerk by 17, and then solicitor, died in 1899, his mother in 1913:

August 10, 1913, Thames, Anna Argles, widow of Charles Argles, solicitor, London, 86th year. In Saturday 23 August 1913, Weekly Freeman's Journal, Dublin, Republic of Ireland, Page 9

The Argles had at least five sons and four daughters  - Napoleon Fredrick Argles, Arthur Felix Argles, Theodore Emil Argles, Julia Alex Argles
Frank William Argles, Josephine Argles, Celeste Argles, Augustus Charles Argles, Charles Argles. His father was a solicitor whose chambers were in Jerusalem Court, off Gracechurch St, London - John Edgar Byrne (QLD), who later published some of Emile's early works here, had brothers working as stockbrokers - hinting a link between these may have sent Emile north months after landing in Australia.

*Abbreviation: Mlle. (often initial capital letter) a French title of respect equivalent to “Miss”, used in speaking to or of a girl or unmarried woman: Mademoiselle Lafitte. 


Gracechurch Street in Norwood’s 1799 map

In December 1872, aboard the Hampshire, from London, Theordore Emile Argles lands in Australia. 
Family Name Given Name Age Month Year Ship
ARGLES THEODORE 21 DEC 1872 HAMPSHIRE B 315 001

London papers and those in surrounds were advertising options the year: 

EMIGRATION TO QUEENSLAND AUSTRALIA. ' Queensland Government Offices, 32, Charing-cross, London By Authority of ..
 
... EMIGRATION TO QUEENSLAND AUSTRALIA. ' Queensland Government Offices, 32, Charing-cross, London By Authority of the Agent-General for Queensland. Land Order Warrants for 40 acres per adult issued to persons paying their own passage. Homestead selections ...
Saturday 25 May 1872, Hampshire Advertiser, Hampshire, England 

Miscellaneous Intelligence
... by nearly £700,000. Above seven millions of gold arrived in this country from the United States; the import of gold from Australia declined from five millions in the first three quarters of 1871 to four millions and a half in the corresponding period of ... 
Saturday 19 October 1872, Tamworth Herald, Staffordshire, England 

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.
"(BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH)
Queenscliff, December 21. -
Arrived — Hampshire, from London SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1872, December 23). Mount Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1854 - 1917), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article201764462 

He alighted at Adelaide unless is among the second and thirds class passengers (100) aboard still and heading for Melbourne: ENGLISH SHIPPING. (1872, November 22).The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199376681 

Although in his first few years here Emile Theodore caught ships in short leaps between towns and 'cities', most of his travel appears to have been via trains between states - a hearkening back to his English upbringing.

On Monday a tea meeting was held at the Town Hall Exchange Boom, in connection with the Young-street Mutual Improvement Society. The tea; which passed off successfully, was followed by an entertainment of. a miscellaneous character. . It, comprised .songs, glees, recitations, readings, and an instructive and enjoyable lecture in two parts,-entitled “Flatterers and Fault-finders," delivered by the Rev. O. Lake. The lecture was attentively listened to, and at its conclusion the appreciation of the audience was shown by loud, applause. The Rev. gentleman gave some most amusing illustrations of " Flattery "and Ridicule " In course of his remarks he referred to the excellence of Geoffrey Crabthorne, spoke of the harmlessness of Portonian, and expressed his gladness that Pasquin's "dirty rag" was no more. The rest of the entertainment was much enjoyed, almost every individual selection being excellent. At, one end of the room there was a table bearing various articles—useful and ' ornamental –in which a small trade was done during the evening. GENERAL NEWS. (1873, January 14). The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), p. 2 (SECOND EDITION.). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207743729 

The first 'Pasquin' of South Australia:

THE LATE MR. E. R. MITFORD.
The late Mr. Eustace Revely Mitford was a near relative of the famous authoress of that name. He came to South Australia in the early days, and for many years conducted a witty satirical paper styled "Pasquin." He was remarkable for his keen wit, caustic humour, and the originality of his style; also for his caricatures, which were drawn in a daring fashion peculiarly his own, and are highly valued by those who are fortunate enough to possess them. He keenly satirised and caricatured the South Australian Government of his day with pen and pencil. He died on October 24, 1869, aged fifty-eight, and was buried in the cemetery of St. Mary's, Sturt, where his friends erected a monument to his memory. THE LATE MR. E. R. MITFORD. (1899, January 7). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 3 (Illustrated Supplement to the Adelaide Observer.). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162353873 

This book was bought for all libraries in SA by the local communities and reading societies:

PASQUIN. PASQUIN.
Reissue in one volume, with Portrait of the late Mr. E. R. Mitford, now ready, price £2 2s. The publication is for the benefit of Mrs. Mitford, the Editor's Widow. Old Colonists and others desiring copies are requested to apply to the undersigned.
LAWRANCE & BROOK,
Melvin Chambers, Adelaide. Advertising (1883, April 25). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42001110 

These items, published in newspapers Emile would have had access to, underline that though the 'Bohemianism' that was to become a creed among Sydney writers may have owed much to Emile, his French mother and heritage (and his own 'pilgrimmage') he was surrounded from the outset of his time in his new home by people with a similar mindset:

ODD NOTES.—BY A BOHEMIAN.
I LIKE to hear Lilley pronounce an eulogium on the legal profession. He is easily drawn into doing it, and, once he starts, the listener gets a rare intellectual treat—my word! I have heard him several times, and would go a long way to hear him do it again. He warms up to that work, all his sympathies are enlisted, and the floodgates of hit eloquence are unlocked. The unsullied purity, lofty patriotism, high-toned morality, and universal philanthropy that hare in all ages distinguished lawyers from the rest of mankind, are set forth with such clearness and force that for days after hearing him I can scarcely refrain from taking off my hat to every lawyer's clerk I meet. I hare long had such a profound respect for the whole legal fraternity that I never approach any member of it without a feeling of awe. There is no doubt that they are all Mr. Lilley thinks them to be —and something more. They are above all things the defenders of the liberty of the subject. Give them an adequate fee and they will rack their brains, twist and torture statutes and precedents, browbeat and frighten witnesses, mystify Judges, and bamboozle juries into believing that their clients are at liberty to do any mortal thing they feel inclined to do. That under the peculiar circumstances- in which their clients are always placed they could not possibly hare, committed the offence with which they are charged; or if they did, that it was deserving of praise rather than punishment. We had a fine illustration the other day of the valuable services lawyers can render a man at a critical time. A tradesman of Melbourne felt dissatisfied with the way things were going on at home, so he made up his mind to clear out with as much cash as he could lay his bands on, leaving his business partner to make the best arrangement he could with his creditors. He landed in Brisbane with over two thousand pounds ready cash in his pocket, and was going to settle down quietly in some snug retreat to enjoy himself. 
The Brisbane detectives were informed by telegram from Melbourne that a warrant was on its way here for his arrest, so they took the man into custody directly he attempted to leave the city. The lawyers heard of the two thousand odd pounds, and their hearts yearned for that man, and so ready were they to assist him that be had the greatest difficulty to decide who should undertake the task. There was no time to lose. The warrant was close at hand, hot had not actually arrived, so a Judge of the Supreme Court was appealed to, and the man was released. Not only released, but a scheme was devised and carried into effect, by means of which the detectives were baffled, and their prey spirited away into safe hiding. Now, the Government are offering a reward of £25 for his apprehension—but they will have to offer. He is worth more than £25, and will not be bought for such a paltry sum. I call it great triumph for the lawyers, and a splendid illustration of their value in a community. The ends of justice have been signally defeated, and the liberty of the subject secured in spite of detectives, warrants, and the whole machinery of the law "in that case made and provided"—and nobody but the lawyers and their clerks know exactly how it was managed. My erring brethren, whenever you make up tout minds to break the law, be sure and reserve sufficient cash to buy up the lawyers—and they make the rest all right. 
We used to hear a great deal about Ipswich influence in the councils of this great colony, and I believe that influence was and still great; but it's nothing in comparison to the Kangaroo Point influence in appointments to the Civil Service. My present ambition is to get an appointment as National School teacher under my friend Randal Macdonnell, as I feel persuaded we could get on well together, but if he can't make room for me I shall have another try for the Civil Service. I won't depend on Palmer this time—it's no me. I shall take a house at Kangaroo Point, and secure that influence, and then I shall be right. An old friend of mine, by a lucky chance, got into a snug little billet the other day, but he did not feel at all safe until he had set up his lares and penates at “the Point," so he did it in a hurry, and now he breathes freely. It was touch and go with him until he had completed his flitting. I expect when my friends Dickson or Cameron have real estate at the Point to dispose of in future, they will make this a prominent feature among the advantages and attractions the property possesses to intending purchasers. If they can say, "this valuable site or eligible allotment overlooks two reaches of the river the whole of North Brisbane, and a magnificent panorama of hill and volley, with the wood crowned heights of Taylor's Range in the distance," and then wind up, you know, by saying that "it is in the very centre of Civil Service patronage, being bounded on the east, south, and west by the properties of Messrs. Lands and Works, Post-office, Audit, Customs, Ac, &c." 
Depend upon it such a description would send the price of that land op to a very high figure indeed. Ambitions heads of families and aspiring young gentlemen would compete for it to the utmost extent of their borrowing powers, while that friend of auctioneers, "the speculator on the look-rut for an eligible investment," would not let it pass him for a trifle. I do not anticipate great results from the Intercolonial Conference. When six Australian Premiers lay their heads together it will be a strange thing if they cannot decide upon something for the general good. But my fear is that our own Premier will allow himself to be talked over by the others, and that be will not secure the recognition of his own dignity and importance as the principal representative of this wonderful colony. He is such an excessively modest and retiring young man and so amiable and yielding, that anybody can get over him. The feet of his being a Good Templar is, you see, all against him at a. meeting of this sort. He frequently imbibes ginger beer until he brings himself down to such a flabby mental condition that he would let a child persuade him, and, when in this state, his elaborate courtesy and refined language are apt to lead strangers to form a wrong impression of the man, and take advantage of his weakness. I hope Thompson will see. that his chief does not go into the ginger beer so extensively down in Sydney as he is in the habit of doing here. We are used to it, end don't notice the thing, except to laugh over and feel rather proud of it. That affair on board the Basilisk the other day, for instance, is still talked over with delight at all the public-house bars in Brisbane, and the popularity of the Premier is becoming as great in the metropolis as Sandy Fyfe's is at Rockhampton. We all feel honored in having such a man at the head of our Government, for the little failing before alluded to only endears him to us the more. But at a conference of hotheaded, overbearing, and hard mouthed Premier! from other colonies he will be snubbed and sat upon to any extent, unless Thompson can proceed in spurring him up a little—which is doubtful. ODD NOTES.—BY A BOHEMIAN. (1873, January 18). The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), p. 4. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article27274389 

Death, of " Bohemian.'
A wire was received in town at noon the 8th instant conveying information of the death, at half-past 11 that day, at Saudgate, of Mr. George Hall, who, for many years, occupied the editorial chair of this journal. The deceased gentleman was upwards of 60 years of age. He came out to Queensland in 1864 to join the staff of the Guardian. When that journal stopped issuing he became connected with the literary staff of the Courier, and in 1874 he was appointed editor of the Telegraph, from which position he temporarily retired in 1878. Early in 1880 he again assumed the editorship, eventually retiring from that position in June, 1885. Under the nom deplume, “Bohemian," he was known throughout Australia, and "Odd Notes" from his pen appeared for several years in the Queenslander and then in the Week, their first appearance in the last named paper being in January, 1876. Those who knew him will remember him as one of the truest souls in friendship. Though not brought up to journalism, Mr. Hall had the true spirit of a journalist. He was scrupulously regardful of facts and truth; painstaking and plodding to a degree. He had singular powers of observation, a ready faculty of generalising facts, an easy style of writing, a humour dry and apt in its use, which gave an admirable tone to his articles. A little more than three years ago he, on account of failing health, retired from the editorship of this journal and took a trip to England. The cold weather there nearly lolled him; he was glad to hasten back; but his health never rallied sufficiently to enable him to do constant work. After his return from England he joined the leader staff of the Telegraph, and held that position till his death. The Bread of Queensland is the poorer for the death of George Hall, and no man ever had a kinder-hearted or truer friend. The funeral took place on the 9th instant, the cortege leaving the Permanent Building and Banking Society's Office, Adelaide street, shortly after 2 o'clock for the South Brisbane Cemetery. Amongst those present were the Hons. J. B. Dickson and .J. Swan, Messrs. H. Wakefield, B. B. Bale, .Alderman Byram, who represented the building society of which Mr. Hall was one of the founders; the editor of the Telegraph, and Mr. C. Mills, and other accredited representatives of that paper's several departmonts; the city editor of the Courier; the editor of the Observer; Archdeacon Matthews, Mr. T. W. Hill, Mr. 8. W. Brooks, and others; and Mr. Loader representing the Moreton Mail and the South Brisbane Times. The burial service was conducted by the Rev. J. Welsh, Baptist minister of Sandgate and pastor of the church of which the deceased was a member. The last resting place of our departed colleague is beside that of his parents. Several wreaths were placed on the coffin, one of them being from the Telegraph standing as a last tribute to him who was for so long their chief and comrade. Death, of "Bohemian." (1888, November 17). The Week(Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), p. 13. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article183937950 

THE SUM OF LIFE.
By a Kangaroo Point Admirer of Longfellow.
Tell me not in scornful numbers
That the Point can’t boost 'the cream' ; .
For the Civil Service numbers ? !
All its sweep from stream to stream.

Civil Service life is earnest ;
In the race to gain the goal 
Screw-love in each bosom burnest ; 
Pay delights the Pointer's soul. 

Much to get, without much bother,
Is our destined end and way ;
All outside our 'ring' to smother, 
Who aspire to place and pay.

Palmer's strong ; no need for bleating,
'Cause our billets we can't save,
And the state milch cow is meeting
All the bills we cannot waive.

In the struggle after office,
In the rush for place and pay, 
We but think how great the muff is
Who to berths can't find his way.

Trust no promise, however pleasant,
Till you see your name in print ;
The Gazette's no welcome present, :
If our circle is not in't.

Civil Servants all remind us, 
That an easy life's sublime ;
That when we go, we'll leave behind us, -
Footprints on the path we climb.

Footprints that some unborn brother;
Seeking place, and hoping gain, 
May travel safely, and not bother '
Friends or ministers in vain. 

Let us then, one course pursuing,
Strive to make the Point the gate
To preferment — aye eschewing !
How to labor, how to wait. —
PASQUIN.   THE SUM OF LIFE. (1873, January 27).The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article169487533 


Brisbane River below Kangaroo Point Cliffs, ca. 1885 [John Oxley Library, State Library of QLD.

His forerunner, in Eustace Revely Mitford, had a similar subject matter:

Abuse or Patronage.—In an old number of Pasquin we find the following remarks made about the then recent appointment of Mr. Bellhouse to the office of Accountant in the Railway Department:—"A vacancy lately occurred in the office of Accountant in the Railway Department by the resignation of Mr. Paqualin. The Assistant-Accountant (Mr. Overbury), an efficient  officer, very properly succeeded Mr. Paqualin ; but Mr. Overbury's vacancy—How was that to be disposed of ? Why if was conferred on the  next most deserving and of course competent officer in the department. Eh! Oh, no! gentle reader, nothing of the kind; it was in the gift of the Hon. the Commissioner of Public Works (Mr. English), and by that gentleman disposed of to one of the clerks in the office of Messrs. Brown & Thomson's timber yard. This is a most unjust way of disposing of the appointments of the province, and will only lead—as in all cases it does—to inefficiency, discontent, and 'disorganization' See what the Police Force  has come to through this vicious system, and its  effects may be traced throughout all the departments of the Civil Service."  THE RABBIT NUISANCE. (1873, February 11). Kapunda Herald and Northern Intelligencer (SA : 1864 - 1878), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108271228 

THE CIVIL SERVICE.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE BRISBANE COURIER
Sir-Some attention is being drawn at present to the Civil Service, and to the unequal favour shown towards the members of it by those in power.
Unless what the Toowoomba gentleman says is true, viz , that the Opposition is in the pay of the Ministry, I have a remedy to propose to which I respectfully call the attention of all honest men interested in such of the Civil Servants as are underpaid , and I call upon all such honest men to do their duty towards their neighbor.
Let, then, a member of the Opposition move for a return of the following -
A list of Civil Servants who have had their salaries raised since 1871, the same since 1870, the same since 1869, and so back to 1864, we will say , giving the amount as well as increase in each case
Also a return of tho Civil Servants who have not had their salaries increased since 1870,1869, and so back to 1861, or further giving the names, offices, and the amount of salary paid.
This return would make the hair of honest kindly men stand on end at the iniquity of the heads of departments, and fill all hearts with pity for those who toil on in summer heat and winter cold, with families to keep, and without a hope of promotion, and all because they don't "move" in Kangaroo Point "circles"
Even when Ministers do bring up nu old toiler for increase of salary, they take care to tack on to him a bunch of drones for increase at the same time And if the Assembly vote the lot, then their favorites reap the benefit, and if the Assembly (happening to detect the drones' names) refuse to grant the increases, poor toiler has to go without as well, and the Ministry shrug their shoulders, and say to him, "It is the Assembly's fault."
Let the Assembly then vote each man's increase separately, and see that drones and working bees are not brought up together in a bunch for a rise, and so let them spoil this stale, old, game of the Ministry.-Yours, Coker Brisbane, May 2. THE CIVIL SERVICE. (1873, May 5). The Brisbane Courier(Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1315980 

The " Maryborough Advertiser " has a heavy down" on " parsons," and chronicles in the following paragraph the visit of the Rev. Mr. Backhouse, who is raising funds for the British and Foreign Bible Society :—" An ecclesiastical tramp will go round with the hat this evening in the Independent Church. He is begging badge is 'Bibles.' This self-constituted and ignorant man is one of a gang of men who lead a lazy life, roaming about sponging on the public, and when they have wheedled all they can out of adults, they coax the poor children to give up their half-pence, while they themselves live on the fat of the land." Surely the mantle of Pasquin has fallen upon this uncharitable scribe. SUMMARY OF NEWS. (1873, August 12).Yorke's Peninsula Advertiser and Miners' News (SA : 1872 - 1874), p. 1 (Supplement to the Yorke's Peninsula Advertiser). Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article215903751 

Departures September 25;— Queen of the Bay,' barque' 391 tons, Wale; master, for Brisbane. Passengers : Anna Maria Canning, . Emma 'Winlo, Robert Winlo, William Jen-am, Ann Jerram, Eliza Chadwick, Henry,; Cornwall, Edwin Taylor, A. Joslin, Emile Argles, and J. Ellen White. SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1873, November 21). The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article169484627 

Per Messrs. Taylor, Bethell, and Roberts' Queen of the Bay, from London, September 22. For Brisbane-Anna Maria Canning, Emma Winlo, Robert Winlo, William Jet-ram, Ann Jerrara, Eliza Chadwick, Henry Cornwall, Edwin Taylor, A. Josling, Emile Argles, and J, Ellen White.  ENGLISH SHIPPING. (1873, November 25).Rockhampton Bulletin (Qld. : 1871 - 1878), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51805206 

PRIVY COUNCIL DECISION.
TO THE EDITOR.
Sir—You would not represent me> I have never had any interest in nor communication with the North Australian Company." "I have stood alone, and never identified - myself with any other land-order-holders. I am the last man in the colony to conceive a studied insult to it. My action is precisely the reverse. I have been very jealous for its honour. I Know, and successive Governments have known that, owing to this vexed question of breach of contract, the fair fame of  South Australia suffered in the City of London, and it is only reasonable that-as a colonist I. should exult on the majesty of the law, as pronounced unanimouely by all our Judges, being upheld by the highest and purest legal tribunal; in the world. I did my best, when I was permitted at the bar of the House of Assembly to address it, to prevent litigation, its enormous cost, and the present mortifying result, but what can one man do against the wrongheadedness of a Parliamentary majority backed up by the Press— penetrating Pasquin excepted. Together they beat even Government itself when it attempted to make the settlement with the land-order- holders which is now inevitable. Although I have borne the-brunt of odium for the stand I have made in what I firmly believe to be the interests of the colony, I feel convinced that public opinion will some day admit that right and justice to be on the side of the Legislative Council, the judges and, Your obedient servant,
SAMUEL TOMKINSON November 17, 1873
As Mr.- Tomkinson has shown a deep interest in the - North - Australian Company; against Blackmore and a strong sympathy with the plaintiffs in the case, it JaJi mere quibble; about terms to say that he has not identified himself-with the Company. As to the effect of "the Privy Councal decision”, our Correspondent has in his letter taken up more intelligible ground than that which we understood him to assume in procuring the ringing of the bells on Saturday last. Then this judgment was said to be a vindication of the fame of South Australia in London., Now it is spoken of as the "mortifying result" of "the wrongheadedness of a Parliament majority backed up by the Press"—and it, might have been added, of the public too. It is in the "majesty of the law" that Mr. Tomkinson now exults a very different thing from the vindication of She-colony's honour. And, referring to the points we should particularly like to know the extent to which the fair fame of South Australia has suffered in the City of London" through her honest attempt to resist what she regarded as ungracious and unjustifiable demand have our securities been depreciated, have our loan operations been affected in the slightest degree-by; the vexed question of breach of contract. We have the best possible evidence that they have not, and this, in spite; of the determined t attempts of men, who owe everything to the colony, to lower her in the estimation of 'the capitalists' of London. One word for Mr. Tomkinson himself .No one can have the least objection to his exultation in "the majesty of the law," and his delight at the discomfiture of the South Australian Government so long as he rejoices in private but it is really too bad that the whole town should be disturbed by the; ringing of the 'Albert Bells because; of the idiosyncrasies of one citizen. [Ed.] PRIVY COUNCIL DECISION. (1873, November 17). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 2 (THIRD EDITION). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197671130 

1874

Arrivals 
January 14. — Queen of the Bay, barque, 391) tons, Captain Wales from London. passengers : Mr and Mrs Jeram, Miss J. E. White, Miss Eliza Chadwick, Miss A. M. Cunmmings, Miss Emma Winto. Messrs A. Gosling, Edwin Taylor, Henry Cornwall, Robert Winto, Horace Fennell, and Emillie Argles. SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE (1874, January 21). The Darling Downs Gazette and General Advertiser (Toowoomba, Qld. : 1858 - 1880), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75468462 

Many of these ships travelled from Perth to Adelaide to Melbourne then Sydney before disembarking passengers who had boarded at nay of these along the way at Brisbane – the Queen of the Bay also picked up and bore passengers south from Rockhampton and was later caught south by Emile.

In other Ships Lists for arrivals this arrival is reported as “Miss Emile Argles", Miss Eliza Chadwick, Miss-A. M. Cummings, Miss Emma Winto, Messrs A. Gosling, Edwin Taylor, Henry Cornwall, Robert Winlo, and Horace Fennell. SHIPPING SUMMARY. (1874, January 21).The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 4. Retrieved, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1378164 

The Queen of the Bay, from London, was towed up to Messrs. Harris's wharf this morning .by the Francis Cadell. She brings the following passengers : — Mr. and Mrs. Jerram, Miss J. E. White, Miss E. Argles, Mrs. A. M. Cummings, Miss E. Chadwick, Miss E. Winto, Messrs. R. Winto, A. .Gosling, E. Taylor, H. Cornwell, II. Fennell. We could not procure her' manifest in time for publication in this issue. SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1874, January 14). The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article169516719 

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.
ARRIVALS.
January 1.--Queen of the Bay, barque, 390 tons,
Captain Wale, from London. Passengers : Mr. and Mrs. Jerram, Miss J. E. White, Miss Emile Argles, Miss Elisa Chadwick, Miss A. M. Cummings, Miss Emma Winto, Messrs. A. Gosling, Edwin Taylor, Henry Cornwall, Robert Winto, and Horace Fennell. SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. (1874, January 17). Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130759402 

ANYBODY having Communications for EMILE ARGLES, please address A.S.N. Hotel, Brisbane, WITHOUT DELAY.  Classified Advertising (1874, January 16).The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1378036 

Same month 464 Government immigrants. J. and G. Harris agents arriving January 10th per Winefred, ship of 1359 tons, Captain Fawkes – from London on October 4th. This also seems to be a sentiment Emile had - although only 21 it seems he may not have expected to ever go home:

THE EMIGRANT
[ORIGINAL.]
After forty years of toil
Before the furnace red,
A workman was forc’d from Albion
To earn his children bread
To earn his children bread
Had he striven hard to live
Alas! that a country should be so rich
And have so little to give!

He gaz'd o'er the vessel's side,
Upon the waters deep; 
And though his heart was sad and full 
He did not dare to weep;
He did not dare to weep 
His mother was standing by — 
A woman of three score years and ten 
Who’d bid her land good-bye 

His wife was ailing and sick,
Her limbs were racked and sore;
But far better he thought to sail away
Than starve on England's shore:
Than starve on England's shore!
That land of plenty and waste,
Where the rich man revels in earthly Joys'.
The poor can never taste.

One last and longing look
At the fast receding shore, 
For the emigrant knew that dim outline
He ne'er should gaze on more;
He ne'er should gaze on more
For his locks were turning gray
Twas a painful sight for that man to see
His country pass away.

O Albion great and brave!
O country of glory and fame !
Dids't thou heed thy crying poverty more' '
How brighter far thy name!
How brighter far thy name — ;
Which yet sends loving thrill
Through our hearts ; for spite of all thy fault!
England! we love thee still.
EMILE ARGLES.
THE EMIGRANT. (1874, February 2). The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article169518209 

We notice by advertisement in another column that Mr Emile Argles will deliver a lecture on Friday evening next, in the School of Arts, Bolsover-street, and that half of the proceeds will be given in aid of the Port Curtis and Leichhardt District Hospital fund. The subject chosen is the popular one of "American Humour,"and the lecturer proposes to read during the evening some selections from the works of Mark Twain, Josh Billings, Bret Harte, Orpheus C. Kerr, and James M. Bailey. There is plenty of scope in such a subject for the lecturer to instruct as well as amuse, and to show us as Sam Slick once said, "the effect of soft sawdur and human natur." A very pleasant evening is anticipated. PRINCESS BEATRCE. (1874, July 1).Rockhampton Bulletin(Qld. : 1871 - 1878), p. 2 (DAILY.). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article92156682 

THE HOSPITAL LECTURE.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN.
Sir,-Would you kindly allow me, through the medium of your valuable journal, to make my excuses to my ticket-holders for the nonfulfilment of my promise to deliver my lecture, “American Humour," at the School of Arts, on Saturday, which had been postponed from the night before ; but the weather was so very bad, that I could not have done so excepting at a heavy pecuniary loss; which, as half the proceeds were to revert to the Hospital, would not have benefited that institution in the slightest degree.
Miss. Gougenheim has done mc the honour to request me to lecture for her, at the Theatre, to-morrow evening, but I will take the first opportunity of giving the lecture at the School of Arts in a few days, when all outstanding tickets will be available.
My sincere and heartfelt thanks are due to his Worship the Mayor, Mr. Hendriok, Mr. Dibdin, and other members of the School of Arts committee, for their kindness on Friday evening, which lessened the heavy disappointment the inclemency of the weather naturally caused me.
I am, etc.,
EMILE ARGLES. CORRESPONDENCE. (1874, July 6).Rockhampton Bulletin (Qld. : 1871 - 1878), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51799653 

E. ARGLES. — Mr. Argles requests that the Person or Firm in Brisbane, to whom money was remitted for him, will oblige by communicating with his Solicitor, Mr. Melbourne, at Rockhampton, as Mr. Argles' advices do not mention the name of the Agent or Firm. Advertising (1874, September 25). The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article169513702 

LIST of Unclaimed Letters at the Post office, Rockhampton ; if not claimed on or before 14th December, 1874, will be forwarded to the Dead Letter Office, Brisbane.
DANIEL PETERSON, Postmaster.
Post-office, Rockhampton,
23rd November, 1874.
; Argles, E., Advertising (1874, December 8).Rockhampton Bulletin (Qld. : 1871 - 1878), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article51799720 

1875

At Theatre Royal
In Operatic Selections, Overtures, &c.
The Entertainment to conclude. with a New Local Musical Burlesque Sketch, written especially for Mr. and Mrs. Griggs by Emile Argles, Esq., entitled — The nautical Lover.  Advertising (1875, November 6). The Daily Northern Argus (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1896), p. 3. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article213421791 

Emile then heads south again - whatever had brought him to Queensland is not to bring him there, to reside, again.

1876

As Harold Grey 1876 – translator of a Belot work as he was not only raised to speak French, as were all well-educated young men and women then, but had a French mother
Adolphe Belot, French novelist and dramatist (1829–90); traveled extensively and settled at Nancy as a lawyer. He won reputation with a witty comedy, ‘The Testament of César Girodot’ (1859, with Villetard); and being less successful with his following dramatic efforts, devoted himself to fiction. Of his novels may be mentioned: ‘The Venus of Gordes’ (1867, with Ernest Daudet), ‘The Drama of the Rue de la Paix’ (1868); ‘Article 47’ (1870); all of which were dramatized. Born in France, at the college of Sainte-Barbe , Belot graduated from the Faculty of Law in Paris, and in 1854 he enrolled in the Nancy Board of Lawyers. After several trips to the two Americas , he devoted himself to letters, publishing the Punishment in 1855 , before approaching the theater with a comedy entitled À la campagne ( 1857 ). In 1859 , in collaboration withPierre Villetard , he gave the Testament of César Girodot , one of the best pieces in the repertoire of theOdeon , a play that counted more than 500 performances.
Belot wrote popular literature of character, if not erotic, at least a "rascal," like Mademoiselle Giraud, my wife , an original, bizarre, immoral work, according to some, moral according to others, which obtained an immense success of curiosity and a circulation of 33 editions, or 66,000 copies ( 1870 ). He was named Knight of the Legion of Honor in 1867. Adolphe Belot. From: (2017, January 1). Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Adolphe_Belot&oldid=133211023 . 

THE STORY - TELLER.
LAURENT'S VOW.
ADAPTED FROM THE FRENCH OF A. BELOT FOR "THE WEEKLY TIMES,"
BY HAROLD GREY.
Part I. THE BATIGNOLLES TRAGEDY. Chapter III.
The detective bent his steps in the direction of Mariette's room. Notwithstanding the exertions of the doctor, the girl still continued in a deep swoon. On finding her in much the same condition in which he had left her, Moule uttered an exclamation of impatience. Everything depended on the revelations this girl would make on regaining the power of speech. At length the police-agent who had been sent in search of Laurent Dalissier returned. The detective glanced at his subordinate. The man was alone. “Well ?" demanded Moule briefly. " M. Dalissier was not at home," answered the agent. " Cannot they tell you where to find him ?" ' No, nor when he is likely to return." 4 Go on. I am listening." " He went out at 9 o'clock this morning ; he returned for a few moments in the afternoon to dress, and he has not since been seen." Moule frowned ominously ; time was being lost when every moment was precious. ... THE STORY - TELLER. (1876, February 26). Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219429097 

THE STORY - TELLER.
LAURENT'S VOW.
adapted from the french of a. belot for "the weekly times,"
BY HAROLD GREY.
— w Part I. THE BATIGNOLLES TRADEGY.
Chapter VI. — ( Continued. )
At this point Laurent was interrupted by the entrance of an usher, who handed the magistrate a large sheet of paper folded in two. M. Thurier glanced carelessly at the document, and placed it in a corner of his bureau.
"That will do," said he to the usher ; and then, turning to Laurent, motioned him to proceed. "A week passed," continued the young man, "and I had almost forgotten the fatal soiree, when I received another invitation from Suchapt. The remembrance of my humiliation returned a thousandfold. I longed to revenge myself, and now an occasion offered, why should I not accept it ?... (TO BE CONTINUED). THE STORY-TELLER. (1876, March 11).Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219428260 

THE STORY-TELLER.
LAURENT'S VOW.
ADAPTED FROM THE FRENCH OF A. BELOT FOR "THE WEEKLY TIMES,"
BY HAROLD GREY.
Past I. THE BATIGNOLLES TRADEGY.
Chapter YII. — (Continued.)
At length all the rooms of the apartment having been visited, the commissary's explanatory discourse came to an end. " But, monsieur," said Laurent, to the magistrate. "in all this I can see nothing by which
you conld gain a clue to the assassin — no trace —no indication." M Thnrie crave an anoTV shudder. "He is...
THE STORY-TELLER. (1876, March 18).Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219427870 

The work he has translated bears resemblance to a play published shortly before he came to Australia, but would also have been available here through imports of books and publications - Le Parricide - written by Belot in collaboration with Jules Dautin, Dentu, Paris. Ulm le Parricide (1872),
Le Parricide, drama in 5 acts and 7 tables, by M. Adolphe Belot.Paris, Ambigu-Comique, October 6, 1873. Unknown Binding - 1874
By Adolphe Belot (Author);
Parricide , a term derived from the Latin parricidia (assassin of a close relative), means:
1. The act of murdering his father, his mother (in the latter case, we speak more specifically of matricide ) or another of his ancestors, or even any close relationship. 2. The act of murdering an established person in a relationship comparable to that of a parent (for example, the leader of a country).
3. The author of this act.

Amid much that is nasty, Adolphe Belot has produced one or two excellent police novels; Le parricide and Les etrangleurs rank with, if not above, Gaboriau in their careful elaboration of the avenging processes of the law. Alexis Bouvier, again, has concentrated some of his best efforts upon the chase and discovery of malefactors.  Detective Fiction in France, article in The Saturday Review 1886

And then:

AUSTRALIAN TELEGRAMS.
from our own correspondents, 
Albury, 15th March.
Harold Grey, alias Emile Argel, was remanded to-day, at the police court, on a charge of forging a cheque, and uttering the same, to John Cleeland, Albion Hotel, Melbourne. AUSTRALIAN TELEGRAMS. (1876, March 16). The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202160197 

The Border Post reports that on Thursday morning Detective Foster appeared at the Albury Police Court and produced a warrant for the arrest of Emile Argle, alias Harold Grey, alias Russell, who was in the custody of the local police. The accused was charged with having forged the name of Mr. Howard Willoughby to a cheque for £3, drawn on the Colonial Bank, Melbourne, and passed to the bar-tender at Mr. J. Cleeland's Albion Hotel, Melbourne, on the 28th February ult. 'When Foster went into prisoner's cell on the previous day he said "Good evening, Foster, expected you would come. What did Charley the barman say? What did  Cleeland think ? I suppose Mr. Clarke is put about? Foster told him that Mr. Mark Clark was very angry at his conduct and showed prisoner the forged cheques and he acknowledged to that produced in the warrant. " Prisoner : Here Foster old man, draw it mild ! draw it mild ! But it does not much matter, I suppose." The remand was granted, and the accused was escorted to Melbourne by the afternoon train from Wodonga on Thursday. He is charged with having forged the name of Mr. Howard Willoughby to a cheque for £40.  NEWS OF THE DAY. (1876, March 20).The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article202162860 

Emile Argle, also known as Harold Grey, was placed in the dock at the City Court last Friday, on a charge of forging and uttering a valueless cheque for £3 to Mr. Cleeland, of the Albion Hotel. It appeared that the prisoner had been employed by Mr. Howard Willoughby to translate a French novel for publication. He was paid for his work at various times by cheques on the Colonial Bank, but at the conclusion of his literary work he asked Mr. Willoughby for a loan of £3, which, however, that gentleman declined to grant, he then wrote out a cheque for the amount, and having placed Mr. Willoughby's signature to it, obtained cash for it at the Albion Hotel. He then took his departure for Albury, New South Wales, |where he was arrested by the local police, and subsequently handed over to the custody of Detective Foster. It was stated that the amount of the cheque had been paid by the prisoner's friends, but the magistrates declined to deal with the case, and committed the prisoner for trial. GENERAL NEWS. (1876, March 29). Hamilton Spectator (Vic. : 1870 - 1918), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226036816

Emile Argle a young man who for some time past has been earning a living by literary work in Melbourne, under the name of Harold Grey, pleaded not guilty to forging the name of Mr. Howard Willoughly to a cheque for £3 on the Colonial Bank, The prisoner obtained cash for the cheque at the Albion Hotel, and was subsequently arrested at Albury. He was found guilty, and sentenced to twelve months' hard labour. GENERAL ; (1876, April 8). Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article170431535 

He was sent to Pentridge according to later reports, which he vehemently refutes in My unnatural life / by H. Grey. Harold Grey 1878-1879 - 30 pages
Available online at State Library of Victoria - while a few months later his younger brother Frank arrives, looking for his brother where he was last heard from?. 

Our attention has been called to a printer's error in the passenger list of the City of Agra, as published in our issue of -Tuesday. A saloon passenger, whose name is Frank Argles, is therein represented as Frank Ayles. We understand that Mr. Argles has friends in the colony who will be glad to be apprised of his arrival, and we trust that this correction will be seen by them. (From the Gympie Times.) (1876, July 20).Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148510984 

ARRIVALS-NOVEMBER 28.
. Florence Irving (s ), OOO tons, Captain Phillips, from Cooktown via intermediate ports. …F. Argles  SHIPPING. ARRIVALS.—NOVEMBER 28. (1876, November 29). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13384334 

FATHER NICEPHORUS, whom Byron immortalised in “Childe Harolde" as the “Caloyer," died recently at the age of 117 years. ORIGINAL POETRY. (1875, December 4).Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954), p. 14. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article170308038 

Arrived December 3
You Yangs, S.S., 800 tons, Charles Ashford, from Sydney. Passengers-saIoon: Mr. and Mrs. Wardle, Mrs. Levy and two children, Mrs. Parker, Miss Parker, Miss Crawford, Mr. F. Argles,  ARRIVED. (1876, December 9). The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), p. 13. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article142995544 

1877

ENGLAND. THE ALLEGED DETENTION OF AN ORPHAN GIRL IN A CONVENT.
The following is a complete exposure of a slander, originated by the London Standard, which has gone the rounds of the Protestant press— Sir,— Marie Jackson, the orphan girl referred to in the recent articles in the Standard, has made a declaration at the British Consulate in Paris and before six disinterested witnesses, traversing the sensational paragraphs and correspondence published by you. This she has done of her free will, and we are instructed to forward her statement; for insertion. We enclose a certified copy thereof; the original will be produced to you by our London agents in the course of to-morrow. — We are, Sir, your obedient servants, ANDERSON and ARGLES. 17, Boulevard de la Madeleine, Paris, December 1. 

'I, Marie Jackson, now residing at the Convent of the Assumption, at Auteuil, in France, wish to state, as I have already done by three letters which were (? not) believed to have emanated from me, because they were not attested, and as I think it necessary for my own reputation and that of the convent in which I am, to relate the calumnies published about me in the Standard newspaper, I find it necessary to make the following declaration :—? ' As to the suicide of which so much has been said, it is true that I once put in my mouth a little piece of Haytian money for a minute. The second time I put some little berries, which were in the garden into my mouth, and I was not even indisposed after so doing. As to my evasion, I can only say that I ran one day into the convent yard which leads into the street, but I came back immediately. If I had wished to run away I could easily gave done so since then, for during the summer holidays I went out several times with a very respectable lady, and I could have rncdo say er.capo ao easily oa possible. I should neves.'1 have thought that such a ehildioh action could have been ascribed to a wish to commit; suicide. It is true that I imprudently told all this to my aunt, but with out thinking she would make such fuss of my trust in her, and I bitterly regret, and from the bottom of my heart, that my light words could have made any one believe that I seriously wished to commit suicide. After Easter I wrote home. The things which are made to appear so odious now were not induced by any hatred against the convent and the nuns, who have always been extremely good to me, but merely to chow my aunt how very grieved I wan at being again, separated from her. The words I employed were, I feel, far too violent; and I sincerely regret having written them, since it is by means of these letters that attacks have been made on persons to whom I commenced to be attached, particularly since my illness. It is true that I said I did not like the convent ; the school life was extremely disagreeable to me, but I never said the same as to the nuns, and I can prove this, because at Easter I came to see them, and even supposing that I did not like them of that, time, can I not have changed my mind since ? No pressure either moral or physical, was ever used to make me a Catholic, and during several months the Roman Catholic doctrines made little or no impression upon me, but at last I saw clearly, by studying and examining them myself, that the Roman Catholic religion was the only true one. Yet I still hesitated, for I knew that my Protestant relations would be severely displeased if I took any such step. This is why I made my first communion only in July, although convinced of the truth before. I was confirmed at the end of July, and since then I have followed the practices of the Roman Catholic religion, and by no means regret having done so. I hope, by God's grace, to remain in these sentiments till the day of my death. 'No cruel treatment was ever exercised upon me on any occasion. On the contrary, the nuns (and one in particular, who has always been to me like a real mother) have always treated me with the greatest kindness, particularly since my illness. When my aunt came to see me I was already better, and certainly not on the verge of death, unless I had had a relapse, and am now in perfect health. ' I wish also to affirm that the letters printed in the Standard under my name were written by me and o£ my own' free will 17, Boulevard de la Madeleine, this day of December, 1876. ' Marie Jackson.' ' Signed by the above-named Marie Jackson in the presence of Napoleon Argles, Solicitor, 17, Boulevard de la Madeleine, Paris. ' W. G. A. Draee, gentleman  80, Broadway, New York, U. S. A., C. S.-Wasok, Student, Boston, Mass., U. S. A. ' J. Mtjllee, Regociant, 12, Hue pevdonnet, Paris.' ' A. Brocarii, Regociant, 7, Iluo de Provence, Paris. ' F. Anderson, Solicitor, 17, Boulevard de la Madeleine, Paris. 'Declared afc ths British Consulate, at Paris, by the above-written Maria Jackson, this 1st day of December, before me The ' (Signed) Henry Willoughby, Consular British Vice Consul at Paris. Seal. ' We declare the above to be a true copy of the original declaration before us, ' Anderson and Argles, Solicitors. ' 17, Boulevard de la Madeleine, Paris.' Home and Foreign. (1877, February 24).Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115375130 

General Post Office,
Sydney, 15th March, 1877.
No. 6.
LIST OF LETTERS RETURNED FROM THE COUNTRY, AND NOW LYING AT THIS OFFICE UNCLAIMED.
PARTIES applying for Unclaimed Letters at the General Post Office, are requested to give the correct number of the Letter, with the date and number of the List in which they may hare observed their names, as such reference will materially facilitate delivery. Parties in the Country making written applications, in addition to the former particulars, are requested to state where they expect their Letters from, and any other information tending to prevent an unnecessary transmission of Letters. 
Ship Letters.
10 Argles —, Esq., Deniliquin
11 Argles Frank, DeniliquinNo. 6. LIST OF LETTERS RETURNED FROM THE COUNTRY, AND NOW LYING AT THIS OFFICE UNCLAIMED. (1877, April 23). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 1631. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223759239 

UNORTHODOX SYDNEY.
By a Pilgrim
No. 2, A NIGHT IN THE CITY REFUGE.
UNORTHODOX SYDNEY. (1877, April 28).Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115377036 

UNORTHODOX SYDNEY.
By a Pilgrim
A SLY GROG SHOP
ONE — two— three ! Three o'clock, ye shades of departed Charlies !— three o'clock and a cloudy morning. As I gaze around, a sense of this virtuous city’s somewhat oppressive morality lies heavily upon me. Save a few swiftly flitting night birds, there in scarcely a soul stirring. The rich but honest merchant slumbers tranquilly upon his couch of down; the conscientious and long-suffering publican peacefully reposes beside the wife of his bosom ; and even the humble baked potato-man has retired to his chaste though lowly dwelling, and, happy in the possession of a pure conscience, has successfully courted the balmy God, and his genial soul is wafted upwards into Dreamland.

The classic province of Kent-street is clothed in the dusky garb of night, and the ghostly silence which envelopes that mysterious neighbourhood is broken only by the muffled clink of the coffee cups, containing the choice beverage dispensed by a wandering purveyor Moka of Araby, at the modest— not to say insignificant— price of one penny the half-pint. I stand pensive at a short distance from the stall of one of these enterprising tradesmen. Stand pensive because I am contemplating human nature in one of its most interesting forms. Let me endeavour to make a pen-and ink sketch of the motley assemblage before me.

Place aux Dames! Phyrne and Chloe, sauce in hand, are placidly lapping up the dark brown fluid. They are brilliantly attired in light purple gowns, the fronts of which are ornamented with a bizarre tracery suggestive of the stains of malt liquor. These charming creatures are engaged in carrying on an animated conversation with a tall emaciated youth who, to judge from the disordered condition of his dress has been ‘making a night of it,' and is now apparently endeavouring to manufacture a morning also. This roystering blade, whose clothes are the counterpart of the garments we see marked ' very chaste' in the windows of cheap tailors, has pushed his ‘Champagne-Charlie's hat as far on the back of his head as the laws of gravity will permit; and the knot of his thunder-and-lightning cravat has worked round beneath his left ear in a manner strongly suggestive of the hang man. To the right of this trio stands an individual, the filthiness of whose garb is only paralleled by the hideousness of his phyziognomy. The man’s face, which is of that putty whiteness so peculiar to the criminal classes, is garnished by a beard of ten days' growth; his eyes, like deeply-sunken beads, possess the steely glare of hereditary villainy, and he glances here and there uneasily, as though in fear of being 'wanted' by some active end intelligent officer. In order, I suppose, to exhibit the muscular proportions of his manly chest to their best advantage, the gentleman wears his grimy shirt unbuttoned at the neck, while around his dusky throat is entwined an eel-like 'belcher' handkerchief, after the most approved pugilistic fashion. His hat, which in form resembles an inverted pudding basin, is garnished, as though in ghostly mockery of the prevailing mode, with a dingy wisp of some unknown fabric twisted to resemble a puggaree. His trousers, which are composed of a material known to the initiated as dungaree, fall in a series of graceful folds over a pair of dilapidated high lows, the uppers of which appear to have no connection whatever with the soles. The group is completed by a couple of sailors, who are in that condition known as ''three sheets in the wind,' and who occasionally vary the monotony of coffee drinking by exchanging mortal defences and vows of eternal friendship. As I approach the stall for the purpose of observing the company more closely, Chloe takes exception to my appearance in a remark in which she stigmatizes me as 'the bloke in the fentail banger !' while such miscellaneous epithits as, ' swell out o' luck,' ' barber's clerk,' and 'the bloomin' dock' are freely bandied about. Strange to say, my advent appears to be a source of annoyance to the company. Even the coffee stall keeper, whom I endeavour to propitate by the expenditure of sixpence, gazes upon me with an evil eye. My endeavour to draw him out is a signal failure. To my modest inquiry d~' How is business?’ He replies gruffly ? — 'Well not so good, but wot I'm willin' to sell out to yon fur a thousn' pun.' 

Not having any repartee handy, I turn to the gentleman in the dungaree pantaloons, and inquire if ho can give the current quotation of laborers' wages. This apparently inoffensive question appeared to give great offence to that individual; for, turning upon me with an oath, he says savagely, 
' Seventy four pound two and tuppence farden and find your own kerosene!' The sally received with great applause by the company generally, and I walk away from the coffee stall amid a derisive howl from the whole party. 

About five minutes later I stand at the outer section of Kent and King streets musing on the scene I had just witnessed, when I see my picturesque friend making in my direction. Strolling up, he touches me on the shoulder. I involuntarily recede a few paces, when he thus addresses me:' 'Say, mate, could yer do a nip?'


Looking west down King Street from Kent Street (showing A.Newton's bakery at no.28-30, Star of Peace Hotel and E.Ryan's store), Sydney by American & Australasian Photographic Company. Image No.: a2825050, courtesy State Library of NSW.

Scenting an opportunity for the manufacture of copy, I replied that nothing could give me greater pleasure, but that unfortunately an arbitrary Licensing Act precluded all possibility of alcoholic refreshment at that hour. But he is equal to the emergency. ' I know a crib,’ he says, hoarsely, ' where there's some slap up tipple.' Then he adds hastily, 'But you’re right, ain't yer — you won't put a bloke away ? I hasten to assure him that if by 'putting away' he implied giving information to the police, I shall certainly do no such thing. This reply pleases my interlocutor so much that he laughs inwardly in a manner extremely unpleasant to behold, and says, ' Well you ain't a bad sort of a swell, in spite of yer plug hat: so come along er me.' 
With this he dives across the road, and we proceed at a rapid pace in the direction of the shipping. 

Treading several evil smelling thoroughfares, we cross a small yard, in which it seemed some person had years before, sowed a crop of second-hand slabs and old kerosene tins, which in the course of time have yielded fruit one hundred fold, we arrive at the back door of a brick cottage in the last stage of dilapidation. Motioning me to keep close to him, my companion murmurs some (to me), unintelligible words through a chink in the door, ;- No answer. Unintelligible phrase repeated, garnished with a shower of highly annoyed ' adjectives, and a richly worded anathema upon I some unseen person's eyes, limbs, and anatomy generally. This apparently has the desired effect, for the bolt is slowly withdrawn from its socket, and we enter. 

Hardly have we crossed the threshold than the door is closed by some ; invisible agent, and all is darkness. As I stand alone a feeling of the insecurity of my position comes rather unpleasantly upon me. I try to recall the articles which I have in my possession. Money — a pound and some loose silver — a meerschaum pipe, part of canto I of an epic poem ; a silver watch, a present from a confiding uncle; and a couple of letters, beginning ' My darling duck,' from— no matter- whom, are all that I can recollect on the spur of the moment. Besides these articles, however, I possess a little plaything, whose component parts are lead, whipcord and whalebone —a trifle that would stand me in good need, did my friend contemplate violence. Any slight uneasiness I may entertain is soon dissipated by his requesting 'a strike.' Interpreting this into a demand for a match, I hand him my box on which he promises to 'show a glim' after that mystic interval which is comprised within a ' brace of shakes.' The first object that meets my gaze on the candle being lighted is an exceedingly diminutive boy, who stands by the door, and who is looking up into my face with a strange mixture of surprise and dislike. He is a pretty child, with an abundance of fair hair, and quite an angelic expression of countenance. His attire airily consists of a little garment that barely reaches to his fifth ribs and, on the whole, he presents rather a comical appearance. I nod pleasantly at the little fellow to encourage him, but instead of responding to my overtures, he trots up to my needy mentor, and exclaims shrilly — ' So you've rose a splodger, Sladdy, hav you .? Oh, lamb him down tilt he ain't gob a caag — lomb him down !' and dances about the damp floor with an appearance of great relish. ' 

What does he mean by a aplodger ?'' I ask of 'Sladdy,' as soon as that worthy'a mirth had subsided. The man laughed. ' The little warmint !' says he admiringly. ' ' Splodger is a cant term for a bushman on the apree. But come, yo'll have the liquor now. You're good for half a bull ?' As I do not appear to be quite clear with regard to this, he puts his question in an amended form. 'Half-a-crown won't break yer?' I reply that the sum he mentions lies within the compass of my means ; on which he nods and says when he has filled his 'gift' he will bring out the spirits. He thereupon produces the blackened stump of a clay pipe, and proceeds leisurely to cut up some tobacco, while I take the opportunity of looking around me; having previously seated myself upon an empty gin case. Faintly illumined by the flickering light of a common tallow candle, the room appeared to be a small place, some fifteen feet square. Not a vestiage of paper-hanging is on the wall or ceiling; and not a particle of furniture of any description is to be seen. The two windows at the farther end cannot boast a single pane of ill glass ; to counterbalance which, the frames are completely blocked up by squares of tin, pieces of paling, and bunches of rag. In one corner of the den a few sheepskins are opened upon the dirty ground, upon which the little boy has stretched a himself; and a few feet from the child lies an object which resembles a heap of rags. The whole place— floor, wall, and ceiling — is blackened by a thick coating of smoke af and grease ; and the poisonous cbse-e neas of the atmosphere is almost  unbearable. I have hardly completed my survey of the apartment when my host rises, and we walking towards the heap of rags I have mentioned, gives it a kick. A groan follows, and slowly from the horrible bed there rises a woman, yes, a woman ! a creature enveloped in a ragged skirt with a fragment of blanket drawn over her shoulders; a blear-eyed, diseased, and drunken creature— but yet a woman. Shading her eyes with her shrunken arm, she leans against the wall and contemplates me ' Now then,' says the man, shaking her roughly 'where's the stuff?' A faint gleam of intelligence comes into the woman’s eyes as she kneels in dorm upon her bed and drawn out a square glass bottle together with two tin pannikins Pushing the drinking vessels she comes towards me. 'Part thagreod, mate,' says he; whereupon I hand him the stipulated half-a-crown, requesting him, however, to fetch me a little water. Murmuring something I could not quite catch, the feHor/ tossed off his own portion of the spirit;, and taking up his pannikin, passed out into the yard. Quick as thought the woman approaches me. ‘For God's sake, sir, can you help a poor wretched creature?' she murmurs; 'take pity on me ! I'm dying, and shall never get out of this.' My answer is to place some silver in
' her trembling palm. As I am doing so, the woman, in her haste to conceal the money, steps sharply brick, and accidentally treading upon the bottle, which lies upon the brick flooring, it is overturned and broken into twenty pieces,, while the spirit (whose odour is a compound of vitriol, banzine, and carbolic acid) trickles in a small rivulets towards the door. At this juncture Sladdy reappears, bearing the water. Catching eight of the broken bottle, however, he drops the pannikin, rushes at the woman, and they roll upon the bed of rags fighting and tearing at one another.
The little boy, who is awakened by the noise, sits up upon his sheep skins, and cries : ' Go it, mother! land him a cuffer! let him have it !' and is to all appearance vastly entertained by the proceedings. I tarry a moment to assure myself that no harm will ensue, then softly opening the door of the den, I flee swiftly out into the fresh air.
UNORTHODOX SYDNEY. (1877, May 5). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115375038

BIRTHS. . _ ARGLES.— 18th, at 17, Boulevard de la Madeleine, Paris, the wife of Napoleon Argles, solicitor, of a daughter.  Friday 22 June 1877, London Evening Standard, London, England 

Fiction Story By 'Harold Grey' – 1877, reflective of what he may have been doing while in Queensland
After this follows just one example of the kind of articles he was then writing in Sydney(they were all alike this) and which led, some of his contemporaries later stated, to him ending up in gaol again

TALES AND SKETCHES.
-A STORY OF CENTRAL QUEENSLAND.
BY HAROLD GREY.
Author of Votarica of Thespis, &c.
PART II.
Three weeks have elapsed since Percy Graham's arrival at the Sirius Downs Hotel. The fever has left him, but he is prostrated with weakness.Comfortably reclining on a canvas chair, in the shady verandah of the house, Percy is gazing dreamily at the landscape before him, and listening to the gurgling of the adjacent creek, which winds like a hue of silver far away across the distant plains. Some books and papers are strewn about the floor at his feet, and a handsome dressing case, filled with every'necessity, lies on a stool near him ; while on a small table to his right are fruits and cooling drinks, all evidently provided by some loving hand.
" Well !" soliloquised Graham, "it seems strange for the so-called muscular human frame to be reduced to a state of such unconscionable torpor. A child of six could knock me out of time in as many minutes. This bout will teach me to have some regard for the constitution with which nature has endowed me. However, I might be worse off, that is -one comfort.-Hullo ! who's this ? Jack Bowring, by all that's good !"
As he spoke a horseman cantered up to the house, and dismounting, strode up to Percy, and shook him by the hand.
" Well, old man, how goes it?" said the new arrival, who was none other than John Bowring, Esq., M.L.A., proprietor of the adjacent station of Tulgarra.
" Pooh ! you're looking quite rosy. You'll be kangarooing .at Tulgarra in another week. By-the-bye, you must be getting tired of this crib."
" Oh, I don't know. I'm not up to much excitement, you know. As for leaving this before another fortnight, it is, I fear, out of the question."
A long whistle was Mr. Bowring's rejoinder.
"Don't make that hideous noise, Jack," said Graham, irritably ; " it goes right through a fellow's head."
The young squatter glanced earnestly at his companion, .and th eh sitting himself down on the edge of the verandah, placed his hand on Graham's arm.
"Look here, old fellow," said he; "I want to speak ^seriously to you."
"Oh, don't, please," said Percy, plaintively: "I'm not -strolls enough for gravity."
"Well, then, I'll be serio-comic."
"That will be worse; for it reminds one of the music
?halls."
"No ; but listen. There is a certain little bird--"
" Come ! no natural history, I'm not up to ib in my present
.emaciated condition."
"A rumour then," continued Bowring; "there is a rumour that you are am petits soins with the charming Polly."
A flush came into Graham's pale, thin cheeks.
" And supposing I were, what theu ?" asked he, sharply. Bowring tapped his boot meditatively with his riding
whip.
" Then you admit it?" he asked, after a pause. " 1 never was great at admissions."
"Look here, Percy," said his friend earnestly ; "I have known you now a long time. We were college friends together, and are even related by marriage. I have thus a right to speak my mind to you. I therefore implore you to leave this place at once, and not get' yourself into an entanglement with any of the people here. The father, yon .know, is little better than a cattle stealer-"
" But I'm not in love with the father."
" Come ! do not split straws about the matter. Say you will leave to-night ; and I will have the buggy sent, with cushions, and all I can think of to make the drive easy. Say you will come.?"
" I cannot say that," replied Graham, slowly. "Besides, it would be a pity not to allow ' rumour' full swing. No, dear boy, I shall certainly stop here two weeks more-perhaps longer."
Bowring gave vent to an expression of annoyance. " In that case," said he, "I had better be off. Can I send you anything?"
"Nothing but your good wishes, dear boy."
"So long, then : I'll look round in a few days," and shaking hands with the invalid, Jack Bowring cantered away.
Left to himself, Graham smiled sadly.
"So it is even here," he said, "here in this semi-wilderness, as in the lands of the civilized. Scandal floats upon the tropical air of the antipodes, and is wafted twenty miles in as many hours. Poor Polly, poor little girl !"
At this moment the weird form of Jack the Butcher, who by the way fulfilled the duties of groom, nurse to the young children, and general "knock-about hand" to Kelly's establishment, walked on to the verandah, and stood eyeing the invalid with attention. At length he said-"My word, captin, you're malting flesh in no mistake."
" I’m not a captain, neither have I made flesh." Jack the Butcher growled. "Sorry I spoke," said he.
"So am I," rejoined Graham, imperturbably.
A perplexed look came over the man's features, and he scratched his shaggy red head for a few moments, then he said-"You're mighty civil."
" You seemed to make me out military just now." The man stamped his huge foot impatiently.
" Now listen here," said he ; " the sooner you are out of this the better. Dy'e hear me ?"
Graham looked up languidly.
"I hear you," he murmured ; "but I don't understand you."
" Well, then," cried Jack the Butcher ; "strike me blind ! but I'll speak plain. I've known that gal-"
"Whom are you alluding to?-Miss Kelly?"
" Aye, Polly as we calls her, and as you calls her too, cl-n you."
Graham winced, in spite of himself ; but he still preserved his outward appearance of sangfroid, although his hands itched to be at the bony throat of his torturer.
" Now mark me," continued the man, "I've loved that gal for fifteen long years. I've nursed her as a child, and I've watched her growin' up day by day ; and I've said to my-self-"Jack, that gal shall be your wife, when she's old enough."
"That was kind of you. But did you consult the young lady or her parents ?"
" Not I! but I saved her life when the floods was up, and I'm not a'goin' to have a swell like you a comin' in between me and her, I can tell you that ! " And he bent over the sick man, and shook his fist in his face.
Percy Graham looked steadily up into the hideous countenance of his interlocutor, and mentally shuddered as he pictured to himself, in his imagination, the hideous result
that would ensue if the man's dreams were ever realized.
"My good fellow," said Percy, calmly; "were I not prostrated with illness I should certainly thrash you ; as it is, however, I must request you not to approach me until I have regained my strength. If you do so, I shall be forced to complain to your master, since I cannot take the law into my own hands."
A short silence succeeded this speech. Then drawing a long breath, Jack the Butcher said-" So be it, then ; I will wait until you are well again; and then we will see if you are man enough to be as good as your word."
So saying he slouched away in the direction of the paddock.
*****
They were seated upon a fallen tree, that lay before a disused shepherd's hut, about half a mile from the Sirius Downs Hotel. Cheek to cheek and hand in hand, they gazed in to each other's eyes, and drank in long draughts of intoxicating love. Yes, it had come to this. Percy Graham, the blase man of fashion, had succumbed to the fascinations of a simple bush beauty ; he had surrendered his heart to a girl who had but compassed the very rudiments of education, and who had never been fifty miles from her father's house. He did not think of this as he sat by her side, running his fingers through her golden tresses, he did not remember that his father was a peer of England ; and that there flowed through his veins, some of the noblest blood in the three kingdoms. No thought of the derisive scorn with which his " set " would receive the intelligence of his marriage with the daughter of a drunken bush publican troubled his brain at that moment. And why ? He had delivered himself up wholly to the intoxication of the present, and shut out the future resolutely from his mind's eye.
"I must get back now, Percy," she murmured ; " I shall be wanted."
" And are you not wanted by me ?" I " But I must look after the little ones ; they have no mother to tend them, you know."
" Remember, Polly, I am an invalid, and require nursing," said he playfully, "and if you leave me I might be seized with a sudden giddiness, or-or-goodness knows what might happen. Prescribe for me, little doctor."
The prescription was a kiss, of which both physician and patient; partook.
"Before you go, Polly, darling, tell me that you love me," said he.
She nestled her fair head against his breast ; then looking into his eyes, as though she would read his very soul, said in half-broken tones-"Yes, Percy, I love you. if I am wrong in doing so, I hope I may be forgiven. Love you !-ah, the word seems too cold, too prosaic, there is no word for love like mine ; it is an inward burning of the heart, whose flame must be fed by your love alone. Iam yours"; do what you will with me, say but 'come,' and t follow ; lead me whither you list-to the world's end, Ï care not. But Percy, darling, I am not fit to be your wife, I know it. I am poor, illiterate, and have naught but my love to offer you ; yet you would not have the heart'to-'
He caught her in his arms, and pressing his lips to hers, passionately exclaimed, "No, though I had tea thousand fathers I would not give ray darling up. In a month from this, you shall be my wife."
As they stood together for a moment she looked up at him, but did not speak. Her heart was full to bursting. No word, passed her lips, yet silence is sometimes more eloquent than the most impassioned phrases.
And so in the warm glow of the noonday sun, they walked away together.
* * *  *
Two weeks had passed quickly by since the above interview, and Percy Graham, no longer having the excuse of illness to prolong his stay at Kelly's, has taken up his quarters at Tulgarra. He rode over to the hotel frequently, however, and on these occasions the lovers had long interviews together. Nor were these the only ones. On Wednesday and Friday evenings, the shepherd's hut was their trysting place, and many were the sweet moments the young couple passed seated in the moonlight, outside that ruined humpy. One morning, as Graham rode up to the hotel, he was surprised to hear that two days before, a strange incident had occurred; Jack the Butcher had disappeared. He had taken nothing with him beyond, (it was surmised) a little bread, 'tea and sugar, and an old gun, usually regarded as worthless. In reply to Percy's questions, Kelly remarked that his henchman's disappearancedid not give him (Kelly) much uneasiness, as Jack had always been "a little touched in the upper story." " He'd come back fast enough," said the landlord " when his flour was done ; until then he was welcome to stay away." In fact Mr. Kelly went so far as to intimate that if Jack the Butcher never returned, he should not expend anything considerable it* mourning, inasmuch as the man had drawn no wages for upwards of seven years, and furthermore had of late "bin; worriting about that gal."
Another two days elasped, and still no signs of the missing man. On the evening of the second day it had been arranged that Percy should ride over at 9 o'clock, and have a five minutes' interview with Polly, who could escape at that hour, on pretence of looking round the premises. It was, however, agreed between them that, should it be wet, Graham was to ride back to the inn, and the love making; was to be accomplished at the paternal residence. At a few moments before the appointed time, therefore, Graham rode, slowly up to the ruined hut, and tying his horse to a tree» sat down to meditate. The sky had been overcast since sun-down, and hardly was he seated than the rain began slowly to descend. Rising to his feet Percy glanced at the hut,, and seeing that a few sheets of bark still adhered to the roof, resolved to enter and seek shelter until the shower should have abated. " Confound the rain!" he muttered, as he swung open the ricketty door ; " there will be no Polly here to night, I'm afraid."
Hardly had he uttered the words than he felt himself: seized from behind, and thrown violently to the ground, hair head striking against a piece of jagged timber, which completely stunned him for a moment. On recovering consciousness he looked up, and beheld the gaunt form of Jack the; Butcher standing over him, with fierce and terrible hatred, written in every line of his countenance. The ruffian was.
armed with a heavy fowling piece, which he pointed straight at the prostrate man's head.
" At last, Mr. Graham," cried Jack the Butcher, " at last we are face to face, where nobody can come between us."
Graham was naturally a brave man. He had inherited the courage of his ancestors, and would have fought as bravely on the field of battle as the best soldier England could produce ; but enfeebled as he was by illness, and blinded by the stream of blood which flowed from the wounds in his head, his presence of mind all but forsook him.
" Scoundrel ! would you murder me ! ? " he muttered.
" Murder you ! " cried the man, in a phrenzy of passion, " Ay, Mr. Graham, that I would. Look well into my face,
and if you do not read murder there, you are no judge off the human phizognomy. Murder yon!-and why nott Have not you robbed me of all I loved in the world: the only being I lived for? Why, mark me, I would nofe. sacrifice my chance of revenge now for the wealth of the Indies. Yes, you shall die, I have sworn it ; and if I have with the same fate a minute later I care not."
" Monster !" cried Graham, vainly endeavouring to rise. " Keep still, you devil," shrieked the infuriated ruffian-, "another movement, and you are a mass of quivering carrion."
! " What harm have I done you?" said Graham. "She never would be wed to you."
"How can you tell, you silken dandy. Had you nerves showed your pale face in the house, she would have had any thoughts beyond her own class. Bub enough of talking! give you five minutes-say your prayers."
Burying his head in his hands, Graham tried to murmer some supplications to heaven ; but his brain was in a whirr and he could not concentrate his thoughts. *' Polly," he murmured in broken tones, " Polly, my darling, I shall never see you more. O that I should have lived so nearly to taste the cup of happiness, and then to have it dashed from my lips in the dust. O my darling, my darling, my last, thoughts, my last words are of you."
"The time has come," cried Jack the Butcher, tapping; the rusty barrel of his weapon-" prepare ! "
"O mercy!" cried the unfortunate man, "mercy, I am too young to die."
A fiendish laugh was the only reply.
Then with an almost superhuman effort, Graham rose W his feet, and staggered towards the murderer. Then came a loud report, a rush of fire and smoke, and he knew no more.
* * * *
On recovering consciousness Graham found himself lying; in his old room at the inn, with his head bandaged up, and Polly sitting by his side. As he opened his eyes, she leaned over him, and kissed his cheek softly.
" Hush ! you must not speak," she whispered.
Graham shuddered.
" Where is that-"
He is dead. The gun exploded as he fired it, and his head was completely shattered by the charge. Thank heaven, my darling, you are restored to nae," cried. Polly. pressing his hand.
Graham laid his head upon her shoulder.
"Restored, never, never more to part," he muttered and falling back on the pillow, sank into a gentle sleep with his hand locked in Polly's.
L'ENVOY.
Two months later, the following paragraph under the heading of "Marriages," appeared in the following paper :
" On Wednesday, February 17, at St. Stephen’s Church, by the Rev. Willum Jones, M. A., the Honourable Peregr Howard Graham, second son of the Right Honourable Loe Gauntlet, to Mary, eldest daughter of Michael Kelly, Esq. of Sirius Downs." 
Immediately after the ceremony, the happy pair made their departure for Europe by the mail steamer.
TALES AND SKETCHES. (1877, June 23).Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier (NSW : 1872 - 1881), p. 19. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63334411 

on Bastille Day!:

( To the Editors of the Protestant Standard. )
Sirs, — Your contemporary, the Freeman's Journal, has been publishing a series of papers under the heading "Unorthodox Sydney, by a Pilgrim," in which he has reviewed nearly all the charities and public institutions in and around Sydney. Amongst them are the Rand-wick Institute, Sydney Infirmary, City Night Refuge, Gladesville Asylum, and the Benevolent Asylum ; and in every instance except one be has come down pall mall on either the Government, directors, committees, superintendents, managers, secretaries, or matrons, as the case may be. But why the Gladesville Lunatic Asylum, and Dr. Manning should have such I complimentary (?) remarks heaped upon them in comparison with the abuse he tries to fling at everything and everybody else, I am at a loss to know, I can only draw the inference that the atmosphere and surroundings wore more congenial to his tastes, for he evidently felt quite at home there, the only fault being that the space for the inmates was too limited. 
If you, sirs, know of any other reason why this place should be so good in the eyes of a " Pilgrim," will you kindly tell it to me. I might suggest that while "Pilgrim" is making his progresses he might just step into some of the nunneries and convents in and around Sydney, and come forth and publish (if he dare) an unvarnished truthful tale of what he saw there, he would he doing a public good, and I would promise him that some notice would then he taken of him and his writings. As I am not aware of his having been noticed by any other person, and I do it now with the hope that while this man has perfect liberty to go in and out of those institutions, the time would be hastened why similar proceedings could be transacted anent monasteries and convents. 
Yours truly, 
NO. 7. 
(To the Editors of the Protestant Standard.) (1877, July 14). The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207786047 

UNORTHODOX SYDNEY:
By a Pilgrim.
No. 7. THE BENEVOLENT ASYLUM.
Of the many thousands of persons who daily pass and repass the forbidding-looking structure at Redfern, which has appropriated to itself the soft and genial title that forms the heading of this article, how many have ever had the curiosity to enter its walls, and gaze upon the mournful picture that is there revealed ? Few, indeed ! and that, perhaps, accounts for the sad state of affairs the internal economy of the institution presents. Unlike Gladesville, where there is nothing to hide, the Benevolent Asylum is never thrown open to the inspection of the public. On the contrary: the visitor whose duty calls him to a glance over the place is received by Mr. Mansfield, the clerk, with the most studied discourtesy. Whether the official in question has any express directions from the committee respecting the visits of gentlemen of the press and others, and whether ho obeys these directions by a rudeness of manner, a vacant stare, and a general owlish stupidity of deportment, is best known to himself ; I cannot think, for my part, the committee would sanction this churlish reception of visitors, which at the onset stamps a bad impression on the mind that in far from being obliterated by the deplorable condition of the Asylum's arrangements. 

Looking at the second page of the Benevolent Society's report for 1876, a most imposing array of names meets the eye. Sir Hercules Robinson is labelled as the ' Patron ;' Sir Edward Deas Thomson,' O.B., the ' President ;' while no less a person than the Hon. George Allen, M.L.O., is designated, not only ' Vice-president,' but 'Secretary ' also; the Hat of the grand officers of the society winding' up with the name of ' J. G. Raphael, Esq.,' who is the 'Treasurer.' But it is in its committee that the Benevolent Asylum is particularly strong. No less than 37 (!) names figure upon the list. It would surely seem, then, that if those gentlemen voluntarily undertake the management and supervision of an important institution they should be called upon to fulfil those duties, and not waste their time and their words by wrangling in the board-room, while the unfortunate inmates, whom it is their duty protect, are languishing under effects of a …as and careless administration. 

The board-room of the Benevolent Asylum in not an attractive apartment. It has a cheap lodging-house appearance, a mildewy aspect, and a vault-like atmosphere, which are apt to cast a damper, I should say, on the most buoyant temperament. The walls are not plastered, and the rough bricks are somewhat elaborately painted an exceedingly dirty gray. When I entered the sacred precincts of this solemn chamber-my eyes rested upon an ancient party, who was lolling back in an' arm-hair, tickling the lobe of his ear with the feather of a quill pen. When I spoke to him he did not immediately reply, but moved his head spasmodically from side to side like a clockwork toy in want of repair. When I stated that I wished to be shown over the building, ho wiped his spectacles, and said, ' Oh !' and looking away, made a note upon his grimy blotting pad with a pen that had no ink in it, and frowned ominously. 'Wearying of this eccentric person, I wandered away till I mot the matron, Mrs. Elric, who professed her willingness to show me round, and furthermore requested me not to mind Mr. Mansfield (the gentleman of the board room) as ho was ' a little peculiar.' I thought him rather more than peculiar, but, like Mrs. Eadcliffe's heros uttered ' never a word.' 

The Roman Catholic infant school was the first place we visited. This is a small dark room, quite grotesque in the hideousness of its appointments. Hero three dozen little ones under the guardianship of Miss Morgan, disport themselves at their lessons for two and a half hours in the morning, and four hours in the afternoon. Many of those children, Mrs. Elric told me, were ' a shingle short,' others however would be drafted to Randwiok, Parramatta, etc., as occasion required. The Protestant schools room was just adjoining. Here was the same crowd of apparently unwashed children, the same rocking walls, and the same foetid odour. A lady named Mrs. Brancdon is in charge of this contingent. I requested her to indicate to me one of her pupils who had successfully mastered the state of the three R.'s ; but such a troubled, not to say terrified, look came into the lady's face that I forbore to press the point. Leaning down, however, I asked a little girl confidentially what was 'twice two ?' The child's reply sounded like 'piclcloa.' I then proceed out in despair.

Turning to the right, we entered what the authorities facetiously term the playground. This is a drear, dismal patch of turf, partitioned into separate slices — one for the boys and one for the girls. There is not in this recreation ground one single appliance for the amusement of the unfortunate children. Tho aspect of the whole place was so bleak and dismal, that I vaguely wondered what crime the little ones had committed that they should be restricted to such wretched accommodation, when oven the felons in Darlinghurst Gaol have their eyes gladdened by a profuse display of most beautiful flowers.

In the laundry nine women, who were awaiting their confinement, were engaged in washing. Only two of these laundresses had been led to the altar of Hymen. They were all dressed in check uniforms, profusely emblazoned with numbers, and wore stout worsted stockings, and boots of that style known to the initiated as 'crabo.'5 It was a painful eight to look upon these women— brought as they were to nearly the lowest depth of misery and shame — washing the clothes of paupers as part of the penalty of their sin; while many of the authors of all the misery are rioting it in the public-houses, thoughtless of having cast a woman on an Institution which has gradually come to be regarded, and truly regarded, as a premium for easy virtue. 

The kitchen, which I next inspected, was presided over by a stout young woman, who had in consideration for her usefulness, been 'kept on ' after her accouchement, and engaged at a salary of 7s per week, out of which she has to find clothing for herself and child. The matron, however, allows her a check uniform to work in, which is, on the whole, very good of the matron. At my request the cook kindly favoured me with a taste of the soup she was preparing. This is, I am inclined to think, better bouillon than that dispensed at the Refuge. But its appearance was not enticing, as it strongly resembled in colour the liquid used by the modern bill-sticker. When the cook asked me ' how I liked it,' I said it was ' unique ' ; whereat that gastronomic goddess smiled delightedly — having previously vainly endeavoured to conceal her features with an iron ladle. 

Adjacent to the kitchen is the mangle-room. This is in charge of an old lady who receives for her services remuneration to the extent of 1rs 6d per week. She has two assistants, however, to aid her, who perform concertos on the mangle as occasion requires, which leaves the old lady just the sorting to do, and no more. She does this admirably, Mrs Elric informed me, having a capital business head, although ' a little shaky in the upper story.' On tho wall here, was a printed card suspended from a nail, which announced that 'John Hughes' and 'David M'Beath ' were the members of the House Committee appointed to inspect the institution that day. I should greatly like to glance at the report of those gentlemen, if they inspected or reported upon the state of the Asylum on the day in question. 

Threading a few very dirty passages, I was ushered into the boys' dormitory. Here four children were crouching on the floor in a corner, with an' appearance of most utter, complete, and abject misery. They hardly looked up as I entered, and appeared to hold no communication whatever with each other. The wretched aspect of this room beggars description. It contained twelve dingy little beds, which is more than the place can comfortably accommodate. The walls were so stained and blackened by the damp that no one could possibly guess what colour they had originally been painted, and a thick foetid liquid which filled the room with a horrible stench trickled slowly down the walls on to the grimy floor. Facing this was another dormitory of the same size, and precisely of the same aspect. Here a poor little thing with a broken arm was lying on a bed covered with a piece of old blanket, while another baby about the size of a quart pot was 'minding' it, and two more were sitting listlessly on the floor near the door gazing upon their mournful surroundings with an air of hopeless apathy. 

Leaving the girls' dormitory, Mrs. Elric next led the way across a patch of ground to a shed in which were a dozen boys, most of whom were afflicted with some horrible skin disease inherited from their wretched parents. As the day was extremely cold, with frequent gusts of rain, it was a matter of surprise to me that such extreme measures were taken for the isolation of these boys as to expose them to the cold and damp, when a room could easily have been found for them inside the building. I am convinced that Dr. Renwick (whose treatment of the patients so far as skill and attention go in beyond all praise) did not authorize such an unwise proceeding. 

The next point of interest was the nursery: This is upstairs. Why this particular apartment has been devoted to the infants it is hard to nay. Certainly not on account of any cheerfulness it may possess. The place presented, however, a curious appearance not easily forgotten. In the corner to the right as I entered there sat an aboriginal woman, leaning over her baby, and rocking it with much cars, while she crooned 'name half-remembered song,' which, though it might have had the desired effect in soothing the infant, presented to the ear of the horrified adults a sound somewhat akin to that made by a cart-wheel in want of lubrication. Seated in a row of little chairs on the floor, with their backs against the wall, were twelve infants. Before them was a heap of toys — horses, dolls, &c. — in every state of mutilation. I never, in sooth, beheld such ghastly play-things. The babies themselves evidently looked upon these heterogeneous articles of pastime with the contempt they deserved, and in almost every case had hurled them as far away as their puny strength would permit. One little thing, however, had got hold of a doll, which looked like some odd remnant of the Waterloo Bridge tragedy. She seemed happy in the possession of this treasure, and refused to exchange it for a lamed cart wheel and an India-rubber ring proffered by her immediate neighbour ; neither would she trade with one against a wooden soldier (desperately wounded) and a dairy-maid who appeared to have 'lost her head' while milking'. Mrs. Elric said that Dr. Renwick had given her instructions to buy a ' Noah's Ark' that afternoon, but she would have to get one with big animals, as on a previous occasion a hungry infant had 'swallowed the camel.' 

Adjoining the nursery is the infants' dormitory. This ward calls for no special notice, for the same defective ventilation, bad lighting, and 'mouldy' odour are apparent in it as in the others. 

The place, however, that I will award the palm to for squalidness, damp, and general hideousness of aspect is the single women's ward. It is here that the females sleep who have recovered from their confinement and are employed about the institution. It is a long, low room, with a small fire place at one end, around which were crouching a few women with infants in their arms. The walls of this ward presented ouch a loathsome appearance, that I inquired of Mrs. Elric why they had not before this been either whitewashed or repainted. That lady in reply merely shrugged her shoulders expressively. 

Surely it is monstrous to think that these unfortunate creatures are denied so many of the advantages which they might be entitled to, had they but committed some greater crime against society than that which they have already been guilty of. It is an undoubted fact that the Darlinghurst female prisoners are better lodged, better dressed, and immeasurably better fed than these women in the Benevolent Asylum ; and that this should be the case, is a serious reflection upon a society which has within the last twenty-four years received upwards of £200,000 from the Government and the public.

The lying-in ward is as nearly a separate institution as circumstances will permit. It is, however, impossible to prevent the inmates from having a certain amount of intercourse with each other, no matter in whatever part of the building they may be for the time located. 

Mrs. Kirkmann is the chief nurse of the lying;' in ward. Her room is positively the only habitable one in the place — Mrs. Elric possessing a grim-looking apartment, in which not even privacy is assured. As I was praising Mrs. Kirkmann's quarters, and launching into a mild panegyric on the generosity of the society, that lady interrupted me, stating that the furniture and all the other contrivances for making the place comfortable were provided at her own expense. 

This division of the Asylum has its own kitchen, which is managed by a fine, stout young woman, with a baby the very counterpart of herself. This place, at any rate, showed signs of the application of soap and water. The range and utensils, too, were bright ; but the general cooking arrangements were sadly defective. The lying-in ward itself is also well kept, and clean as regards bedding, etc. It should be mentioned that the married and single women are separated when convalescing— -a ward of tolerably pleasing exterior being provided for the married inmates, while those who cannot show a certificate are housed in a ward of the most squalid description. Whether it be wise in a place of this kind to make this vast distinction upon a point of morality is to be greatly questioned. I can, in any case, find no precedent. The convalescent married women must have, it would seem, ample elbow room for, glancing at the latest report, it would appear that out of a total of 156 women admitted for accouchement — 

' Your directors regret to state that 38 only were married women, and 118 were unmarried. With regard to the large number of unmarried women admitted, your directors can conscientiously assert that they have used every possible endeavour to exorcise the responsibility which rests on them of admitting or refusing those cases. They can assure the subscribers and the public, that although some apparently unworthy persons may be admitted, this is a result unavoidable under the circumstances attendant on these cases, which frequently are of moat urgent and lamentable character. It is also to be remembered that many women are brought to the hospital in a state demanding immediate admission, and many others come friendless and homeless from the country districts or even from other colonies.' 

It would not, perhaps, be criticizing this somewhat elaborate paragraph too severely were I to ask, what in the name of goodness must constitute that 'unworthiness' by reason of which a woman is refused admittance on the eve of her accouchement to a so-called Benevolent Asylum ? It is not because even some apparently ' unworthy' women were admitted that the directors of the Asylum need come whining to the public ; but if the doors of the place had been closed against a patient seeking admission let her character be ever so bad, it is just possible the authorities would have cause to express even deeper regret, and in more strict terms this they do in the extract I have given. As I have it from Mrs. Elric that, in nearly every case the clothing of the women gaining admittance into the hospital has to be burned, and not unfrequently the patients themselves are in a condition, through causes which need not be specified, that is in the last degree revolting, it is hard to conjecture where the directors draw the line. As long as they do draw it somewhere, I suppose they are satisfied. But is the public in an equally placid state with regard to the institution ? Well, it would appear not. For glancing again at the report of the society, under the heading of 'Out-door Relief,' we see that —

 'Your directors regret to state that while the whole of the subscriptions obtained from the public are devoted to this department they have never readied a sufficient amount wholly to support it, and it has been necessary to continue to receive from Government the supplementary ' aid contributed (on the pound for pound principle) to aid of this department. ' As the function of relieving the poor of the city was that for which this society was at first organized, and as the department is of the greatest public utility, supplying the destitute: and afflicted with the actual necessaries of life, and thereby discountenancing mendicancy and vagrancy, and stepping in between the public and the much-dreaded Poor Law of other countries, it has a strong claim for sympathy and liberal pecuniary assistance, and your directors, therefore, hope that during the ensuing year that claim will be more fully satisfied than it had hitherto been.' 

For my part, I think the institution is quite as well, if not bettor, supported than it deserves. That there be no more laudable charity than a lying-in hospital I am perfectly willing to admit ; but when an institution claims the public sympathy which is a disgrace to the colony, it is then time for the charitable community to refrain from untying its purse strings, until such a time as there be either a material alteration in the conduct of that institution, or until it shall have been done away with, and one more worthy of support supplied. 

Perhaps that portion of the Benevolent Asylum which is calculated to arouse the most painful feelings in the mind of the beholder is the children’s hospital. Here a number of little things are to be found slowly wasting away under the influence of diseases of the most malignant description. One boy, Thomas M'Millan, has been for ten years with hip disease — ten long years of agony in that dreadful place without a mother’s voice to soothe him, or the hand of one whom he loves to tend him in his paroxysms of agony ! The atmosphere of the children’s hospital is offensive to a degree that is almost unbearable. To counter-balance this, however, the doors are left open, in such a manner that a piercing draught sweeps through the ward at all hours, without at all, be it said, alleviating ' the effects of bad ventilation and worse supervision. 

In speaking of the libraries, the directors in their report say : — 'During the year the various libraries of the institution have been largely used by the inmates. In order to increase the attractiveness of this source of improvement a regular supply of various periodicals of a kind calculated to improve the moral and religious welfare of the inmates has been provided.' 

In view of this grandiose statement, I requested  Mrs. Elric to afford me a glimpse of even one of  the ‘various libraries’ of the institution. She did so; and I was considerably disillusioned. 
Concealed in the recesses of a small cupboard on one of the staircases were exactly six dog eared, tattered volumes. Even these could not be said to be calculated to improve the moral and religious wolf tire of the inmates for they were those bald volumes of travel, which are given away to boys at cheap schools as prizes, and which are usually bartered for toffee and  marbles within a week of presentation. As for ' the regular supply of various periodic aln,' they must either be exclusively confined to the use of the inmates of the board room, or must have been so carefully concealed that no human eye could detect their whereabouts, without devoting many hours to the search.

It may be said by some that the state of affairs I have endeavoured to depict should have long ago been discovered by the Inspector of Public Charities and duly reported by him to the Government. From inquiries I have made I am in a position to state that Mr. Robison has made frequent representations to the official chief, Mr. Halloran, respecting the deplorable manner in 1 which many of our charitable institutions are conducted ; but no notice whatever has been taken of big letters. The Government, as a rule, is too wrapped up in petty squabbles, too eager to gain the selfish onda of the men of which it is composed, to give ear to suggestions on the part of a subordinate which may possibly involve the glancing over of a few documents. The Commission employed by the Government to inquire into the state and conduct of the various asylums in 1874, recommended that the Inspector of Public Charities be made 'comptroller, and entrusted with a certain, amount of administrative power. How far this suggestion has been acted upon will be seen when I emphatically  state that beyond the name of Inspector, Mr. Robison has no power whatever, his representations being treated with silence and neglect.UNORTHODOX SYDNEY. (1877, June 30).Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 14. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115374783 

THE 'PILGRIM PAPERS.' 
The first of a series of Parliamentary Sketches, written expressly for this journal by 'A 'Pilgrim,' will appear in our next issue. These articles will treat of the various idiosyncrasies and eccentricities of our legislators ; and in the papers will be embodied other descriptive matter of an original kind. 'Pilgrim's' third article on the Liverpool Asylum will also appear. THE "PILGRIM PAPERS." (1877, October 6). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 13. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115374647 

'THE PILGRIM PAPERS.'
The second of the series of Parliamentary sketches 'Over the Speaker' by "A Pilgrim'' will appear next week. ' Pilgrim's' report on the Erysiplas Hospital at Parramatta will also be published in the forthcoming number of this journal.
Liverpool Asylum. — We learn with much pleasure that in consequence of some statements concerning an inmate named James Wells, which were embodies in "Pilgrim's" first article on this institution, a subscription has been raised for him by the inhabitants of the town, to enable him to purchase his own medicines. We learn that Mr. Alfred Wilson has, with his usual promptness in these matters, headed the list with £1, and we trust that others will not be backward in coming to the assistance of this unfortunate inmate, who, we understand, is rapidly dying of consumption.  THE PILGRIM PAPERS." (1877, October 13). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 15. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115375969 

Freeman's Journal didn't back him up:

THE PILGRIM.
We have received the first of a weekly publication in pamphlet form which bears the above title. The book contains two articles — one, in which is detailed the writers experiences in the lock-up, and the other, a paper devoted to a biographical sketch of Sir Henry Parkes, which is more humorous than complimentary. Of the general spirit of this literary venture we prefer to say nothing. The Pilgrim’s merits as a writer are, we believe, generally acknowledged. The eccentricity which is one of his strangest characteristics is perhaps as much to be deplored as to be laughed at. In any case we cannot but admit that whatever claim may be laid to the Pilgrim's charge, that of dullness is quite foreign to his nature. His pamphlet is fully up to the standard of his writings in this journal, and we are pleased to be able to testify that he has not taken advantage of a freedom from editorial shackles to launch out into that pointless spirit of invective and abuse, which disfigures, while it reduces the sting of a satire. 

The printing of 'The Pilgrim' (for such is the title of the new publication) leaves nothing to be desired. Messrs Gorman and Riordan who print and publish the work, are entitled to the highest praise for the manner in which the pamphlet is turned out. We understand 'The Pilgrim' has had an enormous success in Sydney and the suburbs, and we suppose the country people will eagerly devour this bizarre literary venture. We refer our readers for business particulars to another column. In the pamphlet we are noticing the author sensibly enough, it seems to us, ridicules though notion of a journal being responsible for the vagaries of its writers when not employed on its staff. It is not for us to go into the social merits -or demerits of our quondam contributor. We paid him his own price for his articles, and whatever may now be urged against him. We have no reason to believe that his opinions, as oppressed through the medium of our columns, were otherwise than honest. In any case they have never been successfully controverted. It is not for us at this juncture, to say whether his connection with us has been severed through his misfortune or his fault ; in any case we have no doubt the ' Pilgrim ' is quite capable of fighting his own battles. THE PILGRIM. (1877, November 17).Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 13. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115377787 

COURT OF QUARTER SESSIONS. - A Court of Quarter Sessions opens at Darlinghurst this day (Monday) with a list of from sixty to seventy cases, the chairman being Mr. District Court Judge Wilkinson. The following are the cases for trial :
Harold Grey, stealing from the person;  The [?] Morning [?]. (1877, December 17).The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28395434 

1878

"COURT OF QUARTER SESSIONS. MONDAY.
Before the District Court Judge WILKINSON.
Mr. F. E. Rogers prosecuted for the Crown.
Harold Grey was charged with having, on the 14th September, at Sydney, stolen from the person of Alfred Clarkson a gold watch, hair-chain and locket, his property. Mr. D. Buchanan, instructed by Mr. J. Lowe, defended. The Crown challenged two of the jurors called, and the prisoner fifteen. The Crown Prosecutor opened the case to the jury, and asked them to dismiss from their minds whatever they might have heard out of doors in respect to it. He then stated the facts which he proposed to prove, and called sergeant Mulqueeny, who arrested prisoner and charged him with stealing the property. Prisoner replied, "I know nothing about it." The sergeant also proved the service of a subpoena on a witness named Rankine to give evidence at this trial. The subpoena was served on the 23rd December, but witness had since disappeared, and every effort had been used in vain to find him. 
Alfred Clarkson, the prosecutor, said that about 11 o'clock on the night of the 13th, he went to Joberts's public-house, where prisoner and a Mr. Peisley were; and Grey was introduced to prosecutor for the first time. There they had something to drink, and then went to Uhde's and had some champagne. Prisoner and a Mr. Beard then went in a cab to Emerson's oyster shop, and Peisley and prosecutor followed. At Emerson's the party had oysters and bottled porter in a private room. Mr. Beard left first about mid-night. Prosecutor was not quite sure whether he left Emerson's in Grey's company or not, for he lost his recollection for about twenty minutes. When he recovered his senses, he found that his watch, chain, and locket were gone. Looked at the watch last before that on the way from Roberts' to Uhde's, and told 'Peisley the time". He at once reported the loss at Emerson's and at the detective office, and then went home. In cross-exanimation the prosecutor declined to swear that he had not given the locket to prisoner, and his watch to another person, but thought it highly improbable. Next evening prosecutor saw prisoner at Uhde's, and the latter professed not to know him at first, but afterwards asked prosecutor how he got on the previous night ; and when he was told of the robbery, said he was sorry to hear it. Never accused any other person of having taken his watch, though he was excited, and might have suspected everybody. G. R. Peisley stated that Beard left the party at Emerson's, and then witness, wishing to go home, asked prosecutor to share a cab with him. He refused and the prisoner said, "Leave him to me, "I'll take care of him." Witness then left. The prosecutor was not drunk when witness left: he was sensible; prisoner was not drunk, but was flushed with drink. Re-examined, the witness stated that he had had several conversations with prisoner since the conviction; the purport of some of them was that prisoner said he had [plenty of friends and money, and wished witness to try to make it right with Clarkson, and make the evidence un-certain, so a to give him (prisoner) a chance: witness refused to do this, and said he was sorry to see prisoner in such a scrape.  Thomas Wright, formerly a waiter at Emerson's, stated that when prisoner promised to take care of prosecutor Peisley said " Mind you do," a quarter of an hour after Peisley left prosecutor and prisoner went away, the latter being the worse for liquor; about a quarter of an hour afterwards prosecutor came back and complained of the loss of his watch; when he left with prisoner prosecutor had his watch-chain on. Lucy Burman, barmaid at the Victoria Inn, stated that prisoner, about the middle of September, gave her a locket, which he said some one had given him, but he had no use for it ; witness wore the locket openly for about six weeks, when she gave it up to sergeant Mulqueeny. Louis Mein, hotel-keeper, stated that on the 14th, 15th, or 16th December prisoner showed him a gold watch, which he said he had received from Melbourne and pawned, but had just redeemed; witness, cross-examined, denied that he had any desire to revenge himself on prisoner; he had commenced an action against Grey, but withdrew it by his solicitor's advice. Max Frudenthal, a billiard-marker at Wein's, said that prisoner was frequently at that place with a man named Rankine and others ; on one occasion, about the 14th September, in the afternoon, prisoner showed a gold watch which he said he had just taken out of pawn ; he added that he had had it for 15 years ; his 'poor dear mother had given it to him’; it had a metal chain not a hair chain when shown to witness. [Neither this nor the previous witness could identify the watch shown to them by prisoner with that produced in Court]. Joseph Rose stated that in September last, he bought a pawn ticket for a watch from man named Rankine ; this was four days after the pawn ticket was dated ; redeemed the watch and sold it to Mr. Lang, a clerk on board the mail steamer Australia. Alexander Harris, assistant to Mr. Himmelhoch, pawnbroker, stated, that the watch was pawned about dinner time on the 14th September by Rankine, and was redeemed by Rankine on the 18th. W. D. Bolton stated that he knew prisoner in Geelong gaol two years ago. They were friends up to the time of this charge being made. When witness married there was a quarrel between them on account of some domestic affairs. His wife was a householder and bailed prisoner out. She told prisoner that if he was guilty of stealing the watch he had better go away, and she offered him money to leave the colony. On cross examination prisoner admitted that he had been bound over to keep the peace towards his wife. He refused to answer other questions relative to his previous career. This was the case for the Crown. For the defence Mr. Buchanan called William Martin to show the untrustworthiness of Bolton's evidence and then, addressed the jury. The Crown Prosecutor replied and his Honour summed up. The jury, after retiring for fifty minutes, found the prisoner guilty. His Honor expressed his regret at seeing a person of the prisoner's evident ability in such a position. He thought it better not to refer to anything relative to prisoner's career elsewhere, but to treat this as a first offence committed in this colony. The sentence was six months' imprisonment with hard labour in Darlinghurst Gaol. COURT OF QUARTER SESSIONS. (1878, January 1). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13405106 

Harold Grey, known as the Pilgrim, has been convicted of stealing a watch, and sentenced to six months imprisonment in Maitland jail. SYDNEY. (1878, January 2). The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle (NSW : 1864 - 1881), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article100876016 

Harold Grey was charged with having, on the 14th September, at Sydney, stolen from the person of Alfred Clarkson a gold watch, hair-chain, and locket, his property. The prisoner was sentenced to six months' imprisonment with hard labour in Darlinghurst gaol. LAW. (1878, January 5). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162693394 

He was sent to Maitland, where he was allowed to write - this first item written in 1877:

SUM  P U N K I N S,
A CHRISTMAS ANNUAL,
HAROLD GREY,
THE PILGRIM.
The SIXTH THOUSAND is now issued from the press, and can be obtained from all booksellers and news agents throughout New South Wales.
The book has been read by thousands, and a general verdict of approval has been the result.
It does not contain a single line that has not been written by the Pilgrim. It is perfectly original, and as an Annual it surpasses all the Christmas works that have yet been published. EVERYBODY SHOULD READ IT.
Price, 1s, by post 1s 6d. Advertising (1878, January 14). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13405741 

READ THE DEVIL IN SYDNEY, TO-MORROW,
Tuesday, March 5.
THE DEVIL IN SYDNEY, by THE ORIGINAL PILGRIM (HAROLD GREY), will appear TOMORROW, Tuesday, March 5.
Philip Lynne and Harry Kellier in no way connected with, the above.
DE COURCY- HYDE, and BLAKNEY. Advertising (1878, March 4). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13408979 

No way connected above, perhaps because:
My unnatural life : an autobiographical apology / by a pilgrim.
by Grey, Harold. Published 1878 by De Courcy, Hyde and Blakeney in Sydney
"Supplement to Harold Grey's sensational weekly pamphlet, The Pilgrim."

Cafes After Midnight Sydney after dark, in the '70's, seems a lively town as pictured In a series as 'The Pilgrim, a Sensational Weekly Pamphlet.' The pilgrimages of the writer ('Harold Grey ? or T. E. Argles) were made after midnight, and chiefly to certain cafes, with such names as The Little House Round the Corner, the Cafe Maas. And the Cafe Blind. As to the last of these, 'The Cafe Blind' is, I should think, the most dangerous 'Midnight Temple' in the city.' The proprietor, a foreigner, had 'a complexion like verdigris and a now like a tiger's claw.' The Pilgrim finds Madame Blind behind the counter.' Her attire is of white silk, and her ornaments diamonds. Her face is 'made up' to an extent that Is positively ludicrous; her eyebrows are artificially pencilled, her eyelashes blackened, and her lips smeared with some unctuous preparation of red. Her hair is dyed— and inartistically dyed— a dirty yellow. . . . 'Conversing with her is a prominent member of the Legislative Assembly, who is supposed by his family to be in his seat supporting the ‘..administration.' The Pilgrim explains that he writes without help from any of the 'Journalistic cracks.' And you believe him when he adds, 'Not having raked them in I, of course, hoe them nothing.' GLIMPSES OF THE PAST (1935, December 21). The Newcastle Sun (NSW : 1918 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166491471 

You can read these in full in - From My unnatural life / by H. Grey.
Harold Grey 1878-1879 - 30 pages

Early Bulletin Memoirs.
No. X.
The Pilgrim! The Pilgrim ! A great and remarkable character was Theodore Argles, otherwise Harold Grey, otherwise The Pilgrim— one of the staff of the early Bulletin. I first met the Pilgrim while on the Evening News, before the Bulletin was launched, and he gave us no end of trouble. His general impishness brought him into conflict with everybody, from old Sam Bennett, the proprietor, down to his sons and prospective son-in-law, Henniker Heaton. His contributions were mostly little literary vignettes of Sydney street people who turned up at the office in increasing numbers for either a fight or an apology. Sam Bennett decided that the Pilgrim must depart, whereupon out of sheer mischievousness he encoded a requisition asking for his retention, signing with his own hand the name of every member of the staff, adding that of Alfred Bennett, the eldest son, whose remarkable fist and still more remarkable spelling he faithfully imitated, omitting one ‘n’ from Bennett and inserting it over the name in the most primitive fashion. Samuel was just wild when he got the requisition, and the Pilgrim had to shift his camp. Soon followed his weekly brochure, 'The Devil in Sydney,' something after the style of Rochefort 's fierce Lanterne, in which Grey dissected everybody on the staff— and Henniker Heaton in particular. He went for all persons of note in the city and soon half the populace with a clenched fist was in search of 'The Devil in Sydney.' There was, however general relish over the satires, and not counting a few knockdown blows, and any number of thrown-outs from hotels, Grey was getting on well. There never was a more polished satirical writer in Australia than the Pilgrim. 'He was an equal of Churchill. Besides being a genius, he was a study in many ways. He was the incarnation of impishness, pure devilish mischievousness. Yet while not knowing what friendship or fidelity was, he was incapable of wanton vindictiveness. He was all human cat, whose claws were eternally in and out. He lived in the delight of disturbing somebody's ease. He believed nothing, his bedrock opinion, if he had one at all, being that there was a seamy side to anything and everything, and there was much fun in showing it up. In appearance the Pilgrim was a rare character. He was the son of Theodore Argles, a French Jewish solicitor, whose wife was a London girl. Grey was built entirely of concentrates. There was nothing superfluous about him — he was spare, not more than 8st, a man of exceeding good taste in dress, he was in fact ahead of fashion, and he moved about the street like a sprite. His fleshless face was clean carved, and his Hebraic nose, which was remarkably thin, stood not too prominently out between two grey eyes— the keenest of the keen, and always restless. He was a blonde type of a man, and had about as much sandy hair as would cover a doll's head. His little struggling light moustache he was eternally nervously twisting. Satirical verse and theatrical criticism were his forte, but in his general writing he was always brilliant and destructive. He certainly helped to make an entire community dance to early Bulletin music. His life would fill several volumes, yet it lasted but a day. He was in his prime at 25, and in his coffin at 30. He had burnt out. In vigorous work, his breakfast was a half tumbler of rum in which were steeped two lemons, yet he was seldom or ever intoxicated The liquor went to rouse the fires within. Before he got on the Bulletin, Grey was arrested over a watch, and received eighteen months— most of us believed a rank injustice and a still more vindictive sentence. The facts indicated a lark in one of the King-street cafes then prevalent, and before a third of the sentence was served, Grey was at liberty. 

Governor Reid, of Darlinghurst Gaol, afterwards told me that Grey terrorised the staff the first day he was in goal, and they were all glad to have him removed to Maitland. Here he practically swapped places with the governor, the latter becoming his terrorised prisoner. The gaoler at Maitland, on whom one day later I tilled for some particulars about the Pilgrim's strange doings, told me there was not an hour's peace in the place from the moment of his arrival till the moment of his discharge. He hadn't been a moment in the gaol before be sent for the governor, and said, 'Now, let's have an understanding. ; We'll all be happy if you'll recognise my proper position. If you don't— well, I'll hand you down as the biggest and cruellest scoundrel that ever scourged a gaol.' The gaoler said he was completely taken back, and partly from sympathy but mostly from fear (the gaoler admitting to me he didn't want to be written down) the new arrival was to some extent given the run of the gaol. He soon wormed himself into the confidence of every warder, and then began to brew mischief. He somehow managed to get concocted letters, written by himself, ostensibly from warders, put under the female prisoners' doors. He dropped now and again women prisoners' letters in reply to warders in different parts of the gaol ; and in the same way got up scores of intended breakaways. The turmoil was immense. The gaol was no longer happy, and incessant inquiries followed. His chief devilry, however, was his sending fictitious letters out of the gaol to warders' wives living in and about East Maitland — alleging extraordinary romances between the warders and the female prisoners. This turned the gaol into a veritable pandemonium, several of the wives demanding the removal of their husbands to other gaols. The gaoler's time was largely taken up settling the squabbles, and at last, by some engineering, the Pilgrim was liberated early. 

It was while he was in gaol he met the girl who was to become his wife. Miss Brown, the comely and excellent daughter of the postmaster at East Maitland, was one of the lady visitors to the gaol and listening to Grey's elegies, she fell in love with him, and on his being liberated they were married. 

Grey delivered some very successful lectures after his release. There were two things which he said had struck him greatly the day he came out of gaol. The gates had hardly closed behind him: for 'this silver genevic exploit' when he was accosted by a boy, who said, ' Please, sir, tell me the time by your watch' Going to West Maitland, he stopped opposite a watchmaker's. ' Was he treated there as unkindly as he had been treated— in Sydney ? No Did they order him away from the window ? No. They merely came put and put up the shutters.' 

The Pilgrim, Victor Daley, and Little Caddy, all three of whom were on the early Bulletin together, hunted in packs when out for game, and they all reached home towards morning, but never together. They all lost each other. In their prime they were as fine a Bohemian trio as ever infested a city. Caddy was the only one then with a family, but it was no encumbrance, yet he somehow gave ballast to the party. Caddy, who was a splendid writer with a philosophic turn, was a near relative of Bishop Barker, of Sydney, and was in regular correspondence with Herbert Spencer. No doubt he was a philosopher. He lived in many fine houses in Sydney, but paid no rent. Every bailiff who was put into his house on seeing the large family always begged the landlord to ' let 'em all go.' We were talking one day of the high rents then ruling in Sydney and Caddy remarked, ' They are high, very high. But stay,' he added reflectively ' I've never found the rents too high at all. But what is too high — is van hire.' 
One day the poor little Bohemian, genuine and brilliant, though helpless little man, was killed by a tram in the streets of Melbourne, and now that he is long since dead it will not hurt him to say he was related to a Bishop. It was simply a birth-mark and he was not responsible for it. But to the trio. What hilarious rascals the three were. But more anon. John Haynes. Early "Bulletin" Memoirs. (1905, June 17).The Newsletter: an Australian Paper for Australian People (Sydney, NSW : 1900 - 1919), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114727688 

'Little Caddy' is fellow journalist Edwin Caddy – the ‘violinist’ Daley trekked north with. The postmaster's daughter may have been visiting Maitland gaol because her father was an inmate:

EAST MAITLAND.
Our town has been quite alarmed since Thursday night as to what has become of our postmaster, Mr. Richard Brown. He left on Thursday night late, and nothing can be heard of him in any way. The inspector from Sydney is up, and I am told he said that the books are all correct--so far, well. It is to be hoped that something will be heard of him ere long, and that nothing serious has happened to him. EAST MAITLAND. (1878, May 1).Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133329685 

A Postmaster Charged with Embezzlement,
East Maitland, Friday— At the East Maitland Police Court, this morning, Richard P. Brown, late Postmaster, was charged with embezzling the sum of £44, the property of the Government. The prisoner was remanded until Tuesday. LATEST TELEGRAMS (1878, November 29). Evening News(Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107935620 

Died, at his residence, East Maitland, on the 20th instant, Robert Pyne Browne, postmaster, aged 44 years. Family Notices (1871, July 29). The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18755987 

NSW Birth, Death, Marriages records: BROWNE  ROBERT P 4277/1871 Father:  RICHARD Mother:  HARRIETTE

Mr. Argles speaks about this incident, prior to Richard Brown being found, in My unnatural life / by H. Grey. Harold Grey 1878-1879 - 30 pages

The Hyde Park Riot.
At the Central Police Court tills morning before Messrs. Niell, M'Lean, Neale, and Helsham).— William Stritch, Phillip Stapleton, Patrick Griffin, Henry Sheridan, John Foley, Michael Fogarty, Alexander Murphy, and William Hall appeared to answer an information filed against them by Sub-inspector Anderson for having on Sunday, the 10th March, created a riot on Hyde Park. Messrs. Kippax, Davies, M'Beath, and Dixson also occupied seats on the Bench.

Mr. Want, instructed by Mr. Williams (Crown Solicitor), appeared on behalf of the Crown. Messrs. W. Roberts and Gannon appeared for all the accused except Griffin, who was defended by Mr. Farrell. Mr. Buchanan, instructed by Mr. Order, said he appeared in the interest of the Rev. Mr. Allen, but Mr. Williams maintained that no other person than the Crown and the defendants had a locus standing in the case. The information set forth that the defendants (in company with John Stritch, who had evaded service of summons) did, together with divers other persons, to the number of two and more, unlawfully and riotously assemble to disturb the public peace, and did then and there make a great riot and disturbance, to the terror and alarm of Her Majesty's subjects there being assembled. Mr. Want briefly explained the circumstances of the case, and pointed out that he was not there to express any opinion upon the practice and precepts of Pastor Allen. Whatever had been or done said by that gentleman did not justify a crowd of men committing a serious breach of the peace. He trusted the Bench would, if the case was proved, inflict such a severe punishment as would prevent a repetition of such conduct in future. 

Sub-Inspector Robert Anderson deposed that he laid the information, but was not present. Constable Wm. Tindall stated that he was on duty in Hyde Park on Sunday inst, 10th March. He knew the defendant, William Stritch. Saw him in the Park on that day about 10 minutes past 3 in the after-noon. Had seen him in the park before. Saw the Rev. Mr. Allen near the central avenue of the southern portion of the Park, preaching, there were a great number of persons present. Up to that time there was no disturbance. About twenty minutes afterwards saw defendant Stapleton. He went up to Stritch, and shook hands with him. Up to this time the crowd was orderly. Stapleton and Stritch then darted into the crowd assembled round Mr. Allen and were followed by a mob of about 200 people, He identified Foley, Stapleton, William Stritch, and Griffin as forming part of the crowd that rushed upon Mr. Allen's supporters. Stritch said, 'Let us hunt the heretics off,' and took a book out of his pocket, saying 'This will show them what they are. It's written by the Pilgrim, a man that's now in gaol for stealing a watch.' The crowd around Stritch and Stapleton became much excited. They rushed on Mr. Allen's congregation, and pushed them away, shoving Mr. Allen down, and repeating the cry. Their demeanour was such as to excite terror. Mr. Allen was knocked down by the crowd that followed Stapleton and Stritch who kept repeating 'run old Allen off the Park.' 

Forms on the ground were capsized, and branches of trees broken. Could not say whether the trees were broken willfully or not. 

Mr. Allen was removed from the Park, followed by a crowd of about three or four thousand persons yelling and hooting all the way. Stapleton and Stritch were with that crowd. Mr. Allen was escorted to his residence by the police. The populace followed and remaining outside Mr. Allen's house. While the crowd was outside, he (witness) felt something heavy push against him, and on turning round he found a man with his pocket full of stones. He kept watch upon the man, thinking he would throw some of the stones; but he had not seen him since or he would have summoned him. Stritch was very much excited, behaving more like a lunatic than anything else, taking off his hat and waving it first in one hand and then in the other. 

To Mr. Gannon : Stritch did not speak when he shook hands first with Stapleton. Did not hear Stapleton say; We're here to-day for liberty of speech, and free discussion is allowed on the racecourse. The disturbance took place the moment Stapleton and Stritch entered Mr. Allen's crowd. Was directed by Sergeant Flaherty to watch Stapleton and Stritch. Witness added that Stapleton spoke something in Irish, a language he did not understand.Saw no stones thrown, or blows struck. The witness was also cross-examined at some length by Mr. Farrell. Foley and Griffin were near Stritch and the others, when the rush was first made. Mr. Allen's congregation surrounded him to protect him. They were acting in defence. [The interference of Mr. Buchanan was objected to by Messrs. Gannon and Farrell, at he was only a bystander in the court. The Bench sustained the objection.] Noticed Griffin and Foley in the crowd that attacked Mr. Allen's congregation. On re-examination, he stated that the behaviour of Stritch was so riotous that he could have apprehended him for riotous behaviour under the police regulations, but had been told it would be better to proceed by summons. The Hyde Park Riot. (1878, March 15).Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107939530 

Lecture .-Harold Grey, alias The Pilgrim, is delivering a lecture at the School of Arts, subject  'City Vice and Prison Piety," to a very large audience. He intends lecturing in Newcastle shortly. West Maitland, June 29. WEST MAITLAND. (1878, July 2).Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136041658 

THEATRE ROYAL.
SUNDAY NEXT, 7th July. ,
The PILGRIM (Mr. Harold Grey) will give his views,
AESTHETIC, FANTASTIC, and PHILOSOPHICAL,
upon the subject of CITY VICE and PRISON PIETY-
Prices-One Shilling to Circle ; other parts of House, Sixpence. Advertising (1878, July 4). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13416583 

LIFE.-A WEEKLY EXPONENT OF COMMON SENSE.
Conducted by Harold Grey ("A Pilgrim".)
Price. 3d.
PROSPECTUS.
TO THE PUBLIC OF NEW SOUTH WALES.
On WEDNESDAY, September 4, will appear the first number of Life, an original weekly newspaper, conducted by the Pilgrim.
Life will be a double-demy journal of the highest class, and will contain leading articles upon politics and other topics of Interest, humorous sketches, SPORTING INTELLIGENCE and TIPS ; full and original reports of police cases, all written by the VERY BEST procurable talent. Mr. HAROLD GREY will devote the whole of his time-and attention to the editorship of LIFE, and will commence in the first number a remarkable serial story of intense interest, entitled 
WHAT WAS SHE ?
The plot of this tale is of such an original description, that a gold watch will be given to any person guessing the denouement before the three last chapters have appeared. ^ In addition to the novel, Mr. Grey will each week contribute a town sketch, dramatic criticisms, and Pilgrim pars/
Life is started under unusually favourable auspices. The enormous demand for the PILGRIM (which is incorporated in this newspaper) renders It possible for the publishers to guarantee advertisers a circulation of 6000 copies weekly. As an advertising medium, therefore, LIFE will stand positively unrivalled, not only will It be eagerly purchased by the public throughout the length and breadth of this and adjoining colonies, but it will circulate amongst those classes to whom advertisements are more particularly addressed. The greatest care has been displayed by the conductor in the selection of his staff, no expense having been spared to lender Life a journal which for wit, humour, scholarship,- and fearlessness of opinion shall be without a peer in the antpodes.
Any private communications to be addressed to Mr. HAROLD  GREY, 15, Queen's-place; those of a business nature to Messrs. SAMPSON and GIBSON, at the same address. Advertising (1878, August 20). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 8. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13415725 

Dalley Street, named for politician Victor Dalley, was once called Queen’s Place.Its continuation across George Street was called Charlotte Place (now Grosvenor Street). Queen Charlotte was George III’s queen. Queen’s Court (Dalley Street) was part of a warren of tiny lanes and courtyards that grew up along the banks of the Tank Stream between the “official” George and Pitt Streets. 




Queen's Place - from album 'Sydney City and Suburban Sewage and Health Board : photographs, with excerpts from the final report of the committee appointed "To inquire into the state of crowded dwellings and areas in the city of Sydney and suburbs, so far as it affects public health", 1875. Dated: Nov - Dec 1875 Album ID : 823978, courtesy State Library of New South Wales, Images No.: a424005h and a424006h 

19 Argles Frank W., Echuca No. 16. LIST OF LETTERS RETURNED FROM THE COUNTRY, AND NOW LYING AT THIS OFFICE UNCLAIMED. (1878, September 27). New South Wales Government Gazette (Sydney, NSW : 1832 - 1900), p. 3917. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223113033 

" LIFE."—Mr, Harold Grey and Life have parted company, and we notice that Life seems all the better for the change. Local and General News (1878, September 28). The Singleton Argus and Upper Hunter General Advocate (NSW : 1874 - 1880), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78830751 

PROTESTANT HALL.
THE PILGRIM I!
The Pilgrim!
THE PILGRIM !I
(Mr. Harold Grey)
Will, on SATURDAY NEXT, 21st inst., deliver his
LAY SERMON, IN 3 CANTOS AND 1 BLACK COAT,
UPON THE SUBJECT OF
CITY VICE and PRISON PIETY,
in the course of which he will deliver some remarks,
'ESTHETIO, FANTASTIC, AND
PHILOSOPHICAL,
UPON THE THREE SEXES,
Men, Women, and Clergymen
Admission-2s. and 1s.
N.B.-Come Early to avoid the crowd.
Remember!
THE Pilgrim's Lecture!
which drew 3,500 people to the Theatre  Royal, Sydney.
Doors open at 7.30. Commence at 8 sharp. Advertising (1878, September 20).Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136043608 

Illegally at Large.—On last Monday week Detectives Forster and Nixon arrested a young man named Harold Grey, alias Emile Argle, on warrant under the Indus of Criminals Act, for being illegally at large in Victoria. It appears that Grey has recently undergone a sentence of 12 months' imprisonment for forgery in New South Wales, and a few weeks after being liberated he made his way to Victoria, where he had formerly served a term of imprisonment for a similar offence. 
On Saturday, the 5th instant, he published a pamphlet, entitled "The Pilgrim," which has been suppressed by the police, as it was considered that the publication was inimical to public morality. 
At the City Police Court on Tuesday morning, the prisoner was brought up under the Influx of Criminals Prevention Act, for being illegally at large in Victoria. Detective Forster, who arrested the prisoner, proved that Grey had formerly served a term of imprisonment in that colony for forgery, and had since been convicted of an offence in Now South Wales, for which be received 12 months' imprisonment. The prisoner pleaded ignorance of the act under which he was charged, and he was remanded for a week on his own recognisance, in order to allow him an opportunity of leaving the colony. GENERAL EXTRACTS. (1878, October 16). Wagga Wagga Advertiser (NSW : 1875 - 1910), p. 1 (SUPPLEMENT TO THE "WAGGA WAGGA ADVERTISER"). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article101939765 

NB: The State library of Victoria has a copy of this 'suppressed pamphlet'.

A NEW PILGRIM'S PROGRESS ! THE WRONG WAY.
" Show me your company and I will tell you what you are, " is an old truthful adage. Sometime ago the organ of the Roman Catholic body in Sydney thought it would be well to try and trump up accusations against all the public charities except those which happened to be under exclusively papistic management.
They seleeted as a fit instrument for this unclean work a person calling himself "A Pilgrim;" who filled; whole columns of the journal, with glaring false witness and vulgar abuse. His patrons, however, did not stand by him, when he had to appear publicly on a criminal charge. The following clipping from the Evening News will satisfactorily account for his former and later career.
A young man named Emile Argle, popularly known as "Harold Grey, and under the nom de plume of " The Pilgrim, was last Monday (according to the Melboume Telegraph)'' arrested by Detectives Foster and Nixon under the Influx of Criminals Act; charged with being illegally at large in Victoria. The ' prisoner, it appears, has already undergone a sentence in the Pentridge Prison, and more recently came out of a goal in Sydney. He arrived in Melbourne only a few days ago, since when he is said to have written and published a pamphlet- entitled " The Pilgrim," the contents of which are not altogether of a moral -character. The prisoner was brought before the City Bench and allowed one week to leave the colony.A NEW PILGRIM'S PROGRESS THE WRONG WAY. (1878, October 19). The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207790880 

MELBOURNE.
8th October.
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
The man Emil Argle, alias Harold Grey, who was arrested yesterday by the under the Influx of Criminals Act, was brought before the police court this morning and remanded for a week, on his personal recognisance,- provided he left the colony within that time. The career of this person, both here and. in New South Wales, has bean of a very mixed character. When here before, be forged the names of Mr. Willoughby, then of the Telegraph, and also of Mr. Marcus Clarke; and his New South Wales life was of much- the same kind. It was remarked to-day that the prisoner had lodged at the Reform Club hotel, and that in No. 1 of the “Pilgrim,” which he published, and to which I alluded the other day, in, the second and least objectionable part of that work he made a very complimentary reference to the Attorney-General' Some of the public think that-the two, facts have led to his, being so leniently treated. In any case the “Pilgrim's" progress, or the continuation of that projected serial, has been stopped. MELBOURNE. (1878, October 9). The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199344811 

1879

'The “Pilgrim” in Trouble.
Telegraph from Adelaide announces that the ingenious young gentleman, known to the readers of prurient Holywell-street literature throughout Australasia under the various names or aliases of 'The Pilgrim,' 'Harold Grey,' and 'Arthur Russell' is, or has been, again, ‘in trouble’. Mr. Russell— we adopt his latest pseudonym - whence leaving Sydney, has been in Melbourne, where his peculiar style was so little appreciated as to win for him a reminder from the police that the Parliament of Victoria has passed an Influx of Criminals Act, and as he had known the interior of Pentridge in a more familiar character than that of a 'casual' visitor, he was warned to move-on. Shifting his camp to pastures new and quite so green, he next visited Adelaide, where to tried journalism of a more respectable class, for we see that tales from his versatile pen ornamented the columns of the 'Christmas Issues of both the leading journals. It was no secret either tint accounts of visit to the prisons and lunatic asylums of Adelaide in the REGISTER were written by the once darling of a certain class of Sydney society. There seemed some chance of Mr. Russell turning to something resembling respectability. The telegram of this morning, however, dispels this hope, for notwithstanding that the case of forgery was dismissed, it appears that the brother of the erratic penman is 'wanted,' -and as it is well known that 'Frank ' only lives or moves through ‘Harold’ or ‘Theodore’ or ‘Arthur’, his capture will doubtless render the complexion of affairs anything but gay for the man of plurality of names. "The Pilgrim" in Trouble. (1879, January 22). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107155051 

Theodore Arglis, a young man, was charged with forging and uttering a cheque on the Bank of South Australia for £6 13s.4d, at Adelaide, on January 13. Ernest Henry Bayer, architect, said he first met the prisoner's brother, Frank Arglis, in Adelaide in September or October last. He had previously known both him and the prisoner in England. He was introduced to the prisoner in King William-street, and had subsequently seen the two brothers together both in the street and at witness's office. Prisoner said they were hard up, and witness lent him two cheques on the Bank of South Australia for £3 each.

Since then he had lent Frank Arglis a cheque for £2. The prisoner asked witness where he could get the first two cheques cashed, and witness went with him and cashed them. The cheque produced, dated November 11, was the one witness gave Frank Arglis. The prisoner was present when witness signed the first two cheques, and asked witness if he could sign his name the same way every time he wrote it. It was not witness's signature to the cheque produced, but was a middling imitation of it. Received the letter produced signed 'Theodore Arglis,' and also received the letter produced signed 'Frank Arglis.' From the slight knowledge he had of prisoner's hand writing he believed the forged cheque to have been filled up by the prisoner. Was aware that steps had been taken in regard to the arrest of prisoner's brother. The prisoner stopped witness in the street on Friday last, and said he had been sent to him by Mr. Bonvthon, of the Advertiser, to ascertain if he could give him any information of the cheques which were supposed to have been uttered by his brother. Told him he had slight suspicions that prisoner's  brother had uttered the cheques, but until he had farther evidence he preferred not to take any action. 

Met the prisoner in the afternoon and told him that he had heard statements which left no doubt in his mind that Frank Argils had uttered the cheques. He said he did not know where his brother was, and said it was not true that he had been seen in public-houses drinking- champagne after the cheques had been uttered. He afterwards said his brother had gone, and he would defy all the detectives in Adelaide to take him. 

By the prisoner: I said to you that if you wished to keep yourself straight in Adelaide you had better tell me where your brother was. Heard Mr. Roberts tell Detective Rogers that you had written to him wishing to square 'the matter. John Langdon Bonython, sub-editor of the S. A. Advertiser, said he knew the prisoner's handwriting. The prisoner gave him the clip of writing produced, which he said had been written by his brother. There were some resemblances between the writing on the cheque and the letter produced owned by the prisoner. The writing on the cheque resembled the writing on the slip, which the prisoner said had been written by his brother.

There was a greater' similarity between what witness supposed to be the brother's hand 'writing and that on the cheque than between the prisoner's letter produced and the cheque.

By the prisoner— Remember your bringing a story to me, and my saying that it would be better if more distinctly written. You took it away, and brought it back' written in an entirely different hand. The slip produced was a portion of that copy. As you told me you –were innocent, I suggested your seeing Mr. Bayer and Mr. Roberts with regard to the case.
Superintendent Peterswald was beginning to give evidence as to seeing the prisoner in custody at the Melbourne Police Court in October last, when he was stopped by His Worship.

By the prisoner— No one ever told me you were bringing out a book called, 'Something rotten in the State of Denmark.' Knew Mr. Willis, an artist. He never told me that he was getting up some drawings for you. He never said there was a picture of myself leering at a nursemaid, with underneath the words, 'A Gay Deceiver.' (Laughter.) The Superintendent applied for a remand until the prisoner's brother was caught.
His Worship asked what other evidence he expected to bring, and of certain suspicious circumstances in connection with the prisoner. The Superintendent said he should call farther evidence as to the handwriting. Mr. Beddome remarked that not one witness had sworn to the handwriting, and there was no evidence against him in the case. The information was dismissed.— Arglis was further charged with aiding and abetting Frank Arglis in committing a certain felony, namely, forging and uttering a cheque on the Bank of South Australia for £6 13s. 4d. at Adelaide, on January 13. The evidence of Mr. Bayer given in the previous case was read over to him and confirmed. James McDonald, manager to B. C. Castle & Co., said a young man, whom he had been told was Frank Arglis, came to the shop and bought a suit of clothes and some neckties. 
He paid for the things with a cheque, which had been banked, but for which no money had been received. The necktie prisoner was wearing in Court was similar to that the young man bought. The prisoner applied for an adjournment until Tuesday on account of illness, which His Worship granted. Superintendent Peterswald asked whether it was a remand or an adjournment. His Worship replied that it was an adjournment, as the prosecution had shown no reason why the prisoner should be deprived of his liberty. POLICE COURT—ADELAIDE. (1879, January 21). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article73071363 

Frank Argles, an intelligent looking respectably dressed young man, was brought up on Warrant charged with forging the name of Ernest Henry Bayer, architect, Adelaide, to a cheque on the Bank of South Australia for £6, and uttering the same on William Godfrey Roberts, bookseller, King William-street, on the 13th instant. Mr. Smith defended. Prosecutor gave evidence that prisoner came to his shop, quite a stranger to him, and bought books to the value of 33s., in payment of which he tendered the cheque in question, and witness gave him £4 7s. in change. Prisoner endorsed the cheque at witness's request. It also bore as an endorsement the name of F. C. H. Morsman. Witness passed it through his Bank account, and it was returned marked " signature unlike." Mr. Bayer called, stated that the signature on the cheque purporting to be his name was a forgery. It was a passable imitation. Prisoner was an old schoolfellow of his. In a previous case of the same kind he appeared as the prosecutes against prisoner's brother (now in Court).

James Stobie, ledgerkeeper of .the Bank of South Australia, stated that he returned the cheque marked " signature unlike." Recognised the dissimilarity immediately. William Upton, teller in the - same Bank, identified prisoner as the person who come to the Bank on the 15th instant and asked for a cheque-book. Witness asked who it was for, and he replied Davis. Asked Davis's initials, and prisoner answered " E. D." No such person having an account there witness refused to grant .the request. Prisoner said he had been to some of the other Banks and could not get one. He turned then to go, and witness ultimately gave him a cheque-book of 25 cheques marked a 157. The forged cheque was one of these. 

Lance- Corporal Kerr, stationed at Moonta, stated that on the evening of the 24th he arrested prisoner at Moonta in the Prince of Wales Hotel. Told him the charge and captioned him, when he said, "I know what you want—I did it; I did it for my brother; I am glad he is out of it." On the way to Adelaide on the bus prisoner pointed out the Yatala Labour Prison, and said, "That will be my residence; my brother got all the money; I could have got £500 if I had wished; Mr. Beyer and I were schoolmates; he lent me £8 when I came to Adelaide." 



Yatala Labour Prison, 1870, courtesy State Library of South Australia. Image B 1441.

By Dr. Smith—Arrested prisoner at the hotel, and took him to the station before I cautioned him. Prisoner in Court, on being asked if he had anything to say, said, "I never spoke a word to the constable after being arrested; I never said a word about my brother having anything to do with the case." Committed for trial. Argles was further charged on the information of Thomas Gatty Brown with forging a cheque for £3 3s. on the Bank of South Australia on January 13. Thomas G. Brown, clothier, of King William-street, stated that prisoner came to his shop on January 13. He purchased goods to the amount of 30s., and tendered the cheque produced. Prisoner endorsed the cheque F. C. Reynolds in the presence of witness. Afterwards presented it to the Bank of Australasia, when it was returned. By Dr. Smith—Did not know prisoner before. Ernest H. Beyer said the signature to the cheque produced was not his. 

James Stobie, ledgerkeeper at the Bank of South Australia, said the signature on the cheque produced was not Mr. Beyer's. Corporal Kerr said he arrested the prisoner in the police cells at Adelaide on January 26, when he said nothing. Committed for trial. Argles was then charged on the information of George Macdonald with forging a cheque for £6 138. 4d. on the Bank of South Australia on January 13. 
Mr. Macdonald, salesman at Robert Carr Castle's, said prisoner came to the shop on January 13 and bought clothes to the value of £3 3s. Id., and tendered him the cheque produced, remarking that he was in Mr. Beyer's office. He gave him the name of F. G. H. Walters. Handed the cheque to their accountant, and afterwards saw it marked "Signature doubtful." E. H. Beyer said it was not his signature to the cheque produced. James Stobie said the signature to the cheque was not Mr. Beyer's. 
James Walter Tingey son of Henry Tingey, pawnbroker, said prisoner pawned the clothes with him on January 14 for 12s. Corporal Kerr said he arrested the prisoner on January 26. He made no statement. Committed for trial. Argles was further charged on the information of Thomas E. Symes with forging a cheque for £3 3s. on the Bank of South Australia on January 13. Thomas Symes said prisoner came to Mr. Birke's shop in Bundle-street on January 13 and bought goods to the value of £2 8s. 6d. and tendered cheque produced. Sent the cheque to the Bank, when it was returned marked  “Forgery." Mr. Bayer said the signature to the cheque produced was not his. Prisoner when arrested made no statement. Committed for trial. 

Argles was charged on the information of Thomas Duly Futcher with forging a cheque for £3 3s. on the Bank of South Australia. On January 13 Mr. Futcher, assistant at Finlayson and Co.'s, said prisoner came to their shop, King William-street, on January 13, and bought goods to the amount of 18s. Id., for which he tendered the cheque. It was returned from the  Bank marked "Forged." Mr. Bayer said the signature on cheque produced was not his.
Prisoner when arrested made no statement. Committed for trial. LAW AND CRIMINAL COURTS. (1879, January 28). Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), p. 3 (SECOND EDITION). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article204436396 

The young man, Frank Argles, who was arrested at Moonta on Saturday, was brought before Mr. Beddome on five charges of forgery, on Monday morning, and committed for trial on each. Lance-Constable Kerr stated that when he arrested the prisoner at Moonta he said, " I know what you want; I did it. I did it for my brother. I am glad he's out of it."

On the way down to Adelaide, when on the coach, the prisoner said, according to the constable's' evidence, My brother got all the money; I could have got £500 if I had wished. Mr. Bayer and I were schoolmates. He lent me £8 when we came to Adelaide." He said this talking in a general manner to the passengers, and the constable said he did not introduce the conversation in any way. 

While the constable was giving this evidence Theodore Argles,  who was in Court, looked enquiringly at his brother, who shook his head in denial. The prisoner at the conclusion of the first case indignantly denied the constable's statement in the following words:—"I never once said a single word in reference to my brother's having anything to do with the case, either before or after being cautioned. I said it was all my own fault, and what the constable has stated is a downright falsehood. After the charge had been told me I never opened my mouth, and was taken straight to the cell.''  GENERAL NEWS. (1879, January 28). The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), p. 2 (SECOND EDITION). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207648639 

Ernest Henry Bayer

Mr. E. H. Bayer, the well-known architect, and brother of Mr. C. A. Bayer (Hydraulic Engineer), died at his residence, Smith terrace, Glenelg, on, Tuesday. Early in the morning Mrs. Bayer was awakened by the heavy breathing of her husband. Medical aid was summoned, but before it arrived he had expired, death having been, due to heart failure. Mr. Bayer had complained to his brother on Saturday, and to his wife on Monday evening, of feeling unwell, but when he retired there did not appear to be anything particularly wrong with him. 

Mr. Bayer was in his fifty sixth year, and was the third son of the late Dr. Bayer, who, died in Adelaide in 1867, and a grandson of the late; Dr. Kent, after whom Kent Town was named. Mr. Bayer was educated at Hanwell College, Middlesex, and articled as an architect to Mr. Saunders, of London'. He arrived in South Australia in 1873, and two years later was married to the eldest daughter of the late Mr. Tolley, wine and spirit merchant. Mr. Bayer returned to England in 1883 and came back to Adelaide again in the following year. He designed many public buildings and private residences in the State, and was a member of the Royal Institute of British Architects. He has left a widow, three sons, and four daughters, one of whom is Mrs. Arthur Bristowe, of Glenelg. Miss Bayer is on her way from England, having left London 11 'days ago. CONCERNING PEOPLE. (1908, October 21). The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58933151 

Ernest Henry
Gender Male
Born 21/03/1852
Died 20/10/1908
Biography Adelaide born but educated in England, Ernest Bayer was prominent in South Australian circles in the latter part of the nineteenth century. He was a member of the inaugural committee of the South Australian Institute of Architects (SAIA).

Born on 21 March 1852, Bayer was the third son of Dr Frederick Charles Bayer who had arrived in South Australia from Germany in 1847 on the Heloise. His mother, Eliza, was the daughter of Dr Kent after whom Kent Town was named. He was educated at Hanwell College, Middlesex, England. In 1875 he married Harriet, the eldest daughter of Mr A.J. Tolley, the wine and spirit merchant, at Christ Church, North Adelaide. His brother, C.A. Bayer, was a Hydraulic Engineer. Bayer died of heart failure at Glenelg on 20 October 1908 aged 56, leaving three sons and four daughters (Jensen and Jensen 1980; Obituary: 40d; South Australian marriages index 2001).
Upon leaving Hanwell College, Bayer took up architectural studies, completing his articles with a Mr Saunders of London. He returned to Adelaide in 1873 as an Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and in July 1874 went into private practice on his own at Central Chambers, Waymouth Street (Jensen and Jensen 1980; Page 1986). In 1878 he was a supporter of the newly launched Adelaide - Port Adelaide Brick Company. Bayer formed a partnership with Latham A Withall in 1879, with Bayer returning to England for a year in 1883. The partnership with Withall dissolved in December1884 ('Public Notices' 1885: 2-3). He had a brief association with Rowland Rees in 1888 when they were appointed jointly as architects and referees for the restoration of the Adelaide Club (Jensen and Jensen 1980). A number of architects-in-the making worked for the Bayer Withall partnership or with Bayer. Alfred Wells was their head draughtsman, later forming Withall & Wells in 1885. J Quinton Bruce undertook his articles with the partnership and was later Bayer’s chief draughtsman until 1894. Henry Fuller and Louis Laybourne Smith also worked as draughtsmen for Bayer (Page 1986). From 1899 to 1908, Bayer practised from 31 Pirie Chambers, Pirie Street (Willis 1998).
Actively involved in wider professional activities, Bayer was elected Vice President of the Architectural Students’ Association in September 1884. In 1886 he was elected to a committee to initiate the SAIA, becoming an inaugural councillor of the Institute in that same year (Jensen and Jensen 1980; Page 1986).
As well as being a sought after designer of houses for the upper middle-classes, which included The Marines at Grange (1882) and additions to Forest Lodge, Aldgate (1890-1895) for John Bagot, Bayer designed a number of hotels and schools (Bayer Papers; Jensen and Jensen 1980). Many of Bayer’s listings on the State Heritage Register come from the time of his partnership with Withall. Bayer designed the western section of the Christian Brothers College, Wakefield Street, Adelaide, in 1878, while the south wing fronting Wakefield Street was undertaken by the partnership in 1880 (Marsden et al. 1990). Bayer and Withall were recognised for their high level of detailing in a range of styles. The Cathedral Hotel, North Adelaide (1880), which has also been attributed to English & Soward (Jensen and Jensen 1980), is ‘typical in form of a hotel built during the boom period with stuccoed dressings and chamfered corner’ (Stark 1984: 115). McDougall & Vines (1998: 54) believe that Korra Weera in Marden is likely to have been designed by Bayer and Withall. Complete with Italianate tower, they regard it as ‘an outstanding example of an 1880s Adelaide villa’. The land was bought in 1882, a tender notice for the residence appeared in October 1884 and it was completed in early 1885 (McDougall and Vines 1998). Other Bayer and Withall commissions include Estcourt House, Tennyson (1882), in the Palladian style and the classical ‘Italian’ Largs Bay Pier Hotel (1882) (State Heritage Register Report, 1988; Peake 1982; Danvers Architects 1994; Jensen and Jensen 1980). The Grandstand at Victoria Park Racecourse (1882) showcases cast iron work in a non-domestic situation (City of Adelaide Heritage Study 1982).
Alison McDougall
McDougall, Alison, 'Bayer, Ernest Henry’, Architecture Museum, University of South Australia, 2008, Architects of South Australia: [http://www.architectsdatabase.unisa.edu.au/arch_full.asp?Arch_ID=20]
William Nassau Molesworth, ‎James Alexander Emerton - 1867 - ‎Education
ENGLISH INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE, HANWELL, MIDDLESEX, Formed the 15th November, 1866. J. E. Pemberton H. Norton F. Argles T. H. Smith W. T. ...

Harold Grey's facetious exponent of common sense, The pilgrim.
[Sydney : T.E. Argles] 1879 - 1879
Available  Phone 03 8664 7009 to arrange delivery from Rare Books  RARELT 052 H23A Check other locations below

Common Sense (1879), Adelaide
Common Sense was a small magazine produced by journalists Theodore Argles and Frederick BanburyThe name was taken from the 1776 pamphlet by Thomas Paine which promoted American Independence. The only known issue contains interesting descriptions of the police court (a haunt of Adelaide’s reporters) and a dance at the Queen’s Head, Kermode Street, under landlady, Sarah White.

Harold Grey's facetious exponent of common sense, The pilgrim.; Series dates: Began and ceased in 1879. Publisher: [Sydney : T.E. Argles] 
Date: 1879. Distributor/Manufacturer: (Sydney : De Courcy, Hyde & Blakeney). Subjects: Australian wit and humor -- Periodicals
Notes: Cover title. Description based on: No. 2, published 1879. Other title(s): Pilgrim.

A DISGRACEFUL FRACAS.
At a few minutes before G on the afternoon of Saturday, February 22, persons in the vicinity of the Imperial Hotel were attracted to the corner of Grenfell and King William streets by seeing: Mr. Frank S. Carroll, proprietor of the Lantern, ran into the hotel, followed by Mr. Theodore Emil Argles, who recently figured in the Police Court upon a charge of forgery, which was not sustained. A serious conflict ensued when the two "met" in the passage of the hotel. Argles had a stick, with which he laid about him vigorously. The conductor of the Lantern made use of an umbrella in precisely the same way. Later on the stick and umbrella were broken, and Carroll was seen pummelling his adversary against the wall, but with very little result apparently, as a separation was soon after effected, and beyond Argles carrying away the broken end of the umbrella and leaving a very much battered hat nothing remained as indication of the affray. 

Imperial Hotel, Adelaide, 1875 - Image No.: B 4679, courtesy State Library of South Australia
Carroll at once laid an information, and his assailant was arrested at his residence in Carrington-street, and lodged in the lockup at 8 o'clock.

At the Police Court on Monday, February 24, Theodore Emil Argles, alias Frank Russell, alias Harrold Gray, alias ' The Pilgrim', journalist, was charged with assaulting Frank Skeffington Carroll, editor of the Lantern, on Saturday, February 22. Mr. Smith for the complainant. Complainant said—I was standing at the corner of Grenfell and King William streets on Saturday evening, when defendant came up, called me opprobrious names, and raised a stick. I defended myself with an umbrella. He followed me into the Imperial Hotel and struck me with a stick. The landlord sent for a constable. The blows were dealt with force and intentionally. By defendant—Am the editor of the Lantern, and edited it on February 1. Defendant here read a paragraph in the Lantern referring to a person therein described as "a young man named Theodore Emil Arglis, aged 26, charged with aiding and abetting in a forgery", and asked—Is not that a lying, beastly, illiterate paragraph? Complainant said he would not answer a question put in such a ruffianly way. Defendant—Ruffianism is not new to you, Mr. Carroll. Complainant said he had some recollection of such a paragraph as that pointed out in the Lantern, Defendant—Does it not refer to me ? Complainant —I cannot say; you bear so many names. Defendant—So do you, Mr. O'Reilly. (Laughter.) : Is that paragraph true, or is it not a lying one right through? Complainant—The information was furnished to me on very reliable information. Defendant —And you call yourself a journalist? In that paragraph it says—"The immense powers placed in the hands of Magistrates is notorious." Complainant — That is a printer's error. Defendant—Do you mean to call yourself a journalist ? Complainant—I will not stand here and listen to your twaddle. Ask me proper questions. Defendant—I intend to ask you questions directly. We are going on very fair together indeed. Mr. Smith asked that the usages of other Courts might be adopted here. Where it was a question of credibility.

Defendant—(loudly)—It is a point of credibility. Mr. Beddome—If Mr. Carroll admits that he published a statement, which Mr. Argles says is false, it is a question of credibility and he has a right to examine. Defendant farther read the paragraph in question, and asked if complainant could swear to its truth. Complainant said he had every reason to believe that the statements were true. He could not swear that it was true not having been in Court. Defendant—You are a nice journalist, you are. (Laughter). Mr. Carroll objected to the coarse manner in which defendant was conducting his examination. Mr. Beddome—He only says you are a nice journalist. Defendant—Is not that paragraph a lie all. through. Complainant—It is true. Mr. Smith objected to the insulting way in which the defendant was conducting his examination and appealed to the Court. Defendant proceeded, reading the imprint of the Lantern, asking complainant if the imprint was correct, and whether the paper was not printed by Webb, Vardon, & Pritchard. Complainant said it was by his orders. Defendant —Ton came here in the interests of truth and justice? Complainant—I came here in the interests of both. Defendant—You invariably speak the truth ? Complainant — I try to. Defendant—Do you remember in the last elections when you spoke at Eapunda
Complainant — That is importing foreign matter into the proceedings. Defendant— Do you remember swearing what was false? Complainant—No, I do not. Defendant— Would you believe it if you saw it in the Register ? Complainant—I would. Defendant —Did you not call God to witness to a vile lie? Did you not call God to witness that you had never been in gaol ? Complainant—No. Defendant—Do you mean to say, then, that the reporters on that occasion published lies? Complainant—I do not consider it necessary to answer that question. I believe, however, the report was as near verbatim as it could be. I submit that I should not be insulted in this way. This place is not to be made a mere bear-garden of. Defendant—Did you not call God to witness? Complainant—I said I had never been in Pentridge. Defendant—Or Darlinghurst ? Complainant—That was never mentioned. I was accused of being in Pentridge, and I said I had not been there, which was true. Defendant— Did you not say I assaulted you without provocation ? Complainant—I said you committed the assault without provocation as far as I was aware of. Complainant—Do you not cell that paragraph a provocation ? Who were the friends with yon ? Complainant—Mr. Ebenezer Ward, Mr. George-Bean. (Laughter.) Defendant —They are friends of yours! Complainant—They have done me the honour to he very friendly t« me. (Laughter.) Defendant—Then they have indeed done you an honour. (Laughter.) Defendant—Did I not say to you, " What do yon mean by writing such things about me ?" Complainant—I don't remember your saying so, but perhaps lean refresh your memory by telling you that you called me a scoundrel, and said that I had been in gaol all my life and that I saw you - in Pentridge. _ (Defendant—I did not.) Those were your distinct words, which I can prove. The other two gentlemen were present, and that is the reason why I took umbrage. The newspaper, the Register, gave me a most unjustifiable dressing down, which did not meet the ends of justice or public opinion in any sense of the expression. They attacked me with an innate maliciousness unparalleled in the annals of newspaper literature. The defendant is putting these questions to me for the purpose of creating amusement for this Court and to defame me.

...You were carrying an umbrella you say, was it a thick one? Complainant—I think that the handle is broken. I think I broke it over your head. Defendant -You say I hit you in the street. Is that true? Complainant—You did.'.! Defendant—You swear that? Complainant—I can swear that you struck at me, andI defended the blow with my umbrella. Defendant—With the good old army tactics. (Laughter.) Ton next saw me in the hotel, did you not? Complainant—You, followed me into the passage with a crowd. Defendant— Didn't we go into the large room where I often see you having a free lunch,? (Laughter.) Complainant—I went in there. Defendant—Did you not strike me with your umbrella first ? Complainant—No; you struck at me with your stick.', Defendant .here handed a slip of paper to the Bench containing the names of two gentlemen who he said would testify that he was struck first.'  He would ask for an adjournment as he had not had an opportunity of subpoenaing those gentlemen. Mr. Smith said he had no objection to an adjournment. Mr.. Beddome—How could a man who was arrested on warrant and kept in the lockup get witnesses ? Mr. Smith—Easily. Defendant —"What, on Sunday? Case adjourned till Thursday.

The hearing was resumed on Thursday, when Theodore Emil Argles, described as a journalist, was charged, on remand, with assaulting Frank S. Carroll, of the Lantern, on Saturday afternoon last. Mr. W. V. Smith conducted the prosecution. The case was adjourned to allow of the defendant calling witnesses and continuing his cross-examination of the prosecutor. Mr. Carroll being cross-examined said—I will swear that yon struck at me first with your stick before I hit you! You struck my umbrella. (After some pressing.) Yon struck me on the leg. It left no mark. To His "Worship—Oh no, he could not inflict a mark upon me. (Laughter.) Defendant—Yon could not inflict a greater mark than that on your face. (Renewed laughter.) Ebenezer Ward, M.P., stated—I was at the corner of King William-street at the time of the assault. X was talking to Mr. Bean when Mr. Carroll came up and joined as in conversation. In a few minutes defendant came g up. At the moment Carroll's back was towards the south, and I am sure he could not have seen defendant approaching. The first thing I noticed was the defendant striking Carroll with a cane on the root. It was not a violent blow; it might have been given either offensively or in jest. It was. just a tap on the foot. As he gave the tap he said to Carroll— " What do you mean, you scoundrel, writing about me ? You have been a lag all your life, and you know it! You lived in Pentridge I" 
Carroll appeared to be quite taken by surprise, and said, "who are you, Sir?" Defendant said, " Oh, you know who I am well enough,' and then repeated some of his previous remarks as to Carroll being an old lag. Carroll thereupon raised his umbrella and put it almost in defendant's face, said, "Go away, go away." Defendant replied by raising his cane and a fencing match ensued. By this time a great crowd had assembled, and Carroll went into the hotel and defendant left him and went into Grenfell-street. I thought it was all over then, but defendant presently returned and entered the hotel. I afterwards followed, but they had then been separated. Cross-examined—I am not a friend of Mr. Carroll's. If he said so I can't help it. Defendant—Well now, say as a matter of fact, are yon his friend? Witness—I am not; but I wish to explain what I mean by saying so. I mean that I am not an intimate associate or an intimate friend of Mr. Carroll; but I know Mr. Carroll as a respectable citizen, and I respect every man who tries to conduct himself like a respectable man. 
Prosecutor here rose from his seat and bowed in acknowledgment of the compliment. Saw a portion of this affray, and I have come here to do what is just and right in giving my evidence. I had not been at the races that afternoon. Defendant—There was a good deal of excitement, wasn't there? (Laughter.) Witness—Not that I know of; certainly not on my part. Defendant—Wasn't there a good deal of champagne? Witness—There might have been; I didn't see any. Defendant — Had you any ? (Laughter.) Witness here appealed to the Bench, and asked if there was any necessity to answer such questions ? Mr. Beddome—There is no necessity. Defendant—I believe, Mr. Ward, you are a literary man ? Mr. Smith objected, but Mr. Beddome said he did not think the defendant was going beyond what he (Mr. Smith) would go himself. (Laughter.) Witness—I sometimes write what one called literary articles, but I do not obtain my livelihood by that. Defendant— Do you not conduct the Farmers Advertiser or The Squatters' Advocate ? Oh, I know now. The Farmers' Messenger. Witness did not reply. Defendant—Is it extinguished then ? Witness asked the Bench if the present position of The Farmers' Messenger could be regarded as having anything to do with the case. Mr. Beddome—No, none whatever. 
Mr. George Bean was next called, but did not appear. 
Arthur John Smith, clerk to the prosecutor, stated he saw the crowd outside the hotel on Saturday afternoon, while was coming along the street from the direction of North terrace, and a man strike at Mr. Carroll, and some one interposed. Then saw Mr. Carroll hold up his hand. Cross-examined—Been in Mr. Carroll's employ about three weeks. It was defendant who struck at him. Did not know who struck the first blow. Was told it was defendant. Defendant—Oh, you go down. (Great laughter.) This closed the case for the prosecution. 
Defendant then opened his defence at some length, and as he proceeded he spoke in a very loud excited key. He sought to justify the assault by pleading provocation in the paragraph which appeared in the prosecutor's paper. That paragraph, he said, was written by Carroll from information he had obtained at the bad houses he frequented. A more disgusting prostitution of literature had never been known as that to which this man (pointing to the prosecutor) had been guilty of. Commenting upon the absence of Mr. Bean, he said he thought their Worships would exonerate him from blame for keeping out of such a disgraceful affair. He would call witnesses who should state impartially all they knew about the matter—men who would speak in the interests of truth and justice, and then their Worships would see how he had been arrested and persecuted over this affair. Was this a free country that he was to be arrested and dragged to the lock-up on the word of this fellow—Carroll ? On the word of a lying scoundrel, like him? He called it a monstrous and degrading injustice. He complained of having been assaulted! Was there a mark on that man's body ? Was there a mark on his face ? No, none whatever, except that which long years of diligent imbibing had left! (Sensation.) 
After some further remarks he called George Window Spong, commercial traveller, who stated he had not seen defendant before Saturday last, and was quite a stranger to him. He was passing along King William-street, and saw several people collected round the Imperial Hotel on the day in question. Heard defendant call the prosecutor a scoundrel, and thereupon saw the latter strike defendant right in the face with an umbrella. A scuffle ensued, and the two went inside the hotel, where they fought, the prosecutor with his umbrella and the defendant with his stick. Cross-examined—Saw the wrangle in the first place, and distinctly saw Carroll first strike defendant right in the face. 
Edward Trimmer, of Adelaide, clerk, stated he saw the affray. Had no previous acquaintance with defendant. On approaching the crowd heard Carroll say " If you say that again I’ll strike you." Immediately Carroll struck defendant in the face. Heard Mr. Ward remark "He is decidedly wrong in striking him in the street." The combatants then went inside the hotel, and witness saw them fighting with sticks. Mr. Bean and Mr. Ward walked away when they walked inside. The last witness seeing such a big man as Carroll striking defendant interposed to protect defendant. 
Charles Knight, of Kent Town, medical galvauist, stated he was an entire stranger to either of the parties, and only came forward to give evidence after seeing the report of the matter in the Register. He would give his evidence without any question being put to him. Witness said he was standing near the hotel, and saw the prosecutor and defendant, flourishing, the one an umbrella and the other a stick. No blows were struck by either of them so far as he could see. Previously heard defendant exclaim,' "You are a "scamp" or a scoundrel for saying so." Then Carroll put up with his fist and hit defendant straight in the face. Defendant said, "You have been a convict all your life," and chased him inside the hotel door.
Then there seemed to be a scrimmage between them. Witness—I know no more of the matter. This closed the defence. Mr. Smith made some legal submissions as to there being no provocation or justification for the assault, and the Bench concurred. Mr. Beldome then said—" The Bench is of opinion that a slight assault was committed, but consider that Mr. Argles has been punished enough by having been locked up for a time in the Police Station." This decision was received with loud applause "behind the rail,"and 'defendant left' A DISGRACEFUL FRACAS. (1879, March 1). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 22. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160118471 

Theodore Emil Argles, journalist, was charged with assaulting Frank Skeffington Carroll, at Adelaide, on the 22nd of February. Mr. W. V. Smith prosecuted. Prosecutor said on Saturday last he was standing at the corner of Grenfell street, near the imperial Hotel. Defendant came up to him and used the most opprobrious language towards him. He also raised his stick and struck witness. Witness had not to his knowledge given any provocation for the attack. He left his friends and went inside the public-house, where defendant followed him, and struck him with a stick a second tune. By the defendant — I am the editor of the Lantern. I edited it on the 1st of February, and was quite sober at the time. Remember a paragraph appearing in the Lantern, on that day about your case. Did not know whether it bore your name ; you have so many. 
Defendant— So have you.
Mr. O'Reilly. Witness (cross-examined) — That paragraph, I believe, is perfectly true and not a tissue of lies. Was not in the Court at the time you were tried for forgery, but I got my information from reliable authorities. Defendant then closely examined the witness as to various parts of the paragraph, but the latter stated that he believed every line of it was true when he published it. Witness, in answer to further questions, said he remembered the last election for the constituency of Light, but he objected to questions relating to it as irrelevant. Defendant— Do you remember on the hustings swearing before God to what was false? Witness— I did not. I said I was never in Pentridge, not that I was never in gaol. I never was in Pentridge. You committed the assault on me without my giving you any provocation as far as I am aware. Mr. George Bean and Mr. Ebenezer Ward were with me on that occasion. You called me a — — scoundrel, and said I had been In Pentridge. On that subject I had a most unjustifiable dressing down by the Register. The article published in that journal was not published in the interests of society, but I believe from an innate maliciousness, and it was unparalelled in the annals of literature. (Laughter.) I carried an umbrella at the time of the assault. The handle of it is broken. I think I broke it over your hat when you attacked me a second time. Defendant asked that the case might be adjourned. He had two witnesses, but having been in gaol since the assault he had been unable to communicate with them. The case was accordingly adjourned till Thursday next.  Theodore Emil Argles, alias Frank Russell, alias Harold Gray, alias The Pilgrim, of Adelaide, journalist, was then charged, on the information of James Allison, of Adelaide, theatrical agent, that he' did, on the 22nd of February, at Adelaide, ' with menaces demand money from this informant with intent to steal the same, and did on the same day unlawfully threaten to publish certain matters touching another person with intent. to extort money from this informant.' Mr. W.V. Smith for the prosecutor. This was an information under the 165th and 168th clauses of the Criminal Law Consolidation Act. James Allison, of North-terrace, theatrical manager, said on February 14 he received a letter from the defendant asking for the loan of £8. On the following evening defendant met him, in the dress-circle of the Theatre Royal, and in answer to a question he told defendant that he had no money, and would not lend him any if he had. 
Defendant then said, 'Do you not know that I can do you a lot of harm or a lot of good ?' Witness then called him out and told him to ; beware of what he wrote about him or the theatre. They afterwards had a drink, together and parted. On Saturday, February 22, he was at dinner about half -past 6 o'clock, when defendant came to his house and wanted to see him. Defendant was very excited, and holding up a stick, said, 'Do you see that stick? This is all that is left of it. I've broken it over Carroll's head.' Witness rejoined,' Have yon come to break the balance over my head?' Defendant made no reply, but shut the door. He then said, 'Look here, Allison, are you going to lend me that money ?' Witness replied ‘No.' The Defendant said, ' My book comes out on Wednesday, and I've made it very hot for you.' In reply to the question,  ‘What do you mean?' defendant made a reference to witness's first wife Bridget, and he then threw him oat of the house. As the defendant had left his hat in the house during the scuffle witness refused to give it to him until he had given him in charge. While they were getting into a cab in King William-street to go the station the defendant snatched his hat and ran away. As they were going along North-terrace the defendant said, 'Let it drop and say no more about It.' By Mr. Smith— The defendant said he had five or six columns in his book about Dr. Peel. By the defendant— I was in no bodily fear of you. I do not know that you are acquainted with anything that could harm me. When you called at my house on Saturday you were tinder the influence of drink, but I believe you knew what you were about. The threat you made use of could only cause me annoyance, as it affected my wife. I told your wife this morning that unless you had come to my house and made such a fool of yourself I would not have thought of proceeding against you. There is nothing you could  truthfully rake up that would affect my moral character. 

Abraham Lazar, Treasurer of the Theatre Royal, said he saw the defendant on last Saturday at the Theatre Royal Hotel and White Hart Hotel. He said he would make it very warm for Allison in a book that he was publishing. In reply to witness's question why he was going to do so, he replied, ' You know why.' Witness believed that he referred to his application for some money which Mr. Allison had refused to lend. By the defendant — I remember about three months ago Mr. Allison referred you to me for some money. You were then bringing out a book. I may have said to you, ‘If Mr. Allison does not leave it for you to-morrow, I will give you my own cheque.' I never gave you any money. Mr. Allison received a letter from you asking for the loan of a few pounds. On the next day I met you outside of the Theatre, and in answer to your question, If Mr. Allison would lend you the money?' I told you if Allison promised the money he would give it to you, and that he, Allison, was then at the Globe Hotel. You asked Allison to lend you £8 for a few weeks on the missing letter. Frank Goldney, of Adelaide, printer, said he was commissioned to print a book by the defendant. By the defendant — You gave the manuscript to my partner, who told me that a Mr. Mather had called at the office and had become security for the printing of the book. I showed the manuscript to Mr. Smith, as it contained matter which it would not be advisable to print. By Mr. Smith— I will not print the book now. Edwin Russell, of Adelaide, actor, said he met the defendant at the White Hart Hotel on Saturday last, when he said he was going to make it warm for Mr. Allison in a book he was going to publish. 


Theatre Royal, Adelaide, 1881 - photograph by Sweet, Samuel White, 1825-1886. Image No.: B 58005/50, courtesy State Library of South Australia

By the defendant — You said you did not like Allison. You were inclined to be a little jolly at the time. It was between 4 and 5 o'clock in the afternoon. Henry Rodgers of Adelaide, detective constable, said he arrested the defendant about 8 o'clock on Saturday evening last. In reply to the usual caution he said, ‘Bosh says what I have to say.' He was in custody at the time on a warrant for assaulting Mr. Carroll. The defendant in his address to the Bench said he was drinking a great deal on Saturday, which was a very unusual occurrence. He could not account for his going to Mr. Allison's house, as it was quite certain that he did not want anything from him, as the printing of his book had been guaranteed. He never intended to do Mr. Allison an injury, and would never have printed anything against him beyond fair criticism. He hoped the Court would admit him to bail, if they intended to send him on for trial, as he had a young wife depending upon him, and it was necessary for him to be at liberty in order to obtain work for her support.The defendant was committed for trial. Bail allowed, himself in £50 and two sureties of £25 each. Monday, February 24. (1879, March 1).South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1868 - 1881), p. 10. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93845485 


Theatre Royal Hotel, Hindley Street, Adelaide 1876, Image No.:B 1012, courtesy State Library of South Australia

THEATRE ROYAL HOTEL.
The Theatre Royal bar is undoubtedly the finest in the Australian colonies. It is constructed on the American plan, from suggestions made by Mr. McDonald, and carried out by Mr. Johnson, the architect. It is oval in shape, with the end towards Hindley-street. I he counter, which is of massive cedar, polished, measures 36 feet in length by 20 in breadth. A wall in the centre of the oval is fitted up to hold bottles. The two sides of the bar are separated by a continuation of the wall from the front to the back, but there are arched openings over the counter. One side is devoted to the stalls and the other to the pit. There are separate entrances from back and front. The bar was formally opened on the 1st January, 1878. The saloon bar, which is upstairs, facing Hindley-street, is a magnificent room, and is fitted up as such a place ought to be. Every convenience is obtainable here, and it is also strictly select. Mr. McDonald, the proprietor, is about as good a representation of a landlord as one could find, and his management of the Royal bars is such as to make these a very popular place of resort.


THE THEATRE ROYAL HOTEL— THE SALOON BAR.


THE THEATRE ROYAL HOTEL— THE STALLS AND GENERAL BAR. 
Our Illustrations (1878, May 1). The Illustrated Adelaide News (SA : 1875 - 1880), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article224814749

Carroll, Frank Skeffington (1831-1887). Owner/editor of the Lantern 1878. Jailed for libel in 1879. Copyright infringement charges forced him to sell the Lantern in 1882.
Argles, Theodore Emil (died 1886). Journalist. Appears in an 1879 court case charged with assaulting Frank Carroll, proprietor of the Lantern. The court lists him as 'alias Frank Russell, alias Harold Gray, alias The Pilgrim'. Published the magazine Commonsense in 1879. (Chronicle, 1 March 1879, p. 10.)

JUSTICE ?
TO THE EDITOR.
Sir— I do not write this letter with the view of exciting sympathy on my behalf, for I am thankful to state I am too well able to fight my own battles to require any, but my object in addressing you is to bring under your notice and under that of the public some extremely humorous proceedings on the part of the police authorities a mon egardIt is now well known that on Wednesday, the 26th ult., I had contemplated publishing the first number of a weekly pamphlet. The manuscript of the book was in the hands of my printers, Messrs. Goldney & Tomlinson, on the previous Saturday, and on Mr. Allison preferring his charge against me pressure was brought to bear upon my printers to make them surrender the copy of the pamphlet to the police authorities. I was at that time locked up on a charge (since dismissed) of assaulting a person named Carroll, and had therefore no opportunity of protesting against my private property being handed over to the tender mercies of Mr. Peterswald. 

The MS. was obtained in this wise : — Prior to the case being called on at the Police Court Detective Doyle interviewed Mr. Goldney, one of the printers, and induced him to give up my copy by saying that he (Doyle) was in momentary expectation of a letter (sic) from the Attorney-General commanding Messrs. Goldney &Thomlinson to deliver up the obnoxious Pilgrim copy. Not being posted up in 'ways that are dark and tricks that are vain,' Mr. Goldney surrendered my pamphlet, and it is now in possession of the detectives. It was not brought in evidence at the Police Court, and cannot, so I am informed by an eminent barrister, be tendered at the Supreme Court either, so what on earth Mr. Peterswald wants with it is a mystery. One ludicrous point in connection with the matter is that my printers have been subpoenaed to produce at the Supreme Court MS. that b not in their possession, and which, being a privileged communication, will not be admissible ; and another funny circumstance in connection with the matter is that, while there is a general impression in the public mind that the 'copy' is of a libellous, scurrilous, and generally disreputable nature, the actual fact is there is absolutely nothing in the book which any person could reasonably take exception to. I cannot, indeed, but regard it as a singularly significant circumstance that so much has been done to try and suppress my book, when publications are allowed in this city whose scurrility and blasphemy are only equalled by the 'eccentricity' of their grammar and spelling. No matter, however. When the entire South Australian police force have perused my MS. perhaps I shall have it returned to me. Until then I roust have patience. Meanwhile, however, when I think of the unwarrantable proceedings of Mr. Peterswald in regard to my 'copy.' I cannot help murmuring, with Truthful James — 
Do I sleep ? Do I dream ? 
Do I wonder and doubt ? 
Are things what they seem ? 
Or is visions about ? 
Is our civilization a failure? 
Or is the Caucasian played out ?'
I am, Sir, &c, THEO. ARGLES. Carrington-street. March. 5. JUSTICE ? (1879, March 6). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42970216 

Frank Argles, pleaded guilty to four charges of forgery; Ordered to be imprisoned for four years with hard labor the sentences to be concurrent. Law and Police Courts. SUPREME COURT.—CRIMINAL SITTINGS. (1879, March 29). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160119511 

1879 South Australia Police Gazette:
Argles, Frank, alias Russell, alias W. H. Mossmann, alias Walters, alias C. H. Reynolds .......... 14, 18, 20
Argle, Theodore Emil, alias Russell, alias Harrold Grey, alias The Pilgrim.

Theodore Emil Argles was acquitted Wednesday on a charge of attempting to extort by menaces money from Allison, the lessee of the Theatre Royal. SOUTH AUSTRALIA. (1879, April 5). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 543. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162805882 

Mr. Theo Argles we were informed by the Port Adelaide News, had gone to Port Pirie to assume the editorship of the Gazette. Mr. Argles however, informs us that this statement is not true, and he has since returned to Adelaide. No title (1879, April 19). The Areas' Express (Booyoolee, SA : 1877 - 1948), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article219441312 



Port Adelaide [cartographic material] : supplement to the "Illustrated Adelaide News" May, 1879 [State Library of South Australia Image: B 7760]

WHITE'S ROOMS.
THIS EVENING (TUESDAY, JULY 15. )
Under the patronage of His Honor the Chief Justice, the Hon. the Chief Secretary, His Worship the Major, and leading citizens.
GRAND COMPLIMENTARY BENEFIT TO
MR. ARTHUR AND MISS NELLIE VIVIAN.
UNUSUALLY ATTRACTIVE AND BRILLIANT PROGRAMME,
In which the following Ladies and Gentlemen will take part : —
MISS ELISE SIDNEY, SIR. LVAROY READ, MR. THEODORE ARGLES, the Wanderer
(their first appearance in Adelaide) ; MR. TOM HANLEY,MISS DESPARD, H N. WEIPPEBT,
HENRY and LEONARD SOTHERN, MR. T. WILKENS, MR. ARTHUR VIVIAN AND MISS NELLIE VIVIAN.
By kind permission of Mr. Thompson, the unrivalled Band attached to his Great Confederate Diorama will play selections during the evening and before the hall previous to opening.
Popular Prices— 3s , 2s. , and 1s.
Tickets at Mr. Fischer's and Mr. Armbruster’s  Advertising (1879, July 15). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43095695 

Despite Mark Twain's testimony that "literature is low," it seems to be prospering in these colonies. In Sydney two daily papers have been established within the past few weeks-one of them a likely rival of the Sydney Morning Herald-and in Adelaide we are now looking for the rising of the daily Eagle, which has been promised long, but long delayed. In the meantime, we are being tickled into laughter by a new weekly, which nears the uncommon name of "Common Sense," (rather a suggestive title) and claiming to contain "a dash of humor,". The price per dash, done up in pamphlet form, is sixpence. The editor is understood to be Mr. Theodore Argles, alias the "Pilgrim," who was recently committed for trial on a charge of trying to extort money from the lessee of the Theatre by threatening to "make it hot” him in a book to be shortly published. The "Pilgrim" was discharged when the sessions came, but his brother is now undergoing sentence for forgery. A rather cruel advertisement has lately appeared in the dailies, calling on "Mr. T. Argles" to pay for his lodgings, Everybody who has read Gulliver's Travels knows that a man who has a "project," neglects details such as household debts. It is a pity that Mr. T. A.'s landlady cannot see the common sense of his forgetting her claim for pounds, shillings, and pence. ADELAIDE CORRESPONDENCE. (1879, July 19). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78698510 

The Buckley Bijou Troupe gave two performances here in the ball of the Lacepede Bay Institute during the week, On Friday evening the Ball was comfortably filled, and the audience showed by their applause that they highly approved of the programme laid before them. The banjo solos, negro sketches, &o,, of Tom Buckley kept the audience in roars of laughter; whilst the singing of Miss May Vivian, to the accompaniment of Miss Pauline Ward, brought out many well-deserved cheers. On Saturday, rather a smaller audience put in an appearance, but we loam this was through the company advertising "million prices " which, we believe to be 1s. and 2s., instead of which they made it 2s, and 3s. Our Institute Committee have learned, and we think travelling companies would loam if an experiment was made, that million prices will always command houses two or three times as large as those obtained from the higher charges. KINGSTON. (1879, September 10). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78699109 

John Cameron, manager of the Buckley Bijou Troupe, was charged on the information of  Robert Pickering, librarian to the Mount Gambier Institute, with having on September 12 used abusive language to him in a public place, calculated to provoke a broach of the peace. Mr. Davison for complainant. Defendant said that before he pleaded he had two objections to make, The S.M.-Are yea guilty or not guilty P Defendant-Not faulty. His objections were these-Within the meaning of the Act the library, where the alleged offence took place, was not a public place; and the words used were not abusive. The S.M. said the place was a public one. The Court would decide the other, point afterwards. Robert Pickering, the complainant, said he saw defendant on Friday evening about 8 o'clock. He came bustling into into library and said to witness-" Do you take me for a b--y lot of thieves to keep the door locked against us f" Witness said he was merely carrying out the instructions of the trustees to have payment for the hall before opening the door. Defendant repeated the question, Do yon think us a b-~~y lot of thieves, and that we were 'going away" and … used a great deal of abusive language, Witness warned him not to use such language in the library ; but whilst he (complainant) was making out the receipt, Cameron kept on insulting him. Defendant' used no threats as to what he would do. Witness got no provocation. The library was a public place. The 'institute received a grant from government, Witness told Cameron to leave the room because he insulted him.. He had on the previous evenings allowed him the privilege of taking money at the library window, but after what he said would not allow that evening. William Hyde, printer, continued Pickering's statement. Defendant called Thomas Buckley, who said he went over to the Institute about a quarter past 7 o’clock on Friday evening. He asked complainant for the key, and he replied that he was not in the habit of giving up the key until the hall was paid for. Witness said he would get the rent, and went and saw Cameron. Cameron went into the library and paid the money, but. witness, who was standing in the passage did not hear him use any abusive language.
The defendant made a short statement, in which, he denied using the language imputed to him. He might have been a little out of temper, but used no bad language. He subsequently' had some words with complainant about some lady friends the latter put into the gallery free. Pickering refused to remove them, and considering that he (defendant) paid rent for the hall he thought it was not fair. The S.M. said that, had nothing to do with the case. Mr. IJavigpa said he did not wish to press for a heavy penalty.
Fined 5s. and costs £2 5s
MOUNT GAMBIER POLICE COURT. (1879, September 17). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved February 16, 2017,from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78699192 

BUCKLEY'S BIJOU TROUPE.
(To the Editor of the Border Watch.)
Sir,-As various paragraphs the reverse of complimentary have appeared in several journals respecting the monetary transactions of the above Company, perhaps, in that spirit of fair play, which is a ruling characteristic of your widely circulated paper you will allow me to offer, on behalf of Mrs. Marshall and myself, a few words of explanation.
On the company being organized in Adelaide, Mr, John Cameron gave us to understand that he was possessed of ample funds to carry out the speculation of taking Mr. Buckley, Miss Vivian, my wife and myself to Sydney. On this understanding I agreed-in consideration of being paid a certain salary (not one farthing of which have ever received)-to go forward as agent in-advance; being duly provided with a printed order book on the Company. On my arrival in Mount Gambier after billing Milliceut, Mr. Doughty called at the hotel, and informed me that he held an order of mine, given in Penola which had been presented to Mr. Cameron and dishonoured. Mr. Cameron, however, emphatically denied that the order had been presented, and immediately paid Mr. Doughty the moneys taking his receipt for the same. From circumstances that have since come to my knowledge, I have good reason to believe that wherever Mr. Cameron found he could " bluff" the holder of an order out of his money he did so; and hence the bad odour which has attached itself to the Company. That fact was, that Mr. Cameron -business being bad-did not possess sufficient funds with which to liquidate his pecuniary liabilities contracted on the road ; and I am inclined to think that the fact of his leaving the colony in debt, is rather more his misfortune than his fault.
With regard to myself, I can only say that I am quite disinterested in writing this; inasmuch as Mr. Cameron, Mr. Buckley, and Miss Vivian gracefully retired from this picturesque town on Thursday at 5 a.m. without going through the form of paying our salaries, or even of wishing us a courteous adieu. Possibly, however, Mr. Cameron considers it a small matter to inveigle people under false pretences hundreds of miles from their home and friends, and leave them as far as he is concerned-penniless amongst strangers. But then equestrian geniuses are notoriously erratic.
Faithfully yours,
TALBOT MARSHALL,
Late Agent Buckley's Trooper. Mount Gambler, 18th September, 1879. BUCKLEY'S BIJOU TROUPE. (1879, September 20). Border Watch(Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78699227 

BENEFIT TO MR. AND MRS. TALBOT MARSHALL. - On Wednesday evening an entertainment was given in the Instituten Hall by some of our local amateurs for the benefit of Mr., And Mrs., Marshall, who were left here by the ill starred Buckley Bijou Troupe, without the means of returning to their home in Adelaide, As the entertainment was given for a charitable purpose, it had been hoped that the hall would be well filled, but this expectation was not realised, only a small audience having attended. This was unfortunate, as the net proceeds are insufficient to pay their fares to Adelaide, and so Mr. and Mrs. Marshall are but little better off than before, This was no fault of the performers, who had so kindly volunteered their services …. The Border Watch. (1879, October 4).Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78699344 

Mr. Talbot Marshall's Lecture.—:
Mr. T. Marshall did not proceed with his promised lecture on Wednesday evening in consequence of the limited attendance. ITEMS BY CABLE. (1879, October 14).The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146442858 

Saturday, October 18.
On Monday evening a lecture on Adelaidean Shadows was given in the Hall, of the Lacepede Bay Institute by Mr. Talbot Marshall, late of the Buckley troupe. The lecture was followed by songs from several of our local amateurs, accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Marshall ;the whole finishing with a side-splitting farce written especially for the occasion. As the object for which the lecture and entertainment was given had been pretty well known; the local amateurs who had volunteered their services went to some little troubles and expense to render the affair a success —Mr. Arnold in particular, in his usual way; and we are sure the few who did attend, could not but admire the brilliant style in which he had the stage' illuminated.
The smallness of the audience did not seem to interfere in the least with the lecturer, who appeared to be complete master of the subject he handled. The singing of Messrs. Samuels and Wagstaff as well as the performing on the pianoforte of Mrs. Marshall, were highly appreciated and applauded; whilst the first appearance of Mr. Arnold as a songster on the stage of the Lacepede Bay Institute met with thunders of applause, more especially when he treated the audience to a song of his own dear Fatherland. KINGSTON. (1879, October 21). The Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146442869 

A JOURNALISTIC METEOR.
'About twenty-two years ago a man with brilliant grey eyes, a nose too like the beak of a bird to be pleasing, and a skin as fair as a woman's, came into the office of the N. Herald He was dressed in a suit of checked tweed, and wore a light-brown hard felt hat with a narrow turned-up rim. Now, by some strange mental eccentricity, the explanation of which I must leave for solution to those, say, with occult powers, I knew this man the moment I saw him. This, as I have implied, was passing strange, because I had never before met him, had never known anyone who had either seen or known him—in fact, knew nothing about him beyond the facts that he existed and was a satirical writer of great power and equal indiscretion. And yet there was not the faintest doubt in my mind that the man who stood before me was the redoubtable Argles, well known in the days I speak of as ' The Pilgrim’— a reckless, brilliant, freelance in the ranks of journalism.
Our first conversation ran thus :— * What can I do for you ?
‘That's just what I want to know.’ 
' Aren't yon the pilgrim ?’
' The Pilgrim ! What Pilgrim ?’
'That dry, well-known scribe who elects to be known by that appellation.'
‘No. My name is Harold Grey,' and he looked keenly at me with his birdlike eyes.
' You must pardon me, Mr. Grey, but I still think you are the Pilgrim.'
He put the end of his light-brown moustache between his thin well-cut lips, laid his head a little on one side, and asked—‘And where do you think you have seen me ?' 
‘In Sydney; when you were writing for the Freeman's Journal.'
Then with the look of a man who sees concealment is no longer of any use, he said in an off-hand way— ‘Well, yes, I am the pilgrim. Suppose we have a drink !'
The cold of winter emphasised the wisdom of this proposal, besides I wished to see more of the redoubtable Ishmalite.
' Ah ! now that is very strange; but I have had like experiences,' said Argles, when I had confessed that that was the first time I had ever seen him, had never spoken to anyone who had, and that I had never been in Sydney.
To my enquiry what had brought him, of all men, into such a quiet out-of-the-world spot, his reply was— ‘The Lord only knows : it is fate.'
He wanted to know if I could take him on. I had to bewail the fact that I could not, remembering at the same time that if the average pen is mightier than the sword that of my companion was more potent than a maxim-gum, and that his services would in all probability lead to an able-bodied libel being set loose on me. The consequences of  alleged libel followed later, so that, after all, Argles should have had his opportunity and given me at least the satisfaction of suffering for a real offence instead of for an alleged fault that was subsequently made to do good service for more than one deeply concerned.
How to 'praise the wind' was the spinal marrow of a conversation varied by more than one sample of ' the beverage of heroes.'
'This is my bank,' said Argles, as he produced a florin, and as I have my wife with me there is all the more need for instant action.'
It was eventually decided that he should deliver a lecture. It would be his maiden effort in that line, and the 'Lights and Shades of London Life ' was fixed on as the subject. I undertook to advertise the lecture, bill the town, and have ‘dodgers ' dropped into every trusting home in the town announcing the fact of the arrival of a worldwide platform orator. The decision seemed to lift a load from the brain of my clever acquaintance, and when I informed him that nothing would be charged for these services he became quite reckless, borrowed money from me freely, and abandoned all caution for a lavish liberality.
Adjourning to the office he wrote out the copy for the advertisement, the poster, and the dodger/ and many were his merry and witty sallies at the expense of himself and ' the entranced section of creation,' as he chose to call the then town of my adoption.
With a view to giving the fact of the coming treat a chance of sinking into the brain tissue of the town and district several days were allowed to elapse before the eventful evening, and the interregnum was used by Argles in amusing himself, principally in the production of ' odes '—any one stanza of which would have served as a bombshell in the community. It was at least 'a season of refreshing.'
On the eventful evening Argles bounced into the office, straightened himself up, and declared he couldn't possibly lecture in a tweed suit. ' Whoever heard of a great lecturer unburdening his mind in a tweed suit! The thing's impossible.' But this difficulty was got over by his donning my blacks. A trifle small for me, they fitted him like a glove. As it was publishing night I begged to be excused, stating I would see him after he had got through with his task, and he took himself off in the seriest manner possible.
It was nearing the hour of ten when I next saw him. His face was livid with passion.
' What's up ?’ I queried.
'What's up? Why, I have been robbed of every penny !'
' By whom?’
' Why, by this inference town of yours—by some thirty ruffians of this '
But here he suddenly stopped, a smile lit up his face, and he broke into a loud laugh. ' Dash it all, man, it's the funniest story you ever heard. Listen—and this is what he told me :—
' When I peeped from behind the mighty mountains, the foaming cataracts, and the lightning-shattered pines that veiled ray majestic form from some thirty bodies sitting as still as Chinese gods in the middle distance of the vast emptiness that surrounded them my heart failed me. Besides, I had no lecture ready. But I gave the sign, up went the drop-scene, and advancing to the middle of the stage gave one long, sad look at them, bowed like a Frenchman (here he gave an imitation of his bow) and said— " Ladies and gentlemen—In the whole of my long career as a public lecturer it has never been my misfortune to appear before an audience so small, and I feel, ladies and gentlemen, that I could neither do justice to you nor to my engrossing subject. If I may be allowed to trespass on your good nature I would suggest that you get your money returned at the door and come again to-morrow evening with as many of yon friends as possible. I am hoping that the increased publicity thus gained will reward me with a larger audience." I retired amid the clapping of hands.'
The audience had waited in the passage of the Institute for some fifteen minutes or so, and were growing rather impatient at my nonappearance when a fellow strolling by asked the reason of the crowd and its discontent. No sooner was he informed than out issued the cat from the bag. ' Why,' said this fellow,  the lecturer's over at the pub. enjoying his brandy. A stampede was at once made for the scene of my repose, when I was boycotted, and made to disgorge all I hadn't spent. ' Now,' laughed he, 'I think III get into my tweeds again.'
By this time I had come to the conclusion that all I had heard about Argles was true, and what followed came as a thing of course. The next day Argles and, I regret to say, his young, pretty and accomplished wife, were turned out of the hotel, and their boxes seized as security for what was owing, and this and the lecture episode were bounced about the town with an energy reserved for very exceptional experiences.
Placing a room at the disposal of my new friends I bad recourse to private appeal with the result that the manager (since dead) of a banking institution invited the erring lecturer and his wife to his house, where for an evening they were the delight of a company that probably was never better entertained.
Being thus and in other ways provided with the sinews of war, Argles squared his hotel bill and left, as he had come, in an nnostentaciont manner.
In recognition of what he was pleased consider my ‘great kindness' he presented me with his scrap book containing * The Pilgrim articles contributed to the Freeman's Journal and other papers.
I never saw him again. Years after I read in the Bulletin of his death and of his wife's devotion to the last. He was a valued contributor to the columns of the paper named, and probably no one more regretted his departure from this sphere of graft than Mr. F. Archibald, the satirical but big-hearted founder and editor of the Bulletin.
Quite recently, too, the same paper published from the pen of Victor Daley, the poet journalist, a number of entertaining reminiscences of the hero of the above bucolic pilgrimage. A JOURNALISTIC METEOR. (1899, February 16). Quiz and the Lantern (Adelaide, SA : 1890 - 1900), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166445826 

Some Celebrities recalled
By Mr J. B. Mather, formerly of the 'Narracoorte Herald. '
From The Mail —"The Pilgrim"—The Strangest of Strange Characters.—
"In your opinion, who was the strangest of strange characters you met with?" - "About 35 years ago a man with brilliant grey eyes, a nose too like the beak of a bird to be pleasing, and a skin as fair as a woman's, came into the office of the 'N. Herald.' He was dressed in a suit of checked tweed, and wore a light-brown hard felt hat with a narrow turned-up rim. Now, by some strange mental eccentricity, the explanation of which I must leave for solution to those, say, with occult powers, I knew this man the moment I saw him. This, as I have implied, was passing strange, because I had never before met him, had never known him; in fact, knew nothing about him beyond the fact that he existed and was a satirical writer of great power and equal indiscretion. And yet there was not the faintest doubt in my mind that the man who stood before me was the redoubtable Argles, well known in the days I speak of as 'The Pilgrim ? —a reckless, brilliant, free lance in the ranks of journalism. – 
Our first conversation ran thus:—'What can I do for you?' 'That's just what I want to know.' 'Aren't you the Pilgrim?' 'The Pilgrim! What Pilgrim?' That well-known scribe who elects to be known by that appellation.' 'No. My name is Harold Grey.' and he looked keenly at me with his birdlike eyes. 'You must pardon me, Mr. Grey, but I still think you are the Pilgrim.' He put the end of his light-brown moustache between his thin, well-cut lips, laid his head a little on one side, and asked. 'And where do you think you have seen me?' 'In Sydney; when you were writing for the "Freeman's Journal." ' Then with the look of a man who sees concealment is no longer of any use. he said in an off-hand way, 'Well, yes, I am the Pilgrim. Suppose we have a drink.' The cold of winter emphasized the wisdom of this proposal; besides. I wished to see more of the redoubtable Ismaelite, and our conversation was continued in the nearest hotel. "Ah! now, that is very strange, but I have had like experiences,' said Argles, when I had confessed that that was the first time I had ever seen him, had never spoken to any one who had, and that then Sydney existed only for me in a well-grounded faith. 
To my enquiry what had brought him, of all men, into such a quiet, out-of-the-world spot, his reply was 'The Lord knoweth; it is fate!' He wanted to know if I could 'take him on.' I had to bewail the fact that I could not, remembering that if the average pen is to be considered mightier than the sword, that of my companion was more potent than a cavalry of swords, and that his services would in all probability lead to an able-bodied libel being set loose on me. The consequences of alleged libel followed later, so that, after all, Argles should have had his opportunity and given me at least the satisfaction of suffering for a real offence instead of an alleged fault that was subsequently made to do good service for more than one deeply concerned. How to 'raise the wind' was the spinal marrow of a conversation varied by more than one sample of 'the beverage of heries.' 
'This is my bank.' said Argles, as he produced a florin, 'and as I have my wife with me there is all the more need for instant action.' It was eventually decided that he should deliver a lecture. It would be his maiden effort in that line, and the 'Lights and Shades of London Life' was fixed on as the subject. I undertook to advertise the lecture, bill the town, and have 'dodgers' dropped into every trusting home announcing the fact of the arrival of a world-wide platform orator. The decision seemed to lift a load from the brain of my clever acquaintance, and when he was informed that nothing would be charged for these services he became quite reckless, borrowed money from me freely, and abandoned all caution for a lavish liberality. Adjoining to the office, he wrote out the copy for the advertisement, the poster, and the 'dodger,' and many were his merry and witty sallies at the expense of himself and 'the entranced section of creation.' as he chose to call the then town of my adoption. With a view to giving the fact of the coming treat a chance-of sinking into the brain tissue of the town and district several days were allowed to elapse before the eventful evening, and the interregnum was used by Argles in amusing himself, principally in the production of "odes.' any one stanza of which would have served as a bombshell in the community. It was at least 'a season of refreshing.' 
On the eventful evening Argles bounced into the office, straightened himself up and declared he couldn't possibly lecture in a tweed suit. 'Whoever heard of a great lecturer unburdening his mind in a tweed suit! The thing's impossible.* But this difficulty was got over by his donning my blacks. A trifle small for me, they fitted him like a glove. As it was publishing night. I begged to be excused, stating I would see him after he had got through with his task, and he took himself off in the airiest manner possible. It was nearing the hear of 10 when I next saw him. His face was livid with passion. 'What’s' up?' I asked. "What's up? Why, I have been robbed of every penny!' 'By whom?' 'Why, by this infernal town of yours—by some thirty ruffians of this ' But here he suddenly stopped, a smile lit up his face, and he broke into a loud laugh. —A Funny Story.— 'Dash it all, man! It's the funniest story you ever heard. Listen!' 
And this is what he told me:—'When I peeped from behind the mighty mountains, the foaming cataracts, and the lightning shattered pines that veiled my majestic form from some 30 bodies sitting as still as Chinese gods in the middle distance of the vast emptiness that surrounded them my heart failed me. Besides, I had no lecture ready. But I gave the sign, up went the drop scene, and advancing to the middle of the stage, I gave one long, sad look at them, bowed like a Frenchman (here he gave me an imitation of his bow), and said—"Ladies and Gentlemen—In the whole course of my long career as a public lecturer it has never been my misfortune to appear before an audience so small, and I feel, ladies and gentlemen, that I could neither do justice to you nor to my engrossing subject. If I may be allowed to trespass on your good nature, I would suggest that you get your money returned at the door, and come again to-morrow evening, with as many of your friends as possible. I am hoping that the increased publicity thus gained will reward we with a larger audience." 
I retired amid the clapping of hands. The "audience" had waited in the passage of the institute for some 15 minutes or so, and were growing rather impatient at my non-appearance, when a fellow strolling by asked the reason of the crowd and its discontent. No sooner was he informed than out issued the cat from the bag. "Why," said this fellow, "the lecturer's over at the pub enjoying his brandy." A stampede was at once made for the scene of my repose, where I was besieged, and made to disgorge all I hadn't spent. "Now," laughed he, "I think I'll get into my tweeds again." 
By this time I had come to the conclusion that all I had heard about Argles was true, and what followed came as a thing of course. 
The next day Argles and, I regret to say, his young, pretty, and accomplished wife, were turned out of the hotel, and their boxes seized as security for what was owing, and this and the 'lecture' episode were bounced about the town with an energy reserved for very exceptional experiences. Placing a room at the services of my new friends, I had recourse to private appeal, with the result that the manager (since dead) of a banking institution invited the erring lecturer and his wife to his house, where for an evening they were the delight of a company that probably was never better entertained. Being thus and in other ways provided with the sinews of war, Argles squared his hotel bill and left, as he had come, in an unostentatious manner. In recognition of what he was pleased to consider my 'great kindness.' he presented me with his scrap book, containing 'The Pilgrim's' articles contributed to the 'Freeman's Journal' and other papers. 
I never saw him again. Years after I read in the 'Bulletin' of his death, and of his wife's devotion to the last. She took up Salvation Army work, and the last I heard of her she was engaged in connection with that organization in Melbourne She was a splendid woman. Argles was a splendid woman. Argles was a valued contributor to the columns of the paper named, and probably no one more regretted his departure from this sphere of graft than Mr. J. F. Archibald, the satirical but big-hearted founder of the 'Bulletin,' who credited him with having been the most brilliant satirist who ever came under the Southern Cross. Some Celebrities Recalled. (1916, May 5).Border Chronicle (Bordertown, SA : 1908 - 1950), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article212860287 

About 35 years ago: 1881

JOURNALISTIC reminiscences.
MEN WHO HAVE GONE AHEAD.
J. F. ARCHIBALD, OF THE 'BULLETIN.'
Nothing succeeds like success, and success and the Bulletin may be regarded as synonymous . terms in newspaperdom. In writing as above, ‘Archibald, of the Bulletin,' it would be perfectly safe to go further and to Say Archibald is the Bulletin. Though probably the most powerful moulder of opinion in national as against provincial politics, the editor of the Bulletin, except in journalistic circles, is known to fewer men than is the ordinary hack reporter of a daily' newspaper. It may not be said of him as it was of Tennyson on his entry to London, that he came in singing, with his bundle of songs in his pocket, but as the Bulletin has said, he struck Sydney with nothing much in his pocket except a hole and no capital but brains. To quote the journal itself, and the line was Written in all modesty, 'This paper was started with no capital save brains.' To-day, after a career not unmarked by vicissitudes, the Bulletin is the most valuable newspaper property— comparatively with its cost of production—in Australia. The secret of the success of the paper in the first instance was the undoubted ability and capability of its founder in every part of the business of newspaper conduct. Born at Warrnamboo in the fifties, after the usual period of school experience he entered the office of the Warrnambool Standard as an apprentice to the stamp-snatching industry—otherwise a compositor—and thus early many stories are told of his energy, cynical wit and adaptability to circumstances. He established a reputation as a ' whip' in the office, and the local talent were unable to extend him in any way. But a rival appeared one morning in the person of J. B. Mather (now of the 'Tiseb) who came there from the Border Watch, Mount Gambier, and a speed trial in type-setting was sometime after arranged between the two. As there was nothing to choose between the competitors, and a second go produced the same result. Honors were thus easy between the pair, who worked together side by side for some considerable period subsequently. The two fast comps. remained fast friends, and when many years later Mather on the occasion of a visit to Sydney met Archibald, the editor of the Bulletin after ransacking the recesses of his memory and recalling his old associate, was guilty of an act rarely ever charged to his account. He gave himself a half holiday, and for the afternoon became one of the boys, and in memory of old Warrnambool proceeded to give Sydney a mud coat of carmine. Archibald rarely takes anything for his stomach's sake, but it is on regard that on this occasion-he endeavored to proceed to Manly Beach by a North Shore ferry boat, and Mather, being ignorant of the locality, was easily persuaded to walk, the intervening 8 miles.

But this by the way. At the conclusion of his term of apprenticeship on the Warrnambool paper, and satisfied that he could learn no more of the mysteries of type-setting, he devoted himself to the study of shorthand and the work generally of a journalist He corresponded for several country papers, and even ventured so far before his admission to the charmed circle of journalism proper as to spread himself in the leading columns of the papers for which he corresponded. His articles were marked by a distinctive vigor, and carried so much of fire in their composition as induced one timid editor to observe ' this man writes well, but his stuff is too sledge hammery for us.' This recalls an observation of Archibald, who, commenting on the work of that editor said, * The old fellow writes first, and then thinks afterwards/ - He emigrated to Melbourne, but did not at once enter upon newspaper work. He was first employed as a clerk in the Education Department, but left hurriedly a caustic paragraph referring to an illiterate minute written by the political head, and. reproduced in all its unloveiness by Archibald in a Melbourne journal being traced to his vitriolic pen. From there he drifted to Queensland, and followed commercial pursuits. 

With the journalistic instinct strong within him he eventually made his way to Sydney, and after some battling succeeded in issuing the first number of the Bulletin in 1879. Associated with him in the venture was Mr. John Haynes, the present M.L.A. for Wellington in N.S.W., modestly dubbed by himself ‘the member for Australia.' When first issued the price of the Bulletin was 3d., and it is a question amongst the keenest critics whether the old Bulletin was not a crisper and livlier paper than the popular pink covered issue of the present proprietary—J. F. Archibald, William Macleod, ;and Livingstone Hopkins. Of course Archibald's answer is that the Bulletin never was what it used to be. . Amongst, the curiosities of earlier Sydney is a glass placard in the bar of the Exchange Hotel, George and King street,' bearing the legend 'Bulletin sold here, price 3d., Haynes and Archibald, proprietors. Haynes long since dropped out of the business, and after many years of buffetting with the tide of journalistic adversity became a professional politician, who plays the game of patriotism for all that in there is. In those days, Archibald was editor, sub-editor, office staff, occasional compositor, frequent machine-hand of the budding journal which in after years became such a pronounced financial success. 

With him and associated in its production, were some of the best writers of the time in New South Wales. The Pilgrim ' (Harold Grey), Victor J. Daley, Jim O'Brien (J.O.B. of the Sydney Morning Herald), O'Bern, Jack Hunt (' Boondi'), Dick Thatcher, Charles Wesley Caddy, and a few others. Caddy, Thatcher, and Grey are dead, such of the others still contribute to the columns of a paper whose editor never undervalues the firstel and writing of first-rate men. In his quick estimate of the value of 1 copy' is the secret of Archibald success as an editor. Almost at a dance he is able to decide whether or not matter submitted is of any use to him. If it is it is accepted and paid for—if not, rejected and referred to pointedly in a column with which the majority of amateur writers in Australia are painfully familiar.

The tone of the Bulletin in the beginning was decidedly meaty, and as a consequence caught on from the jump. It was a. new sensation to Sydney newspaper readers, and accepted and appreciated as such. Its price placed it within reach of all, and its circulation jumped from hundreds to thousands within a few weeks. The first few- issues were devoted to exposures of the night side of city life mostly from the pen of the ‘Pilgrim,' who was thoroughly competent to prepare an indictment of this sort. And with the exposures of the holiday orgies at various places of public resort the paper opened the eyes of the unco guid as to the kind of Sodom and Gomorrah atmosphere which they had for years been breathing—at a distance. The Chowder Bay Bacchanalian revels, and the exposing in their unlovely wickedness of the incidents of one such gathering furnished Archibald with an experience which he has since taken no chances of renewing. The article as has already been stated in these columns, was written by W. H. Traill, who subsequently became part proprietor of the Bulletin. The owner of the grounds on which the saturnalia occurred proceeded against the paper with a view to recovering substantial damages, but the jury rightly regarding the exposure as justified returned a verdict for a nominal amount, unmindful or ignorant of the fact that the costs would be against the defendants. These the Bulletin was unable to pay, and in default of payment Archibald and Haynes were incarcerated as first-class misdemeanants in Darlinghurst Gaol. In this retirement Archibald turned out some vigorous and brilliant work for the paper, and on his release resumed its active conduct. Undeterred by this experience he maintained the vigorous tone of the paper, and established a reputation as a variety of journalistic Ishmael. Intensely Australian in thought and expression, he continued to swing the battering-ram of the Bulletin at established institutions political and social which he regarded with disfavor, and within a few years the leading politicians and public men generally grew to fear the lash of the bold author of a new journalism more than they even did the weak reproaches of the grand motherly old established daily press. When the journalistic bantling fairly felt its feet the pencil of the satirist artist was employed to the assistance of the pen of- the biting humorist writer, and the Bulletin at* once stepped into the front rank of journalism proper, and gave earnest of the strength and power which it now so distinctly enjoys and in the majority of' instances so judiciously and wisely employs.
(To be continued.) JOURNALISTIC REMINISCENCES. (1899, April 27). Quiz and the Lantern (Adelaide, SA : 1890 - 1900), p. 3. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article166447687 

ANNOUNCEMENT EXTRAORDINARY.
SPECIAL CHRISTMAS NUMBER
PUBLISHED TO-MORROW,
TUESDAY, at 12.30.
Look out for one. containing —
'The Midnight Shadows of the City,' by the Pilgrim (Mr. Harold Grey), lately arrived from Adelaide. Appalling Disclosures ' '. !
And the usual Fascinating and Fantastic' Articles by Bob Avery, The Waif, Flipper-Flopper, &o., &o. Screaming Fun, Terrific Sensation, and Holy Truth, for A WHOLE SIXPENCE!! ! ! Advertising (1879, December 22). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107166369 


'Circular Quay', from Album Mort family - Photographs of Sydney & N. S. Wales [ca. 1879-1889]. Image No.: a7242013, courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales

1880

(From the Evening News.)
John T. Barnett was charged with assaulting George Sawkins. It appeared that Sawkins had  made insinuations to Mrs. Roberts, of the Shakespeare Hotel, Pitt-street, in reference to her giving an individual known as "The Pilgrim" money; which that lady considered insulting. Complainant and defendant took off their coats and had a fight, the result of which was that Sawkins was kicked downstairs and received a rather severe handling. The occurrence took place between half-past twelve and one o'clock on the morning of January 7. Barnett was fined 20/- and 5/10 costs. SYDNEY. (1880, January 10). The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle (NSW : 1864 - 1881), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article101446094 

THEODORE ARGLES, alias Talbot Marshall, Paul M. Ward, Harold Gray, The Pilgrim, Graham Fenton, &c., &c., has been committed for trial in Brisbane on a charge of forging Lingard's name to a cheque for £4. Argles will be remembered by a good many in the South-East as having been, under the name of Talbot Marshall, a member of the notorious Buckley troupe. The Border Watch, PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY MORNING. (1880, January 14). Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77586604 

A CORRESPONDENT of the Australian Star says :-"I apologise to the public and Theo.  Argles for a blunder. 'The Pilgrim' who was arrested in Brisbane for forging Lingard's name is not the Pilgrim.  Argles is in Sydney trying to earn an honest living-no easy job, for he is better and less favourably known in Sydney than in Adelaide." THE WATER SUPPLY. (1880, January 31).Border Watch (Mount Gambier, SA : 1861 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article77586804 

HUMOURS OF THE GARDEN PALACE.
By Pasquin. 

The humour of it. — Shakespeare. 
To the student, however humble, of human nature, Saturday, as a rule, affords more scope for obtaining sketches of life and character than any other day in the week. Humanity of a Saturday — more especially after 2 p.m. — is ' up and doing' to a very considerable extent; and from the little office boy who jingles his three half-crowns in the pockets of his moleskin pants, to the be-whiskered and bescented roysterer whose pecuniary weekly complement permits him the expenditure of ' half-a-times ' — exclusive of the sixpence for his ‘shave and brush-up ' — every Saturday afternoon — the populace is, with a very few exceptions, provided with a sufficiency of ready cash ; and money, as we all know — in spite of what misanthropical poets and others have said about it — is an exceedingly pleasant and soothing thing to have about one. The various amusements that can be indulged in on Saturday afternoon are really so very numerous ' that a man of a vacillating disposition might find considerable difficulty in making up his mind within a given time, and 5 o'clock tea has come suddenly upon many a good man and true while in the throes of indecision between Botany and San Souci. With men of a retiring nature, the piscatorial delights of Mossman's Bay find favour, as a rule, with persons of an aesthetic disposition a trip to Manly with some one else's sister is the acme of enjoyment ; the 'robust Christian ' is invariably enthralled by the glories of cricket ; with the civilized and harmless lunatic the bicycle is the rage ; and with a large section of the community a visit to the Garden Palace is a favourite form of recreation after the week's 'toil and trouble.' 

And yet, for all this, the Exhibition is far from being a popular institution with, at any rate, the commercial world. Sometimes when I enter a shop to make a purchase, after the first few thrilling remarks about the weather, I inquire of the affable merchant if he often visits the Garden Palace. It is amusing, then, to watch ' the inky storm clouds gather on his brow,' and to mark him mutter under his beard adjectives of a forcible nature. Another extraordinary point in connection with the Exhibition itself is, that the caterers at the Garden Palace are almost unanimous in complaining of the badness of trade, and many of the exhibitors express themselves as greatly disappointed with the result of their speculation. Considering the enormous influx of people that the International Exhibition has been the means of bringing to the city, the state of affairs I allude to is difficult to account for. It must be patent to all that if business be dull both at the Exhibition and in the city, the ' strangers in our tents ' must either have very little money to spend or the extreme of Scottish caution in spending it. Personally, however, I think that the present depression is caused, not so much by the fact of trade being absolutely dull, as by the commercial community having formed exaggerated notions of what the Exhibition would accomplish for them, which golden visions have proved dreams in the most exact acceptation of the term. 


The Garden Palace, Sydney, N.S.Wales / [attributed to the New South Wales. Government Printing Office]. Date: 1880 - Image No.: a089259, courtesy the State Library of New South Wales

So much has been written concerning the Garden Palace by the well-meaning, though somewhat dull gentlemen on the staffs of the Freeman's contemporaries, that it would seem at first sight as though the subject were nearly exhausted. The Herald reporters are positively indefatigable in hunting up and hoisting into print the feeblest exhibits. This is something after their style Mr. Johnson, of Burrumgunyah, shows a chaste specimen of earthenware and a highly interesting exhibit consisting of an aboriginal fog-horn. We are at a loss, really, to which of these undeniable evidences of the commercial prosperity of Burrumgunyah we should award the greatest meed of praise. While risking it on the fog-horn, we have much pleasure in testifying to the sublime excellence of the earthenware sample, and congratulate Mr. Johnson on having added one to the many attractions of the Garden Palace.' On reading this over it seems- somewhat lighter than the usual run of Herald pars ; but, no matter. It's near enough with the thermometer at 120 degrees in the shade ! 

Now for sober narrative. At eleven o'clock on the morning of Saturday last, a jaded pedestrian might have been seen walking slowly up Macquarie-street, in the direction of the Exhibition. He halted now and then and mopped his heated brow with a silk bandanna of comfortable proportions, and on arriving at the gate of entrance purchased from an elderly lady, in a dark blue gown and a profuse perspiration, a ticket of admission. That 'was I — the writer of these lines ! Through one of the turnstiles set apart for that comparatively unimportant section of the community, the ' general public,' I passed, and standing before a pretty little fountain in the front enclosure, amused myself for a little while watching the various arrivals. In a few moments I arrived at the conclusion that the free list of the Garden Palace was very far indeed from being suspended ! The amount of persons—men, women, and children who ' came in on the ?whisper' was surprising. It would appear, therefore, that every exhibitor, attendant, door-, keeper, or caterer is allowed by the authorities to introduce 'his sisters and his cousins and his aunts.' I subsequently took the trouble of making a few enquiries on the subject of Garden Palace dead-heads, and I ascertained that no one, however slightly acquainted with even the humblest functionary attached to the Exhibition ever thinks of troubling the money-taker. This is, after all, as it should be : for was not the International organized for the purpose of rejoicing our hearts and filling our pockets ? 

On entering — the day being extremely hot — I made, without loss of time, for the fountain under the dome. This monument is surmounted by a statue of the Queen; the likeness of which is said, by many who have read about her Majesty, to be most excellent. I looked at this statue for a long while with an intensity of gaze that at length attracted the attention of a farmer from Orange. 
' Whar's wrong wi' the statter ?' he inquired. 
' Well, it's curious,' I replied, still gazing intently upon the bronze features of her Most Gracious Majesty ; ' but when I knew her she'd a small mole just abaft the left ear, and I'm looking for it.' 


Queens Statue, Garden Palace Building, ca. 1879-1882, Images No.: a089148 and 


Queens Statue, Garden Palace Building, 1882, No.: a089149 courtesy State Library of NSW.

I then strolled away, and when, after walking twenty yards or so, I happened to turn my head, there was my friend from Orange on tip-toe, trying to puzzle out the mole that the Queen had when I knew her. I wonder whether he is looking for it still ! The statue is, on the whole, a fine one ; but, why in the name of Benvenuto Cellini, did the sculptor place nothing more regal in her Majesty's hand than a rolling pin ? Wow, this takes away all the poetry of the conception. To my idea, the Queen seems to be saying — ' God bless my soul ! it's getting on for twelve o'clock and there's no tart for Leopold's luncheon. Mary ! hurry up with the pie-board and flour!' 

After a turn as far as the orchestra, I descended to the basement to interview those seasonable exhibits — strawberry-ice and cherries. It is nice and dark, and cool, down there by the basin of the fountain, and several people were taking advantage of the pleasant spot, and were lunching. At the next table to me was a whole family: father, mother, three boys, the eldest daughter and her young man; at least so I presume, as although he was eating a 'cheese sandwich' with his right hand, his left clasped the palm of the young lady: a platonic endearment which she endeavoured to conceal by covering the entwining fingers with yesterday's Soho. These people went in for enjoyment — undisguised, undiluted, unabashed enjoyment. They had part of a cold round of corned beef, raw tomatoes, and bread and pickles. ' Father ' called for three long beers, and into it they went. If Messrs. Compagnoni, Cripps, and Emerson had chanced that way, what a sigh would have escaped from the inmost souls of those estimable men. 

Having thoroughly cooled myself, I went down the steps between the fruit and lolly stalls, in search of material for copy. There was a man spinning a little top at a table, and extolling its merits at a great rate, while he spun the toy on his nose, on a thread, on the blade of a knife, up his arm — in fact all over him. Several people looked on, and in the end we all became fascinated. Finally he put the top on a little pedestal where it reeled about like a country publican coming from the ex-Mayor's picnic. At last it fell, and the charm was broken. And curious to say no one offered to purchase it. The man then brought out some cement, which he said would join any two bodies together any way, except in matrimony, and nothing would ever make them come asunder again ; not even, he went on to say (he was rather a scoffer, as I thought), would a decision of a divorce-court judge affect its adhesive powers. A middle-aged lady, who was there with her husband, purchased a bottle, while I bought, for a shilling, an instrument that was an oyster knife, a glazier's diamond, a knife-sharpener, and a tin-opener, all in one. Subsequently I invested in an exhibition medal and a packet of pop-corn, and left the basement a ruined and a broken-hearted man. 

I then bent my steps in the direction of the Art Gallery, which as everybody knows is in the grounds, facing the pavilion where the waiters cry 'Fried oysters, one!' so melodiously.

Some one was just paying for oyster stew as I passed, for I heard the clink of money and a voice call out, ' Eighteen pence — 'arf-a-crown — right !' and the customer came walking out wiping his lips with his pocket-handkerchief. At the entrance of the Art Gallery, a melancholy young man impounds your umbrella. There was a wag of an American standing there with me, and he endeavoured to ' take a rise ' out of the boy. He handed in his stick and received a brass token about the size of a shilling in return. ' Weal, young man,' he said, ' kin you only loan me a quarter on it ? I reckon you'd better hand out the ticket , anyhow.' But not the ghost of a smile flitted over the juvenile custodian's countenance. 
‘Melancholy had marked him for her own.' 

There was a good attendance in the Art Gallery ; chiefly people from the country. It was curious to observe how these good folk led one another about by the arm. Some of the rustics were got up in the very latest style, with silver-mounted sticks, and shining bell-toppers. The ladies, however, though for the most part fresh and rosy as to their faces, chiefly sported those readymade costumes which are always going 'at an alarming sacrifice,' and which torture the gaze of mankind generally in the vicinity of Punch's corner. A bewildered couple without a catalogue stood before 117, in the French Gallery, striving to puzzle out the meaning of the pretty motto of the picture 
II visite souvent vos paisibles rivages 
Souvent j'oconte et l'air gemit dans vos bois 
A mon orcille an loin vient apporter sa voix.

In vain, however. Still I could see that the lady had arrogated to herself some knowledge of French, and that her husband was a little bit disappointed. As they walked away, she said — 'Well, Fred, I could do it with a dictionary;' an assurance which he appeared by his manner to receive with some distrust. With the permission of the Council of Education, I will turn the French extract into a simple little English stanza : — 
He often wanders by the river, 
By the peaceful river side ; 
And when the gentle breeze makes shiver 
The rustling leaves of the forest wide, 
From far away, so soft and clear, 
His voice is borne upon my ear. 

There we are — and without a dictionary, too. ' Think of that, Master Brook !' 
After strolling through the rooms, I went out into the grounds again, and entered a small Viennese pavilion where they sell lager bier — the celebrated brew of Dreher, who is said to be worth — I forget how many millions of money. A little dark woman sat behind the counter, knitting. She was dressed in black, and with a little white lace at her neck and wrists, looked the personification of neatness — and so cool bless you ! that a glance at her was as refreshing as an ice-cream soda. Over a glass of lager we got on famously. I couldn't speak any German, and her French hobbled a good deal, but yet we managed to understand one another tolerably well. Once I was rather out, it is true, I was growing eloquent in French on the wrongs of Hungary, while she was hammering away at the exorbitant price she and her husband were charged at their boarding house. At other times, however, I ' chipped in' and struck it with ' Die bier ist sare goot,' which I considered to be the language. Personally I am doubtful about the gender of the definite article; but I have made it feminine out compliment to my fair interlocutor. 

A walk around the galleries of the Garden Palace is as pregnant of surprises as a box of Christmas crackers. For it is in the recesses of this portion of the building that fervid young lovers bill and coo ; and up there, too, stout matrons inveigle their offspring, and sponge their faces with 'billies' of cold water filched from the fountain. The strangest exhibits are to be found in deserted portions of the gallery. I stood in front of the Albury 'court,' and nearly cried. They have there some funny — inexpressibly funny things; and, marques bien, the exhibit tickets all purport to be signed by 'The Committee’. First and foremost there are some broken red tiles. Now, a red tile in its entirety is not an intensely exciting exhibit; but a tile that looks as though it had passed through the Franco-Prussian war is an article that should be carefully 'hid from Sol's warm rays.' Then there are some — well — some drawings — intensity droll drawings — and some photographs. Albury from the north — from the south — from the east — from the west. The banks, the baker's — all points, in short, of thrilling local interest. I have not the faintest notion by whom those photographs were taken, but I should like to know — in ease of going there by accident to have the baby taken. A walk round the galleries entails considerable exertion; but the fatigue, as I have already hinted, is more than repaid by what you see there. I am not alluding at this moment to exhibits alone; but to other things of a good deal more romantic character. I happened to stumble into a lonely corner, not far from the dazzling Albury collection. In short, may as well admit, that I wished to be alone somewhere, and have a good scream at the broken tiles. For broken tiles, ' look you,' as Fluellen says — are a very strange exhibit. Well, I glided into a corner where there was some tapestry hanging, and I was about to penetrate further, when, to my surprise, I heard the low sound of two voices — one gruff and the other shrill; both, however, piano. I approached cautiously. Hardly had I reached within arm's length of the screen, when he murmured something, whose meaning I could not quite catch. Her answer came in dulcet and melodious tones — ' What ! — not love you, Charlie? Oh, you know I do, darling !' I walked away then. I thought possibly that these two might enjoy the vast monument of colonial enterprise, as exemplified by the Garden Palace, better by themselves !

When at the northern end of the gallery I encountered an elderly gentleman who was making for some stairs at a great rate. I inquired whither he was bound, and he informed me that he was about to ascend to the summit of the north tower, in order to obtain a bird's eye view of the city. ' I haven't got long to spare,' he added, breathing hard; ' because I'm going to Parramatta by the train.' He left me then and I could hear him pounding up those steps as if his very life depended on it. After a few moments of indecision, I resolved to follow him, and mounting the spiral staircase, was soon close upon the heels of the Parramattonian's bluchers. 

The view from the summit of the tower is inexpressibly beautiful. The moving waters of the harbour, upon whose rippling surface every! colour flashes, every shade reposes, stretch out before the eye like a fairy lake, and the gardens, with the rays of the sun darting through the foliage, are more beautiful than the loveliest transformation scene. To the right is Woolloomooloo — a sea of houses radiating to the heights of Darlinghurst. Ah, if a modern Diablo Boitoau could but lift haphazard some of the iron roofs of those houses, what strange material for romances would be revealed! Just discernible, too, is the weathercock of the prison, within whoso grim walls the two condemned men are awaiting their certain doom. What must be the thoughts of those poor chained wretches when gay sounds are wafted upon the summer breeze into their cells, and while all without is bright with life and light the hand of Death is slowly closing upon them. Long before this slip is in type, the doomed men will have passed into eternity. Who could feel anything but pity for them as they lie in the shadow of 'Death's pale flag?' Who can help, for their sakes, trusting that Longfellow sings truly in his stanza from Resignation : — ' There is no death ! What seems so is transition ; The life of mortal breath Is but a suburb of the life elysian, 'Whose portal we call death.' 


Sydney Harbour [from Garden Palace tower], 1880. Image No.: a089865, Attributed and dated from the NSW Government Printing Office collection of copy negatives (Frame no. GPO 1 - 05453), courtesy State Library of NSW.

At two o'clock Madame Cecilia Summerhayes gave a pianoforte recital in front of the orchestra. In the programme it was announced that her third number would be a selection from Don Pasquale; but she played Home Sweet Home instead. A stout couple in front of me were much exercised by this. ' Why, isn't that Home Sweet Home, John ?' she inquired, after Madam Summerhayes had played the first few bars. ' Sounds like it,' replied her spouse gruffly. ' Then,' rejoined the lady, looking at her programme, 'I suppose Don Pasquale is Home Sweet Home in French.' 

At 3 o'clock Miss Emilie E. North had an innings, and punished one of Pohlmann and Son's pianos severely; and later on in the afternoon Signor Paolo Giorza took it out of an Ascherborg in the orchestra. What rather spoilt the effect, of the pianoforte solos was that the refreshment people under the dome had hired a very powerful band, and the musicians, being conscientious men, played as loudly as possible in order to attract customers and drown the opposition. Before I left the promenade was crowded with people, and, to quote Byron — 
A thousand hearts beat happily ; and when 
Music arose with its voluptuous swell, 
Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again, 
And all wont merry as a marriage bell.
HUMOURS OF THE GARDEN PALACE. (1880, January 24). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 14. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133486870 


'Garden Palace', from Album Mort family - Photographs of Sydney & N. S. Wales [ca. 1879-1889]. Image No.: a7242063, courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales

SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPES.
By Pasquin.
No. 1. A Six Penny Dinner.

God sends meet, and the Devil sends cooks. — Garrick. — Ep. on Goldsmith's Retaliation. 
Le veritable Amphitryon 
Est l' Amphitryon ou l'on dineTalleyrand

There is always — most sensible people will, doubtless, admit — a large amount of interest centred in the inner life of any great city. Anent the rich and well-known, who walk along the side-walks in all the glories of broad-cloth, or flash round the Domain in barouches bewilderingly emblazoned with heraldic devices — persons whose names figure daily in the various journals — whose doings are upon the lips of the haute noblesse ( Coloniale ) although occasional details of a fantastic order concerning them crop up, and are a nine days' wonder to the general public — it is the actions and lives of those mysterious persons who live, so to speak, in a world of their own, having friends that we never know, places of resort we are ignorant of, that enchain, by reason of their simple secresy, the interest of the general reader. It is impossible, as every practised journalist will allow, to write upon any subject that is not of the stereotyped order, without having gone to the trouble of working up your facts, and studying your theme upon both its fantastic and its serious sides. No writer, however vivid his imagination, or 'versatile ' his pen, could do justice to a sixpenny banquet without having previously partaken of that meal, and given some attention to the manner in which the food is prepared, to the ingredients of which it is composed, ' and to the company who daily sacrifice on the altar of Victua,(The Goddess of Gastronomy)' one or more of the 'sprats' of democracy. It is amusing to lie back, and, with half-closed eyes, ponder upon the wonderfully luxurious feats in the art of cookery that are now performed, and have been since time immemorial in the houses of the rich and great ; and of the equally surprising achievements with scraps and garbage which have been accomplished since the deluge, in the homes of the poor and needy. 

Lets now carry our thoughts eighteen hundred years back — to the lively days of Nero, for instance : — Nero, at once the grossest tyrant and the grandest gourmet the world has ever known. The elaborate cookery-books of Soyer and Francatelli are apt to gush a good deal about Nero. They appear, these delicate epicures, to forget the cruelties of the Roman monster in their admiration of his love for, and artistic skill in, conceiving rare gastronomical phenomena. Perhaps, après tout, this is excusable; for we should all look, charitably upon the faults of the dead : more especially when the inscription on their tombstones marks the day of their decease to have occurred one thousand eight hundred years ago. And then looking at the late Emperor through a roseate haze of culinary glory, he doesn't seem to have been so very bad after all. He only poisoned Bultaneus, slaughtered his mother, kicked his wife Octavia to death, cupped in a primitive manner his tutor Seneca, broke the fire insurance companies of the period by burning his own city, murdered all the popular music of the day on his fiddle, and finally, with the aid of Epapliroditus, bored a hole in himself and died. This, I may mention, is the generally-accepted version of how Nero departed this life. For my part, however, I am a little sceptical. I believe in trying to pronounce the name of his follower, the poor monarch broke his jaw, and calmly and peacefully passed away ! Yes, Nero was a gourmet of the first water. Let us imagine him, and say ten or fifteen friends, ' laying off ' on their couches around the banquet table. They have all their feet unsandalled, and their brows are encircled by wreaths of the rarest flowers, which have just been called for by the Emperor. In those days when one of the swell Romans wished for floral embellishments, ho did not say, as we do — 'Mary, just run down to the central market and see if you can get me a three; shilling bouquet for half-a-crown.' Not at all. This show Nero—according to Veuillot— used to 'shout ' flowers for his boon-companions — 'Slaves !— bring us wreaths of flowers ! — fugitive nymphs of the spring and of pleasure; and they shall bind our brows. At the same time let garlands adorn our craters, in which the cherished liquor of the Son of Semele sparkles ; and let us bestow no thought upon the uncertain and fatal hour, when Atropos shall pronounce our doom.' In these unromantic times, people might consider this ' tall-talking ' ; but in Nero's day they were very great on Allegory and Metaphor. I have, indeed, heard it said that it took a fellow-citizen you met at the bath about twenty minutes to inquire after the health of your mother-in-law, they used to 'pile it on' to that extent. Here are now a few of the things Nero was partial to : Peacocks— small part of the breast and head, capons' livers, peppered beccaficos, grouse, pheasants, sows' paps, stag, roebuck : ' all of which,' says Soyer, ' they took care to humect with peppered garum.'

It was a rule, in the middle of the repast in that gentle period, to drink the Emperor's health in brimming craters — one to every letter in the monarch's name. Now, as Nero's simple patronymic was Caius Lucius Demetrius Nero, it is plain that it must have taken twenty-four half-gallon goblets to satisfy the exigencies of the regal toast. And yet there are persons who actually have the ' face ' to complain of the innocent ' long beers ' of these degenerate days. Only fancy even one of the old Moore's Corner topers drinking seventeen gallons of Ealemian or Mulsaui or Passum. The wine-goblet of the period, warranted to  hold half a gallon unpeml measure, or even Granatum ! Qaramba ! — I'd like to see John Davies's face as he reads this ! 

To take a slight leap from A.D. 54 until the present time, it might possible be of interest to my readers to give them the name of one dish, chosen haphazard, from every course of the menu of her Majesty on an ordinary day, when, perhaps, in addition to the Minister in attendance, ' Bertie ' (the Prince of Wales), ' Uncle George' (Duke of Cambridge), and 'Cousin Ted ' (Prince Edward of Saxe Weimar) have dropped in for a gratuitous ' square meal.' A man would certainly not go away starving after this selection : — 
ROYAL TABLE— MENU. ' . .. 
First Course (3). ; 
Torfcue iransparente. 
POISSON (3), ... 
John Dory a la Marinierc. 
REI.EVES (3). 
L'extravagance culinaire. 
de 1' Alderman. * 
Flancs (4). ; 
Vol au vent a la Talleyrand, 
Entrees (6)
Blades de Volaille a la 
York Minster. ' 
Rotis (3). '
Becasse an feuilles de celeri, . . ; 
Entremets (10 !). 
Gellees de fraiscs t'raneaises v 
a la Fontainbleau. 
Releves (3). 
Hure de Sanglier a L’Allemande en surprise. 
Dessert 
Floreal a la Watteau. ' 
*This dish which costs the enormous sum of' £105 sterling, is composed of turtles, capons, turkeys, fowls, plovers, larks, otolims, cocks' combs, crayfish, olives, and green mangoes. See Soyer’s exhaustive work on food and its treatment. 

I would willingly translate these items were it possible to do so without being either pedantic or ridiculous. But, unfortunately, as the French student will easily perceive, there is hardly a plat in the menu that is not utterly untranslatable. In any case it is about time I descended from the clouds to earth — from ' the Alderman's Culinary Extravagance ' at £105, to the New South Welshman's thrift at sixpence. 

Those persons who take a delight, as I do, in perambulating the public streets, must have observed that in the Sydney restaurants there is a very graduating scale indeed, a scale, be it said, which does not graduate from excellent to mediocre, as is the case in London and — how more especially ! — Paris, but from mediocre to very bad indeed. Those who are bachelors, and whose business avocations reduce them to the necessity of lunching and dining en ville, know to their cost how difficult it is in Sydney, even at this ' festive period,' to discover a restaurant where one can I obtain a clean, well-cooked, and decently served meal at a moderate price. 

Personally I have given all the eating-houses a turn. I have feasted luxuriously at Giblin's; worried a cutlet at the Metropolitan; 'wolfed' some roast lamb at Punch's, and dived through the bill of fare at Spencer's. I have even been to the Coffee Palace, and marked with feelings of anxiety how the Rechabitesbolted their chops, and with what demoniacal recklessness they juggled with the blades of their knives. It is a curious thing, by the way, to mark how a 'Good Templar' perspires over his food; how, too, he keeps his eyes on his neighbour's plate; and how, when he requires the waitress, he calls out to her with his mouth full and the gravy running in little rivulets all down his chin. 
I took a dislike to the Coffee Palace after three visits. For this reason The 'lady helps' are too busy having their hands squeezed by the customers, and listening to love tales through the ambrosial steam of maccaroni soup, to attend to an elderly gentleman who bears ' passed the rubicon' stamped upon his every lineament. 

Although I have, as I have already intimated, partaken of sustenance at a great many caravanserais in Sydney, my experience amongst the sixpenny restaurants has been practically limited. It will not, perhaps, be considered a surprising fact when I state that, as a rule, the proprietors of sixpenny eating-houses do not court inquiry into the mysteries of the kitchen-house. On one occasion after investing sixpence wherewith to propitiate the 'boss' a of small tumble-down rookery near the docks, I requested him to let me inspect the kitchen. He took me to the door of the wash-house, and then eyeing me from head to foot, he stopped short. 'Say, old un,' he inquired with pleasant familiarity — ' are yez ' a lightning tatur peeler ?' 'Well no; I can't say I am,' I replied, ' Then you're no good to me, my man,' rejoined he, 'and I can't do nothin' for you.' I then left, a sadder, but not a wiser man. It was some weeks later before I mustered courage to try again. This time I was tolerably successful. There is a certain publican in this city, whose hotel is in the immediate vicinity of one of the sixpenny restaurants. This genial Boniface I cultivated as a flower, and, at length he agreed to allow me the run of the house so that from various coigns of vantage I could inspect the proceedings of the sixpenny cooks. There were two of those disciples of Brillat Savarin. The head cook was a tall, swarthy fellow, in a pair of greasy pants, a Crimean shirt of no discernable tint, and blackened canvas slippers very much down at a pair of heels, which looked as though they had been coal-tarred. The second cook, I found, was rather looked down upon by the chef, and usually addressed as 'Slushy.' This latter official wore a jumper and pants which appeared to be wholly composed of crystallized mud. His face was ornamented with choice arabesques of slate-coloured grease. His feet were bare, his arms were bare, and his head was bare; but so generally filthy was he in appearance, that he seemed to be all of one colour — like an ombre Chinois. There was another ancient party there who was also in a very picturesque condition of griminess. This old person was employed in picking the stones out of plums and scratching his head alternately. The head-cook was kneading dough in a huge boiler. He worked hard and conscientiously. Perhaps he worked rather too hard, as the perspiration kept pouring from his brow upon the flour and suet, adding to it possibly a richness which it would not otherwise have possessed. For my part I have been brought up to live plainly, and I mentally formed a vow to avoid that dough. 
'Slushy' (who, by the-way, gets no wages at all, but sleeps in an out-house on the premises, and takes the grease for his perquisite), 'Slushy' was engaged in chopping up meat upon a board. While chopping he conversed upon current fashionable topics with somebody inside, and therefore; failed to notice the approach of three kittens and a fowl or two, who, from the haste- in which they mounted the board and went for the meat, appeared to have urgent business which did not admit of their waiting until dinner-time. He turned round after a bit, and struck at a rooster with his chopper. In hastily retiring, the bird overturned a billy-can half-filled with beer, and the fluid trickled down amongst the embryo hash. I then made up my mind not to shriek for hash when I went in for my sixpenny worth. While I was watching, the old man, with the plums (who, I discovered, worked an hour or two for his 'tucker,' daily) commenced peeling potatoes. He was pretty quick at it, but he evidently wished to shine too brightly; for in pitching the peeled ones back into the bucket, he often missed his aim, and the vegetable rolled along on the greasy floor, collecting dirt about it like a miniature avalanche. 

About one o'clock I went in and sate down. Passing in at the door, I noticed a board, upon which was written the agreeable intelligence that ham and eggs were 9d, and there was also an intimation in blank verse to the effect that roast veal and stuffed mutton figured upon the bill of fare. The place was crowded with diners, and there were also a few millions of flies that had dropped in to have a time with the sugar. The place itself was long and narrow, with two rows of tables placed closely together. The tablecloths were peculiar. They bore a resemblance somewhat to marine charts from the manifold marks and traces upon them. Someone at breakfast-time had spilled his coffee-cup where I sat, and the mocha had left an exact picture of Norway and Sweden upon the cover. The company was exceedingly mixed. Amongst them were very many of those amateur inspectors of public buildings one sees at the street corners continually. Some of these took their food with great energy, biting fiercely at their bread, and hoarsely shouting for 'cups o' corfey.' At the next table to mine I recognized two shoe-blacks and a market-porter ; while a little nearer the door, lapping up mutton broth, was a trio of well-known news-vendors. Next to me, on the same side, reclined a feeble old gentleman with a stick and crutches, who, besides breathing hard over his food, took snuff at frequent intervals. Facing me was a man in his shirt-sleeves who said 'pass the salt ' continually ; and next him was an individual in a ragged silk coat, who consumed his food entirely with his knife. 

I started my dinner on Scotch broth. Just as it was brought to me the man opposite was served with some of the 'plum duff' I had seen in course of preparation. This rather shook my courage, but with an effort I managed to risk a spoonful of the soup. Directly I tasted it I knew it immediately. It was such an old friend that had I retained my hat, I should have involuntarily have 'doffed my Jack Lancaster' in his honour. The soup was a decoction of flour, artificial colouring, burnt onions, and the day before yesterday's hash, insufficiently boiled with barley and chopped greens. Seeing that I did not get on with my soup, my neighbour said — ' What ! — don't you like it.' 'It's rather too rich,' I faltered. He was half through his meat; but his rejoinder was prompt — ' Hand it over ! ' and I handed it over without a sigh. The meat came next –mutton. With this were two argus-eyed potatoes and a scrap of cabbage in a distressing condition of pallor. The meat was tough, but sweet, though I could have well dispensed with the 'gravy,' which was as artificial in its construction as the complexion of an Italian danscuse. A cup of coffee — or rather a facetious claimant to the name of that aromatic berry — was served with the mutton; one spoonful, however, sufficiently convinced me that there were but too many grounds for my deciding to reject it. Sago pudding closed the repast; but as the cook had forgotten to put any egg in it, I did not get on very fast with that. So ended my experience of a sixpenny dinner. As I filed out, hot, hungry, and greasy, and beheld the money-taker with her hand out, I could not help thinking of Canning's, line in the ' Knife-grinder ' — ' Give three sixpence ! I will see thee cl — d first,' But, nevertheless, I paid and went out ; poorer by sixpence — the richer by experience. 
In conclusion I must necessarily admit that sixpenny dinners are an excellent institution for those who cannot afford shilling ones; at the same time I cannot but think that some modifications in the manner of cooking the food are urgently required. If the Inspector of Nuisances would look in at the cheap eating-houses occasionally it would undoubtedly be productive of good results; and perhaps that officer will be so obliging as to take the hint. There is an old saying to the effect that every man must eat a peck of dirt before he dies. Possibly that may be true. But that is no reason why he should swallow a plateful at every meal ! SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPES. (1880, February 14). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 17. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133487625 

THE SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPE.
By Pasquin.
No. 2. The George-street Coffee Palace.

'Sdeath, I'll print it, and shame the fools. Pope. Ep. to Dr. Arbuthnot, 
Iis en font leur choux gras. ?' ' —French Proverb. 
And what is writ is writ— 
Would it were worthier, — BYRON, Childe Harold. 

It will be, perchance, a matter of some surprise to the readers of this journal, that I should devote an entire sketch to such a comparatively unimportant, institution as that which forms the heading of this article. Yet, when they come to consider that, the leading Sydney newspaper, together with its host of petty parasites, have both since the issuing of the prospectus, and after the floating of the company, lost no opportunity of glorifying the Coffee Palace, buttering the directors, extolling the paid officers, and puffing the whole thing generally, surely I may humbly follow on the same side, and sound my little journalistic clarion, even though its blare be drowned by the fanfarronade of the Morning Muffin

The Sydney Mail of October 4th contains a long article on, and two indifferently executed woodcuts of the Coffee Palace Hotel. The descriptive sketch is of that peculiar description known in Parisian newspapers as a réclame. That, of course, the directors should receive some return for the fifty guineas they expended with the Mail is only right and proper; nevertheless, it is somewhat amusing to find the journal in question endeavouring to glorify what is merely a prosaic commercial speculation, launched by hard-headed and close-fisted men of the world — such as Roseby, Goodlet, Lees, and others — into a disinterested action for the undying benefit of a grateful community. The writer in the Mail, after half a column or so of unliquidated 'gush,' wipes the drops of distilled genius from his brow, and lowers himself down to plain statistics, and to 'supplying the letter press' to the advertising illustrations. He says — alluding to the occupation by the Coffee Palace Company of Messrs. Keep and Parson's premises : — 
'The transformation of these extensive warehouse premises into a modern hotel of first-class character has been effected by Mr. William Hardy (contractor), under the supervision of Mr. Thomas Rowe (architect). The furniture has been supplied by Messrs. Farmer and Co., and the decorations have been executed by Messrs. Watson and Sons, who deserve a compliment for the success they have achieved. In altering and Furnishing about £4500 has been expended. This is stout-hearted philanthropy .' 

Here is a specimen of one of those puffs, translated from the Paris Figaro; On Thursday last the snow fell, enveloping the city like a cloud, and as it fell upon the side-walks, coruscating and glittering with myriad sparkles, What then does this suggest ? Why, that for the small sum of 100 frs. Madame Angelique, of the Rue Vivienne, will supply an adorable costume that Will resist the severest temperature.

Personally, I fail to see exactly whore the 'stout-hearted philanthropy' comes in, considering that the Coffee Palace is merely a temperance hotel and restaurant, which feeds the general public at a slightly higher charge than nine-tenths of the other Sydney eating-houses — ' temperance'' or otherwise. Looking at the prospectus, I see that the capital of the company is £6000 (since raised to £12,000), all, long since, fully paid up, and that the directors are as follow ; — P. P. Fletcher, Esq., of Messrs. Fletcher Bros., Park-street. William Clarice, Esq., J.P., E. S. and A. C. Bank, Pitt-street. G. Anderson, Esq., of Geo. Anderson and Co., Pitt-street. Dr. W. W. J. O'Reilly, Liverpool-street. B. James, junr., Esq., of Barker and James, Market-street. J. H. Goodlet, Esq., of Messrs. Goodlet and Smith, George-street. J. Roseby, Esq., M.L.A., George-street.  J. W. Watkin, Esq., Secretary, Sydney Permanent Building Society. - P. R. Holdsworth, Esq., Temperance Hall. Rev. J. Barnier, St. Barnabas' Church, George-street. J. S. Godwin, Esq., Castlereagh-street. E. Hogben, Esq., of Messrs. Barrett and Co., Castlereagh-street. S. E. Lees, Esq., 174 Pitt-street. 

Of this directory of 'Esquires,' it is pleasing to notice how comparatively few of the members are directly interested in supplying goods to the philanthropical institution which they proudly claim to have called into being ! Positively, out of thirteen directors, only seven are in a position to confer upon the Coffee Palace the inestimable boon of supplying it with their own goods at their own prices. Well may the Mail man exclaim with poetic fervour : 
' This is indeed is stout-hearted philanthropy !' Let us first take Literal translation: They are making a good thing out of it. 

S. E. Lees, Esq. This 'disinterested vessel' reminds me of ' Brother Tadger,' secretary of the Brick Lane Disinterested Branch Temperance Association in Pickwick, who, by way of demonstrating his disinterestedness, 'sold tea to the members.' Well, as may well be imagined, S. E. Lees, Esq., does the company's printing, and thus it may be not inaptly said of him — ' With one hand he puts a penny in the urn of temperance, And with the other takes a shilling out.' By the same token P. R. Holdsworth, Esq., and P. P. Fletcher have a supply of ovens, stoves, and ironmongery at the service of the establishment- ; E. Hogben, Esq., cordial and aerated waters ; J. H. Roseby, Esq., mantlepieces and tomb stones ; B. James, Junr., Esq., groceries and flour ; and Majah (!) Goodlet has, it is reported, supplied the contractors, and will doubtless in future supply them, with the timber for building and general alterations and embellishments. I am also informed that each director has his cows milked in turn, and thus is able to be philanthropical, and to turn an honest penny by his ' prime milkers ' at the same time. I do not, however, endorse this. I hardly think even J. Roseby, Esq., would have the 'face' to dispense the ' milk of human kindness ' to this extent' — good as he is ! The Coffee Palace Hotel is practically under the supervision of three paid officials : the Manager, Mr. Hughes ; the Assistant Manager, Mr. Huntley ; and the Secretary, Mr. Meldrum ; while the staff is numerically as follows : — twenty waitresses, chief cook and five assistants, housekeeper and three housemaids, four pantrymen, and a barmaid. The aggregate weekly salaries of these people is as nearly as I am able to judge £63 14s ; and the division of the spoil is thus : — manager, per week, £6 ; assistant manager, £4 ? secretary, £3 chief cook, £7 ; seven other cooks varying in salaries — say £20 ; barmaid, £1 ; five pantrymen at £1 5s each — £6 5s ; twenty-five waitresses, at 16s — £20; housekeeper, £1 15; three housemaids, at 14s each — £2 2s ; two pages at 10s each ; total, £63 14a. So much for statistics. 

The Coffee Palace contains four dining-saloons, a billiard-room, a ladies' retiring-room, a smoking-room, and fifty sleeping apartments, which are rented out at 10s 6d per week. The kitchen and other offices are in the basement, and, indeed, I can say with truth, that owing to the defective ventilation of the dining-rooms, their presence there is very acutely felt. Taking it as a whole, the Coffee Palace is decorated with considerable taste, and is well furnished as to the lower portion of the premises. The bed-rooms, however, are small, close, and meanly appointed, those on the second floor, lighted by gas, being so dark that they resemble rat holes illuminated by a glow-worm. The officials of the Coffee Palace may truly be termed remarkable-looking men. That is to say, when once you have beheld them, they haunt your vision by day, and your dreams by night for a year or two. Mr. Hughes, the manager, is a puffy-faced gentleman, in a silk coat, and a profuse perspiration. His principal duty seems to be to plant his portly form in the way of everybody. He does not consider it worth his while to be civil to anyone requiring information ; but when conversing with the directors, the spirit of adulation quavers in his every tone. To tell the truth, I don't think Mr. Hughes's situation agrees with him. There is an acquired dulncss about his eyes, and inertness and lassitude in his movements, which, even to the nonmedical observer, tell how the adulterated ether of cheap cooking, which he constantly inhales, is telling on his sensitive system. Mr. Huntley, the assistant-manager, is somewhat younger, and reminds one, at a very great distance off, of Lord Byron — not on account of his facial lineaments resembling those of the deceased noble bard, for they don't! — but because he wears an eighteen-penny smoking-cap, with a moulting tassel. Mr. H.'s mission is to stalk about amongst the girls, glare fiercely at terrified pantrymen, and pick his remaining teeth with a german-silver toothpick. No one appears to have the faintest idea where Mr. Huntley came from. Like the hero of the poem he seems — 
' A glitt'ring vision there to stand, 
Unknown to all throughout the land 
Aud yet that brow, that flashing eye
Were symbols grand of majesty.' 
All this of course is put metaphorically. Seriously, however, I cannot compliment Mr. Huntley upon aping the pasha to the extent of a pseudo Asiatic coiffure ; but if he will do it, for goodness' sake let the directors club together and buy him a new eighteen-penny worth of Oriental splendour ! The secretary, Mr. Meldrum, is a mere shadow of his former self. I don't quite know what his former self was, but I risk this statement, because it is quite impossible for Mr. M. to have ever been any thinner than he is at present. Evidently he does not thrive on Coffee-Palace rations. I expect he has seen the scullery-men , and is disillusioned ! Or perhaps he has seen the manager trifling with the milk, and that has broken his heart. lie's nob looking well, anjr how ; but don't let him be offended ; for what saith Terence ? — ' Nosse hffic omnia salus est adoleseentulis.' 
The first meal that I ever took in the Coffee Palace was tea. I went there about half-past six, and 'glancing over the bill of fare, hailed a passing waitress, and said, 'Stewed veal and peas.' But she passed on, and took no notice. The next moment a tall, dark young lady came tripping along from the other end, and I gave her a hail, and pronounced ' Stewed veal and peas' for the second time. But she only smiled sweetly and murmured, 'Not my tables,' and passed on, leaving me still a hungered. I waited for a few moments, gnawing savagely at my bread. By-and-by the right one did come along; a short, dark little party, dressed in the regulation uniform— black stuff dress, white apron and cap, and boots the shape of candleboxes. She stopped the next table to me, and handed some gay trifler a glass of milk. As she did so he took hold of the tumbler where her hand was and gave it a very perceptible squeeze. Then he whispered something, and she bent down and nodded. Then he whispered again and she nodded again. This by-play becoming monotonous, I beckoned to her like the ghost beckons to Hamlet. On this she tore herself away | from her youthful admirer, and standing before me, said, ' What's for you ?' ' Stewed veal and peas,' I murmured. 'That's off,' she said. 'Curried lamb, then,' I hazarded. She was moving away, when another waitress, who had heard the order, shrilly ejaculated — ' Curried lamb's off.' I then clutched at haricot mutton, and away went my Gannymede after it; only to return, however, to inform me that 'they'd just served the last of it.' The result of course was steak, of which I was served a block, that defied successfully every dental assault. Like Gibraltar, it was impregnable. The next day, I went to the saloon upstairs, in which an extra charge of sixpence (I think) is made, so as to keep it more select. You only get the same viands up there as in the saloon below, but then you have the pleasant sensation of feeling that you are select. I noticed several members of the aristocracy ' diving into the tucker ' in this patrician saloon. First there was ' Pastor ' Allen committing an unfelonious assault on chops and tomatoes ; then there was Mr. E. Lewis Scott, hiding away, with magical celerity, roast pork and apple-sauce. Seated at the same table with me was a dark man, with a large extent of whisker, who appeared to be on terms of great intimacy — not to say familiarity — with the somewhat angular ' lady-help,' at one of whose tables we sat. I watched this gentleman with some interest, be' cause an idea came into my head that I had seen him out at Randwick in days gone by, wearing a calico jockey-jacket, and standing upon a gin case, bawling ' Two to one bar — r — r one' — 'I'll lay, I'll lay, I'll lay !' and other professional cries. Indeed, I had a kind of hazy recollection that on one occasion he 'lay'd' two points over the quoted odds on the ' Metrop. '; got up six half-crown sweeps, and then, having no further interest in the meeting, gracefully retired : and after the race the men who had drawn the winner in sweeps, went groping about the course looking for him with bludgeons. Well, this hirsute individual had soup, twice fish, entree, joint, twice pie, and various etceteras. As I was wondering where he could possibly have made the 'rise' which would justify him in indulging in such a Balthazzar-like banquet, and considering whether he would have to leave his 'slinter ' watch-guard, the waitress came up and gave him a ticket. What the ticket amounted to I cannot of course say ; all I know is, that when my friend received it, a beaming smile illuminated his features, and he retired, apparently well pleased with the extreme smallness of the charge. Another trick greatly in vogue amongst members of the hard-up club is this : — To enter the saloon on the ground floor, call for all the delicacies of the season, and when bhe waitress hands you your ticket, carelessly stroll up to the saloon above, walk into the billiard-room, whistle in a degage manner, and then either ' leave ' by the ladies' staircase, or else return downstairs, and when accosted by the lady who handles the 'spons,' say — ' paid up-stairs,' and humming the ' Sweet Little Buttercup,' pass airily out. The waitresses at the Coffee Palace, are, with a few exceptions, of pikestaffian plainneas. They are chosen apparently for the complexion of their creed. A '’daughter of temperance '' is sure of a billet. It is amusing to watch the by-play of these young women ; ; how they ogle their favourite customers ; the glances they dart a drolte et a gauche as they bear the romantic tripe and onions to some hungry swain. Each one prises in her owtl peculiar style, and the effect of the whole resembles a platform of clockwork figures considerably out of repair. I will conclude this article by giving to the world a song I have composed ; my inspiration being drawn from the spirit of philanthropy which has actuated the board of directors of the Coffee Palace, in establishing art eating-house which is utterly beyond the means of the needy, and was not required by the rich. I make it a free present to the Coffee Palace directory — nob even reserving to myself the copyright of a lyric, which should outlive in popularity ' The Babies on our Block.' Here we go, then : — 
THE THIRTEEN PHILANTHROPISTS. 
A Lay of the Coffee Palace. [To be sung by Mr. P. R. Holdsworth at the next Temperance Hall concert. Admittance Free.]
It came to pass, about last May, 
That thirteen benevolent men, 
All on the philanthropic lay 
Did meet together, when 
As with one voice they cried out 
'Shall us Start a lovely Coffee Palace ?' 
[Chorus.] 

There was Goodlet, O'Reilly, Holdsworth, Lees, 
Barnier, Hogben, Roseby, James, 
Fletcher, Clarke, and if you please 
Godwin, Watkins — oh, what names ! — 
Anderson G. — that ends the list — 
Each man a true philanthropist. 

They met together, and they told 
Each other what good men they were ; 
They scorned the thought of making gold, 
But merely wished to do a fair 
And honest thing — avaunt all malice ! — 
And start a lovely Coffee Palace. 
[Chorus.] 
'Twas done ere half-an-hour they'd tarried, 
And then S. Lees quick threw a hint in, 
Quoth he—' As this fair motion's carried, 
I think I'll tender for the printing.' (Loud cheers.) 
Then each with brimming chalice 
Of water drank—' The Coffee Palace. 
[Chorus.] 
Then Hogben up and says, says he, 
' The cordials, boys, then I'll supply,' 
And howled B. James — ' The grocery I've all the time had in my eye.' 
On which the others shrieked — ' 
Let all us Sell something to our Coffee Palace.' 
[Chorus] . 
So then they called for pen and ink ; 
At the prospectus all do hammer, 
Excepting Hogben, who, I think, 
Had mislaid all his early grammar. 
Read that prospectus — Lord! how tall is , 
Those scribes' style of the Coffee Palace, [Chorus.] –
 And so — Vogue la galore ! 
THE SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPE. (1880, February 21). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 17. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133485581 


The Sydney Coffee Palace Hotel. (1879, October 4). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 552. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161872773 



Coffee Palace, No. 2. (1880, July 17).Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 24. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70945730 

The Bulletin – first set in Express Office and ‘stamped on’ – Archibald and Haynes quickly found another office, reset the type, and published there the first Issue. 

THE "Australian." — We have to acknowledge, the February number of this very acceptable magazine. Many of the articles are well written and interesting. We suppose that the picture sketches which are given in this-number of the theatrical characters that play their part in the pantomime at Christmas" times, "in honour of the advent: of our Lord,"' are given in faithful burlesque of so heathen a practice. Popery wanted to make its people, whom it occasionally starves for the good of their souls, very happy at the Christmas time as a sort of setoff to the hardships of Easter ; and as it did, not know-how; to make its; people really glad, really happy in the understanding of the ..purpose- for, -which Christ came, it got up pantomimes and plays and mock laughter as its best and most spiritual substitute. One has only to look at the pictures in the Australian to, see what fools the pantomime people are.
" Freeman '' in Fix.— It did not appear, very clear to Freeman how he was to regard the startling of the new Catholic organ— "the Express." He knew that the Express was only the Catholic Times redone— re-baptised— recuscitated— and re-blest by priests Mahoney, Sheridan, and a few others, as the tools of the hierarchy and that the ex-sub-editor of the Evening News, Haynes, was honoured with the responsible and honourable position of, "literary Jove " for the articles but as this paper was to be under "his Grace, " did Freeman did not give up hope that the smiles, of "his Grace' might yet come to York-street, the fix was-serious — ''How to allude to the new paper."; Flaneur was strictly charged not to allude to it at all. The man who gets up the "acta populi," and the other man who curls the " Smoke wreaths," were forbidden to know that the Express was started and the ticklish job of referring to the matter, if it was to be referred to at all, was reserved, like a Popish reserved-case  of conscience, to the after judgment of the Butlers and M'Girrs. In a solemn conclave it was resolved that the least said was the soonest mended, and so the fiat went forth— ."'Don't refer to the Express at all. "...This policy of quietness was supposed to be golden." Haynes was known not to be overly judicious and the priests, Mahoney and Sheridan, a were known not to be over-talented in literary work ; so it was thought, "let the hierarchy make-use of their tools; probably the little pat arrangement will soon break down ; and so their Lordships may gracefully return to their old love and poor old Freeman flourish ( again in the sunshine of St. Mary's and St. John's favour)!  What prophetic wisdom and farseeing on the part of the sober old Freeman . The dreaded Express had only issued one number when fearful war took place in the editor's ' room ! What was it?  You may well ask- (Were the Express types composing themselves? Were the frames and the presses in conflict to do his face's bidding ? Were the heretics breaking into the establishment; to put down the terrible Express ? Why the noise of men's voices, and the terrible threatenings of lightening and rain ? Why —it was this; The priests, the obedient servants of the hierarchy, were in conflict with the mighty Haynes, and - telling him that he was nobody. The ; famous Haynes, feeling that the Heiress was too little for his vast resources and powers, had arranged to publish another paper in the same office called, the Bulletin but the priests forbade it and refused to allow it and so Haynes was not very.; kindly and. not very ceremoniously told to quit,: as no- , thing, was to rival the great Express:—Now,' what a fix for Freeman to be in ! ;Not at liberty to attack the now paper, because  in fact, Bishop Vaughan is the chief writer of the articles, and so the danger therefore of criticising " his Grace ;" and not at liberty to; rejoice that so soon after the conclave their “man " Haynes had burst up ! If it were not, for "the Church," how would Freeman smash up the priests, and' " his Grace's " leaders ; but lie dare not. If it were not for " the Church, " how would 'Freeman' have rejoiced over the rumpus in the Express Office last week, but he dare not ! Poor Freeman ! we pity him very much. He feels the trammels of the dogma of "authority." If thieves would only fall out, honest men would get their own Popish Morality THE WIND BAG PRICKED. (1880, February 7). The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207514377 

THE BULLETIN.
THE LIVE PAPER.
..FOR TO-MORROWS ISSUE.
THE GREAT CARTOON.
PARKES, ...
SP E E C H
of the
Hon. W. B. DALLEY
on the
EDUCATION BILL.
For a
Complete end Revised Report,
see this week's
FREEMAN'S JOURNAL.
THE HUMOURS OF THE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS 
By PASQUIN.
...
Advertising (1880, March 18). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108751455 

Although worth noting 'Humours' via a literary gentleman such as Emile, who was always employing such references, may have involved a little of the old terms for 'Humours":
Humoural theory, also known as humorism or the theory of the four humours, was a model for the workings of the human body. It was systemised in Ancient Greece, although its origins may go back further still. The theory was central to the teachings of Hippocrates and Galen and it became the dominant theory in Europe for many centuries. It remained a major influence on medical practice and teaching until well into the 1800s.

In this theory, humours existed as liquids within the body and were identified as blood, phlegm, black bile and yellow bile. These were in turn associated with the fundamental elements of air, water, earth and fire. It was further proposed that each of the humours was associated with a particular season of the year, during which too much of the corresponding humour could exist in the body - blood, for example, was associated with spring. A good balance between the four humours was essential to retain a healthy body and mind, as imbalance could result in disease. 

April 1880 - 
Harold Gray, otherwise known as Emile Argle, and “The Pilgrim," was charged with unlawfully assaulting Augusta McKenzie. The complainant stated that while at the house of Mrs. Emily Macdougall, in Stanley- street, on Tuesday, the defendant entered the room, and abused Mrs. McDougall, on being remonstrated with for using foul language in the presence of ladies, he left the room and slammed the door in the face of the complainant, inflicting a bruise on her forehead. Mrs. Macdougall corroborated the statement of the complainant. Detective Lyons arrested the prisoner by virtue of a warrant on Tuesday last in York-street, and on charging him with assaulting Augusta Mackenzie, he replied that he had never seen the woman, and knew nothing about the charge. During the progress of the case the defendant acted towards the Bench in a manner which induced Mr. Solomon to severely reprimand him for his conduct, and threaten to commit him for contempt of Court. The bench considered the charge proved and inflicted a fine of 40s. with 5s. 10d. costs, or in default of payment seven days imprisonment. WATER POLICE COURT. (1880, April 2 - Friday).The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13457199 

"Pasquin” Conscience. — The other week we exposed the dastard meanness of this literary hack of Freeman, and left him to the scorn of every honest-minded man. Our dart reached his conscience; and although the tanning process has well nigh made the article into leather, the pricking was felt. The creature winced- — hopeful sign, but, unfortunately,  "Pasquin" has gone too long between "Freeman's" office and oyster shops, not to be able to 
silence conscience and pursue his course of meanness and villainy. " Pasquin " has not denied the substantial correctness of our account of his base hypocrisy and lying  but he has tried to turn the edge by giving us the volunteered, opinion of Mr. Dowie respecting ourselves. That could not be of any consequence whatever. It matters nothing what Mr. Dowie's  opinion of us may be but his opinion on such a matter has nothing to do with the sneaking villany of Freeman's "Pasquin," entering the rev. gentleman's house with a lie on his tongue and mean hypocrisy in his heart. He entered muttering  something about Mr. Simes, of the Melbourne Age ; he entered. with the false face of a friend and then, when he had caught the rev. gentleman with his guile, he wanted to lead him out  into a sea of opinions about others. The trick was that of a practised assassin. "Pasquin," however, now tells us that Mr. Dowie volunteered his opinion. If "Pasquin" lied' so grossly to get into Mr. Dowie's house is it not possible that he may similarly lie now that lie has got out! If he told lies about Mr. Simes, is it not just likely that he now tells lies about Mr. Dowie ? He says that Mr. Dowie spoke about ourselves in disparaging terms; Possibly he reports truly ; but more than possibly he reports falsely ; with a dispensation from Freeman's confessor. He says that Mr. Dowie remarked that Dr. M 'Gibbon's " copy is not of a very scholarly description." May not this, however, be another slander ? The wretch invaded the privacy of Mr. Dowie, to blacken his character and stab his reputation in the dark : is not his malice now stirred up against him because we have, dared, in- Mr. Dowie's defence, to expose the cowardly assassin? We said before that we hold the whole tribe of "Pasquin," writers and readers, are not to be believed even on their oath. More than one jury in Sydney have said as much of the "Pasquin " now concerned, whom Freeman employs to vilify all who are inconvenient to the Church. His aliases are a testimonial to the doubtfulness of his character. He is Freeman's hack just now, at so much per line, and will probably be so until the next oyster-shop robbery and gold watch stealing case, when even Freeman will leave him in the lurch. 
He is "Pasquin" just now ; "Pilgrim " on other convenient occasions ; "Common Sense," as a new dodge; for raising the wind ; and "Grey Harold" as a last resort. The police know him by all these cognomens. Any name will do for one who speaks so many languages: but the circumstances make it evident that he has come to this country for his country's' good ! 
Latest Concerning "Pasquin." — The Evening News of Wednesday is responsible for the following, which tells our readers how correctly we have taken the measure of Freeman's ' literary hack, " Pasquin :" — " Harold Gray, alias "the Pilgrim," alias "Emile Argle," was arrested last evening by detective Lyons, on a charge of beating and assaulting  Mrs. Augusta M'Kenzie. Gray was brought before the Water Police bench this morning, and remanded until Friday next, bail being allowed. Mrs. M'Kenzie had a child with her when the alleged assault was committed." We hope Freeman will report his pet. He has changed his occupation — from parson baiting to woman beating." It is said that the villain who will slander a parson will strike a woman and "Pasquin" speedily has proved the truth of the proverb. We felt certain that the police would not be long before they would have a job with him. It is curious how the Popish press depends on ruffians who are wisely discarded from respectable society. HENNEBERY ON SCHOOLS. (1880, April 3).The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207516040 

"Freeman's" Lying Gaolbird- — The wretched, creature with half a dozen aliases ; from "Grey Harold " to " Pasquin," continues at his mercenary' work for the sake of bread from his Unprincipled masters. . "Wicked men wax worse and worse." The hireling " Pasquin," not being at present able to rob in oyster shops; tries his hand at another kind of robbery. Not being at present able to assault women, he amuses himself by assaulting clergymen. The ruffian likes' variety. When he is not in gaol he goes about abusing his liberty ; and when, for being too free with other people's property, he is fed and housed In Darlinghurst at the Queen's expense; he only prepares himself for returning to his oyster shops and public houses with more zest than ever. Grey Harold, like the swine with whom he herds, may get a washing from the Darlinghurst warders,- but no sooner is he free from their friendly care than he is found again wallowing in his mire:- It is, not with the.swine that we find fault, but- with the masters of the swine. Freeman is the paymaster. Freeman gets '’ the gain." 

No doubt, since the Express appeared Freeman is rather driven to his wits to get ends to meet. The Archbishop's " paper," since it became the " authorized organ of Catholic opinion and news," has cast Freeman into the shade and taken away a good many of  the coppers that used to fee "Pasquin." The swine therefore must work all the more among the low Irish to get gain for the masters; else the feeing will fall off.  What better chance, therefore, since oyster shop robbery won't pay just now, than that "Pasquin" should.. rob clergymen of their good name and reputation, for the pleasure of the low Irish who may have a few coppers to spare ? - Accordingly "Pasquin" started with a swine like assault on the Rev.  Mr. Dowie. We have told the public how, with falsehood and malice, he got access to the rev. gentleman's house ; and how, with a baseness which ought to have made Freeman ashamed, he libelled Mr. Dowie with falsehood and scurrility. ' But the exposure was like the washing of the swine ; the hog nature remains in "Pasquin;" and so' we find him again engaged in his low and brutal attacks. His victim is now Pastor Allen, Mr. Allen has good reason to feel insulted that a wretch like this should make sport of him for a few coppers. No' doubt he will feel; that so gross a libel as that which Freeman has published ought , to be punished. 

But what would be the use ? Suppose " Pasquin " were to get six months for his pains, the Queen's hominy would not change a swine into a creature of a higher sort ; and then, suppose Freeman were to be convicted of a false and malicious libel, what would be the use ? It would probably be found, at the present crisis of Freeman's affairs, that the type and presses were under a bill of sale, or made over to the wife, after the approved fashion of such Papal disciples, who learn from Liguori and the, other doctors of the Church, that falsehood and false insolvencies may be very Christian! Mr. Allen will not be hurt by the wretched villainy, of  "Pasquin" and Freeman. The public are now quite aware of the moral standing of both. 
Their abuse and scurrility are no reproach. 

Who that have any respect for himself would not rather be the object of their- malice than of their favour ?— There is one thing, however, in " Pasquin's " libel On Mr. Allen which calls for notice. It appears that Pastor Allen's chapel is in a low part of the city. It appears that a lot  of Chinamen live near, by It appears that the rest of the' neighbourhood is made up of the lowest of the low who live in squalor, filth and crime. This is said as a reproach to Pastor 
Allen.' And it is said that Pastor Allen has not  much improved the neighbourhood. Perhaps he  has not ; nor would the 'neighbourhood be much  improved if " Pasquin;"-  “Grey Harold," "Pilgrim," and the whole tribe of such sculking  wretches were the lodgers or householders. 

Why? because, if the Chinamen be excepted,  who are perhaps, in their own Way very decent and sober people, nine-tenths of the neighbourhood will be found to be the " faithful " of St. Mary's or St. Francis' ; the faithful readers, if they can-read, of Freeman and Pasquin and the 'beloved followers of Dr. -Vaughari and Vicar Sheridan! It shows a good deal of moral courage on the part of Pastor Allen to have his chapel in: the midst of such Papal squalor and holiness in rags and misery. ! But bow could a poor heretic improve such a neighbourhood of  Papal blessedness ?. Does not " Pasquin " know how many bottles of holy water are kept in those wretched cabins to scare away the devil  from them ? Does he not know, that all the dirty ragged larrikin children that are running about have had the holy finger 'and thumb of Dr. Vaughan upon them; and that by means of holy clirism they have had the devil cast out of them, and that they have all received the seven; gifts of the Holy Ghost ? Blessed neighbourhood 'There is none so Papally favoured in all the city. In every one of the broken down cabins and squalid hovels to which '" Pasquin " refers, there will be found a holy cross, a bottle of holy water, a piece of the last- given ' out palms, a rosary, a scapular of the blessed Lady and a piece of the tooth of St. Lawrence O'Toole. " Squalor ! " — it is not squalor, but Popish holiness. Dirt ! — it is not dirt, but the cleanness of saints who delight in vermin. 

Rags !— they are not rags, but remnants of clothes : which the blessed Ligouri would have been proud to wear. And, poverty ! — it is not poverty, but the virtuous self-denial of holy- Papists, who, by having little of this world's goods, are hoping to be very rich in blessings when they get out of purgatory — if ever !;- it  is astonishing that Freeman and " Pasquin," in their malice, should call on the heretic Allen to " improve " a neighbourhood ; so signally : 
blessed with Papal fruits and moral accomplishments ! Both of them, too, overlooked, in their malice, that the holy Father Sheridan lives in the same neighbourhood, only over the way !

That reverend, learned, and accomplished Father is a "model" of Papal perfection, and a centre of beautiful influences for the sweetening of  the neighbourhood which " Pasquin " says is " corrupt and stinking ! " As Pastor Allen looks across to the "elegant mansion ", of Vicar Sheridan, to which, at certain seasons, the people from the cabins and huts and squalid shelters aforesaid flock, to get rid of their sins and crimes by holy confession, and from which they carry away " good consciences " and holy water, he cannot but feel envious and discontented. It is not a begrimmed mansion, but one of splendid proportions, indicative of the intellectual taste of the accomplished Father ! No wonder that the neighbourhood is Papally blessed, when Father Sheridan is the centre of attraction in it ; and Pastor -Allen — the horrid heretic— is only settled on the out- skirts !— Besides the sanctifying influence of Vicar Sheridan. ' there is the powerful influence of those "shops" where "Pasquin" spends many a happy hour, looking out for oysters and golden watches which he may steal, if opportunity be offered. There are about half-a-dozen such houses of spiritual and "Papistical'! influence in the neighbourhood; all kept, doubtless, by "faithful Papists," and sheep of Vicar  Sheridan. " Pasquin " is quite at home in such places : he is better acquainted with the sort of people who frequent: such places than with the people who attend a "Baptist chapel." 

"Water ' is too much - esteemed an article in such a chapel for " Pasquin." The " P.B." element ' is more appreciated by such a gaol-bird. Had he gone south a few paces, he would have found the "warm chapel " of St. Francis, which is literally surrounded by public-houses ; and the miserable, squalid crowd of "faithful "  to be seen about the doors is the best testimony to the efficacy of holy water and wafers in which unprincipled Freeman and his swine Pasquin put their trust. Pastor Allen does in the comparison !  ALPHONSUS LIGUORI. (1880, April 17).The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207515500 

The above refers to an article that may be linked to the 'Hyde Park Riot' of 1878 - the names are the same, although Emile was in Maitland Gaol when this 1878 riot occurred. The Protestant Standard's continually bringing up the gold watch theft, which wasn't widely published in detail but was widely known, casts another light on that incident. Considering his brother had been sent to prison for longer, and that a few short decades prior to this people were hung for theft, the credibility of the witnesses called in the trail, who could not identify the stolen watch presented during this as the one they associated with Argles, from his mother, adds credence to the reports by others that this was a frame, launched to silence an articulate speaker against inconsistencies within churches.

At the 'Water Police Court, on Saturday, Harold Grey, described as a journalist, was charged with unlawfully assaulting one Francis Ranken. Before any evidence was taken the case was remanded till Tuesday next, and the defendant admitted to bail. Railway Accident in Victoria. (1880, May 17 - Monday). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108739380 

Harold Grey, or  ‘The Pilgrim,' has been remanded till Tuesday next on a charge of assaulting Mrs. Ranken, the landlady of the hotel where he was staying, by throwing a tumbler at her, and of using abusive language towards her. NEW SOUTH WALES. (1880, May 19). The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30802012 

Freeman's Pasquin.— This now notorious creature, under the name of Harold Grey is again in the hands of the police. According to the Evening News, he was brought before the Water Police Court on Monday or Tuesday last, for assaulting a woman. The case, on the application of the lawyer, Carrol, was adjourned for a week.  BUTLER'S CATECHISM. (1880, May 22).The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 3. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207512650 

THE SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPE. 
By PASQUIN.
'No. 9. Dr. Barry At Woollahra. 

You beat your pate and fancy wit will come; 
Knock as you please, there's nobody at home. — Pope, Epigrams. 

If you were stamped out, my immense Pharisee, 
Much brighter, much sweeter, this fair world would be ; 
For what is the end of your labour ? — Henry Kendall. Holy Stiggins.

I would not live one hour with you In your peculiar heaven ! Ibid. The Conventicle Larrikin.
 
Under the influence of fanaticism all common modes of reasoning are perverted, and all general principles are destroyed. — Colton, Lacon. 

Est propi'ium stultitioe aliorum cernere vitia, oblivisei suormn. — Cicero. 

Those who have followed me in my critical description of those truly holy, charitable, and benevolent men, the 'Reverends' Dowie, M'Gibbon, Allen, and Beg will possibly be disposed to give mo credit for having operated on these 'shining lights' with a gentleness of touch which perhaps the subjects under treatment did not completely warrant. If I have erred, I have erred on the side of leniency ; and in each case I have given the ' clergyman' about whom I was writing credit for every iota of 'godliness or ability that he may have possessed. And yet it would appear that they are not satisfied. Of course this is a sad disappointment to me, who have been, all these weeks, doing my utmost to blazon their goodness) their eloquence, and their disinterestedness to the world. Now although I do not pretend to be 'One that excels the quirks of blazoning pens,' I am nevertheless — like lago — 'nothing if not critical.' That criticism has reached rather a low ebb in Sydney, now that snuffy old women are employed by the Sydney Morning Herald, I am quite willing to admit ; at the same time, the weaker the criticism the bettor for the sensitive subject — at least so far as his feelings are concerned. In my notices of the above named ' gentlemen,' it would appear that weakness is not what I am accused of. Well, that is one comfort, anyhow. Abuse I never indulge in ; for I always bear in mind a great philosopher's celebrated axiom : — ' When certain persons abuse us, let us ask ourselves what description of characters it is that they admire ; we shall often find this a very consolatory question.' All, All I do— or endeavour to do — in these sketches, is to reproduce on paper the reflection of the Considering the Incumbent of Woollahra’s learned prefix, he should have some knowledge of the classics. ' Doctors' and ' Reverends' are so plentiful in Sydney however, that I am by no means satisfied that Dr. Barry is a ' real Simon Pure ; and I therefore think it the safe plan to translate the aphorism. Literally, then — It is the peculiar faculty of fools to discern the faults of others, at the same time that they forget their own ! thoughts these men have prompted, I cannot invent facts in regard to them ; I cannot give them credit for virtues and for talents which they do not possess. Had I written that Mr. Dowie was a quiet, unassuming scholar of Paraonian c.c a -augments ; that ' Pastor Allen ' was an earnest minister, of polished oratory ; that M'Gibbon was an eloquent and learned divine, to whom fanaticism and bigotry were unknown ; that little Bog was as brilliant a speaker as he was a godly and charitable man ; — had I written, I any, all these things, there is not one of these men, but who would have sung my praises as a writer and a critic from one end of the city to the other. But I have not done this. As I have neon them, do have I depicted them. And yet, as I have before remarked, they are not satisfied. The reason of this is obvious. Messrs. Dowie, Allen, Bog, and M'Gibbon are essentially dull men ; and dull men, like dull authors, ' will measure our judgment, not by our abilities, but by their own conceit . The fact of these persons writhing under a little good humoured satire is neither a thing to command astonishment nor to be grieved at. It does not cause surprise, because, being themselves guiltless of either satire or humour, the literary lash falls upon their shoulders with a double shock and as to their calling up into the breath of any one sorrow for their sufferings, why, considering that their hands have long been against almost everything and everybody, the mere thought of Messrs. Dowie, Allen, M'Gibbon, and Beg exciting sympathy in the breast of any but a mad-man, is a ludicrous and screaming pleasantly. As Dr. Barry was the last on the list of ' reverends' for review, and as he is moreover, an orthodox Anglican minister; — or, to speak more correctly, perhaps, a minister fattening on an orthodox living — I had some hopes that his attitude and preaching, generally, would go some way towards eliminating the generally unfavourable opinion I had formed concerning the clique of holy howlers, of which the Rev. Doctor himself and his distinguished co-editor are the wire-pullers. I was, however, doomed to the completest possible disappointment. After sitting out the, service, in a sitting too — mark this ! — immediately facing the presiding minister, the conclusion I have come to is, that Dr. Barry is the most lamentable failure of the lot ! Yes, this orthodox ; divine, with his LL.D. degree, with his boasted mental acquirements, his vaunted theological research, is merely a grotesque old 'mumbler,' who has mistaken his vocation as a preacher equally as much as Malvolio did his fitness to be Olivia's gallant. Yet Dr. Barry is equal in self opinionatedness with that grotesque editor, and in addition to this, I am told, he is as dogmatic as the first grave-digger in 'Hamlet,' though not so entertaining. Another peculiar attribute pertaining to M'Gibbon's distinguished partner is, that he is known to possess the utmost amount of pride that can be compressed into such a comparatively stunted carcase. In short, with his inferiors (as Churchill says of another divine),'

' He is as proud, that should he meet : 
The twelve: apostles in the street, 
With upturned nose he'd pass them all, 
And shove his Saviour from the wall.' 

When 'perked up in a little brief authority and 'flashing' his degree, Dr. Barry does not possibly remember that of all the marvellous works of the Deity, there is, perhaps, nothing the angels behold with such extreme astonishment as a proud man. The point is : What does the rev. gentleman base his pride on ? His preaching ? his writing ? (!) his appearance ? his church. ? his parsonage ? or the whole of these combined ? Who can tell ? Let me, any way, turn the light on to some of these heaven-sent gifts and blessings. But first let me take a fresh pen, and a draught of M'Gribbon's favorwrite mixture, . . . So! ... 

Now do not wince, my little Zack, 
Nor hide your head, nor turn your back; 
'Twill be no use ! 
I'll merely try a gentle laugh, 
And perhaps — who knows — a little chaff, 
But no abuse!. 
You've read a deal of what I've writ ; 
And if you say that I've no wit, 
I'll cry about it ; 
I'll not revile you, little man ; '
The reason, Zack, is, that I can 
Well— do without it! '

A bright, breezy Sunday morning. The hands of the dial are nearing the eleventh hour, and the writer of those lines, staggering beneath an enormous bible, hails a passing hansom, ' Where to ?' inquires the Jehu. ' Dr. Barry's,' I reply, 'Who's he?' 'Dr. M'Gibbon's partner.' ' Never heerd of either on 'em, sir,' says the man, with a grin. ' What !' I cry, ' never heard of Barry or M'Gibbon ! And yet people talk about the march of civilization !' When I tell him it is somewhere in Woollahra, his face brightens, and we drive quickly up Oxford-street, and so on through the toll-bar, whore I am rendered unhappy at being mulcted of sixpence, hue brighten as I resolve to escape before the collection, and thus make a clear profit — according to Richard Carstono's calculation, any way — out of Dr. Barry. When we arrive at the church, it is considerately past 11 o'clock, and seeing me eye the church doubtfully, the driver says — ' Don't you think you'd better go to Bondi, sir ? You're late for the entertainment ; not but what' (with a jerk of his finger) 'you'll find plenty o' room in theer I' [Reproving the man for his irreverence, I dismiss him, but can hardly repress a glance of envy as I watch him trot gaily away in the sunshine, while I am doomed to listen for an hour or so to what I somehow anticipate will be undiluted galimatias 

Dr. Barry's church and parsonage are situated at some little distance from the Paddington Barracks, in what I believe is called the Old South Head Road. They stand in a dreary paddock in which luxuriate also two forlorn-looking trees, as many stunted shrubs, and any amount of foozled weeds and rank grass. Fronting the house, some attempt has been made to form a garden. The result is the most satisfactory horticultural failure that ever distinguished a neighbourhood. I expect that either the depressing effect of the gardener's surroundings Bent him mad ; or else he found there was a good deal more of the hoe about the arrangement than was compatible with feelings of general serenity. Anyhow, one flower-bed in the ocean of turf is the heart-rending result; one, be it said, which is strangely symbolical of the Rev. Doctor's success as a minister of the Gospel. The church itself is a mean-looking little gothic building, something like a duck in shape, having a long body and two very short wings. It does not possess a steeple, and the roof displays satisfactory evidence of the shingler's art. The house is more elaborate than the ' manse ' of Daniel Allen, but its aspect lacks the delightful air of rusticity, the calm, quiet aspect of repose by which the ' Pastor's ' habitation is so undeniably graced ! The church is approached by an ill kept gravelled path, and immediately under the windows on the south side an old billy-goat was stationed, apparently endeavouring to pick up any stray crumbs of wisdom that might penetrate through the easement. When I entered, by some strange fatality I was shown by the attendant sexton to a seat immediately facing the leading-desk, consequently I had a splendid opportunity of mentally photographing Dr. Barry, I was so pleased with my position that I would have ' tipped' the genial sexton handsomely ; but when I left I was not so fortunate as to come across him. If he will send me his address, I will forward him sufficient to purchase a square meal with — an indulgence, judging from his haggard looks, to which he has long been a stronger. 
In appearance Doctor Barry is a short 'squat' little gentleman, who is built on the 'top-boot principle,' being the same size all the way down. His age is, I judge, between fifty-five and sixty. His — but let me do it in heroic couplets, being in a poetical humour — 

His hair is snowy, and his beard is grey ; 
His legs unshapely, and his feet are splay ; 
His forehead low, but that light in his eyes 
That cunning intellectual implies. 

His conk is large: and on one side reposes 
A crimson blossom on that nose of noses ; 
And likewise by another similar freak 
Of Nature, he has one more on his cheek.

The cause of these pink flowers, who'll divine ? 
Can it be devotion now— or wine ? 
His mouth's of mod'rate size, his lips are blue, 
His tint is mottled, and his teeth are — few. 

His form was in a well-boiled surplice cased, 
The blue shade of whose whiteness, oh ! was chaste 
His boots were polisli'd, his ' store ' pants were black ; 
He wore a crimson fish-bag down his back — 

A fine momento, I could plainly see, 
Of how he came to compass that degree, 
Which in ado Mm, from a student young and raw— 
Ye tarts ! — A ' Doctor learned in the Law I' 
Just think of this ! Why with a little care 
Dean Daniel Allen never need despair ! 

The interior of Dr. Barry's Church is not particularly striking. The Communion table is at one end, and a little organ at the other. The choir consisted of a few stout matrons, two or three spinsters beyond the pale of matrimony, and half a dozen or so of young men of the haberdasher type, the scented bears grease of whose locks rendered the air quite oppressive. The congregation numbered, I should say, some two hundred persons, and there was not one amongst them who did not look fully respectable enough to keep a snuff-shop. There were several interesting personages in my immediate vicinity. Just behind me was a little fairy in grey silk, whose age was about eight, and who was ' all alone by. herself.' The demure attitude of this little devotee set mo the best of examples, and I did not smile once, although at one period of the service, I had some difficulty in repressing a guffaw, when I saw an artillery- man who was dozing nearly put his foot through his helmet. To my left 'over the way' sat an engaged pair, who sang out of the same hymnbook, an interesting couple —  Amorous, fond, and billing like Philip and Mary on a shilling.' The artillerymen mustered in great strength. This made me uneasy. There were fully fifty rank and file in the church, and I couldn't help thinking what would have been the terrible consequences if the German army had landed at Woolloomooloo when all our own warriors were shut up in Dr. Barry's place of worship ! Dr. Barry, being under the eye of his Bishop, adheres to the ordinary Church of England form of worship. Whether or not Ins opinions are in keeping with the creed he affects, I cannot say. I have heard, however, that Dr. Barry is a Dissenter in his heart, and that his orthodoxy fits him as loosely as his cloak. In any case, ho has not, up to the present time, cast the bread of the Church on the waters, possibly because he entertains doubts as to the fulfilment of certain Scriptural promises. I arrived just as they were singing the Venite. The psalms followed and the choir sang them too. Then came the first lesson — the 4th chapter of Deuteronomy. This, to my surprise, was not read by the rev. Doctor at all, but it was both given out and stumbled through by a medium sized young man, in a black coat and drab pants with a crease down tho back. This youth likewise read the second lessen. lie stood at a desk near the altar, and appeared to have every confidence in his powers. After the Jubilate, Dr. Barry commenced to read the prayers and thanksgivings. Then, alas ! came a painful trial. It is generally admitted, I believe, that the prayers of the Church of England liturgy are very beautiful examples of skilful composition, and contain many passages of remarkable beauty. Indeed the diction of the whole is elegant and scholarly, and, if in places the style is a little artificial, the general spirit of the collection is (to my mind, anyway) quite simple enough to be comprehended by even the densest reader. When I heard Dr. Barry drawling out these beautiful supplications in one long, low monotone, I almost wished the young man to ' cut in ' again. Dr. Barry's voice, besides being naturally harsh, is unnaturally cracked. The sounds it produces are such as would emanate from a saw-mill in full swing, with a large dog growling next door. The rev. gentleman has no knowledge whatever of the ordinary principles of reading aloud, which every school boy of ten has mastered. Then he is so deaf that he never knows when his congregation are saying ' Amen,' and hardly hears them when they are singing the Gloria. The consequence is, that at times some confusion is the result. Some years ago the Rev. Doctor thought he would like to go home to consult an aurist. Well, Sydney was scoured by canvassers, the Herald gave the old fellow a puff gratis, and at length, after great exertions, sufficient was raised to pay his passage. But he soon came back again. Whether- he had consulted an aurist or not, I cannot tell ; but ho had spent all the shillings, and half-crowns, and sixpences, and he was as deaf as ever. One day a man went to his office, and seeing Doctor Barry there, angrily said ' What the devil do you mean by writing about me in that rag of yours ?' To which the Docterer replied — ' Gl-lad to see you — glad to see you. The subscription to the Firebrand is four and four pence per quarter.' All his family suffer with chronic sore throats from continually bawling at him, and he never goes in to his dinner till he can see the bell vibrate. When at a public meeting he can never hear a word the other speakers have said ; but that doesn't trouble him much. He can hear his own voice, and that s all he cares about ! I recommend the rev. gentleman to peruse without delay a story by Wilkie Collins called 'Hide and Seek,' and then root around and fossick up another testimonial (for Dr. M'Gibbon this time they can halve it !) and give the London aurists another turn. Deafness, taken in conjunction with a voice like yours, sweet Zack, are things not to be trifled with. Yes ; take my advice, and sail. But come back again. Good men are scarce, and your loss, great man ! to the colony would be irreparable ! 
Dr. Barry preached his sermon from the 16th John, 16th verse. The brevity of the discourse, which was extempore, was its only merit. The text, too, afforded fine scope. Let me clip it : — ' A little while and ye shall not see me ; and again a little while and ye shall see mo, because I go to my father.' And yet to think that out of this material Doctor Barry was not enabled to strike a single chord in the hearts of his hearers ! All was ' stale, flat, and unprofitable.' In the course of his sermon, the rev. gentlemen was delivered of the following truism : — ' A man may make his favourite lust his god and his king, but these are not by nature constituted his god and his king.' This is indeed sad stuff ; yet Dr. Barry did not appear to think so, for he dwelt and he re-dwelt upon it. During the sermon the military contingent went fast asleep — officers and all. They are such good soldi's, however, and have such stiff backs, that | they didn't show it much. For they all slumbered bolt upright, so that beyond resembling gasworks, their slumbers did not have an unpleasant effect. One sergeant kept awake for about ten minutes, eyeing his comrades with remonstrating glances as one after the other they succumbed to the somnolent influence of the discourse. At length he too became drowsy. Then he made a pretence of reading his bible, but in the end dropped off also, and behold the whole regiment slept soundly — without the inevitable camp-fire of the novels of our early youth. When the sermon was over I left. I did not wait for the collection. If, however, the sermon had been moderately intelligent, I would have gladly given the Rev. Doctor a shilling. I felt, however, that had I done so under the circumstances, I should have been selling a had example to the congregation. As I walked homo I reflected on Dr. Barry and his confreres, and the conclusion I came to was, that if the general public would take the trouble to go and hear them as I have heard them, to analyse their sayings as I have analysed them, to critically read (.he hideous trash they write, to carefully weigh the opinions they advocate, the support accorded to these men by the moneyed section of the community would be such that there would be speedily a very large exodus of the sensational howlers. It is true that Barry and M'Gibbon, and Dowie and Allen and Beg are continuity hammering away at the general wickedness of the world; but is their world any better for it ? Do their ministrations to their hearers benefit them in the slightest degree ? I think not ; and, indeed, it would seem that these 'reverend' gentleman write, talk, and think so much about vice and virtue that they have no time to practise either the one or the other. No, these men benefit no one but themselves. They should remember that while true religion has prevented one crime, false religions have afforded a pretext for a thousand. And what is their doctrine ? Heaven only knows. ' What makes all doctrines plain and clear ? About two hundred pounds a year. And that which was proved true before Prove false again ? Two hundred more.' What sacrifice has any one of them over made for the benefit of his fellow-creatures ? Take away their virulence — the only thing that makes them notorious — and what are they ? Merely ill-read, incapable men, who are unable, through their narrow-minded ignorance, to impart either spiritual or secular instruction to the people. They are men who will wrangle for religion, write for it, fight for it, do anything, in short, but live or die for it. 
Let me conclude with a stanza from my favourite bard, than whom no one understands better the men of whom I have written : — ' God help the souls who grope in night— Who in your ways have trusted ; I've said enough ! the more I write, The more I feel disgusted.'
THE SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPE. (1880, May 1). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 18. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133485672 

His favourite bard is now Australian songman Henry Kendall

The Rev. Dr. Barry.
The Rev. Zachary Barry, LL.D., incumbent of St. Matthias's, the subject of our engraving, was born in Cork, on the 1st of February, 1827, his father being an eminent doctor of medicine in that city, and his mother the daughter of the Venerable Zachary Cook Collie, Archdeacon of Cloyne, and owner of property at Castle Cooke, county Cork. Dr. Barry's parents hiving died while he was still a child, his mother’s family became his guardians, and after attending in succession schools famous for classical and mathematical teaching, he entered Trinity College, Dublin, in the year 1815, under the tutorship of Dr. Butcher, afterwards Regius Professor of Divinity, and subsequently Bishop of Meath. 


THE REV. DR. BARRY, LL.D. 
In five successive university competitions after matriculation, he obtained 'first honours' in mathematics, and the science scholarship, for which, there being at that time only one, the best science men of the years contended. Before his graduation as B.A., in 1819, he had taken up theology with a view to ordination, and obtained a prize in that school ; and on two occasions he obtained a Vice-Chancellor's prize for English poetic composition — a subject which we judge, from the few efforts which here have been made public, would engage his thoughts much more pleasantly to himself than the sterner line which he has felt it his duty to trace here, if he had only to gratify his own taste. After ordination by theLord Bishop of Chester, he became the curate of the Rev. Frederic Barker, incumbent of St. Mary's, Edge Hill, Liverpool. After two years' service there, he became colonial chaplain of Fremantle, W. A. ; and returned home after eight years. He then occupied the position of organizing- secretary to one of the great missionary societies, and finally returned to Australia to the diocese of his former incumbent, now Lord Bishop of Sydney. Recently Dr. Barry has been suffering from illness, which necessitates a respite for a short time from his professional labours, in order to preserve his voice. He therefore proposes shortly to visit England, and it is intended to present a testimonial to him prior to his departure. 
The Rev. Dr. Barry. (1878, August 10).The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 212. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162696705 

Suburban Churches.
(BY "PEREGRINE")

The suburb of Paddington is now so closely linked to the metropolis that, were it not that has a Mayor and corporation and a magnificent town hall, it might be taken to be part and parcel of the great city of the Southern Hemisphere At no distant time it consisted of but few houses scattered over a large area, but now it is a little town of itself, and is built over as closely as an: part of the city which it so closely joins.

The Church of St. Matthias is, I believe, the oldest church in the district, having been built long before the stately spire of St. John's, Darlinghurst, became one of the landmarks of Sydney. There is always considerable difficulty in getting a sketchable view of a church or of the building which, placed in a street, is surrounded by houses, and has to be drawn from so close a distance as the other side o: the road, thus bringing it too near for an effective sketch. This is the case with St. Matthias's, for to get a good side view is next to impossible. However, from a little way down Queen-street,a fairly good idea of the church ant its surroundings' may be obtained, and it was from this point that the accompanying illustration was obtained. The exterior is plain, but of substantial character, and the architecture is of the early English type. Its apsidal chancel, at shown in the sketch, is of ample size, and adds much to the gracefulness of the building ; while the solid buttresses not only give strength to the walls, but a medieval look to the entire fabric. Inside, the fittings are plain, even to boldness. Down the centre there runs a row of benches of the most primitive kind, and on either side are common chairs, strapped together by wooden bars. The altar stands, according to medieval usage, in the centre of the apse, several feet removed from the eastern wall. There is no attempt at decoration, and everything about the sanctuary is of the very plainest description.


St. Matthias's (C.E.), Paddington. 
The services are somewhat like those of the old English parish churches of 70 years ago, and somewhat lacking in the beauty, liveliness, and expressed devotion, which have characterised Anglican devotional exercises of late years. The congregations are small, and to a worshipper accustomed to the crowded churches in other parts of the city and suburbs, it is very dispiriting to see a church which could easily seat 500 or 600, holding scarcely 100 at any service. Various causes are assigned for this, one of them being the erection of other churches in the neighborhood, such as All Saints', Woollahra, and St. George's, Glenmore road, but the parish ' is still large and populous enough to fill to overflowing the old parish church. No church can hold its own with the people unless it keeps step with the wants of the age. People will not now take things for granted, as did the northern farmer in Tennyson's poem : .

A thowt a said what a owt, 
An a coomed awaay.

They must be touched with a sense of devotion, stirred with the strains of heartfelt praise, and aroused by strong teaching bearing on the individual life, and applying to it the doctrine and practice of the church catholic.

The Rev. Zachary Barry, LL.D., is the incumbent, and has been well known in Sydney, for many years, as an able preacher, a profound scholar, and an uncompromising controversialist.

Dr. Barry also holds the position of chaplain to the troops quartered at Victoria Barracks. The church parade takes place at the time of morning prayer (11 o'clock), when those, who attend parade march gaily up the street, under the charge of an officer, and preceded by the band. They seldom number more than 20, sometimes not so many, for the hour is an awkward one. Some of the men have to go on guard, others are engaged cooking, while the men of the field battery never get to church at all, as they have to exercise their horses at the time when church parade takes place. What a pity that some arrangements are not made to give them a service, either in barracks or at St. Matthias's at 9 a.m., and to secure the attendance of all who are free from necessary duty. Besides, what may suit an ordinary congregation may not be so suitable for soldiers. They have their special temptations and dangers, and require special teaching; and -above all, direct plain talk of a practical kind, with short services. A military service should be made as bright as possible, and ought never to exceed an hour, inclusive of a sermon, for which 15 minutes is sufficient. A lot of good plain truth can be put well and forcibly in that time. The men are not wearied, the attention is awake, and one or two distinct thoughts, briefly and forcibly impressed, will be remembered.

At one side of the church is a comfortable parsonage, and at the other a noble parish hall, distinctly the best of its kind in Sydney and its neighborhood. In it Sunday school is held, and during the week it is used for concerts, lectures, &c, and many societies, such as Oddfellows, Orange lodges, and Good Templars make it their home. Suburban Churches. (1892, July 2). Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 31. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71200873

A Godsend.— That wonderful editor, auctioneer; and general dealer in' pigs and horses, Mr. Harrison, of the 'Moruya Examiner', has had a godsend to commercial newspaper to the nearly bankrupt ''Freeman. ''What is it ? Why, it is -this—After his dreadful beseeching that in Moruya no Orange Lodge should be opened, as it is paradise, where "all sects" are and have been dwelling in unity; those horrid fellows, the Orangemen, would 'not listen to' him, but insisted on having in their midst a "true centre of unity," in ‘the form of a real "True Blue" lodge.' The poor man was much affected at the thought that his paradise was going to be made a "fallen one" He grieved so much that, in his seat in his editor's chair; his hair grew grey. Although a professed Protestant, all of a sudden he found himself the most perfect facsimile of “Grey Harold " that ever the world saw. No wonder ! for he became “Grey Dick," and that is near enough to "Grey Harold." Not only that but as his outside head became grey, his inside head became affected so much that, when using the hammer to sell pigs, he actually spoke of them as “blood, horses of the finest class and brood," and guaranteed to all purchasers' that each of them would "win a race" at the next " Orange races," or he admitted a brother of the Holy Guild of St. Mary's ! The Moruya people are sorry that so useful a member of society as the “Grey Dick " would thus become confused. The last instance of his mental weakness is a paragraph in his paper— which has, been a godsend to Freeman, who is greatly in want of interesting news, so as to beat the Express— to the effect that an Orangeman mistook a' Papist for a Protestant, and a Knight Templar for a Candidate to be initiated into the Orange lodge! The paragraph is laughable. Think of a Popish knight being mistaken for an embryo Orangeman! And think of a Papist being thought to be a Protestant—because be said so, with Jesuitical falsehood ! After, this, what is to be expected in Moruya ! The " Grey Dick " will likely some day mistake a prize pig for himself, and ask that Mr. Grumpily should ' take the hammer and knock him, Grey Dick Harvison, down as worth about five pounds ! ' Compara blturclies.— When Freeman just now is hiring the personification of falsehood and baseness, to hold up certain churches to the laughter of groundlings among the faithful, it may be edifying that we ask him to look at one of his own, in the laud of true religion, where "heretics are hardly, allowed to live, and where the blessed saints, diffuse the odour of sanctity. Comparisons are never satisfying to Popery. Slanderers never like to see their own face in the glass. But the laugh, belongs to those who can say—" That is Popery to the T." 'The following is the substanoe of a Popish, sermon, preached last -December in the town of 'Porgiq' Mirteto, where the priest. was deploring that the people were so remiss in going to confession, and when he was proving to them that confession is the best'thing which they can do in order to ; cheat the devil " A certain soldier , had been excommunicated. His only salvation was in coming to the confessional this,' Satan,' who had 'possession' of him, would not suffer him to do. 'At length, however, the grace of 'God' was so potent that it induced him to come. On his arrival at church he knelt before the confessional and Satan seized him from behind to 'prevent him from 'the pious act. The soldier clung so firmly by the confessional that Satan was unable to detach him; but, as the tempter has great strength, he dragged the soldier and the confessional box “with the confessor within across the entire church!" Eisuni teneatis .'
"Finally the confessor, after a fine ride about the sacred edifice, secured the soldier, put the devil to flight by exorcisms, and immediately carried off the poor, penitent into the sacristy, where he received his confession, administered the communion to him, and reconciled him to the church. But, so great was the joy that took possession of the soldier's heart that he opened a tomb, hard by and threw himself into it!. The confessor, if we may believe the preacher, had a harder work, in drawing him out than, he had in rescuing him from Satan's hands." Such is said to be a sample of preaching in one of the churches of Poggio Mirteto, in the year of grace, 1879!---; And this is real-Popish gospel. The degradation of the priest who could utter such rubbish without laughing ; and the still more hopeless degradation of the people who could listen to such a libel on their, intelligence, tells the reading public what Popery is, and what is the need for public schools in the lands of the faithful. This is what Dr. Vaughan would call "religious, education." This is what Freeman and his slanderous scribes would call an "edifying sermon." Worth a shilling ?  Worth far more!; —Worth all the money, which the faithful give for the canonization of the soldier who cheated the devil! After such convincing proof as this supplies that "confession" is the thing to he sought first, our readers can imagine the whole town going to the victorious priest, who took the soldier and the confessional box out of the power of the Devil. If it he proposed to get up a testimonial in St. Mary's for the behalf of that noble priest, we also Freeman to put us down for five thousand pounds. Besides, we recommend that he should he sent for to-come to Sydney. What a work he should have to do here! Think of the chapels, the taverns, the editors' room and oyster shops- where he would find profitable employment. With such a priest as this in Sydney for a month or two, Dr. Vaughan could afford to go to the feet of the apostles to got that red- hat for which he has been labouring ! HOME RULE CHANGING FRONT. (1880, May 8). The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207513575 

What is now called 'Bulletin Place' named after JF Archibalds weekly publication, founded in 1880, and published from Bulletin Place for many years. marks the boundaries of allotments first appearing on Meehans Map of 1807, sloping down to the Tank Stream from Macquarie Place. The warehouse buildings were part of a grant to Andrew Thompson on 1 January 1810, who also owned Scotland Island for a short while. Mary Reiby also owned property on Bulletin Place. Their first 'office' was renting the Scandinavian Hall at 107 Castlereagh Street. 
An example of others using material from the Bulletin (many did republish their words) and some of that material during its inaugural year - for the 'humour' of it!:

CLIPPINGS FROM 'BULLETIN.'
Brief mention.
Hanley says Ninny knocks 'im into a cocked 'at Ball wanted an appointment. He was disappointed. Melville does not dine very regularly at Government House. David Buchanan is in training for a Son of Temperance. G. H. Reid and Dr. M'Kellar are the two coming men for East Sydney.
Ninny is to introduce a 'bill for the abolition of starvation in families.' The '15' puzzle is what now troubles Civil Servants in office hours. Sir Hercules liked horses. Lord Augustus likes fowls. Horsey Robinson, Fowley Loftus. Melville says he's going to learn grammar, so that the 'ouse won't know when he's speaking. The Yass man who tried to send pigs to Sydney alive in air-tight cases may be described as pig-headed. David Buchanan's intemperate zeal was the Delilah that betrayed Sampson into the hands of the Philistines. J. H. Murray wants to know if a testimonial is to be got up to De Courcy Brown. Yass. He reckons he'll subscribe. A man beat his wife in the Wagga sleeping-car the other night. Some fellars make themselves at home anywhere. Poor Ted Sadler was the original lessee of the ' flying horse,' now plagiarised in the Mines office ; Ted's horse was patronised by Prince Alfred. Dean Cowper is to lecture the Y. M. C. A. on the Sabbath question from three lights — church light, gas light, and intense light, but not ' Bright' light. A Melbourne wit writes us stating that Peter Lalor's face is the attempt of Nature to give expression to a potato. 

THE NEWS IN A NUTSHELL. 
The Queensland black trackers are to leave Victoria. Spring tides submerged some Sydney wharfs on Tuesday. At Mudgee, prison labour has been found dearer than free. Palmer machine owners now decline to crush for Chinamen; Gladstone says the Afghan war must stop. The Afghans dissent. Seventy bushels to the acre is not ah uncommon Tasmanian wheat crop. More N. S. W. wool has gone to Melbourne this year than in any previous one. Sampson has heart disease, three years' imprisonment, and a wife and children. District Inspectors under the Department of Public Instruction: Mr. M'Credie, Sydney; Mr. J. W. Allpass, Bathurst; Mr. J. C. Maynard, Maitland; Mr. J., D. Bradley, Armidale ; Mr. W. M'Intyre, Goulburn ; Mr. D. S. Hicks, Wagga Wagga. Sub-inspectors will shortly be appointed. In the Far North of Queensland everyone has something belonging to him named 'Trickett' — either a horse, a dog, or a black boy. ? Three years for perjury. Mein Gott, I'll slidder ! .! ! said a foreign friend to us on hearing, a few days ago, of Sampson's tribulation. The Cooma Express takes 200 paragraphs from last week's Bulletin. This pleases us, though the name of our paper was accidentally omitted. The discovery of the son of an English nobleman, lost for years to his family and friends, is the latest great achievement of Arthur Cubitt, Missing friends office, Pittstreet, Sydney, It is said that the N. S. W. locomotive contractors, instead of getting the engines made in this colony are importing ninetenths of the manufactured material from England. On Monday evening some naughty boys amused themselves by stealithy placing large crackers underneath those seats in Hyde Park on which the innumerable couples whisper sweet nothings in each others' ears. By the aid of a slow match the crackers were exploded. The results were surprising, for in some cases it was some time before the victims could actually find themselves. In one case the joke was attended with rather serious consequences, for one of the prowlers whose occupation it is during the night to wander about our parks on hands and knees watching the unsuspecting, had just wriggled under a seat, when a cracker exploded immediately under his nose. This led to his detection, and before extricating himself he was treated with an additional display of fireworks, such as he scarcely ever dreamed of. His nose is now in a sling, and he has not sat down since Queen's Birthday!
During the salute fired, at Dawes Point on Queen's Birthday, in honour of her Majesty. Sergeant M'Fuddin got in front of the muzzle of No. 2 gun, which resulted in the singeing of his helmet and the total destruction of his back hair. The major in command fainted straight away, and was convoyed on a portable stretcher to the Barrack hospital. Very luckily Sergeant M'Fuddin retained his presence of mind amid the excitement, and, gathering himself up, he shouted in the martial thunder of Captain Fahoy, ' Cease firin', left limber up, roar turn, and strike for dinner 'ome and dooty.'- A retreat ensued which, though rather disorderly, was not attended with the loss of a single gun. After dinner the commanding officer, who had entirely recovered, complimented the men upon their pluck and manly appearance while under fire. This is a true explanation of the salute being one gun short. CLIPPINGS FROM "BULLETIN." (1880, June 5). Cootamundra Herald (NSW : 1877 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143383725

THE SOCIAL KALEIDESCOPE.
No. 13. The Humours of the Quarter Sessions.
By Pasquin
THE SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPE. (1880, June 12). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133485369 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR,
(To the Editor of the Freeman's Journal .)
Sir, — I was surprised to see in your issue of Saturday last an attack made by your contributor, 'Pasquin,' on my professional character as uncalled for as it is untrue. I feel certain that the article in which I am described in terms exceeding the limits of such of satirical criticism appeared in your columns wholly without your knowledge or assent. The description is too absurd to refute, and its only chance of damaging me arises from the fact that it was printed in a newspaper of such high character as the Freeman's Journal. Your obedient servant, JOSEPH LOWE. 129, King-street, Sydney. 
[On inquiry, we find that the reflection cast on Mr. Lowe by ' Pasquin;' in his ' Humours of the Quarter Sessions,' are, in the opinion of a number of gentlemen of his own profession who should know him better wholly undeserved. We therefore, regret exceedingly having admitted them into our columns. On reference to ' Pasquin,' he says that the imputations he made against Mr. Lowe are so freely indulged in regarding solicitors practicing at the police courts, that he must have inadvertently misapplied them, so far as Mr. Lowe is concerned. — Ed. F. J. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. (1880, June 19). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 16. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133488611 

Harold Grey, alias the " Pilgrim," has been imprisoned for four days in the Debtors' Ward, Darlinghurst, at his own request and under a friendly ca sa. His object is to write concerning Mr. G. R. Dibbs. General Intelligence. (1880, July 20). Glen Innes Examiner and General Advertiser (NSW : 1874 - 1908), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article217784369 

THE SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPE.
By Pasquin.
No. 19. The Humours Of The Debtors' Prison. Section I.

Meo sum pauper in uere. — Horace. 

My business in this state 
Made me a looker on here. Shakespeare — Measure for Measure
Yo bayiiixe bouldo strode up ye streete, Close eyein^o alio heo chanced to meete, 'When suddenlie he gave a chappo Upon ye shoulder blade a tappe. — Tussito.

I COMMENCE this, my first exhilarating sketch upon the Debtors' side of Darlinghurst prison, in the awful precincts of the gaol itself. The room in which I am writing is the salle a manger of the establishment, and I will treat my readers to a description of it just by way of putting them (and myself) into a good humour at the commencement of the narrative of my experiences. An apartment, some twelve feet by twenty-four, with a little closely-barred dormer window, and a small door, the centre panels of which are of glass. The walls are of stone and whitewashed, but the floor is boarded, and the ceiling also is of painted planking. The fittings are of parochial primitiveness. They consist of a narrow deal table, and a couple of forms, a shelf with a curtain of green calico, four hooks, a gas bracket, and a spittoon. There is a certain club-house splendour lingering about the last article, which tends to make it out of keeping with the rest of the things ; and I rather incline to the belief that it was not originally included in the furnishing contract, but was added by Mr. Read for necessary purposes during the temporary incarceration of an American book canvasser. 

It is evening and we have just had tea. When I say 'we' it must not be thought ' we are seven,' for we are not. There are only three of us — Mr. G. R. Dibbs, a Mr. Vavasour, and the distinguished popular educator who pens these lines. As we all ' keep ourselves,' the tea table (which will not be cleared away until to-morrow morning, our prison servant being locked up) presents quite a luxurious appearance. There is cold beef, and ham, and half-cold chops ; not to mention jams of various kinds — the whole life up and embellished by Mr. Dibbs's silver-teapot, upon which the rays of the gas-jet play fantastically. Looked at as imprisoned debtors, we are all three comparatively wealthy. Although George Richard has assigned his estate, his name is good at the cookshop over the way, and Mr. Vavasour is a young gentleman of independent means, in merely a temporary condition of embarrassment. I know he is a gentleman of independent means, because he told me when I first arrived that he couldn't live under a thousand year : — upon which I immediately borrowed a pipe of tobacco. With regard to myself, I can ruminate upon my financial position without being seized with a desire to commit suicide. I could satisfy my detaining creditor with the handful of loose silver in my trousers' pocket. Indeed, after paying him in full, there would be sufficient change remaining to purchase intoxication for a couple of baliffs; and, mark you, making a Sydney bailiff drunk is by no means an inexpensive proceeding. 

I have selected the dining-room for a writing den for several reasons. And that they are unanswerable ones may be inferred from the fact that besides being as gloomy as a sepulchre, my present quarters are as cold as an Arctic ruin. The fact is, not being of a literary turn himself, Mr. Dibbs resorts to many expedients for whiling away the time of an evening, which renders original composition in his immediate vicinity a matter of some difficulty. For half-an-hour perhaps he will perform on his lathe, turning ornamental articles of gun-metal, with a noise resembling the growling of five hundred Polar bears. Tiring of this, he, will 'put his tools to rights,' and as in this process he lets a 6lb. chisel fall about three times in every five minutes, the effect is a very tolerable imitation, on a small scale, of Nelson's bombardment of Copenhagen. It is, however, when he sits down to talk political economy, and compliments certain judges upon their legal acumen, that things get the most unsettled. His voice (which I should say was originally manufactured for a giant, who for some reason or other neglected to call for it) possesses a depth and volume sufficient to fill Wynyard Square on a windy morning. When therefore he becomes carried away by his subject (his chronic state) his tones vibrate through the prison until they make all the padlocks rattle, and the people in Burton-street, over the way, hide their fire-irons under their hearth-rugs 'until the thunderstorm shall have blown over.' And, when, in addition to ail this, I add that us, Mr. Vavasour has a passion for 'fives' and a turn for singing operatic music with a voice of which a quavering falsetto is the principal ingredient, the reader will understand that the sitting-room is hardly a place for a man to write effectively in. And thus I have descended below, relinquishing many comforts, to manufacture my copy amongst the debris of the feen-equipage. 

Now for a slight retrospect. When some little time ago I had made up my mind to ventilate the workings of the clause in the Insolvency Act which provides for imprisonment of debtors, I consulted a friend as to the easiest and most expeditious way of obtaining admission to the prison, and staying there until such time as I should have gathered sufficient material for a series of articles — ' Oh,' he said, ' it's the simplest thing in the world. Get the District Court Judge to make an order for you to pay a certain amount on a certain day, and don't pay it. Then you'll be arrested soon enough, never fear.' Also for the ignorance of mankind  I took his advice ; was served with a summons appeared at the Court ; was ordered by Judge Dowling to pay a certain amount on a certain day ; didn't pay it : — and what resulted ? — very little. 

When the day came I walked about waiting to be arrested. The day growing old, I hunted up the plaintiffs solicitor and entreated him to carry out the law. He said he had done all he could, but recommended to hunt up a bailiff. So until evening with its ' twinking vapours' arrived, I careered over the city screaming for an officer — but without avail. At all the hotels where I am known I left messages calculated, as I thought, to ensure my almost immediate capture. Here is a sample : — ' If man comes in and asks for me, saying his name is Lavish Sholomon Aaronsh, tell him I will be back at three.' But it bore no fruit. Not one bailiff turned up. So the next morning I went up to the Local Court, resolved that if I did not find an officer, I would call at the office for the warrant, and take it up to the gaol myself. But its luck favoured me that morning. While I was hanging about, I heard my name pronounced from behind. In a moment I was round and faced my interlocutor. He had no need to say a word! —to make a gesture. His identity rushed upon me immediately. He was the executive administrator of the law under civil process. 

Tap, tap! against; the nail-studded gate with the knocker. With a clash and a groan the huge portal swung upon its hinges, and we entered. The bailiff produced a paper and pointed to me; the gate keeper read the document, and I was a prisoner. The place was a square enclosure, railed at the front and back and enclosed by the two lodges on either side. A number of warders were lounging about warming themselves at fires, and reading very dirty looking newspapers. 

The ceremony of my reception occupied only about two minutes. Being given into the custody of a mild-faced warder, I was taken through the inner gate, across the court-yard, down some stone steps into a passage dimly lighted by a gaslamp. We then entered a subterranean chamber on the left — a gloomy place likewise lit with gas. This was the office. Here my name was taken by a warder who was sitting down, and echoed by a warder who was standing up. I was asked no questions of any kind, and was told nothing — not even to sit down. I made a remark upon the inclemency of the weather, but it elicited no reply; neither when I made a request that my portmanteau should be looked after, did any of the figures 'yapp'  out a rejoinder. It was a dark, mysterious-looking place, fitted with a large table upon which loomed huge ledgers, and to the right was a high desk at which stood a man of careworn aspect, who was rapidly totting up columns of figures. The room reminded me of a description I had once read of a cellar occupied at night by a section or the Florentine carbonari, and in which they planned little nose-slittings and assassinations for the especial behoof of people who annoyed them; and so strong was the impression that I almost expected the warder who was standing to momentarily produce a skull and a beef-bone, and enrol me as a member of the society. 

My name having been entered in the book, I was led out into the fresh air, and taken away to the quarters assigned to me by Government.
The debtors' prison at Darlinghurst is a large, square, one-story freestone building, one side of which is occupied by warders of the gaol, and the other by such unfortunates as are compelled to undergo imprisonment under civil process. It stands inside the walls, at the intersection of Burton and Forbes streets, and the windows of 'the debtors' sitting-room command quite a lovely view of the windows of the houses in those picturesque and salubrious thoroughfares, The ward comprises six separate apartments — a day room, a dining-room (already described), a kitchen (which contains a bath), and three bedrooms, two of which lead out of the day room, and one of which is in the basement. 

The ward is approached through a small garden, which fronts the warders' quarters, and in turning the corner you come into a small floricultural patch sacred to the 'Hard-up Club.' Both gardens are, how ever, common to the debtors, who, indeed, are allowed to stroll as far as the front gate, but are not permitted to hold any converse with prisoners on the criminal side. Our garden, it being winter time, has rather a dreary appearance, the most flourishing object it contains being a pomegranate tree in the centre bed, upon which forlornly dangles a solitary pomegranate. The only living thing that seems to take the faintest interest in the garden is a large black and tan terrier that belongs to one of the warders. This animal, it would seem, has taken to amateur gardening merely as a pastime, and without any serious idea as to the general embellishment of the prison grounds. Every morning he trots in about nine, surveys all the geraniums with a critical eye, and usually, before departing, scratches up a particularly fine plant and lays it carefully in the centre of the principal walk. One day he brought another dog — one of Mr. Read's greyhounds — to show him the improvements. But the visitor didn't seem to think much of them; for the interview ended in high words, which culminated in a pitched battle, in which the greyhound was signally worsted. 

On being introduced into the prison I was shown straight up stairs into the sitting-room, in order, as the warder jocularly observed — ' To be made free o' the premises.' On the door being opened a very strange sight presented itself — one which will live for a considerable time in my memory. The room itself was large and lofty, and well ventilated, notwithstanding that the air was rendered somewhat oppressive by the fumes of a gas-stove which burned at one end of the apartment. A large table covered with American cloth stood in the centre of the room. Upon it were scattered about a number of law-books, papers, novels, pipes, tobacco jars-cigar-boxes — every conceivable kind of litter the mind of man could imagine. At the end nearest the stove were a couple of exquisitely executed photographs of a very beautiful little girl. These were framed in handsome leather cases, and were flanked by two glasses filled with flowers. Three or four polished cedar chairs were scattered about the room, and the wall was lined with forms. Near the fire, however, were a number of cane lounges, and one American sofa. The floor was covered with cocoa-nut matting, and, although the wails were only roughly whitewashed, the place had a comfortable aspect. The most striking object in the room was a large iron lathe, fitted in work man-like fashion close up against the window. Upon the racks near the machine, and upon a form running at right angles with it, were arranged tools without number; and a considerable quantity of material in the shape of myall logs, sawn cedar planks, and bags of vegetable ivory (of which more anon) were heaped pell-mell in an adjacent corner. With the exception of the regulation boards, the only relief to the white stone walls was a large print of the Prince and Princess of Wales. I may remark, en passant, that this picture gives great offence to Mr. David Buchanan, who is a frequent visitor to Mr. Dibbs. Whenever David enters and his fiery eye alights on the engraving, his soul is immediately in arms. 'Tak doon tharr-t thung,' he cried, ' tear doon tharrt half-bred Garman and his missus, and let am noot disgrace the room.' It is a very fortunate thing that the Prince, living so far away, is comparatively unlikely to be affected in any serious degree by Davie's dislike. I hope no one will tell him that David is antagonistic to the line of the Guelphs. It would, in any case, make him seriously uncomfortable, and possibly tend to make him abandon his project of visiting the colonies. 

There were three persons in the room when I entered. One of these was a very tall man, who was sharpening a small tool on a hone upon the shelf of his lathe. A remarkable figure this. Upon his head he wore a blue-velvet skull cap, embroidered with yellow silk. His attire consisted of a shabby tweed vest and trousers, and long brown double-breasted overcoat of exceedingly ancient appearance. This garment brought to one's recollection the 'Father of the Marshalsea,' it was so thread-bare and dilapidated. All the clothes hung loosely about him, and his shoes were but lightly laced; an infirmity of the feet being perceptible when he moved. But, despite the ragged coat and shapeless inexpressibles, you had but to look at the man's face and you would at once see that he was a person out of the common order of mortals. It was in truth a most remarkable face — not remarkable for any peculiar or striking trait of personal beauty — but on account of its general expression. The head was the head of a lion; the features bold and striking — more especially the eyes, which were of a light blue, and singularly bold and restless. Both his hair and beard were thick and curly and very much grizzled, and being unkempt, rendered his appearance fiercer than it would otherwise have been. He wore gold spectacles, and was smoking a long pipe, blowing forth clouds of smoke with an evident relish. He looked around at me as I entered, with a loud — ' Hullo ! what's up now ?' and laughed in such a loud key that all the tools in his rack were set a-jingling. As doubtless the reader will have guessed, the gentleman I have described was none other than the redoubtable Mr. G. R. Dibbs. For a sketch of the other occupants of the room, I must refer my readers to the forthcoming number of the Freeman. THE SOCIAL KALEIDOSCOPE. (1880, July 24). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133488528 

The Bulletin and the Evening News Libel Case.
Everyone that can command a three penny bit should get last Saturday's Bulletin, and preserve the illustration and reading matter in connection with the E. News alleged libel case. They unitedly afford the most brilliant examples of pluck, humour, and patriotism contributed to journalistic literature that Sydney has yet seen. Long live to the Bulletin and all sturdy defenders of Australia's greatest glory,  A FREE PRESS. The Bulletin and the Evening News Libel Case. (1880, September 1). Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate(NSW : 1876 - 1954) , p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136706529 

During 1880 Manly was just a ferry ride away, close to the city and far enough away for a little peace and privacy, and not too expensive during the 'off season' times. It became a popular place for Bulletin staff members, including the edtior, Mr. Archibald - visit: 

A PARK FOR MANLY.
To the Editor.
SIR, — As the choice of a site for the proposed park is a matter of such importance both to the residents of Manly and Sydney, great care should be exercised in the selection, that it may really meet the public requirements. I understand the borough council has recommended the purchase of a block of land near the public baths for the purpose, which, it seems to me has nothing to recommend it but the opportunity of spending public money in the locality. A considerable sum has already been spent, or misspent, on making baths at Little Manly, where they get the wash from the quarantine ground, and are too distant for the inhabitants in Manly proper to make use of; and the park, if made there, will be open to the same objection, besides being out off from the great attraction of Manly— the grand ocean beach. If public money is to be spent on a park, let it be where the public can avail themselves of It. A park for Manly should embrace all the attractions native to the place— the picturesque both of land and water. The ocean beach has already a reserve running from one end to the other, and that, with the addition of a few acres added at the south end, would make a park of unrivalled beauty. I would suggest that the addition to the reserve consist of a portion of the Clifton Heights— say as far as Cliff -street, or the Addison road, running westerly as far as Darley-road, southerly by that road to the Victoria Parade, and by the utter to the ocean reserve. This block would contain the greatest variety of romantic beauty— rocky height and level lawn, magnificent views both of land and water, possessing, too, the great advantage of being the nearest possible position to the steamers' wharves, and the most easily accessible to visitors. If I am right in supposing this to be the very best spot for the Manly Park, I hope public attention may be given to the matter ere it be too late ; and the choice of a site for Manly Park be decided upon its merits. October 22. A MANLY PILGRIM. A PARK FOR MANLY. (1880, October 30).Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108736687 


Manly Beach, circa 189? -  from Picturesque New South Wales / Kerry & Co., Photo., Sydney. Digital Order Number: a5091010, courtesy State Library of NSW

OBSCENE LITERATURE.
At the Water Police Court, yesterday (before Mr. Marah, P.M., and Messrs. V. Brown and Edwards), Henry J. Franklin, printer and publisher, of No. 40, Hunter-street, appeared on summons to answer the complaint of Sub-inspector William Camphin, of having published an obscene newspaper, entitledOur Wild Oats. The proceeding was brought under the provision of the Obscene Publications Act, which was passed last session, and which enacts that any publication containing anything deemed to be obscene may be seized, and the publisher fined, while the printing plant used in the production of such publication may be confiscated for the benefit of her Majesty.
Mr. Rogers (instructed by the Crown) conducted the prosecution, and Mr. W. Roberts appeared for the defendant.
At the request of Mr. Roberts it was decided that the proceedings as regarded the forfeiture of the goods on the one hand and the infliction of a penalty on the other, should be taken simultaneously.
Sub-inspector William Camphin deposed that on the 20th November he made a complaint, on oath, before a Justice of the Peace, that he had reason to believe that certain obscene printed matter was kept in a house situated at No. 40, Hunter-street. By virtue of a warrant, he went to the premises and saw the defendant ; he asked if he was the publisher of Our Wild Oats; defendant replied that he was. Camphin then told him he had a warrant to search the premises, which he read to defendant. Franklin said : -" I suppose this is the work of Harold Grey," or words to that effect. Witness answered :—"No; he had nothing to do with it, so far as I am concerned." The defendant asked him to point out the offensive passages. Camphin read some of the paragraphs to him, and defendant said he was not aware that the paper contained anything obscene, and added that the paragraphs wera principally extracts from American papers. Defendant said he was sorry that some of the paragraphs had appeared in the first number of the publication, and that they had appeared without his knowledge. Witness asked defendant if he had any of the papers in stock, and about thirteen packages of the publication were pointed to him, of which he took possession, and which were produced in court. He also took possession of the printing plant, and an officer was placed in charge. Defendant said the type was set up on the premises, but the machining was done elsewhere.
Mr. Rogers then read several paragraphs from Nos. 1, 2, and 3 of the publication, which were alleged to be obscene.
In cross-examination by Mr. Roberts, the witness said that he could appreciate broad humour, and witticism, but not of the sort in question. (Laughter.) He was not a man of literature, but had received a fair education. He could see no wit or humour in the paragraphs referred to. Had read some of Shakespeare's comedies, but could not remember whether they contained any witty passages bear-ing different interpretations. He had not seen the " School for Scandal." He was not a critic, except on Wild Oats. (Laughter.) He would not swear that the meaning of the paragraphs would not bear a different construction to that put upon them.
At this stage Mr. Roberts submitted that Sub-inspector Camphin was not a competent judge, upon his own confession, to decide whether the publication was obscene or not. The charge was an alleged offence against good literature, and they required competent critics to decide in the matter, just as experts were recently called in to give their opinion in the case of certain pictures which were alleged to be indecent. They did not look to the members of the police to decide as to what was offensive to a sense of delicacy in this respect, but, on the other hand, to the ranks of the people.
The examination being continued, the witness stated that he did not think there was any approach to wit in the paragraph ; they were vulgar and obscene. There was nothing offensive in the other portions of the paper. He was not the first to discover the offensive paragraphs, but his attention was directed to one offensive paragraph. An offensive construction could certainly be placed upon the paragraphs which had been read in Court. [The witness was then examined at length as to the different interpretations put upon the offensive paragraphs.] He did not think he had heard language more direct, more broad, or more pointed in any of the plays at the theatre than was contained is the publication. He did not look upon the paper as an illustrated sporting journal, and would not allow it in his house. He did not consider it a humorous but a licentious publication.
Detective Wigg deposed to having been at the premises of the defendant, in Hunter-street, on three different occasions ; on the 19th he purchased the first number of Wild Oats from a boy employed on the premises ; on the 24th he purchased the second number of the paper ; and on the 26th he accompanied Sub-inspector Camphin to execute the search warrant ; he had seen numbers of the papers sold in the streets by the newsboys ; after the search warrant was executed, the publisher sent round to the agents, instructing them to stop the sale of the paper for the time being.
This being the case for the prosecution, Mr. Rogers requested that the justices on the bench would refrain from adjudicating in the case, as he was inclined to believe that the jurisdiction rested with the Police Magistrate, who had initiated the proceedings by issuing the warrant.
Messrs. V. Brown and Edwards agreed to take no part in deciding on the merits of the case.
Mr. Roberts submitted that the case was not one which came under the meaning of the Act. The paper was in-tended to be a humorous publication, without any desire to offend against a sense of delicacy, or to contain anything approaching to doubtful morality. He contended that the publication contained no more indelicate allusions to facts and circumstances than what was generally found in such comedies as "Friends," the "Two Roses," the "School for Scandal," and other similar plays. The paragraphs which had been singled out were not necessarily offensive to delicacy. They were merely playful allusions to various matters, and indeed one of the paragraphs was simply an old saying upon which a very different construction might be placed by impure minds to that which was intended. Although the witness Camphin did not consider it an illustrated sporting paper, it was quite clear that it was so, and he would ask his Worship to take into consideration the nature of the entire production. He did not believe that men of education, and men of experienced minds, would place the same interpretation on the paragraphs alleged to be offensive as had been done by the witness, for there was not one of the paragraphs but what was in-tended to be a witty or playful reference to some circumstance or other. He submitted that, upon the unsupported testimony of the witness (Camphin)—for he was the only person who had determined as to the alleged obscenity of the paragraphs-there was no public complaint against the paper ; the charge was not one which could be substantiated.
Mr. Marsh said that he was sorry that he had not the advice and assistance of his fellow magistrates, who had attentively listened to the whole case throughout. But after giving the case his full consideration, he could come to no other conclusion but that the publication was unquestionably obscene. Of course he recognised the difficulty in determining what was obscene; but what, he asked, was the use of the Act if it did not put a stop to such publications as the one before the Court. Although most of the paragraphs may have been extracted from American papers, there was one which was a simple fact in reference to something that was said to have occurred at Balmain. He thought the case had been proved. He ordered that the portion of the printing plant used in the publication of the paper should be confiscated, the whole of the papers seized on the premises to be destroyed ; and, taking into consideration the fact that the defendant was not aware that the paper contained the offensive paragraphs, the mitigated penalty of £5, together with costs of Court, would be imposed.
The Act gives the magistrates the power to impose a fine not exceeding £20.  OBSCENE LITERATURE. (1880, December 2). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13477746 

The death of the Infidel, Mr. John Tyreman, deserves a little more notice than we gave it last week. We have noticed that, the TelegraphEvening News,-Bulletin, and other papers, have alluded: to his death in such a way as leaves the public- in total ignorance of the facts of the case ; and indeed they have, one and all, on the heathen maxim, " Nil nisi bonum de mortuis," put the thing bye, and made it up as nicely as possible, that the, public should not know anything about the deceased spiritualistic lecturer, unless , what may be called " good and respectable." Concerning the dead, as concerning the living, nothing should be said unless what is true. In some cases it is not necessary to make public the truth, but in other cases it is fair and proper that the whole truth should be told. Mr. Tyreman had been for years in this city, and, with a restlessness and a zeal which was worthy of a better cause, he did every thing in his power to unhinge the religious principles of young men and others, and his attacks upon religion were always characterised with a vulgar cleverness which was piquant and acceptable to certain persons, because of its attacks upon the clergy as dishonest in their work and bent only on money making. His last publication, " Freethought Defended," to which we referred some weeks ago, was nothing but a low attack upon the clergy. He compared them with the priests of Ephesius, who got their living by craft ; and he compared himself to the Apostle Paul who exposed the craft, and consequently stirred up the wrath of the priests; but while there was plenty of this in his performances, with the usual bit of biography about himself, as having been once "one of the clergy," who had been behind the scenes, and who had, therefore, a perfect acquaintance with all the many dodges by which the clergy live, the said performances were nothing but re hashes of what infidels have alleged a hundred times before, and of what has been answered just as often. Infidelity is, of course, far more acceptable to the human heart than any religion, and especially any revealed religion. Men of loose morals and incorrect life always have a leaning to infidelity ; and just as surely hate the Bible. So certain is it that " fast men, loose women, and gay young men" hate the Bible and sympathise with everything which assails and mocks at the Bible, that it may be accepted as a certainty that haters of the Bible are wrong at the heart rather than wrong in the head. On the other hand, and with the same certainty, it is invariably true that honest, sober, pure, and faithful people love the Bible, and accept its teaching as the very truth of heaven. Strange to say also, those haters of the Bible pretend that they hate it because its morality is not good! They go over its many books, and they pick out all sort of passages and hold them up to ridicule as teaching an impure morality. So they hate the Bible, because the Bible is a bad book ; and yet the proof is patent everywhere; that the best people on the face of the earth are those who love and follow the Bible, while those who blaspheme it are almost certainly the loose and the doubtful. It was easy to see who were Mr. Tyerman's followers. It was easy to see what was the morality to which his teaching tended. Those whom he drew away and misguided were not those who had found the Bible a bad book, and Christ an unreasonable master ; but, on the other hand; those who wanted an excuse for their impieties, and who wished to be free from the thoughts and restraints of future punishment.— Well, Mr. Tyerman met all such with most gratifying news — no devil— no hell —no punishment— but a delightful spiritual world where no one should ever meet with anything that could cause him fear !— Well, Mr. Tyerman has gone. It is a fair question, What sort of life did he live ? and what was his death ? The news papers unctuously tell the public that he originally appeared among the Wesleyans (which is not correct) ; they next state that he became a minister of the Church of England (which is also not correct) ; and they give their testimony to his high conscientiousness by telling the public that when he was asked to preach against spiritualism, he said that he would investigate it first, and then, if he found that it was untrue; he would preach against it ; but that, on investigation, having found that it was true, he preached for it ; and then of course, the license of Bishop Perry was withdrawn !' Thus: Mr. Tyerman, the newspapers tell us, became a spiritualist lecturer and an infidel. But this account is very imperfect. It is a vast slurring over of many curious things which are not explained. It is so unsatisfactory that no one who truly believes in history will consent to accept it. But why should the newspapers stop there? Why should they not tell the public that the said Mr. Tyerman, who had been doing such a great infidel work, died at Darlinghurst ? Ought they not, in the interests of truth, and in defence of what the said Mr. Tyerman had been seeking to destroy, have told the truth? How did Mr. Tyerman come to die at Darlinghurst ? What part of Darlinghurst ? and of what trouble ? Why were the papers so reticent when, under the circumstances, they ought to have explained? He had been denouncing the clergy. He had been assuming to be the modern Apostle Paul. He had been affirming " no devil, no hell, and no punishment." Well, what was his life ? and what was his death ? The newspapers will give no information ; but the public, and especially the religious public, or the public of those young men whom the mischievous man had been seeking to pervert, are concerned to know what was the fact ? Well: the fact is this; the life of Mr. Tyerman was exactly such as might have been predicated of a Bible hater. His loose and drunken life was manifest. About twelve months ago he was confined because of delirium tremens. A few weeks ago he went to Melbourne to lecture, and his loose life was well known. And, when he came back, so bad was he that even publicans refused to serve him ; and at length he died in Darlinghurst Receiving-house, of delirium tremens. This is the simple, true, and warning story of the life, and death of the chief of the infidels in Sydney. The end was miserable, and let infidelity get the benefit of it. The case of Dibbs versus Dibbs and Blair for divorce, is now over but the conclusion adds infinitely to the misery which has long been suffered by the unfortunate family. After years of distress, the expenditure of thousands of pounds, and a trial, with its counterpart some months ago of Dibbs versus Shepherd, what is the issue? The jury could not. agree! Not three fourths of them one, way or another? and the consequence is that the matter rests where it was, and no relief has come to the petitioner or respondent. It is a most lamentable conclusion. Eight were sure that the woman was guilty ; and four held that the guilt was not sufficiently proved ; and so both man and wife left the court just as they entered it, only with this difference that the condition of both is now more deplorable than ever. If the woman be a pure and innocent woman, what can be more dreadful than the state in which she now is ? And, on the other hand, if the man be an injured and dishonoured man, what a deplorable condition is his, to be saddled-with a wife who has ruined his peace and destroyed the happiness of himself and family ?  As the evidence, is now made public, every one will be able to form an opinion on it. Possibly there will be the same division among the readers of the evidence as there was among the jury who heard it.,.. It was purely circumstantial, and therefore difficult . to weigh and value, but the nature of the case made it certain that only that sort of evidence would be forthcoming. 
THE ELECTIONS. (1880, December 11).The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207512441 

THE BULLETIN ON THE HAWKESBURY ELECTION.
That Italian paper, the Bulletin, appears to be very much cut up and disappointed at the result of Hawkesbury election. Let us explain matters a little for the edification of the writer of an article appearing in the last issue. The causes which contributed to the satisfactory' issue, were as follows On one side, i.e. the winning, were (1) the Orange, a strong Protestant party ; (2) the influence of Messers. Oaus and Lanock at Richmond ; and (3) of Mr. WV ' Walker aud friends at Windsor and throughout ; the district. On the other, or losing side, there were (1) the great Andrew Towns of Richmond, cousin of Mr. M'Quade ; (2) the priest and entire Romish party ; and (3) the Windsor Anglican clergyman and his followers. The most respectable and order loving people were with Mr. Bowman, whereas all the roudyism and ruffianism, worthy of his Tipperary supporters, were with Mr. M'Quade. A man is known by the company he keeps, and it was not likely that the staunch Protestants of the Hawkesbury could support such a candidate as Mr. M'Quade, although his speeches may have appeared better than Mr. Bowman's, brought out as they were under the auspices of a special reporter engaged for the occasion in his interest. Mr. Bowman's principles were the soundest. He did not base his claim to re-election upon a repeal of the Dog Act. He was a tried man, particularly on the Education question, and the electors returned him on his own merits, and by their own action, and not at the fiat of any organization in Sydney. Mr. M'Quade complains of the element of religion having been introduced into the contest ; but he must lay part of the blame upon Archbishop Vaughan, and Father Sheehy of Windsor, who directed all his flock to stick to the Catholic candidate. Every Roman Catholic elector in the district about 300, with scarcely an exception, voted for Mr. McQuade. Was it therefore to be wondered at that the staunch Protestants stuck to Mr. Bowman, a member of a good Protestant family.
We are sorry to say that upwards of 300 weak kneed Protestants, many of them induced by bribes, and others acted upon by intimidation added their vote to the Romans, and gave Mr: McQuade the number he got ; otherwise, had the election turned entirely upon principle he would have been beaten by two to one. To show tho character of many of Mr. McQuade's supporters, it is only to be mentioned that in the days of polling, and declaration of the poll, numbers of Mr. Bowman's supporters were assaulted and insulted in a most cowardly manner by bullies in McQuade's interest ; and some of the assailants have been brought before the police courts at Windsor and Richmond, and fined heavily for their miscondnct. We verily believe, that had there not been an extra police force present on the day of polling, a serious riot would have ensued. The Celts cannot stand being thrashed, as was thoroughly the case at the recent election ; which we trust will be so again, whenever the time arrives. THE BULLETIN ON THE HAWKESBURY ELECTION. (1880, December 18). The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 6. Retrieved, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207514495 

Mischievous Papers.— is it worth while to reply to anything that appears in the paper called the Bulletin '! If the things stated in that  paper be true, who believes them ? And if they be false, then who will be the worse for them? The object of the writers is, sometimes, to give rise to a malicious laugh, and at other times to mock at things sacred, and at other times still; to make some person whom some of the writers hate, look a little ridiculous. Who can reply, under such circumstances, to anything that appears? And yet non reply helps the paper  to pursue its mischief making, and to profit by  its maliciousness. 
In its last, the Bulletin had an article on the "Gospel of hatred,". We should judge in a moment, from the internal evidence of the piece, that it was written by an unwashed Papist, who had not been at confession for years past, or," that its author is a Brightite, whose ignorance is as bright as His impudence is like that of his master ! It is 'natural for him' to talk flippently of the "Gospel." It is natural for him to wish that such characters as that of Tyerman should be falsely carried out to the public. It is natural for Him  to talk ignorantly of religious papers— that is of Protestant religious papers. And it is natural  for him to take advantage of his position to use names while he retains his useful anonymity. 
All this is exactly what might be expected of a Brightite infidel. He, of course; does not like religious papers. He, of course, cannot say a good word of them. He, of course; does not like  the Protestant Standard. How could he? ' His master does not like it.! - The Protestant Standard is too much for him. We cannot stomach the word "slaughtered." That word creates an unpleasant sensation in him. But we beg to assure him that if he will give us his name, we will guarantee that while we will give him his deserts, we won't slaughter him! Poor man! PARLIAMENT OPENED. (1880, December 18). The Protestant Standard (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1895), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207514481 

The Protestant Standard, also published as The Protestant Banner, was a weekly English language newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The newspaper was first published in Sydney on 1 May 1869 by Samuel Goold, under the title: The Protestant Standard. The newspaper changed its name to The Protestant Banner and continued under this later title from 31 August 1895 to 28 July 1906. 

Death of Mr S. Goold J.P.
A Chequered Career.
On Saturday last, Mr. S. Goold, J.P., for many years a prominent Parramatta district man, breathed his last at Rookwood. The funeral took place on Monday morning, the deceased gentleman’s remains being interred at the Parramatta Baptist Cemetery ; and the Revs. H. Gainford and R. F. Beclwr, B.A., jointly conducting the service at the grave. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Mrs. Jordan Sparks, and there was a fairly large knot of the deceased gentle man's old-time friends present; despite the short notice that had been given, locally, of the funeral. Among the well known faces noticed were -those of Mrs. Forsaith and Messrs. Hurt, E. . K. Bowden and Hewitt. Mr. Samuel Goold was an. old city business man, who for many years resided at ' Broadoaks,' one of the most pleasantly situated and most commodious residences on the high ridge of Dundas (or Rydalmere) immediately to the north of the Parramatta River. For many years Mr. Goold officiated as a magistrate in ..., at a time when stipendiaries were unknown, and he was in the front rank — in the early days to which we are now alluding — in the Free Trade cause of New South Wales. Mr. Goold and his wife (who, it may be mentioned, pre-deceased ; him) were well-known members of the Parra matta Congregational Church, Mr. . Goold holding the office of deacon there for many years. Miss Goold, the deceased gentle man's only daughter, married Mr. C. W. Mills, whilst her family were residents of ' Broadoaks ' but she and her husband and family left New South Wales some time ago for Western Australia. Late in his life the venerable politician magistrate-churchman made with considerable reverses and it was in one sense, perhaps, a mercy (if the intrusion of the sentiment may, here, be pardoned) that the severest blows of reversal of fortune did not fall till after Mrs. Goold's death.. Mr. Goold's misfortunes came at a time when others— through bank failures, and the general depression in business and general depreciation in the value of property — had little time to give to anyone's affairs save their own and the old gentle man was in sore straits, indeed, when the Rev. H. Gainford (late pastor of the Alfred Square Congregational Church) came to his aid. Mr. Goold was to be sent to Little Bay hospital — there to receive the care, which his increasing bodily ailments demanded — when Mr. Gainford induced a few of the Independents of the city and its suburbs to subscribe enough, for a time, to obtain for the veteran the few comforts, and that attention, which were necessary in his case'.. His illness — heart-disease and dropsy — was a lingering one, however, and death must have been a/ happy release, after all, to the tired and stricken wayfarer. His case was, indeed, one of the most striking commentaries on the ups and downs of Colonial life that our district has ever known, for 12 or 15 years ago Mr. Goold was considered to be one of the men most comfortably situated (so far as this world's goods go) in our midst. In his earlier city days Mr. Goold was a prominent member of the Bourke-street Congregational Church, and he assisted to found the Congregational Church at Balmain. He was an old-time friend of the Rev. H. Gainford, he having known that gentleman's family when Mr. Gainford was but a lad. Speaking at the side of the open grave on Monday, the Rev. H. Gainford alluded incidentally to the fact, and he referred in appropriate periods to the long connection of Mr. S. Goold, J'. P., with the cause of the Congregational churches in. this part of New South Wales. The deceased gentleman was 79 years of age. Death of Mrs. S. Goold J.P. (1899, April 12). The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85779754 

1881

Same day as judgement for the Robertson Bulletin libel case comes out in local newspapers:
Frank Argles, a brother of Theodore Argles, has died in the Yatala labor prison. EPITOME OF GENERAL NEWS. (1881, March 4). Christian Colonist (SA : 1878 - 1894), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article217297839 

DEATH AT THE STOCKADE.
The City Coroner (Mr. T. Ward, J.P.) held an inquest at the Stockade on March 2, on the body of a prisoner named Frank Argles, who died at that institution the previous day. Mr. O. Young was chosen foreman of the Jury. I Edward Scott, Superintendent of the Yatala Labour Prison, said that' deceased was in the prison under a sentence of four years for forgery. He was admitted on April 2, 1879. He was a native of London, and reported as coming from Melbourne. His age was twenty-three, and he had a brother in Sydney. Knew that the deceased had been out of health lately, and was placed in the infirmary. Mr. E. W. Way, medical officer of the Yatala Prison, said the deceased when admitted was in fair health, though he was not a very robust man. He had been in the infirmary two or three times for trifling matters. Deceased was employed in the prison as a wardsman, but that work not suiting him he was placed at the quarries. On Jannary 18, 1881, he had a sprained wrist, and was exempt from work till February 7. when he resumed his duties. A few days after this date (on February 11) he was taken ill, and placed in the infirmary, suffering from fever, which developed itself into enteric fever. He continued in the infirmary, and received all the medical care and diet suitable for the case. A change took place for the worse on Monday, February 28, and he died at 9.30 on Tuesday morning. The cause of death was enteric fever. The most frequent causes of this fever are drinking polluted water, and bad drainage- Neither of these causes, however, existed in the prison. Every precaution is taken to prevent the origin of any infections disease, the greatest cleanliness being enforced. They never had any epidemic of any kind in the prison. The sanitary arrangements were in good order, and the water supply was not likely to be affected by drainage. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence. DEATH AT THE STOCKADE. (1881, March 5). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 32. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article160141983 

The “BULLETIN” Libel Case 
In the Supreme Court on Friday February 25th before his honour the chief Justice and a jury of four) the libel case Robertson v. Archibald was heard.
Mr., Darley Q.C., Sir Archibald Michie and Mr. Coglan were instructed by  Messrs. McCarthy, Robertson and Fisher, appeared for the plaintiff; Mr. Pilcher, instructed by Messrs. Slattery and Heydon appeared for Mr. Heaton; Mr. Haynes appeared in person. Mr. Archibald was unrepresented and did not appear. 
In this action Thomas Robertson, of the firm of M'Carthy, Robertson, and. Fisher, solicitors, sued Jules Francois Archibald, John Henniker Heaton, and John Haynes, three of the proprietors of the Bulletin, for having printed and published of him in a newspaper called the Bulletin an alleged libel. The plaintiff claimed £10,000. The defendants pleaded not guilty. The article was as follows :—
“Rival Magnates— an Australian Pastoral, in Prose. — In a smiling town, deep down in the sunny south-west, there were, each blooming in the zenith of his popularity, two great men. They were both so great that none dare say which was the greater ; and, as is common all over the world with gorgeous potentates of nearly equal splendour, they fell out ; and so serious did they fall out that two cross slander actions were pending between them. One was the Mayor of the town, and a man, who though he condescended to collar the venal six-and-eight-pences of the local cockatoos, lifted his head as high as Haman - but no ; the metaphor won't 'gee'-; — anyhow, he was in his own estimation (and indeed in that of many of the local bucolics) as big a man as was ever encased in a suit of Geelong tweed. The other man was a doctor of medicine — or rather had been a physician, but had flung aside the jalap for the pen. There were some who said that he slung around his paregoric (which he had prescribed for all diseases — cancer included) better than he did the ink of his newly-adopted profession ; but that, of course — like Melville's merit — is merely a matter of opinion. The doctor had, it is true, a slight advantage over his antagonist from the fact of possessing the paper ; since he was enabled, from time to time, to lampoon the worthy Mayor in the Poet's Corner of his journal under the headings of ' Lines to an Owl,' ' Stanzas to a Turnip,' &c ; still the man of law chipped in occasionally by the withering satire he indulged in over the billiard table at the Royal. When the quarrel was at its height, a certain well-known Sydney gentleman visited the district, and in the course of his peregrinations encountered the Mayor. After they had greeted one another, his worship drew the Sydney man aside; and said, ' I say, you know that fellow Bones — Bones, of the Grazier's Champion — well, he's the biggest scoundrel out. Why, it was not long ago since a namesake of his — a doctor — got seven years for forging medical certificates. He sold them wholesale to whoever would buy them, and, let me whisper, Bones — Bones of the local rag — bought one of 'em. Hardly had the Sydney man time to shift away and digest this somewhat startling ' personal item,' than ho encountered Bones himself. After they had indulged in the usual refresher, the ex-doctor took him by the coat cuff and said, ‘A word in your ear, you know that six-and-eight-penny scarecrow, the Mayor ? Well, I was at the Royal Hotel the other day, and a lot of fellows were standing about as his worship entered. ' Hullo !' cried one ; ' why, that's so-and-so ; he used to work in the same chain-gang as me at the Cape.' Well, the actions went on, and each party, to use an expression much in vogue in the district at that time, 'went in a perisher. ' Bones tore up to Sydney to inspect the Mayor's papers of admission to practice, at the Supreme Court. He found everything torn out but the bare 'admission of solicitor.' Then he groped along until he discovered that between the time his antagonist was admitted as an attorney by the London law institution, until the period at which he mysteriously turned up as poundkeeper of a small township near the scene of his future mayoralty, that there was an enormous blank. So what did Bones do, but he fitted the chain-gang episode it: to the blank, and submitted the completed Mosaic medallion to 'his worship.' In the end both drew their actions, and shortly afterwards Bones died. The quondam mayor, however, was afterwards a member of Parliament, and is now a ' haw-haw' lawyer of Sydney, who has become so short-sighted that he hardly ever recognises a man from the pastoral districts — and never by any chance one from the Cape of Good Hope.''

Mr. Haynes said he was one of the defendants, and appeared for himself. He produced a medical certificate stating Mr. Archibald's inability to attend. Thomas Robertson, being sworn, was examined by Sir Archibald Michie, and stated he was a solicitor and proctor of this Court, and was admitted on the 29th October, 1853, in Sydney; he produced a copy of the Bulletin, dated 15th January, and which he purchased on the 14th of that month ; it was published two days before it was dated ; after he had purchased the paper he saw Mr. Haynes, one of defendants, in the office of the Bulletin ; this was on the same day ; he drew his attention to the article headed 'Rival Magnates,' and told him he believed it a libel upon himself, and that from the internal evidence he believed it was written by Mr. Heaton ; Mr. Haynes said that witness could not expect him to admit that ; he told Haynes he understood Mr. Heaton was one of the proprietors of the paper, but that he had had a search made, and found that Heaton was not a registered proprietor ; Mr. Haynes said that Mr. Heaton had purchased a share in the paper ; witness pointed out to him the penalties they were liable to for not having the proprietors' names properly registered, and Mr. Haynes said he would see that it was done ; he afterwards received a letter from Mr. Haynes, dated the 19th January, stating that Mr. Heaton was the author of the article in the last issue of the Bulletin. 
John Haynes was here called, and produced the manuscript of the article in question. 
Mr. Darley proposed to put the document in as evidence, to which Mr. Pilcher objected ; and, after argument, his Honor ruled that although it was not evidence against Heaton at that moment, he could not throw it out altogether. The document was accordingly admitted in evidence as against defendant Haynes, and the Bulletin of the 15th January was also put in.
Witness (Thomas Robertson), continued : Mr. Haynes, Mr. Archibald, and Mr. John Woods each represented themselves in witness's office as proprietors of the Bulletin, they were there together.
Mr. Archibald said he and Mr. Haynes had given Mr. John Woods an indemnity against any libels the might publish – (laughter) – and Mr. Haynes and Mr. Archibald asked him to leave Mr. Woods out of the action he told them he intended to bring. He said he would do so and he promised also that he would exhaust his remedy against Mr., Heaton before he levied on the goods and chattels of Messrs. Haynes and Archibald, on condition that they gave him a letter stating that Mr. Heaton was the author of the article of which witness complained. Mr. Haynes said that Mr. Heaton had dictated the article to one of their writers called the Pilgrim, in his (Mr. Haynes') presence, and that he would give witness the letter he required. Mr. Woods expressed great indignation at Mr. Heaton’s conduct. After that witness received a letter to which lie sent a reply, promising to keep his part of the contract Mr. Haynes also told him that he thought Mr. Heaton had corrected the manuscript after it was written, that the word 'Tom' was struck out as the name of the lawyer. Witness's name was Thomas. Mr. Haynes asked him if the Pilgrim, the man who had written the article, had called upon him and what lie had said. Witness told him that a gentleman had called upon him, and refusing to give his name, said he had a communication to make, and would make it if witness would not make any use of it. He told him he must decline to hold any. conversation with any gentleman who refused to give his name, and that he would make no promise whatever. The Pilgrim (witness found out afterwards that the person was the Pilgrim, then said. ' Well. I'll tell you everything without any promise. I want to save Archibald and Haynes. You think that Heaton wrote that article. He couldn't write anything of the kind, he hasn't the brains; I wrote the article at Mr. Heaton's dictation. Heaton came into the office and said to me ' take your pen ; there's a big bug at the Australian Club — (laughter) — I want to give him a turn ; I am going to take the starch out of him.'' (Laughter.) Mr. Haynes told witness he did not remember Heaton saying anything about the Australian Club or the starch, and advised witness not to place any confidence in what the Pilgrim might tell him, but that Heaton did dictate in substance the article to the Pilgrim in his (Mr. Haynes') presence. 
When quite a young man witness studied the law in Scotland, but left that country for Port Natal, and arrived there at the beginning of the year 1850. On the 1st of July of that year he was admitted to practise at Natal as a solicitor and advocate of the Supreme Court of Natal, and he was practising with some considerable success when the Kaffir war broke out. The Governor organised a force of 3000 Zulus for the assistance of Sir Harry Smith ; and as there was some opposition to the raising of this native contingent, the Governor requested witness to get up a counter-demonstration to the opposition. This he did, and it was resolved at a public meeting that the colony should assist Sir Harry Smith. Witness was nominated to a lieutenancy in a force of mounted men who went as a bodyguard to Sir Theophilus Shepstone; but the assistance of the Natal contingent was declined by Sir Harry Smith. However, a letter had been given witness to Sir Harry Smith and another to the Governor of Cape Town, and the result was that he went up as one of a party to the mouth of the Buffalo River. It was found impossible to give him a military appointment, but he succeeded in obtaining the promise of a passage home to England by the Birkenhead, and during the time he had to wait before the vessel sailed he saw some active service, and was highly commended for what he did. He afterwards left by the Birkenhead, and had never since been in the Cape. Instead of returning to Natal he came to New South Wales, and went to Port Stephens as secretary and general overseer for the Australian Agricultural Company. He remained in that position for three months, and then he was sent to Liverpool Plains, where he took charge of Warrah, another property belonging to the company. After that he came to Sydney to practise as a solicitor, and he was admitted in October, 1853. He practised for about three months, and then went down to Melbourne, where he met Mr. Henry Jeffries, who, as he was going to England for a year or two, offered witness the management of his station on the Campaspe. He accepted that, and at the suggestion of Mr. Jeffries, he established a pound on the Murray. It was represented to him that the country was full of stray cattle which were a great nuisance to the settlers, and which nobody owned, and that the only way to get rid of them was to establish a pound. He was appointed poundkeeper by the Bench at Albury, which was in the Hume district — the district he afterwards represented in Parliament — and he used to get about £2 out of every animal impounded. The cattle were never released. They were in the pound for the thirty days, and he used to receive about £2 out of every animal. He made enough money in twelve months to buy a share in a station, and after that he was on the high road to make a fortune. But a drought set in, and he sold his share in the station. Then he went to Deniliquin, and being offered by the poundkeeper there his yard for £1000, and finding he had been making £2000, witness gave the £1000 and was duly installed poundkeeper. He held office there for two years, and made a net income of upwards of £2000 a year, and also sent to the Treasury money that was afterwards returned to the Deniliquin Hospital, to the extent of upwards of £1000 a year. That was, he sent to the Government upwards of a £1000 a year above his profits, and that amount came back, according to an Act of Parliament, to the Deniliquin Hospital. 
At the time the whole of the country was unfenced and stocked with cattle, and as the settlers were beginning to fence the country in order to stock it with sheep, they sent to the pound cattle unclaimed and unmarked. At one time he had upwards of 700 head of cattle in the yard. They were fed on large reserves. Those that were fat were sent out at daylight, and those that were what was called store cattle were kept by themselves. There was a reserve there about 20 miles in extent, with plenty of grass, and he had plenty of men to assist him. In that way the cattle were kept in splendid condition, and butchers used to come from Sandhurst and Moama to buy them. At that time in addition to being poundkeeper witness was a churchwarden and honorary secretary to the hospital ; and when Sir John Hay first stood for the district he was selected to second his nomination on the hustings ; and he was vice-chairman at a banquet given to him. Soon afterwards the Government established District Courts throughout that part of the colony, and when a District Court was gazetted to be held at Deniliquin, witness thought the time had arrived for him to resume practice.  He sold the pound yard for £1000, and then he retired, an opening an office in Deniliquin he resumed practice as a solicitor. He practiced at Deniliquin from between 1862 and 1863, until 1872 or about 9 ½ years. He remembered the case of Linton vs. Giles. Witness was professionally retained to defend the Police Magistrate, who was charged with having assaulted a man with a wooden leg. Witness was instructed to ask the complainant Linton if he had ever been convicted. It appeared that he had been convicted under the Vagrant Act by the Police Magistrate a few weeks, before for making use of obscene language.
Witness misunderstood the Police Magistrate, and thought he was to ask Linton whether he was not an old convict. Witness asked him to be good enough to tell the Bench how he came out here. He immediately said, ' Oh, I see what you're driving at ; I am an old convict, and I've seen you before. I've seen you at the Cape of Good Hope.' Witness said,' ' Indeed ! Did I ever prosecute you there ?' ' Oh, ho,' he said, ' you and I were on Ribbon Island together.' Ribbon Island was the penal establishment — the Cockatoo of the Cape of Good Hope. This man Linton had been a servant of a Mr. Clarence, who was a brother-in-law of Mr., Brobridd out here, and whose father had been a Cape Town merchant.
Witness used to visit Mr. Clarence on the Murray, and their conversation used to be about the Cape. Linton was employed by Mr. Clarence as hutkeeper, and, as he used to hear the conversation between his employer and witness he knew that witness was a Cape man. There was not the slightest foundation in the world for what the man said. The case was dismissed ; and after witness, had gone outside the Court, Mr. John Taylor, of the Royal Hotel at Deniliquin, said, in the presence of Linton, 'This man has been saying you and he were lags together at the Cape of Good Hope.' Witness turned to Linton, and asked, 'Have you said that ?' Linton replied, ' What I said was, that we ought to have been lagged together. Witness thon took out a summons against Linton for making use of language in a public place calculated to provoke a breach of the peace. The case was heard, and Linton being convicted, was fined £5, with an alternative of three months' imprisonment, and he underwent his term of imprisonment. At the time of the assault case there was a criminal information before the Supreme Court. The Police Magistrate had applied for a rule from the Court directing the Attorney-General to prosecute Dr. Jones, editor and proprietor of the Pastoral Times, for libel, and during the cross-examination in the assault case witness said that the case was a trumpery one got up by Dr. Jones as a set-off against the case which the Police Magistrate had against him. Witness made some very strong remarks on this point, and the editor of the Pastoral Times wrote a leader impugning the correctness of the report of the assault case published by the rival journal, insinuating that witness had concocted that report, and intending, as he though, to let the public suppose there might be some truth in Linton's statement. Witness wrote a letter to one paper about some points of the case, and commenced an action against Dr. Jones for the article in the Pastoral Times. Before the time came for pleading Dr. Jones represented that he was willing to retract everything, and published an apology. This was agreed to, and the action dropped, everything being said in the article of apology that would relieve witness from obloquy. During the time that witness was Mayor of Deniliquin, Mr. Heaton came there. He came as a stranger, travelling for the Town and Country Journal, canvassing for subscriptions ; and he called upon witness as Mayor of the place. Witness entertained him hospitably, and gave him all the information he asked for. After that, and when witness was living in Sydney, Mr. Heaton was the medium of communication between some people in Albury and witness, those people wanting him to stand as member for the Hume. In fact, the requisition asking him to stand was consigned to Mr. Heaton, in order that he should present it to witness; Heaton brought the requisition to witness, and he agreed to contest the election. Then on the occasion of his going to address the electors at Albury Mr. Heaton accompanied him, and of course their conversation referred to the fact that witness had met him at Deniliquin, and witness told him all about the case of Linton — the whole affair — and particularly about his experience in South Africa. Witness's firm were solicitors for the representatives of Leichhardt. They proved Leichardt’s will.

Mr. Du Faur called upon witness, and in consequence of what passed between them witness gave certain advice professionally. That was on the 11th of 12th of last January, a day or two before the publication of the libel. Witness understood this article containing the libel to refer to himself. He was referred to as a lawyer, Mayor, poundkeeper, member of Parliament, and solicitor now in Sydney ; and when ' he read the article he saw at once it was an allusion to the affair of Linton's. The article said in one place that there was an action brought against the lawyer by the newspaper proprietor. That was not true — there was no such action ; and the innuendo in the article that witness had obtained his admission as an attorney by false pretences — something having been torn from the records of the Supreme Court — was utterly untrue. The records were complete, and were in Court to-day. In another part of the article he was represented as having worked in a chain-gang at the Cape of. Good Hope. The first time witness met Heaton was at Deniliquin, and then their relations were perfectly friendly. Witness gave him information which was valuable to him as an agent travelling for a paper. Witness's firm acted as solicitors for Heaton in an Equity suit, and he afterwards acted on behalf of witness, and worked for him during the election for the Hume. Witness was on friendly terms with him even up to last year, but recently there had been no relations between them except those arising out of business transactions. Up to that time his relations with witness had been of a most friendly character. After the article appeared witness saw ' the Pilgrim,' who came to his office of his own accord, as far as witness knew. Mr. Pilcher : Then I understand that the effect of your negotiations with Haynes and Archibald is that they are to beheld harmless, until you have taken everything you can get out of Heaton ? Witness : Yes. Mr. Pilcher : With reference to 'the Pilgrim,' is there any understanding between him and you ! Witness : No, nothing in the world. Mr. Pilcher : Has he made no offers or overtures ? Witness : None whatever. ' Mr. Pilcher : Directly or indirectly ?

… wrote, exonerating Mr. Woods, witness suggested that the manuscript should be sent to him ; Haynes did not tell witness that the alterations were made by himself in the manuscript, altering the name 'Jones' to ' Bones' for .instance ; he said that Heaton had made, some alternations with his own pen ; lie did not tell witness he had made some alterations himself ; never saw ' the Pilgrim' at his hotel with reference to this case, and had never had one word with him except on one occasion that day, when he asked witness if the case was coining on ; Dr. Jones had an ill feeling against witness, but there never was any trouble between him and witness with reference to anything witness had said about him. Mr. Pilcher : Then a portion of this statement in the article about what you said of Dr. Jones must be untrue ; or if it is true you cannot be the lawyer referred to in the article. Witness : It does not follow ; there was no fuss about an article which appeared in a paper' of which witness was part proprietor, and in which the name of a man in England, named Dr. Griffith Jones, who had obtained the bogus diplomas, was mentioned. Ho did not say, as stated in the article, that ' Bones' or ' Jones' had bought one of these forged diplomas. Cross-examined by Mr. Haynes : ' The Pilgrim' came to witness' office, and said Heaton dictated the article and made some alterations in it. Remembered distinctly Haynes saying the article was dictated in his presence, but that he did not remember Heaton saying- anything about the Australian Club. Witness told Haynes that 'the Pilgrim' said the manuscript had been altered by Heaton, and Haynes appeared to be unwilling to admit that, and witness told him that ' the Pilgrim' had with his own pen struck out the word ' Tom ;' Haynes called upon him subsequently, and told him that Heaton had seen the proof : he told witness then that Heaton had never seen the manuscript, and witness said, ' How can you tell me that when, you told me that Heaton dictated the article in your presence ?' Re-examined by Sir Archibald Michie : Haynes told witness that Heaton had in his presence said to Harold Grey (the Pilgrim), 'I want to make good or fast friends with you about this article,' and that the Pilgrim replied ' Heaton, you never were a friend of mine, and now I have got you by the throat, and if you want me to help you in this matter, you must bring out your cheque-book and write mo a cheque for £10, and tomorrow I shall require another cheque for £10, and the day after I shall probably want a cheque for £50 ;' (laughter)— and Haynes added, ' and there was a great row there' ; witness, however, purposely abstained from asking him any questions ; that was all Haynes said on that occasion ; the article kept witness awake all night after he had read it. At this stage, the Court adjourned until Monday, at 10 a.m. On Monday, the evidence given indentified plaintiff as the person referred to in the alleged libel. Mr. Pilcher addressed the jury for Mr. Heaton. His Honor the Chief Justice having summed up, the jury retired at twenty-two minutes past 4, and after an absence of eighteen minutes, returned into Court with a verdict for plaintiff, damages £1000. THE "BULLETIN" LIBEL CASE. (1881, March 4). The Burrowa News (NSW : 1874 - 1951), p. 3. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107931424 

THE BULLETIN LIBEL CASE.
SUPREME COURT.— Friday, February 25.
Banco Court. — {Before his honor the chief Justice and a jury of four.) ROBERTSON V. ARCHIBALD AND OTHERS.
Mr. Darley, Q.C., Sir Archibald Michie, and Mr. Coglan, instructed by Messrs. M'Carthy, Robertson, and Fisher appeared for the plaintiff; Mr. Pilcher, instructed by Messrs Slattery and Heydon, appeared for Mr. Heaton ; Mr. Haynes appeared in person. Mr. Archibald was unrepresented, and did not appear.

In this action Thomas Robertson, of the firm of M’Carthy, Robertson, and Fisher, solicitors, sued Jules Francois Archibald, John Henniker Heaton, and John Haynes, three of the proprietors of the Bulletin, for having printed and published of him in a newspaper called the Bulletin an alleged libel. The plaintiff claimed £10,000. The defendants pleaded not guilty. Mr. Darley, in addressing the jury, said this action was brought by Mr. Robertson for defamation of character, and although he (Mr. Darley) had been many years now practising his profession he never approached a case which so much taxed his powers to do justice to his client. The libel was, without exception, the very worst he ever read. His client claimed £10,000 damages, but he might tell the jury that if they gave £10,000 damages it would not be sufficient compensation to the plaintiff, or sufficient punishment for the libel. He said sufficient punishment, because he was going to ask them to inflict what he did not often ask for — punitive damages. He asked them to inflict upon Mr. Heaton, who indulged in this libel under circumstances which the jury -would soon hear, punitive damages. He asked them to punish him as they ought to punish him. He did not suppose that his client would care to soil his pocket with any of the money ; but whatever Mr. Robertson might do with the damages let the jury inflict on that man (Mr. Heaton) punitive damages, for that was the only way they could uphold Mr. Robertson's honour, or the honour of anyone of us who might be attacked. We were all subject to this—every one of us— as long as papers of this sort polluted our midst. Mr. Robertson's name was not mentioned in the article, and therefore it might be said that the article was a mere fancy sketch — that it might mean anybody, and therefore what had Mr. Robertson to complain of ? But he(Mr. Darley) would show the jury that no other man in the world could be pointed to in that article but Mr. Robertson. The article contained references to circumstances which occurred in Mr. Robertson's life, and which were not likely to have occurred in the life of any other man in this community ; and further, those circumstances were all known to Mr.' Heaton. Mr. Robertson's life had been an eventful life — an honourable life — and one of which any man might be well proud. Mr. Robertson would be placed in the box, and would tell what his life had been; and witnesses of the highest honour would be called, who would say that immediately the article in the Bulletin was read by them they recognized to whom it referred, and said it was a cowardly, dastardly libel. 
In the year 1875 Mr. Robertson was about standing for the Hume, and while he was journeying towards Albury he had Mr. Heaton for his fellow-passenger, and they got into conversation about this old story of seven or eight years before, the circumstances of which Mr. Heaton knew. Mr. Robertson, in order to while away the time for Mr. Heaton, gave a history of his life's experience, and told him all about the Cape of Good Hope. The whole thing was told to Mr. Heaton by Mr. Robertson. In 1880, this valuable paper — the Bulletin — published an advertisement announcing that the proprietors would come forward with the enormous sum of £1000, and pay it to any person who would obtain any authentic information with respect to the fate of Leichhardt ; and, curiously enough, before it was possible for that advertisement to reach Queensland a telegram came down to Mr. Du Faur, an officer of high standing in the Lands Office of this colony, and who had always taken a very deep personal interest in endeavouring to discover something about the fate of Leichhardt. This telegram was sent by Skuthorpe, announcing that certain relics and certain journals had been discovered and were in his possession. This telegram being to a certain extent of national importance, was published in the papers, and the moment it appeared Mr. Heaton rushed off to Mr. Du Faur, and told him that having published the advertisement offering the reward he claimed the relics on behalf of the Bulletin. Of course Mr. Du Faur said that he was not entitled to anything of the kind, and having consulted Mr. Robertson, who was then a partner in the firm of M'Carthy and Robertson, who were solicitors for Leichhardt's representatives, and had taken out letters of administration, he was advised that the relics belonged either to the Government or Leichhardt's representatives, whoever they might be. Mr. Heaton was informed of this by Mr. Du Faur, and he went to the office of this paper. 

There happened to be a writer connected with this paper named Harold Grey, better known as the 'Pilgrim’, a man who some years ago published certain productions which were a disgrace to the Press, and this writer being employed by the Bulletin Mr. Heaton went to him. He dared say that Mr. Heaton was not capable of writing the flowery language which surrounded this article, but he went to Grey and dictated to him, leaving him to clothe it in his own language. That article was as follows: —'Rival Magnates — an Australian Pastoral, in Prose'. — In a smiling town, deep down in the sunny south-west, there were, each blooming in the zenith of his popularity, two great men. They were both so great that none dare say which was the greater ; and, as is common all over the world with, gorgeous potentates of nearly equal splendour, they fell out ; and so seriously did they fall out that two cross slander actions were pending between them. One was the Mayor of the town, and a man who, though he condescended to collar the venal six-and-eight-pences of the local cockatoos, lifted his head as high as Haman ? but no ; the metaphor won't 'gee' ;— anyhow, he was in his own estimation (and indeed in that of many of the local bucolics) as big a -man as was ever encased in a suit of Geelong tweed. The other man was a doctor of medicine — or rather had been a physician, but had flung aside the jalap for the pen. There were some who said that he slung around his paregoric (which he had prescribed for all diseases — cancer included) better than he did the ink of his newly-adopted profession ; but that, of course— like Melville's merit— is merely a matter of opinion. The doctor tad, it is true, a slight advantage over his antagonist from the fact of possessing the paper ; since he was enabled, from time to time, to lampoon the worthy Mayor in the Poet's Comer of his journal under the headings of ' Lines to an Owl,' ' Stanzas to a Turnip,' &c. ; still the man of law chipped in occasionally by the withering satire he indulged in over the billiard table at the Royal. When the quarrel was at its height, a certain well-known Sydney gentleman visited the district, and in the course of his peregrinations encountered the Mayor. After they had greeted one another, his Worship drew the Sydney man aside, and said, * I say, you know that fellow Bones —Bones, of the Grazier's Champion — well, he's the biggest scoundrel out. Why, it was not long ago since a namesake of his— a doctor— got seven years for forging medical certificates. He sold them wholesale to whoever would buy them, and, let me whisper, Bones — Bones of the local rag — bought one of 'em.' Hardly tad the Sydney man time to shift away and digest this somewhat startling 'personal item,' than he encountered Bones himself. After they had indulged in the usual refresher, the ex-doctor took him by the coat cuff and said, ' A word in your ear. You know that six-and-eight-penny scarecrow, the Mayor F Well, I was at the Royal Hotel the other day, and a lot of fellows were standing'about as his Worship entered. 'Hullo ! ' cried one; ' why, that's so and so ; he used to work in the same chain-gang as me at the Cape.' 'Well, the actions went on, and each party, to use an expression much in vogue in the district at that time, went in a perieher.' Bones tore up to Sydney to inspect the Mayor's papers of admission to practice at the Supreme Court. He found everything torn out but the bare ' admission of solicitor.' ' Then he groped along until he discovered that between the time his antagonist was admitted as an attorney by the London law institution, until the period at which he mysteriously turned up as poundkeeper of a small township near the scene of his future mayoralty, that there was an enormous blank. So what did Bones do, but he fitted the chain-gang episode into the blank, and submitted the completed Mosaic medallion to ' his worship.' In the end both drew their actions, and shortly afterwards Bones died. The quondam Mayor, however, was afterward a member of Parliament, and is now a ' haw-haw ' lawyer of Sydney, who has become so short-sighted that he hardly ever recognises a man from the pastoral districts— and never by any chance one from the Cape of Good Hope.' 

What did they think of that document ? This was an article arising first of all out of the case at the Police Court, at Deniliquin for which the man Linton got three months. It was afterwards published in a paper, the editor of which was only too glad to get out of the action which followed by making an ample apology, and yet on the 15th January, 1881, we had this brought up again by this man Heaton ; and why - Simply because Mr. Robertson gave a client of his honest advice which did not exactly suit Mr. Heaton's views. We had heard a great deal of vapouring about the freedom of the Press, but he ventured to say that his learned friend on the other side would not venture to justify, under the guise of freedom of the Press, anything that appeared in this article. There was nothing so much misunderstood by the class of men of which this defendant, Heaton belonged as the meaning of the expression ' freedom of the Press.' Every body of men such as we were thought it right that we should have a free Press, but would they say that a man should be permitted to go out into the open street and defame his neighbour, and bring ridicule, contempt, and injury upon him ? Did we call that proper freedom? Most certainly we did not; but that was just what some of these newspapers did. There were many hard things said of business men, which they might be able to get over. In the hurry and care of their avocations their minds were taken up and they did not think much of these attacks perhaps ; but there were those who were dear to them who felt these things keenly. The wife saw this thing, and what must be her feelings; what must be the result upon a daughter who was just budding into womanhood ? It desecrated homes, this sort of thing. Here was Mr. Robertson, who had lived in this colony and been before the public for years. He had a wife and a number of daughters, some of whom were young women, and some just verging on womanhood. Ho had sons, too, and he asked the jury to think what their feelings were ; and as they measured their feelings so he hoped they would punish this man Heaton. We might say that our characters stood so high that such statements would inflict no injury ; but there were those dear to us who could not get over it. They say the invasion of houses and families which appeared in this paper from time to time, and they felt it, and felt it deeply. Perhaps ten years hence when Mr. Robertson was in his grave, the same thing might be brought against his sons by some dastard, some coward, some other Henniker Heaton, who might, when these young men were struggling upwards in life, run up against them and say, ' Oh, your father was a convict at the Cape.' ' He asked the jury, therefore, to give his client a full verdict, and stamp this sort of thing out ; he asked them to put it down, and not allow our houses to be invaded. There was not a single private transaction that was not heralded forth in this paper, which ought to be burned by the hangman. Let us have respectable papers ; but for God's sake stamp out this kind of journalism, otherwise they would have men using weapons to put a stop to this sort of thing, as was sometimes done in America. 

Mr. Haynes said he was one of the defendants, and appeared for himself. He produced a medical certificate stating Mr. Archibald's inability to attend. Thomas Robertson, being sworn, was examined by Sir Archibald Michie, and stated he was a solicitor and proctor of this Court, and was admitted on the 29th October, 1853, in Sydney ; he produced a copy of the Bulletin, dated 16th January, and which he purchased on the 14th of that month ; it was published two days before it was dated ; after he had purchased the paper he saw Mr. Haynes, one of defendants, in the office of the Bulletin ; this was on the same day ; he drew his attention to the article headed ' Rival Magnates,' and told him he believed it a libel upon himself, and that from the internal evidence he believed it was written by Mr. Heaton ; Mr. Haynes said that witness could not expect him to admit that ; he told Haynes he understood Mr. Heaton was one of the proprietors of the paper, but that he had had a search made, and found that Heaton was not a registered proprietor ; Mr. Haynes said that Mr. Heaton had purchased a share in the paper ; witness pointed out to him the penalties they were liable to for not having the proprietors’ names properly registered, and Mr. Haynes said he would see that it was done ; he afterwards received a letter from Mr. Haynes, dated the 19th January, stating that Mr. Heaton was the author of the article in the last issue of the Bulletin. John Haynes was here called, and produced the manuscript of the article in question. Mr. Darley proposed to put the document in as evidence, to which Mr. Pilcher objected ; and, after argument, his Honor ruled that although it was not evidence against Heaton at (hat moment, he could not throw it out altogether. The document was accordingly admitted in evidence as against defendant Haynes and the Bulletin of the 10th January was also put in. Witness (Thomas Robertson), continued: Mr. Haynes, Mr. Archibald, and Mr. John Woods each represented themselves in witness's office as proprietors of the Bulletin. They were there together. Mr. Archibald said he and Mr. Haynes had given Mr. John Woods an indemnity against any libels they might publish— (laughter) — and Mr. Haynes' and Mr. Archibald asked him to leave Mr. Woods out of the action he told them he intended to bring. He said he would do so ; and he promised also that he would exhaust this remedy against Mr. Heaton before he levied on the goods and chattels of Messrs. Haynes and Archibald, on condition that they gave him a letter stating that Mr. Heaton was the author of the article of which witness complained. Mr. Haynes said that Mr. Heaton had dictated the article to one of their writers called the Pilgrim, in his (Mr. Haynes') presence, and that he would give witness the letter he required. Mr. Woods expressed great indignation at Mr. Heaton's conduct. After that witness received a letter to which he sent a reply, promising to keep his part of the contract. Mr. Haynes also told him that he thought Mr. Heaton had corrected the manuscript after it was written, that the word ' Tom ' was struck out as the name of the lawyer. Witness's name was Thomas. 

Mr. Haynes asked him if the Pilgrim, the man who had written the article, had called upon him and what he had said. Witness told him that a gentleman had called upon him, and refusing to give his name, said he had a communication to make, and would make it if witness would not make any use of it. He told him he must decline to hold any conversation with any gentleman who refused to give his name, and that he would make no promise whatever. The Pilgrim (witness found out afterwards that the person was the Pilgrim) then said, 'Well, I'll tell you everything without any promise. I want to save Archibald and Haynes You think that Heaton wrote that article. He couldn't write anything of ? the kind, he hasn't the brains ; I wrote the article at Mr. Heaton's dictation. Heaton came into the office and said to me ' Take your pen ; there's a big bug at the Australian Club— (laughter)— I want to give him a turn; I am going to take the starch out of him.' '(Laughter.) Mr. Haynes told witness he did not remember Heaton saying anything about the Australian Club or the starch, and advised witness not to place any confidence in what the Pilgrim might tell him, but that Heaton did dictate in substance the article to the Pilgrim in his (Mr. Haynes') presence. When quite a young man witness studied the law in Scotland, but left that country for Port Natal, and arrived there at the beginning of the year 1850. On the 1st of July of that year he was admitted to practise at Natal as a solicitor and advocate of the Supreme Court of Natal, and he was practising with some considerable success when the Kaffir war broke out. The Governor organised a force of 3000 Zulus for the assistance of Sir Harry Smith ; and as there was some opposition to the raising of this native contingent, the Governor requested witness to get up a counter demonstration to the opposition. This he did, and it was resolved at a public meeting that the colony should assist Sir Harry Smith. Witness was nominated to a lieutenancy in a force of mounted men who went as a bodyguard to Sir Theophilus Shepstone ; but the assistance of the Natal contingent was declined by Sir Harry Smith. However, a letter had been given witness to Sir Harry Smith and another to the Governor of Cape Town, and the result was that he went up as one of a party to the mouth of the Buffalo River.

It was found impossible to give him a military appointment, but he succeeded in obtaining the promise of a passage home to England by the Birkenhead, and during the time he had to wait before the vessel sailed he saw some active service, and was highly commended for what he did. He afterwards left by the Birkenhead, and had never since been in the Cape. Instead of returning to Natal he came to New South Wales, and went to Port Stephens as secretary and general overseer for the Australian Agricultural Company. He remained in that position for three months, and then he was sent to Liverpool Plains, where he took charge of Warrah, another property belonging to the company. After that he came to Sydney to practise as a solicitor, and he was admitted in October, 1853. He practised for about three months, and then went down to Melbourne, where he met Mr. Henry Jeffries, who, as he was going to England for a year or two, offered witness the management of his station on the Campaspe. He accepted that, and at the suggestion of Mr. Jeffries, he established a pound on the Murray. It was represented to him that the country was full of stray cattle which were a great nuisance to the settlers, and which nobody owned, and that the only way to get rid of them was to establish a pound. He was appointed pound keeper by the Bench at Albury, which was in the Hume district— the district he afterwards . represented in Parliament— and he used to get about £2 out of every animal impounded. The cattle were never released. They were in the pound for the thirty days, and he used to receive about £2 out of every animal. He made enough money in twelve months to buy' a share in a station, and after that he was on the high road to make a fortune. But a drought set in, and he sold his share in the station. Then he went to Deniliquin, and being offered by the poundkeeper there his yard for £1000, and finding he had been making £2000, witness gave the £1000 and was duly installed poundkeeper. He held office there for two years, and made a net income of upwards of £2000 , a year, and also sent to the Treasury money that was' afterwards returned to the Deniliquin Hospital, to the extent of upwards of £1000 a year. That was, he sent to the Government upwards of a £1000 a year above his profits, and that amount came back, according to an Act of Parliament, to the Deniliquiu Hospital. At that time the whole of the country was unfenced and stocked with cattle, and as the settlers were beginning to fence the country in order to stock it with sheep, they sent to the pound cattle unclaimed and unmarked. At one time Le had upwards of 700 head of cattle in the yard. They were fed on large reserves. Those that were fat were sent out at daylight, and those that were what was called store cattle were kept by themselves. There was a reserve there about 20 miles in extent, with plenty of grass, and he had plenty of men to assist him. In that way the cattle were kept in splendid condition, and butchers used to come from Sandhurst and Moama to buy them. 

At that time in addition to being poundkeeper witness was a churchwarden and honorary secretary to the hospital ; and when Sir John Hay first stood for the district lie was selected to second his nomination on the hustings ; and he was vice-chairman at a banquet given to him. Soon afterwards the Government established District Courts throughout that part of the colony, and when a District Court was gazetted to be held at Deniliquin, witness thought the time had arrived for him to resume practice. He sold the pound yard for £1000, and then he retired, and opening an office at Deniliquin, he resumed practice as a solicitor. He practiced at Deniliquin from between 1862 and 1863, until 1872, or about 9£ years. He remembered the case of Linton v. Giles. Witness was professionally retained to defend the Police Magistrate, who was charged with having assaulted a man with a wooden leg. Witness was instructed to ask the complainant Linton if he had ever been convicted. It appeared that he had been convicted under the Vagrant Act by the Police Magistrate a few weeks before for making use of obscene language. Witness misunderstood the Police Magistrate, and thought he was to ask Linton whether he was not an old convict. Witness asked him to be good enough to tell the Bench how he came out here. He immediately said, ' Oh, I see what you're driving at; I am an old convict, and I've been you before. I've seen you at the Cape of Good Hope.' Witness said, 'Indeed! Did I ever prosecute you there?'  ' Oh, no,' he said, ' you and I were on Ribbon Island together.' Ribbon Island was the penal establishment — the Cockatoo of the Cape of Good Hope. This man Linton had been a servant of a Mr. Clarence, who was a brother-in-law of Mr. Brodribb out here, and whose father had been a Cape Town merchant. Witness used to visit Mr. Clarence on the Murray, and their conversation used to be about the Cape. Linton was employed by Mr. Clarence as hutkeeper, and as he used to hear the conversation between his employer and witness he knew that witness was a Cape man. There was not the slightest foundation in the world for what the man said. 

The case was dismissed ; and after witness had gone outside the Court, Mr. John Taylor, of the Royal Hotel at Deniliquin, said, in the presence of Linton, ' This man has been saying you and he were lags together at the Cape of Good Hope.' Witness turned to Linton, and asked, 'Have you said that?' Linton replied, ' What I said was, that we ought to have been lagged together.' Witness then took out a summons against Linton for making use of language in a public place calculated to provoke a breach of the peace. The case was heard, and Linton being convicted, was fined £o, with an alternative of three months' imprisonment, and he underwent his term of imprisonment. At the time of the assault case there was a criminal information before the Supreme Court. The Police Magistrate had applied for a rule from the Court directing the Attorney -General to prosecute Dr. Jones, editor and proprietor of the Pastoral limes, for libel, and during the cross-examination in the assault case witness said that the case was a trumpery one got up by Dr. Jones as a set-off against the case which the Police Magistrate had against him. Witness made tome very strong remarks on this point, and the editor of the Pastoral Times wrote a leader impugning the correctness of the report of the assault case published by the rival journal, insinuating that witness had concocted that report, and intending, as he thought, to let the public suppose there might be some truth in Linton's statement. Witness wrote a letter to one paper about some points of the case, and commenced an action against Dr. Jones for the article in the Pastoral Times. Before the time came for pleading Dr. Jones represented that he was willing to retract everything, and published an apology. This was agreed to, and the action dropped, everything being said in the article of apology that would relieve witness from obloquy. During the lime that witness was Mayor of ' Deniliquin, Mr. Heaton came there. He came as a stranger, travelling for the Town and Country Journal, canvassing for subscriptions ; and he called upon witness as Mayor of the place. Witness entertained him hospitably, and gave him all the information he asked for. After that, and when witness was living in Sydney, Mr. Heaton was the medium of communication between some people in Albury and witness, those people wanting him to stand as member for the Hume. In fact, the requisition asking him to stand was consigned to Mr. Heaton, in order that he should present it to witness ; Heaton brought the requisition to witness, and he agreed to contest the election. Then on the occasion of his going to address the electors at Albury Mr. Heaton accompanied him, and of course their conversation referred to the fact that witness had met him at Deniliquin, and witness told him all about the case of Linton — the whole affair— and particularly about his experience in South Africa. When witness left Deniliquin he was presented with £200 worth of silver plate and an address. He was banqueted also, and in fact there were showered upon him all the honours that could be showered upon any man. 

Witness's firm were solicitors for the representatives of Leichhardt. They proved Leichhardt's will. Mr. Du Faur called upon witness, and in consequence of what passed between them witness gave certain advice professionally. That was on the 11th or 12th of last January, a day or two before the publication of the libel. Witness understood this article containing the libel to refer to himself. He was referred to as a lawyer, Mayor, poundkeeper, member of Parliament, and solicitor now in Sydney ; and when he read the article he saw at once it was an allusion to the affair of Linton's. The article said in one place that there was an action brought against the lawyer by the newspaper proprietor. That was not true— there was no such action ; and the innuendo in the article that witness had obtained his admission as an attorney by false pretences— something having been torn from the records of the Supreme Court — was utterly untrue. The records were complete, and, were in Court to-day. In another part of the article he was represented as having worked in a chain-gang at the Cape of Good Hope. 

The first time witness met Heaton was at Deniliquin, and then their relations were perfectly friendly. Witness gave him information which was valuable to him as an agent travelling for a paper. Witness's firm acted as solicitors for Heaton in an Equity suit, and he afterwards acted on behalf of witness, and worked for him during the election for the Hume. Witness was on friendly terms with him even up to last year, but recently there had been no relations between them except those arising out of business transactions. Up to that time his relations with witness had been of a most friendly character. After the article appeared witness saw ' the Pilgrim,' who came to his office of hi» own accord; as far as witness knew. Mr. Pilcher: Then I understand that the effect of your negotiations with Haynes and Archibald is that they are to be held harmless, until you have taken everything you can get out of Heaton '( Witness: Yes. Mr. Pilcher-. With reference to 'the Pilgrim,' is there any understanding between him and your Witness : No, nothing in the world. Mr. Pilcher : You are not the only gentleman who can claim the qualifications of being a lawyer, Mayor, and member of Parliament. There are several gentlemen in Sydney who possess these three qualifications— Messrs. Trickett, Pigott, and Abbott, for instance. Witness : I do not think any of them can claim the qualification of having been a poundkeeper. (Laughter.) Re-examined by Sir Archibald Michie: Haynes told witness that Heaton had in his presence said to Harold Grey (the Pilgrim), ' I want to make good or fast friends with you about this article,' and that the Pilgrim replied, ' Heaton, you never were a friend of mine, and now I have got you by the throat, and if you want me to help you in this matter, you must bring out your cheque-book and write me a cheque for £10, and to-morrow I shall require another cheque for £10, and. the day after I shall probably want a cheque for £50 ;' (laughter) — and Haynes added, 'and there was a great row there;' witness, however, purposely abstained from asking him any questions ; that was all Haynes said on that occasion ; the article kept witness awake all night after he had read it. At this stage, the Court adjourned until Monday, at 10 a.m. 

Monday, February 28. 
Mr. Pilcher stated that Mr. G. H. Reid appeared with him on behalf of the defendant Heaton. Mr. Robertson wished to correct his evidence as to the date of the engagements at the Cape in which he took part; it was the 28th August, 1851, and not 31st August. 
Mr. Pilcher : Were you aware that the Government had also offered a reward, or offered to purchase the relics of Leichhardt '( Witness : The Premier stated to me that he might unofficially assure me that the Government would not be less liberal than the proprietors of the Bulletin. Hugh George, sworn and examined by Mr. Darley, stated that he was at present connected with the Sydney Morning Herald, and at one time had one-fourth share in the Bulletin ; he was not quite sure about the exact date, but he thought he held a share up till about the middle of December last ; in the month of December last witness saw Mr. Heaton in reference to selling his share in the Bulletin to him; Heaton asked witness what he wanted for his share, as he was anxious to buy it ; witness told him £2000, and Heaton said he would not give that for it ; witness then said to him, *' I am willing to take £1500, as I want to get rid of it ; ' the interview then terminated ; the next time Heaton saw witness he agreed to buy the fourth share for £1250 ; witness got a cheque for £250 and the remainder by acceptances ; since that time he had had no interest in the paper; witness told Heaton at that interview that in every sense he was to stand in his shoes, that he was to take over all the liabilities and responsibilities, as well as the interests, which were in every sense transferred to him. 

Eccleston Du Faur, sworn, and examined by Sir Archibald Michie, stated: He was chief draughtsman in the Occupation branch of the Lands Office ; he knew plaintiff ; witness had taken great interest in the inquiry as to the fate of Leichhardt, and remembered a telegram reaching him from Skuthorpe in reference to the alleged discovery of relics; the first telegram he received was at home on the 8th January, and when he received a subsequent telegram on the 12th January, he saw Mr. Robertson; he saw Mr. Heaton between those dates; he was interested in the subject, and witness gave him what he had received ; Heaton had previously offered a reward for the recovery of these relics ; witness bad seen him on the subject before, and the conversation was as to the probability of the relics being genuine and the finder getting the reward; during the conversations the reward advertised in the Bulletin was mentioned; witness laughed at the idea that the offering of the reward gave Heaton a claim, as the relics must have been found long before the advertisement appeared and had to be brought 400 or 500 miles from Skuthorpe' a place into Black all ; this occurred at the first interview ; Heaton had not previously consulted witness as to the propriety of offering a reward ; witness had had conversations during the last half a dozen years with Heaton upon the subject of Leichhardt, but nothing definite ; witness found the second telegram at his office on the morning of the 12th January ; Heaton called upon witness on the afternoon of the same day, and asked whether there was any further information; witness believed that he showed Heaton the telegram, and told him he had consulted Mr. Robertson on the matter, and that he had also, consulted the Colonial Secretary as to the course witness should fake, and that he had to consider the interests of the representatives of Leichhardt; Heaton was annoyed that witness had not taken the telegram to him in the first instance, and in reference to the first telegram, which witness brought in on Sunday and put in the Herald box, he complained that witness had not brought it to him first ; he said that, having come forward with this liberal offer of £1000, he thought that witness ought to have reserved his intelligence for him ; witness toid Heaton that he ought to know him better than to think he would keep a telegram of public importance back when he had an early opportunity of publishing it ; the telegram was published in the Herald on the following Monday; directly Heaton's offer appeared in the Bulletin of the 25th December, which was published on Thursday, the 23rd December, witness went over to the Bulletin office and saw Mr. Heaton there and two other gentlemen, Mr. Haynes being one; witness congratulated him on his plucky offer ; witness recalled to him the interest he had taken in the matter, and lent him a number of documents relating to the expeditions that had been sent out in search of Leichhardt ; he did not know who the editor was when he went over, and the first person he saw was Mr. Heaton, who informed him that he had joined the paper ; witness understood Heaton to say he had left the Evening News, and had become a proprietor of the Bulletin ; witness left the newspaper cuttings with Heaton for the use of the paper. John Woods, examined by Mr. Darley, deposed that he was one of the proprietors of the Bulletin; his co-proprietors were Mr. Haynes, Mr. Archibald, and Mr. Heaton; they and himself were the recognised proprietors in January last; witness had a conversation with Heaton in reference to his becoming proprietor, and also with reference to his having become a proprietor ; Mr. Heaton told him he had become a proprietor, and had purchased Mr. George's share in the Bulletin. Mr. Pilcher : Do you happen to know that he has not a shilling in the world except what belongs to his wife ? Witness said he knew differently ; he knew that Mr. Heaton had £1000 for the Leichhardt reward in the Joint Stock Bank, for Mr. Heaton told him so. Mr. Pilcher : Don't you know that every bit of property is settled on Heaton's wife by her father's will, and that ho has not a shilling ? Witness said Mr. Heaton fold him so the other day. Evidence in favour of the high character of plaintiff was given by several witnesses. Mr. Pilcher then addressed the jury on behalf of defendant Heaton. His Honor summed up. The jury retired at twenty-two minutes past 4, and after an absence of eighteen minutes, returned into Court with a verdict for plaintiff, damages £1000. THE BULLETIN LIBEL CASE. (1881, March 5). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 368. Retrieved, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161885338

Henniker Heaton (later Sir)

PRESS TELEGRAPH RATES.
A deputation consisting; of Mr. Alfred Bennett and Mr. J. Henniker Heaton (EVENING NEWS and TOWN AND COUNTRY JOURNAL). Mr. Hugh George (SYDNEY MORNING HERALD), Mr. J. Mooyart Lynch and Mr. Wynne (DAILY TELEGRAPH), was introduced by Mr. Bennett to the Postmaster General (Hon. Saul Samuel) last Monday, to ask for certain, modifications in the charges for intercolonial and provincial Press messages, by which the public would be enabled to get the fullest particulars by wire from all the colonies daily. The Superintendent of Telegraphs (E C. Cracknell. Esq.,) was present, and stated the arrangement by which he proposed to meet the wishes of the deputation. Mr. Samuel said that he was most favourable to the wishes of the deputation if they could be carried out. The objections were now being removed by the introduction of new and improved instruments, and he hoped to bring into operation, by February 1, the new arrangement. Mr. Alfred Bennett and Mr. George cordially thanked the Post master-General for his courtesy, and the deputation withdrew. PRESS TELEGRAPH RATES. (1880, January 17). Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 13. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70940230 

Recollections of an Australian Squatter.
In years gone by a radical legislator ominously declared his intention of driving the squatters in Victoria across the Murray with their own stockwhips ; and it is now a question " within the realms or poetical politics" as to whether the squatters, like the aborigines, even on this side of the Murray, are rapidly becoming an extinct race. It is an opportune time, when there is before the country a land bill intended to reduce, with a stroke of the pen, the present squatters' holdings to one-half. We have placed before us the experiences or the ups and downs in Australia of the Hon. W. A. Brodribb, M.L.C., F.R.G.S., who is in every sense a squatter, and a squatter of the pioneer order. In England we may remark that at the present day to nine-tenths of the people the name squatter is used as a term of opprobrium, and he corresponds to our loafer or ' sundowner ;' whereas he is a prince among men in Australia. As the work before us is a very readable narrative, and should obtain a circulation in Europe, it would have been well if a few of the technical terms, such as these, were explained by the veteran, who has now attained the fine old age of 75. William Adams Brodribb, though born in London, arrived with his parents — his father was a solicitor — in Tasmania at the age of seven years. After completing his education, and acquiring a taste for pastoral pursuits, he, at the age of 25 years, found himself with a capital of £500. With this he embarked in a small trader for Sydney, and the journey from Hobart Town occupied 10 days. After remaining three days in Sydney he purchased a small pony, and started into the interior in April, 1835 — almost 50 years ago. 

Young Brodribb took the southern road, and from thence to the Limestone Plains to Monaro, or as it was then spelt 'Maneroo.' With Mr. Charles Meredith — afterwards a prominent Tasmanian politician, and husband of the talented Mrs. Charles Meredith — Mr. Brodribb took up a station on Monaro, 100 square miles on the north bank of the Murrumbidgee, and within 50 miles of the Australian Alps. After stocking this station he bought out his partner, and in a few weeks he himself disposed of the whole station at a good profit. Mr. Brodribb's second station was selected on the spot where the important township of Gundagai now stands. With the assistance of one man and a few aborigines, Mr. Brodribb washed and sheared his 1200 ewes, and the wool was pressed by the hutkeeper with a spade into the rough primitive box made by themselves on the station. He sold his Gundagai station, without stock, for £100, and joined then in a bigger venture in purchasing sheep and cattle, and horses. 

Mr. Brodribb's friend, Mr. Joseph Hawdon, was the first person to send cattle to Port Phillip, in 1836, while he started the second draft the same year, and these two gentle-men ‘were the first to mark a road to Melbourne.' 

The next remarkable adventure told in these pages is the expedition from Port Phillip, or Melbourne, to Gippsland. Mr. Brodribb formed one of a small party of seven, and they chartered a vessel called the Singapore, and after stirring adventures they discovered those now important rivers, the Albert, the Latrobe, and the Tara. They formed their depot at a place they named Port Albert. Afterwards the party obtained an order to select 5120 acres of the choicest land in the neighbourhood of Port Albert, but this order of Lieut.-Governor Latrobe of Port Phillip was cancelled by the Surveyor-General of Sydney, Sir T. Mitchell, and the expedition, valuable to the country, was a total loss to Mr. Brodribb, who appears not to have received a farthing compensation. 

Bad seasons, low prices of stock, other disasters followed, and the large purchases of cattle previously alluded to, turned out unprofitably. Mr. Brodribb then undertook the management of the extensive squatting property of the late William Bradley, of Goulburn, on Monaro, where he remained for 12 years. In 1855 he again started for himself, and in a few pages a graphic description of perils in the Snowy Mountains are given, when Mr. Brodribb surmounted with stock the Australian Alps, in the neighbourhood of the famous Yarrongobilly Pass. Mr. Brodribb, on pages 67, 68, 69, and 70, gives some touching sketches of his domestic life in the Australian bush, and of the heartrending loss he sustained by tike death of two beautiful and loving children, and the horrible suspense during a long illness of his wife and remaining child. 

Mr. Brodribb afterwards acquired a share in Wanganella station, near Deniliquin, and from there sold out, and went to reside at Brighton, near Melbourne. He was elected a member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly in 1861, defeating Mr. Higinbotham, now a judge, for the electorate in which he resided; and he remained in the Victorian Parliament about nine months, and assisted to pass the Duffy Land Bill of 1862. Mr. Brodribb then visited England, and during his two years stay there did good work in making Australia known as a field for emigration. He returned to Australia in 1864, and shortly afterwards again entered into squatting pursuits on the Lachlan. He stood for Monaro in 1864 ; but was defeated by Sir James Martin. In 1873 he paid a second visit to England, when he did excellent service in reforming the wool sales. Upon his return he engaged directly and indirectly in pastoral pursuits, and ended by settling in Sydney; and at the general election of 1880 he was elected for Wentworth in the N.S.W. Legislative Assembly ; but, resigning in less than two years, he accepted a seat in the Legislative Council, which he still holds. In this very brief outline of 48 years' squatting life in New South Wales, and 65 years' residence in Australia and Tasmania, the reader will see that Mr. Brodribb has done a good work in publishing the records of his trials and vicissitudes. Many portions are of historical importance, and every page abounds with interest even when gossipy and relating to home life 'in the bush.' J. H. H. Recollections of an Australian Squatter. (1883, November 24). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 7. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108840458 

J. H. H = John Henniker Heaton (EVENING NEWS and TOWN AND COUNTRY JOURNAL)

Mr, J. Henniker Heaton,
LONDON, May 14.— Mr. J. Henniker Heaton of Sydney, has been chosen as the Tory candidate for Canterbury at the next election for that constituency.Mr. J. Henniker Heaton. (1884, May 15).Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107263889 

Sir John Henniker Heaton
Sir John Henniker Heaton, 1st Baronet (18 May 1848 – 8 September 1914) was a United Kingdom Member of Parliament and a postal reformer and journalist in Australia. Visit: http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/heaton-sir-john-henniker-3745

APOSTLE OF PENNY
POSTAGE.
SIR HENNIKER HEATON
DEAD.
LONDON, September 9.
Sir John Henniker Heaton. Bart. K C M G , the great postal reformer, died to-day while on a trip to Geneva.
Since the time of Rowland Hill the cause of postal reform the cheapening and improvement of the postal service in every way has had no advance to compare with Sir Henniker Heaton. The possessor of private means, enabling him to command most of the good things of life he might easily have yielded, as so many in the same circumstances do, to the temptation of living a life of enjoyment free from all work and worry. It says much, therefore, for his inherent altruism he used for the benefit of his fellow beings the advantages of wealth and leisure. 

Born at Rochester, Kent, in 1848 he was a son of the late Lieutenant Colonel Heaton He was educated at Kent House grammar school and Kings College, London. Early in life he came to Australia and lived for 20 years in New South Wales, marrying a daughter of Mr. Samuel Bennett, who founded the Sydney "Evening News" and the "Town and Country Journal." He represented New South Wales at the Amsterdam Exhibition of 1883 and the Indian Colonial Exhibition of'1886. In 1885 he represented the Tasmanian Government at the Berlin Telegraphic Conference. He lived during later years in England, and first entered the House of Commons in 1885 as Conservative member for Canter-bury. Subsequently he was elected for the same constituency in 1888, 1892, 1895, 1900, and for 1906-10 (the last four times unopposed) .

The late Sir Henniker Heaton. (our copy is: Sir John Henniker Heaton, London, ca. 1880s [picture] / Russell & Sons, nla.obj-152775595-1 courtesy National Library of Australia. )
It was his experience in the mining ramps of Australia, where he saw how the miners suffered through the heavy charge for letters to England, that led him to begin his reform crusade. By dint of unlimited energy and patience, subjecting to a persistent bombardment with protests and representations the authorities of St. Martin’s-Le-Grand, he at length, in 1893, carried Imperial penny postage, the reform being heralded by successive reductions in the charge for oversea letters. This was followed ten years later by Anglo-American penny postage. He introduced telegraphic money orders to Great Britain and parcel post to France. In recognition of his services to the nation the freedom of the City of London in a gold casket was conferred upon him in 1899, and of the City of Canterbury in a silver casket during the same year. Among his many publications are "The Manners and Customs of the Aborigines of Australia" and "The Australian Dictionary of Dates and Men of the Tune." 

He was knighted in 1905 and raised to the baronetage in 1912. On that occasion a reception was given at the London Guildhall in recognition of his services in the cause of postal reform and the cheapening of cable rates between the various parts of the Empire. He was then presented with an album in which were inscribed over 1,000 names of the most distinguished persons in the public life of the Empire. 

It may safely be said that there, is scarcely a soul in the English-speaking world who has not reaped some advantage from the work of the deceased gentleman. His ideal of a penny post all over the civilised world and a penny-a-word cable rate, irrespective of distance, has not yet been reaped, but a very good advance has been made in extending, cheapening, and facilitating communication between mankind. The service thus rendered to the spread of knowledge, the extension of commerce, will not soon be forgotten. It is said of him that when he started his political career he made out a list of 60 reforms in the post office system which he meant to achieve. A large proportion were accomplished, but his scheme for an Imperial penny post is that by which he will best be remembered. APOSTLE OF PENNY POSTAGE. (1914, September 10). The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), p. 8. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6431936 

Round two! - and possibly visited by Bulletin scribes - one at least!:

THE CLONTARF CASE.
The following is Thursday's evidence :— 
Patrick John Horgan, publican : Was at Clontarf on Boxing Day ; I saw the dancing for a short time in the pavilion; it was a drunken scene; there was much bad language ; I saw a young man with his arms round a young woman hugging her; outside the pavilion I heard a young man use very bad language to a young woman ; I think that she was under the influence of drink ; there was a man lying drunk near the pavilion ; it was the first time I was ever at Clontarf, and I will swear it shall be the last ; I saw a man lying drunk ; another man put his hand into the drunken man's trousers- pocket ; he turned him over, and put his hand into the other pocket ; I could not see whether he got anything; I could not see a policeman; there was a great deal of blasphemous and indecent and obscene language ; I never heard worse language in my life ; there were two young women fighting in the most disgraceful manner ; larrikins were standing around ; the fight was stopped by some men ; the conduct of the larrikins was scandalous; I saw 12 larrikins on one man, knocking him about his face was brutally smashed up ; I have lived in America and other parts of the world, and have seen a great many public entertainments of this nature, but I never in all my life saw such a scene as I witnessed on Boxing Day. It will be remembered that Mr. Hawkins, a witness, had sworn that he saw a ticket-taker at Clontarf with a revolver in his belt. As some doubt was thrown upon this portion of his evidence, he now identified the man in court. 
Oliver Oliffe : Was at Clontarf on Boxing Day ; I saw disgraceful swinging; the girls used indecent language; their conduct was not respectable ; they had no shame; there were four or five fights at the back of the pavilion ; there was much pushing and rowdyism at the bar ; a good few of them were drunk; some girls were bathing off the boat pier ; some of them were naked ; larrikins were watching them from the shore ; there was a great deal of drunkenness both among the young women and men; in the pavilion some of the dancing was respectable and some was indecent. (Mr. Darley, Q.C., cross-examined this witness at length as to the relative positions of the parties when the girls were bathing, and as to the times of the different circumstances.) 
Charles Dunning, printer : Was at Clontarf on Boxing Day ; saw a fight between two girls in the pavilion ; saw two men stripped to the waist fighting, and surrounded by a crowd of larrikins ; from appearances, dress, and manner, the girls appeared to be women of the town ; many of them were under the influence of drink ; the language was indecent. 
Charles Button, member of the Permanent Artillery Force : Was at Clontarf on Boxing Day ; have read the article complained of ; from what I saw I consider that the statements in that article are true ; there were low women in the grounds, at the bars, and in the pavilion ; the conduct of the larrikins and young women was indecent ; a great number of them were the worse for drink ; there was a fight between two women in the bar by the pavilion ; there was a great deal of drinking going on ; the drinks chiefly called for by the larrikins and young women were rum or brandy ; nearly all the young women were under 21 ; in the pavilion there was a step dance, in which the women pulled their dresses up above their knees and exposed their legs ; the conduct of the young men was most indelicate ; there was no policeman present to stop this indecency ; most of these women were prostitutes ; it was not a fit place for any respectable person to go to ; by my instructions, I am not allowed to interfere with civilians without orders from my superior ; the sergeant was present ; I saw several young men bathing on the beach ; they were stark naked ; some young women were watching them from the shore ; a young man, naked, came out of the water; he ran after a young girl who was on the shore ; a constable in plain clothes rushed forward and arrested him, and borrowed my handcuffs, and I assisted to handcuff him ; I never heard of this man being proceeded against by the police for this indecent exposure ; I never saw such scenes in my life. 
Cross-examined by Mr. Darley, Q.C. : I was subpoenaed on Friday evening ; I remember meeting constable Skinner on Tuesday last ; constable Hall was with him ; I gave my evidence to Mr. Slattery yesterday ; I do not know how I came to be subpoenaed ; I told Skinner when I was subpoenaed ; I said ' I will not go unless I am paid for it ;'' Skinner said it was not a bad place ; I never told Skinner that I was not at Clontarf at all ; Skinner told me that he was going to give it a good name ; I told Skinner that if I was called I would only remember about the handcuffs ; the sergeant who was with me has committed suicide; the two men of the force we were looking after have deserted ; 
William Henry Traill, Reuter's agent for New South Wales, formerly editor of the Sydney Mail : I wrote the article complained of ; I was at Clontarf on Boxing Day ; I wrote that article from what I saw myself ; the ' Pilgrim ' had nothing to do with it ; I do not know Harold Gray ; I wrote every line ; I had been to Clontarf before on several occasions, but never on a public holiday ; I was not aware of the existence of Messrs. Moore when I wrote the article ; I thought that Clontarf was a public reserve ; I thought solely of the public when I wrote the article. [The learned counsel here took the witness through the different allegations in order, and each of them he swore to be true.] I saw young girls dancing in a way in which no girls should dance ; they were going to the bars, and coming back flushed ; some of them were not helplessly drunk, hut decidedly under the influence of liquor ; in the refreshment room there were a few respectable people taking their tea ; I saw a couple, a young man and woman, seated apart ; they were each tipsy. [The witness here described minutely what occurred between them.] There were four boys looking on. [To his Honor the' Judge: This took place at one end of the room ; the respectable people were at the other end.] I saw a little girl fall, and another girl behaved to her in an improper manner. [This witness here entered into particulars which are not fit for publication.] I saw a fight between two young women, and another between two girls of about 14 years of age ; the former fight began as though they were men, and ended as though they were women ; the latter fight I could pot see distinctly, because a crowd gathered round ; the dancing in the pavilion was very loose ; I have not the slightest doubt that a considerable number of those dancing were harlots ; I conclude this from their actions and manners ; between the dances there was a general rush and scramble to the bar ; I would not take away one word from this article ; no other word but an orgy would adequately describe that which I saw, I had no motive whatever in writing that article, except the good of the community ; I am a professional journalist, and I considered it my duty to write that article. Cross-examined by Mr. Darley, Q.C. : In describing the conduct of the little child to the one who fell down, I could not possibly place upon it any other construction ; I did not write the article, 'The Bulletin's Home Throats,' in the following week; I do not know the 'Pilgrim.' [Mr. Darley here handed the witness the copy of the Bulletin, which he had put in evidence, and which contains an account of 'A Scandal at Darling Point.'] He maintained its admissibility as evidence, inasmuch as it tends to show that the Bulletin did not publish the alleged libel in the public interest. Mr. Salomons objected. What has a scandal at Darling Point got to do with the alleged libel? His Honor the Judge reserved the point for further consideration whether the paper was admissible or not. Case adjourned. 
The Military Committee connected with the Royal Commission appointed to inquire into the military defences of the colony met yesterday, at the Brigade Office, under the vice-presidency of Colonel Scratchley, and were engaged with the consideration of their final report to the Commission. THE CLONTARF CASE. (1881, May 14).The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 800. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161884728 

The far more exhaustive report below records the penalty of one farthing being given to the complainants, indicating the jury and public opinion knew something unseemly was going on at Clontarf, and had been for a while. Unfortunately their token decision did not take into account costs being awarded against the defendants, already struggling after their earlier case of that year. 

Legend has it that Archibald and Haynes refused to pay on principle, for moral reasons while other records state they simply couldn't afford to. In March 1882 they were placed in Darlinghurst Gaol. Haynes and Archibald also indicate, (in the articles that follow) what went on the record in the newspapers of the day; the support the public then tendered them in getting them out of the Debtor's Prison - which was paying the debt. This was an early incident that reflects Australians will support those who will put themselves at risk to tell the truth.


John Feltham Archibald and John Haynes, journalists of The Bulletin, in Darlinghurst Gaol, March 1882 / unknown photographer. Image No.:  a4157058, courtesy State Library of New South Wales

Theodore, his works and what they were trying to rectify, attracted huge support, as evidenced in the thousands who are reported attending his Lectures post the 'watch stealing case' that put an end to his focus subjects as 'The Pilgrim'. The days of papers reporting to an audience that always had a mind of its own with a tone of 'we'll tell you what to think' were ending, perhaps ended. The 'colonials' or 'currency lads and lasses' were snubbing their noses in return at those who deemed them lesser - they knew the world they wanted to live in and saw opportunity for this to occur in this brand new nation. They would stick up for those who effectively fought for the kind of society we wanted, ensure such discussions continued.

THE CLONTARF CASE.
Friday, May 13. MOORE AND ANOTHER V. HAYNES AND OTHERS.
Mr. Darley, Q.C., and Mr. Manning, instructed by Mr. Heron, appeared for the plaintiffs ; Mr. Salomons, Q.C., and Mr. Pilcher, instructed by Messrs. Slattery and Heydon, appeared for the defendants. His Honor the Judge took his scat at 11 o'clock, and stated that he had consulted with the Chief Justice, and had determined that the whole paper was in evidence, and that comments might be made on it to show the general tone of the paper. Mr. Salomons, Q.C., here tendered evidence as to particular things which had taken place on occasions previous to last Boxing Day. The evidence was not admitted. Here the defendants' case was closed. 
Frederick Rollo : Was at Clontarf last Boxing Day. [Mr. Darley informed the Court that he was about to' ask this witness as to the specific acts of indecency sworn to by the witness Haynes.] I was in the pavilion. [Mr. Haynes's evidence as to the pavilion was here detailed, and its truthfulness was denied, These things could not have happened without my seeing them ; I was a musician and was there all the time. The hearing of this case was continued after we went to press yesterday. John O'Loughlan : I was master of the ceremonies at Clontarf on Boxing Day ; I was in the room all day ; I saw everything that went on. [The witness here denied the alleged improprieties seriatim'.] Cross-examined by Mr. Salomons, Q.C. : I was there all the time, and must have seen and heard everything ; I may have heard the word ' damn,' but there was no indecent nor obscene language ; there were no harlots; I saw no improprieties ; the article in the Bulletin is all a lie. Mr. Mills (recalled) : I have been in Court since I gave my evidence ; I heard Mr. Haynes's evidence ; I was bandmaster, and saw all over the room. [The witness here denied specifically different portions of Mr. Haynes's evidence.] Girls with long dresses might have lifted them up, but I never saw any deliberate attempt to lift the clothes. Cross-examined by Mr. Salomons, Q.C. : There were 500 dancers present ; no one came into the pavilion with women's drawers on; it would have caused a rush of the lower orders by the term ' lower orders' I mean people who ... person who, from her behaviour, I would take to be disreputable; I saw no impropriety; I heard no blasphemy or obscene talk. Charles Binks : Played in the band at Clontarf on Boxing Day ; saw no impropriety, and heard no bad language ; did not see a young man with a pair of women's drawers on ; would have seen it if it had occurred in the pavilion. Constable Skinner, recalled : I heard the witness Rounsevell's evidence; I saw him at Clontarf. Did you lay hands on Rounsevell? [Mr. Salomons objected. It is not competent to call a witness to contradict Rounsevell. He has sworn in answer to them, and they are bound by his answer. 31 L. J, Mag. Cas., 98. The Court, having refused evidence as to Rounsevell's credibility, cannot now receive evidence to show that he is not to be believed. Mr. Darley, Q.C., withdrew the question.] I heard Mr. Haynes' evidence; if anything of that sort took place I must have seen it ; I swear that it did not take place ; I saw Oliffe and Dunning (defendants' witnesses) that day ; I know Hutton well; we have been on duty together; I did not see him there on that day ; no young men were bathing about the pier on that day ; I did not see them. Cross-examined by Mr. Salomons, Q.C. : I have not acted as a detective for the plaintiffs in this matter ; I did go with the plaintiffs to Hodge's public-house; I have not been to Clontarf since Boxing Day; on January 5 I did swear at the Water Police Court that Burns was riotous at Clontarf ; I did swear at the Water Police Court, on January 10, that Mulholland was fighting, shouting, and that he was stripped; I did swear that Thomas Brown was riotous on that day, and that he 'rushed' the police; there were two other informations which I could not serve. [The learned counsel here confronted the witness with his depositions at the Water Police Court.] I did not swear all that at my examination in chief. Edward Hickson was at Clontarf on December 27 ; I was off the pier about 2 o'clock; I could have seen both piers underneath the piles ; I saw some little boys about 8 or 9 years of age bathing, but no one older ; I did not see any young women bathing. 
Sydney Jacobs : I was in a boat about 100 yards off the pier from 12 to half -past 1 o'clock ; I did not see any men or women bathing ; I do not believe it could have happened without my seeing it. Cross-examined : Saw one or two cases of drunkenness : I saw no one in the water ; there were no children bathing. Arthur Davis: Was at Clontarf on Boxing Day; was ticket-taker ; had no revolver on that day. [This witness denied several material particulars of the evidence for the defence.] Case adjourned. 

Monday, May 16. 
Matthew Jones : Was one of a fishing party at Clontarf on Boxing Day ; was moored near the wharf ; did not see any bathing ; would have seen it if it had taken place. Constable Kerr, re-examined : Did not see any bathing even by children off the wharf; never saw a woman's drawers being thrown about; I think I would have seen these things, for I was about among the people all day. James King : Was employed as a ticket-taker on Boxing Day ; had no revolver ; saw no bathing off the pier ; if there had been any bathing I must have seen it ; I was afcout the wharf all day, and I saw no indecency; I never heard of or saw any impropriety of any kind, either on the wharf or on the grounds ; I saw no improper characters ; everything was as it ought to be. Cross-examined : Did not see the larrikins opposing the police ; I saw no girls fighting ; the ground was very quiet the whole of the day ; there were 2500 persons there that day ; I am a very old friend of the Moores, and have known them more than 20 years ; I never charge them for my services ; my children often go and stay at Clontarf as at a private house. 

Donald Haffener : Was a musician at Clontarf on Boxing Day. (The acts of indecency which were alleged in the defendants' case to have taken place in the pavilion were here detailed to the witness. He swore that it was almost impossible for them to have taken place without his knowledge, and he denied that he saw anything of the kind take place.) To Mr. Salomons, Q.C. : I heard no bad language ; saw no fighting, no women under the influence of liquor ; I saw nothing at all improper; I saw nothing about the women's dress or manners to show that they were in any way loose women. Frederick Robinson was in a boating party off Clontarf last Boxing Day ; saw some little children, but no men nor women, bathing near the boat pier. Cross-examined : I was on and off the grounds all day ; I saw nothing improper, but I heard bad and blasphemous but not obscene language near the pier ; I went into the pavilion twice ; I did not dance : I saw one or two loose women dancing ; I knew this by their dress. 
Martin Hincks : Was at Clontarf on Boxing Day ; was in the dining-room. This witness was examined as to an act of indecency sworn to have taken place in the refreshment room.] I never saw any act of indecency or impropriety ; I was engaged by Messrs. Moore in the tearoom. Cross-examined : 1 saw none but decent, respectable people. 
Senior-constable Dods, on duty at No.4 police station: No charge of indecency arising out of Boxing Day at Clontarf was made at No. 4 station, to the best of my knowledge ; if a man had been arrested at Clontarf he would probably have been brought to No. 4 station ; I am not aware that there were any plain clothes constables sent to Clontarf from my station on Boxing Day, but there might have been. This was the close of the plaintiffs' case in reply. 

Mr. Salomons, Q.C., applied that he might be allowed to call evidence to show that the witness Hutton had spoken the truth. The contradiction of evidence was such that, if the evidence in reply was true, Hutton could not have spoken the truth. The defendants had not had, and, unless the Court acceded to this request, the defendants would not have, an opportunity of showing that Hutton was a man of truth. The new matter, which was material to the issue, re the credibility of Hutton, had been imported into this case during the plaintiffs' reply, and therefore it was strictly just that the defendants should have an opportunity of answering it. His Honor reserved the point to consider with the Chief Justice, and will give his decision to-morrow morning.On the application of the jury, the case was postponed till this morning, in order to give them an opportunity of a private view of Clontarf. 


'Clontarf', from Album Mort family - Photographs of Sydney & N. S. Wales [ca. 1879-1889]. Image No.: a7242056, courtesy Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales
Tuesday, May 17. 
When his Honor the Judge took his seat, he said that he had consulted the Chief-Justice with regard to the question that had been reserved from the previous day respecting the admission of certain evidence, and his Honor Sir James Martin concurred in the decision that the evidence ought not to be received. 
Mr. Salomons then began his address to the jury. He said this was the ninth day over which the case had ex- . tended, and while his clients from the opening to the close had done everything' to allow his learned friend to put before the jury whatever evidence he thought fit to bring forward, he (Mr. Salomons had over and over again offered to produce evidence which no jury in the world could have resisted, and which might compel the most able counsel to put down his brief, but he had been prevented from giving that evidence. His clients came into Court on purely public grounds. The article was substantially true. The effect upon young women from drinking and dancing was as the article represented, and if the Messrs. Moore, thinking they were at a disadvantage, could bring a better case into Court, and would allow the defendants to show what Clontarf had been for the last two or three or four years, they would consent to another trial, and before any special jury in this city. 
No one could shut his eyes to the fact that the whole of this city cried out for a verdict according to justice. His learned friend had been very anxious to meet at the writer of the article complained of, thinking it was the work of 'The Pilgrim,' a man of ability, but one who, even if he swore on a bundle of Bibles, would not be believed; and when it was shown that the writer was Mr. Traill, a man well known and of respectability in the community, his learned friend attempted to bolster up his case by saying that the article was not printed in good faith. It would be a great victory to the Messrs. Moore if they could get the jury to differ, but although three of the jury after a certain number of hours could give a verdict, one given by a majority only would be deprived of all moral weight, though in law it would have the same effect as a verdict given by the four. 
There were in this country numbers of girls fond of frippery and finery, and unable to gratify their longing for these things; and there were numbers of men brought up in such a loose manner that you never would think they were brought up in respectable homes. These young men, having money, went down to these picnicing places, and large sums of money were spent in a manner which was highly injurious to the morals of both sexes. 
Mothers and fathers had read the article in the Bulletin, and it had had a great effect on the takings of the Messrs. Moore. But though it had been an injury to them, it was a benefit to the community. 
The plaintiffs had come into Court with his learned friend to represent them and it was asserted that all which was said in the article was a lie. Constable Skinner was one of the witnesses called. Ordinary witnesses generally did no more than answer the questions asked them, but where a witness was a public officer, with no leaning to one side or the other, and knowing what he admitted on cross-examination, he was supposed to come there and give impartial and complete evidence. But to go into the box and finish his evidence by saying that the article was a lie rendered that officer open to the most serious condemnation. It might be said that the article, if true, showed that the police did not do their duty. That was exactly what the defendants said. This man Skinner had been going to Clontarf a great many times, and had become intimate with the Messrs. Moore. He would not say that Skinner would swear what was not true, but there was such a thing as partisanship and keeping back everything until it was dragged from you. But take away all the witnesses for the defendants, and leave Mr. Traill, the writer of the article, alone; and it would be found that Mr. Traill never knew the Messrs. Moore, and had given an account of what he saw, enough to make the blood run cold. 
The Messrs. Moore had told them that they had taken all the means they could in Sydney to keep improper females from going there. No doubt that was perfectly true, but they admitted that on one occasion they had 23 of these characters put across the Spit, and 17 on another occasion. Well, that showed what an attraction this place must have for women of this class, if, notwithstanding all the ability of Mr, Moore, and all the precautions he took, 23 of these women were found there on one occasion. Why did they go there? To prey upon, and to tempt to perdition, the numbers of young men who go there. They had heard that hundreds of larrikins went there ; they had that from Moore's own case. With all the precautions they took there were 23 bad characters there on one occasion, 17 on another, and 5 on another, and they had to land them on the Spit. 
Mr. Salomons referred at length to the necessity for maintaining the independence of the Press and reviewed the evidence of several witnesses. At this stage the Court adjourned until 10 o'clock on the following morning, when Mr. Salomons concluded his address. 

Wednesday, May 18. 
Mr. Salomons, resuming his address to the jury, said that a great deal of what he had said on the previous day he might have omitted, but he had addressed them at length because he saw that this case was one likely to create a great deal of interest, and that what took place at that trial would have some effect on the public mind. He intentionally had not called either of the defendants to give evidence, because he had been determined to have this question tried on its merits. 
The Messrs. Moore came into Court saying this article in the Bulletin was a libel which injured them. He admitted it had injured them, but it had deterred many young people from going to Clontarf, and had done a public good. The amount of eating and drinking had decreased with the smaller number of people going there, and the profits of the Messrs. Moore were consequently less than they had been. They, therefore, came into Court and claimed damages, which they were entitled to if it were proved that the article complained of was a lie or a romance. But it was proved by a large number of witnesses that what had been written was really true, and if the Bulletin took the tide which was now in its favour, it might secure a stand in the country which would raise a barrier against vice, and cause a stop to be put to this drinking and other objectionable proceedings on the part of young men and young women. 
His learned friend had come into court wrongly instructed and misled. The defendants did not come there to save damages or secure their own liberty ; they were indifferent as to these. If it were possible that the jury could think that his learned friend's opening address had given a proper cast of this case, and that all the defendants' witnesses were speaking what was not true, the plaintiffs would be entitled to every penny they claimed, and if the defendants could not pay the amount they should go to prison. But when the case of his learned friend was shattered and destroyed, it was no use turning round and saying 'Look at this article on 'Rival Magnates,' or at that on 'A Darling Point Mystery.'' 
Twenty-six witnesses, including friends and intimate acquaintances of the plaintiffs, had been called by the defendants, and the first thing to consider was what had been said by these witnesses, and whether it was true. Twenty witnesses proved that they had seen certain things, and anyone of those witnesses disproved the Messrs. Moore's case. It was easy to understand that many persons who were at Clontarf would not see the incidents which had been sworn to in evidence; and this was quite consistent with a number of others seeing them. Witnesses had sworn they had seen these things, and if they were to be believed they proved the defendants' case. Proof of the truth of this evidence met the jury from every point, apart from public opinion, as strong as 'Holy Writ. When you had a body of men -who gave evidence, and all the evidence pointed in one direction, those witnesses were true. 
The result of the verdict he expected from the jury would be the impossibility in the future for a man to have a license, and without the chance of losing that license, to open a dancing saloon on his ground and put another drinking-bar near it. The article in the Bulletin would be beneficial to the people in a highly moral sense. Now that the subject of these so-called picnics was brought into notice, the Government would prevent any dancing-saloon from being opened in connection with a licensed house; they would provide better police protection, and sweep that class of persons who defied the police into the gaols, and leave them there until they became wiser and better men. 
He did not ask them to say by their verdict that there were no respectable persons at Clontarf ; there may have been respectable people there, but they were lost sight of. As far as this ease was concerned he had finished. If his clients bad brought persons there to swear what was false they deserved to pay damages ; but if their witnesses were to be believed the jury could not find a verdict against the defendants. It should be understood that this paper had no animosity against the Messrs. Moore ; they had simply published the article from a sense of public duty, they might have prevented this action if they had apologised ; but they refused to apologise, and stood by the article. 
They did not say that the Messrs. Moore were responsible for all that took place at Clontarf, but they said that persons who violated the law by opening drinking bars attached to dancing- saloons, persons who carried on this illegal thing for profit, were greatly to blame, because they held out these allurements, and made money out of them. The Messrs. Moore had been badly advised, and had made a great error in bringing this action, and thinking that they could carry the case as it were by storm. The Government, he thought, would be justified in buying up these places, which were the beauty spots of the 'harbour. No doubt, pure air and lovely scenery were calculated to purify the most debased minds if they were away from drink and women. If the Government had this place there would be no bar, and no drinking; no women, and no loose behaviour. His learned friend would have to struggle against the evidence of many witnesses, but his ability would succeed in giving a colour to it all, and making the worse appear the better case. But let him (Mr. Salomons) point out that the jury had to decide for themselves, and that the article in the Bulletin had been absolutely proved. 
He had nothing more to say. It had been suggested that he might sit down and write a peroration with regard to the mothers of the city and their daughters, and to the injury they had suffered, and so on; but he would do no such thing. If he could not by calm, cool, solid judgment, obtain a verdict, he would not attempt to obtain it by other means. He admitted that he had not been able to rob himself of the character of an advocate; but reading the evidence that had been given, and seeing the scenes painted by men who saw them and swore to having seen them at these so-called picnics, he had not been able to keep himself down to the level of indifference. 
He now left the case in the hands of the jury, satisfied that they would do justice in the matter, and would conclude by asking his Honor to take note of a judgment of Lord Ken yon in a case Dibdin v. Swan and Bostock. It was given in an action against the editor and printer of a public newspaper called the World. Lord Kenyon said that the editor of a public newspaper may fairly and candidly comment upon any place or species of public entertainment, but it must be done fairly and without malice or view to injure or prejudice the proprietor in the eyes of the public. That if so done, however severe the censure, the justice of it screens the editor from legal animadversion ; but if it can be proved that the comment is unjust, is malevolent, or exceeding the bounds of fair opinion, that such is a libel, and therefore actionable.'' In the present ease the defendants said that Clontarf was a place of public entertainment ; and the article written concerning it was written fairly, without malice, and without any view to injure or prejudice the proprietor. Ii had turned out that the article was perfectly true, and the defendants showed that it had been written for the public benefit only, in the days of a great and crying evil. Again apologizing most sincerely for the time he had been compelled to take up, he submitted that when the jury had heard his learned friend and his Honor they would feel it their duty to give a verdict satisfactory to their consciences; and that verdict would be, and could only be— because he had proved the truth of the article— a verdict for the defendants. (Applause.) Tuesday and Wednesday were occupied by counsels' addressee. 

Thursday, May 19. 
His Honor, addressing the jury, said they had been a very long time over this case, and it was quite' possible that some little portion of their time had not been quite usefully employed, but upon the whole he thought there could be no doubt that their time had been usefully employed, and whatever might be the immediate result of the case between the parties concerned, the inquiry had been one in the course of which a good deal of evidence had been given of an undisputed character, showing that it was very desirable that the way in which public picnics were conducted — or rather the way in which picnics were spoiled by the intrusion of low characters on public holidays— should be changed. It suggested on undoubted evidence that some remedy was required. It was no use talking of the public being deprived of the liberty of going to these places of resort for the purpose of amusing themselves on public holidays, and no Government had a right to interfere so paternally, as it was sometimes called, with that right in a country like ours. 

People had a right to go to those places, and seek their own amusement according to their own tastes. Happily the great bulk of society was respectable, and it was the duty of the Government and of society to protect the respectable part of the community from those who were rowdies and blackguards. It had been suggested by counsel that these places ought to be put into the hands of the Government, and maintained as beauty spots for public recreation. There might be advantages in that, but it was not a remedy which could apply to this matter ; and if the Government did take certain spots into their hands, other spots would immediately be taken up by persons catering for public amusement, and ! the Government would have to take upon themselves duties which did not properly belong to our theory of government. There might be countries in which government existed in a democratic form, where public amusements might be taken in hand by the authorities, but that was not the case here. He thought it would be found that in our society the best i and wisest course, on the whole, was to leave these I things to private enterprise, to those who saw their way to do it, and who had to make their living out of public amusements. At the same time the Government, on behalf of the great majority of the people, were bound to take steps to check those who undertook these things if they were disposed to encourage disorder ; and to support those who desired to keep their places orderly and free from the intrusion of those they wished to keep away, and whose presence had the effect of destroying the enjoyment of the thousands who attended for harmless recreation. We were told that there were a great many prostitutes and larrikins at these places. There were some States in Europe where prostitutes were kept under control. Somehow or other there had been rather a morbid sensitiveness amongst English people against recognising the existence of this evil at all. Rather than regulate it, they ignored it, and therefore these persons were left to exercise license according to their own free will. In other States they were put under regulations —licensed on condition that they observed sanitary rules, medical inspection, and were under strict police surveillance. If we had something of that sort, and if on any occasion of a large public gathering any of these unhappy creatures presented themselves, a single word in their ear from one of the police would send them away without public exposure. If they were known, and they understood that the police and magistrates had authority over them, then if they intruded where they ought not to intrude they could be made to go away.

The case of the larrikins was perhaps not so easy to dispose of. The word 'larrikin' was not well understood, and was said to have originated from a peculiar pronunciation in these colonies of the word ' larking.' He supposed larrikins meant a lawless, dissipated, I disorderly set, who recognised no discipline, and who disturbed the public peace. Probably some strong remedy would have to be tried with them before long. If i society must suffer terribly from their licentious presence without sufficient control they must be put under control; and he hoped the day was coming when some f strong measures would be taken to keep them in order, or | keep them within gaol walls, which was the fittest place for ' them. Now, with reference to the matter under consideration, it was entirely for the jury to consider whether the article was a libel— whether it was a libel in the widest sense, or a libel in the sense of undue exaggeration. We had certain facts before us in undisputed evidence, and, therefore, it was a fit subject for observation, and had given to the I labours of those engaged an interest which would have been wanting if there had not been some strong moral element in the case. With the sense that they were there inquiring into a matter which largely concerned the public welfare, they had felt an interest which, had sustained them from the commencement, and would do be to the close, of the case. He had said that some of the evidence was undisputed evidence. Upon that point there was the evidence of constable Skinner, who told us that fourteen or fifteen prostitutes were at Clontarf on the day in question, and forty or fifty larrikins also, who were disturbing the public peace, and at one time defied the police. That might be token as undisputed evidence, and showed that there was present on the occasions of these picnics a mischief-making element, And from other evidence they might consider that this circumstance did not apply to Clontarf only, but that the same kind of thing occurred at other places where there were large public picnics. The jury and he had now their duties to discharge. Some of those duties were in common, and others were separate and distinct. They had their duties in common to see that they were not in any ?degree misled by favour of either party, that they were not allowing themselves to be misled even by previous conceptions as to public gatherings, or by indignation at what they considered to be wrong. It was necessary for them to keep their minds on even balance between the parties in the case. For although there were questions in which the public were concerned, they had to keep their immediate duty before them, and decide upon the evidence. He confessed for himself, it was a matter of difficulty to get rid of what might turn out to be an illusion — that our public holiday people were an especially orderly set. He had told strangers visiting Sydney from England that a remarkable feature here was the tens of thousands of people who congregated on public holidays, well dressed and happy, and without any disorder taking place among them ; but if that illusion was to be dispelled by the evidence it must be dispelled. Neither he nor the jury mutt be led away by what they had understood. He hoped, however, it might still be possible to retain the belief that our public holiday people were, as a rule, an orderly and respectable, well-conducted people in their amusements, as they were in everyday life, and that if in the instance referred to in this case there were disorders, it was the exception and not the rule. It was quite possible they would be able to retain the belief that as a rule the public were an orderly people on holidays; and yet they might think that on the occasion referred to in this case there was such a large assemblage of bad characters that it was sufficient to justify the article which was before them. 
Let them retain their opinion of the general respectability of the people of this city, although they might consider that on this particular occasion there were things which justified the dashing article which caused this action to be brought. This action was one of libel. In all cases the duties of the Judge and the jury were, to some extent distinct. Ordinarily the Judge had to decide questions of law, and the jury questions of fact ; but here were duties distinct in another sense. The jury had to decide questions of law as well as of fact, and he had no voice in the matter except by way of explanation. His duty was simply to help the jury as far as he was able to do, but always bearing in mind that upon this question of libel or no libel the matter was ultimately for them 'to decide. In this question of libel, where a Judge was satisfied there was no libel, he would not hesitate to tell the jury so, but no Judge nowadays told the jury that a certain thing was a libel, except under qualifying circumstances, and ultimately the question still went to the jury, and to them alone, as to whether that which was complained of was a libel or not. He did not think that in this case any question of the liberty of the Press was seriously involved ; and certainly he was not one — and he would scorn the idea of saying anything there with a view to depreciating the Press — who was unfavourable to a very large liberty being given to the Press ; and he believed if it came to a question it would be found that perhaps ho would allow a greater latitude than would be allowed by any other person in the law. There was no doubt that it was a duty to uphold the power of the Press as a useful instrument towards the public good; but at the same time, whilst Upholding that power, care must be taken that that which was too often an instrument of power was not made an instrument of oppression. It was found through all departments of life that those who possessed power which was not subject to sufficient control were apt to go to excess, and that often very arbitrary and unjust things were done; and, therefore, it was essential for the liberty of the subject, which was much higher than the liberty of the Press, that there should be some restraint. That, he thought, must be obvious ; but more than that, he thoughts-was not obvious. 
Let the Press have full power, because he knew it was useful to the public ; but to his mind he was not prepared to put the position of the Press on entirely the same platform as the position of a private individual. Because, while it might be simple and pertinent on the part of a private individuals go to the corners of the streets and talk of this thing and that thing for the public good, it might not be pertinent on the part of the public Press, for the reason that the public looked to the Press for information of that sort. Such information was the daily food of a people in a free country, and although t he mere fact of a person having a printing press and type - did not give that person authority to speak more than a private individual ; yet the fact that the public desired to have the Press, and to support it, and look to it for information upon matters of public concern — look to it more or less for the protection of society against wrongs which might lie hidden unless exposed by the Press— gave a certain right and duty not emanating from the mere printing and type. It was therefore desirable that there should be a high degree of liberty to the Press, for the public good. If you went down to strict legal principle, there was no distinction between the right of one who wielded the power of the Press and the right of a private individual. But in practice there was a distinction. The public voice was in favour of the Press ; and in a free country we should lose the full power of public opinion if the Press were not allowed to speak in an outspoken public manner. They had, of course, the right to speak the truth, and that, no doubt, where it concerned the public. They had not always the right to speak where it concerned a private individual, because that might not concern the public ; and why should the Press, because it found out something concerning a private individual, send it forth to the tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands of their readers? Such a thing did not benefit the public. But where the matter was one that concerned the public, and was a publication of truth, then that ought to be protected, and was protected, by the law. Nay, more than that; a considerable amount of latitude was justifiable. We were not bound to have an amount of truth poured out in the columns of the Press, like figures in a calculating machine. 
We must make allowance for the vigour of writing, for the zeal of those who honestly desired to write for the public good. We must make some allowance even , for the necessity for writing in such a way as to 'direct , public attention to that which demanded such attention. If that which was written were put forward t in dull plodding words, no one would look at it the second time. It required strong, clear, vigourous language, which was apt to pass beyond the | bounds of literal truth in order to ensure real effectiveness to the publication of matters which really required public attention. There might be a case where a great deal was seen which naturally aroused a considerable amount of indignation. Allowance must be made for that. A person j might become indignant, and speak more strongly than would be actually justifiable if he were to sit down soberly } and calmly and weigh every word, and allowance must be , made for zeal just as at the Bar allowance was made j for the zeal of counsel. License would be checked, ( but advocates on both sides were allowed to speak ( under the influence of their own views, inspired by their own clients, and by that which struck them in the evidence as most in favour of their clients. So with the Press. In a controversial matter in the Press you must make allowance for their taking a course which would influence their readers.. But at the same time care must be f taken that they do not go beyond reasonable limits. Neither advocates at the Bar nor advocates in the Press were allowed to degenerate freedom from reasonable latitude  into licence. 
Therefore, in this case the jury would have to make reasonable allowance for what had been seen, and not hold the paper down to exact literalness of truth, except under circumstances , which he would mention. If they believed that the exaggeration was not for the public good, but was for the purpose of pandering to the taste for sensational writing, then j the paper would be responsible for damages. But where it , was supposed that the article was written for the public good — it was not a question of writing, but of printing — then they must allow a considerable amount of latitude for every honest right-minded man who saw something wrong was very apt to write more strongly than was literally correct. In this particular cast the matter was not of private concern, but of public concern: and, therefore, these rules of allowing latitude must apply to this case. Unquestionably if public assemblies of 200C or 3000 persons were to be disturbed by people of a vicious class it was a matter which concerned the public largely. In this case he thought the main question for the jury would be not whether there was some evidence of truth in the article, but whether it had not gone beyond that ; and a further question was whether it had not involved the innocent with the guilty — whether the writer had not generalised in the article that which ought to have been applied to certain individuals. It was necessary to consider from those points of view whether the article was exaggerated. Then the question was not as to the views of the writer, but as to the publication of the article. The public saw only what was in the paper, and when an article appeared in tho paper ii was read by thousands, or tens of thousands, and — it might be — by hundreds of thousands. The next thing to look at was the general character of the article. Nobody could question that it was very well written, and the first part of it was admirable from every point of view; but tne jury would have to look at the article to see whether it was within proper bounds, and also as to whom it involved in its denunciation. Incidental to this, it was important to inquire whether it referred to a majority of the people on the ground at the time or to only a few. The tenor of the article seemed to be of a very sweeping character, which spoke of very little of a respectable element in the place. It described the place in fact, almost as if it were a sort of hell. The jury, therefore, would find it important to consider whether or not a majority of the people present on the occasion were respectable, or in what degree the respectable part of the people stood, and whether the article was too lavish in its condemnation. Here there was a most extraordinary variation of evidence. If the jury believed the great majority of the people were respectable and the small minority were otherwise, and if they thought the article included all in its denunciation, then they might think that in this respect the article went beyond legitimate limits. But even here allowance must be made in favour of the Press. It often happened that the minority were more conspicuous than the majority, and that a vicious minority might give an apparent character to the whole. Allowance must be made for that ; but still no person would be justified in specially witnessing particular things, and then writing an article denouncing everything. The jury had to consider how far the article went, whom it referred to, how far it was justified by the facts, and then the nature of the evidence. 
A man is naturally responsible for his own acts. If he keeps grounds for the recreation of the people, and has there drinking bars and dancing saloons, and if those grounds are be unenclosed that rowdies can go in and out, going and coming as they like, and in consequence of that disturbances take place, he is naturally responsible. If the place be of such a nature as that, and if the manner of conducting it, although the intention may be to have it as orderly as possible, is such as to leave it open to disorders by which a man may raise a devil which he cannot lay, he is responsible. If for the sake of money he exposes his grounds to these things, the consequence must fall upon him ; not morally to the full extent, but to the extent that he keeps his grounds as a publican may keep a public house which becomes disorderly. It might be that the jury would think, that if there had been this great disorder at Clontarf, the Messrs. Moore had no right to complain, because, although unintentionally on their part, they kept their grounds under such allurements that disorderly people went there. But that was referable to them, and the responsibility was with them, but not altogether. There ought to be more effectual police protection ; there ought to be more magisterial protection. Seven days' imprisonment for men actually threatening to fight the police was preposterous. Men who went there to disturb people — men who were rowdy blackguards, and who actually threatened to fight the police, to give these men only seven days was not effectual magisterial protection. It should be known that those persons who act in such a manner, that this kind of men when they come before the magistrates, will get such punishment that they will be sure to remember ; and not only that they will remember it, but it should be such that others of their class would be afraid to incur the danger of receiving. 
The responsibility, therefore, was not altogether with the Messrs. Moore. The three policemen present were not sufficient, and either from the want of proper action on the part of the police, or from the want of assistance on the part of persons to aid the police, these disorders occurred. At the same time although the Messrs. Moore were not responsible because the police were not in Sufficient numbers, or that the orderly part of the people did not back them up as was necessary, still the root of the whole matter was more or less in the fact that the Messrs. Moore had these grounds for the collecting together of large numbers of persons, and that there were these allurements in the shape of drinking bars and dancing pavilions, and there was a want of sufficient protection to prevent disorderly characters from getting in upon the f round. He could understand that not only did the Messrs. Moore do what they could, but it was to their interest to do what they could to prevent disorder ; for if their ground became known as the resort of improper characters, respectable people would not go there. He came now to the evidence generally. They had had fifty-six witnesses altogether, and the jury had had a view of the ground. He had had a view of it himself thirteen years ago, and not a very pleasant one — one in which he was very near being placed in a position in which he should not have been addressing them that day. 
Since then, however, he had been there, and had a general view of the ground ; but he had not had the same opportunity for examining it as the jury had had. Fifty-six was a large number of witnesses, and numerically there had been rather a greater number on the part of the plaintiffs. He believed there were twenty-six for the defence, and thirty for the plaintiffs. Probably 2500 people were at Clontarf on the occasion in question. He had not himself the most absolute confidence in the selection of witnesses. He very much doubted, from what he knew of this thing, whether they could place the most absolute reliance upon having the best evidence brought before them. In all probability, if they had the whole 2500 people, and put their names into a ballot box, and took out 56, they would have a nearer approach to the truth than they had had ; for a man might be sent for, and on being asked a question might say that the proceedings were very disorderly, and he would be told he might go. Another might say they were very orderly, and he would be told that he could come. 
Then, on the part of the defence, one might come and say, ' Well, I did not see anything very disorderly,' and he would be told he might go, while another who said that the proceedings were disorderly would be brought to give evidence. Neither side selected witnesses who would not be favourable to them. But if they had some judicial form by which out of the 2500 we could select 56 indiscriminately, they would, he thought, have a nearer approach to the truth than they had under the present system. He did not say there was anything of the sort in this case, but the fact was that we had not as judicial and impartial a selection of witnesses as was possible ; but at the same time it could not be helped. They had to go through the evidence before them, and they had no right to form too wide a surmise that other witnesses might give a different account. They could not shut their eyes to the fact that out of this large number of witnesses it was quite possible that they would have variations of evidence. He did not propose to go into details in considering the evidence, except in regard to some isolated matters which required special attention from the jury. He would first remark, however, that in this case there were extraordinary contradictions, so totally at variance were the witnesses on one side and on the other. These contradictions, which were too common, sometimes arose from one man observing things which another did not, and also from some seeing things from a distorted point of view. Such contradictions might sometimes be reconciled by our knowledge of human nature, but in all cases those contradictions were very Embarrassing; in some they were very sad; in Others they were positively horrible.' Unfortunately there were a great many that were embarrassing, there were others that were sad, and there were a great many that were horrible, because they could not remove the impression from their minds that there was wilful perjury. These variations were most likely to arise in cases which Evoked feeling, but in this case the jury would, reconcile them if they could. They would not believe that the witnesses exaggerated', still less that they intended to give evidence for dishonest purposes. If they could they would attribute the contradictions to differences of observations, and arrive at a proper decision. 
It had been said that a great deal of this evidence might be reconciled by the circumstance that some saw and some did I not see. This was a strong argument in many cases, and was so in this case. A fact may have existed, and may have been seen by some and not by others. Both, then, would be speaking the truth. But, of course, in a case of that sort the evidence of those who saw must be better than the evidence of those who did not see, because the evidence of the latter might be true, and quite consistent with a fact that occurred out of their sight. , He did not sav, however, that they could place much reliance upon that in considering the evidence in this case. They had evidence on both sides which more or less generalized, or spoke to the general character of the place. There was a very broad contradiction in the evidence as to the tone or tenor of the state of affairs in the pavilion, but there was some evidence to which he thought he ought to direct particular attention, and that was to the drinking of men in the presence or women, and or women in the presence of men. The article did not refer to that. He should have thought that such an outrageous thing as that, if it had occurred, would have reached the ears of the writer, and would have formed a prominent feature in this article.
If these things did occur, they support the case for the defence, as showing that the whole place must have been demoralized to a frightful extent. It was important to look at this evidence, and see whether it was reliable. But the only evidence as to the women bathing was that of the two boys ; the only evidence as to the men bathing was that of Hutton. He could conceive of nothing more loathsome than the statements made by these witnesses. If it were as they stated there was indeed an abominable lot of people there, and the devil had indeed broken loose, and these were his minions, These perhaps were, upon the whole, the very worst allegations in this case, and therefore it was particularly important to look at them. There were no witnesses to support these statements but the two boys in the one case, and the one man in the other. He should have thought that matters of this kind would have flown like wildfire over the whole place. To his mind the fact that these occurrences were not heard of by any one else was of far more importance than the evidence of these witnesses. 
And here came the question of who preponderated on the ground — whether respectable or disorderly people — and this must be taken into account when considering the truth of these witnesses. In the same way must be considered the evidence concerning disorderly scenes near the pavilion. He thought it probable that the jury would not rely upon the evidence of the boys or of Hutton with regard to the bathing, and if they thought in the face of the probabilities of the case, in the face of the contradictions, that these particular pieces of evidence were not to be relied upon, they would throw them out. But if they should unhappily come to the conclusion that either the evidence of the boys or of Hutton was wilfully false, then the matter did not rest there, for they could not simply put that evidence aside, they could not help seeing that the whole case was in consequence more or less tainted. Upon the general evidence there was a great deal that had been said against what occurred on that day. There were some witnesses perhaps that they would not be disposed to care very much about on both sides. Undoubtedly, there was a mass of evidence from persons who, as far as they knew, were of a highly respectable character, who had sworn to things that they had seen, and although there might be evidence from those who did not see, yet their evidence was not of so much value as that of those who did see. There was the evidence of Mr. Horan, which was perhaps the most valuable for the defence. That witness had told them a number of things, which, if true, would go far to characterise the whole as it appeared to the writer of that article. There was the evidence also of Mr. Traill, who said that there was not one word in the article he wished to withdraw, and that every word of it was true. There was no doubt that the incident of the drawers did occur; if it was true, it was an abomination, and it would characterize those concerned in it as of a very bad class. But whether it would characterize the whole of those who were present as bad, was another thing. That there were abominations he supposed there was no doubt at all, and this brought him to what he had nearly omitted to mention — the evidence of the bandsmen, and the master of the ceremonies, and Mrs. Moore, as to the order in the pavilion. They swore that they saw nothing disorderly; but then it was possible that a great deal might have occurred which they did not see. He could quite understand that a great many individual cases of disorder might have occurred ; but when the general character of the dancing and the conduct of the people were spoken of, then the evidence of these witnesses was of importance. It might be that there had been a great deal of what was bad, but that in commenting upon it there had been too much generalisation. Bad enough as it might have been, it was not, according to the evidence of these witnesses, of so general a character as some of the witnesses said it was. As he had told them before, people could not be blamed if there were some rowdies present ; and if they attracted attention, and gave an appearance, and tone, and character to the whole of the proceedings, people could not be blamed if they judged by what was obvious, and did not judge by what was out of sight. He now left the jury to balance this evidence, for it rested entirely with them. If they thought that, upon the whole mass of contradictions, there was such a general weight of evidence as to turn the scale on the side of the defence, of course they ... they believed that this article was on the face of it a libel, if they were not satisfied that the disorderliness was such as to justify the article, then the article remained, and they must consider whether it was a libel. If they believed it was justified, then the article was no longer a libel. If they believed it was not altogether justified, but excused after making a proper allowance for zeal and honest indignation in showing scenes that were bad — that it did not exceed reasonable and proper latitude — then they would say it was not a libel. But he did not direct them on that point ; he left it to them. If they thought the article was wholly untrue, then they would find for the plaintiffs. If they thought the article was exaggerated in respect to the numbers of people involved ; or, if they thought that the scenes described were greatly exaggerated, beyond that reasonable allowance and latitude, then they would find for the plaintiffs. 

There was an argument of Mr. Darley, when he alluded to other articles in the paper, which he said had been written, not for the public benefit, but to pander to sensational tastes. Now, all he had said about allowing a great latitude— and he would himself allow a great latitude to honest indignation and the outspokenness of the public Press respecting that which required public attention to be called to it — all he had said upon that point applied only to cases which they knew were matters of fact, or which they could judge from the publication of them were for the public good. Let great latitude be allowed to those who wrote for the public good ; but if a man wrote for sensational purposes, and exaggerated, he might be defended so far as related to what he said of actual truth, but he could not be defended for any exaggeration put in for sensational purposes. Some little colouring for the purpose of arousing attention to a crying evil he dared say would be forgiven, but any amount of colouring in order to make a sensational paper pay could not be justified. Mr. Darley had contended that the object of the publication of this and other articles in the Bulletin was to meet the tastes of that part of the public who loved sensational articles written without much regard to the truth. I If the jury could come to that conclusion, and to the conclusion that there was serious exaggeration in it — exaggeration constituted a libel— they would have to find a verdict for the plaintiffs. Part of the article complained of was admirable, and he wished it could be printed in letters of gold, but the latter part might be considered by the jury as libellous. 
If it were thought that there was exaggeration in the article, and that it was put in, not with a desire for the public good, but purely for sensational purposes, then there was no justification for it. He would say nothing about damages. Very little had been said on that subject. One side had said nothing about it ; and counsel in reply had stated that the plaintiffs did not come into Court for any damages beyond those which would set their own character and the character of their ground right before the public. He now left the case with the jury. He hoped in what he had said he had said nothing that was calculated to mislead.
Most certainly he had no feeling against the Press, he had a strong respect for the Press, and what we had to see to was to encourage it where it was useful, and only restrain it where it degenerated into licence. There was no reason to think that the liberty of the Press was in danger when we knew that all actions against the Press depended upon juries taken from the great body of the people of the country. They might more highly value the liberty of the subject when any individual was attacked by the Press ; but he felt confident there was no disposition on the part of juries in this country unduly to limit the power of the Press. Therefore, seeing that these matters rested with a jury, there was no danger that actions of this sort would do more than keep the Press within proper limits. Juries, and Courts, and individuals had a right to do that; and individuals whose properties, were attacked had a right to expect this from juries and Courts in this country. At the conclusion of the summing up, the jury retired; and, after some short deliberation, returned into Court with, a verdict for plaintiffs, damages one farthing. His Honor certified for costs. Mr. Salomons gave notice of appeal. THE CLONTARF CASE. (1881, May 21).The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 828. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161884061 

Early  Bulletin' Memoirs.
No'. XVII
In Quod. When last speaking to you, we were in gaol, of course. I was nearly forgetting the hotel where Haynes and Archibald were putting up over the Clontarf Libel Scandal. The first few hours of our incarceration were devoted to arranging details for a ' stay.' and the important matter of provider coming up, Archibald decided that we should not procure our own meals outside, as permitted by regulation, but go right in for prison diet, so that we should have real experience. I agreed, but was fully convinced that my partner, who was a bit of an epicure, would soon require a change of menu. Two servings of hominy sufficed, and then it was agreed we should have our supplies from without. But before this, the gaol cook had sent us a fresh loaf of bread, fairly cut in two, which was the first piece of justice we had had in the Clontarf trial. 

During the day we had many funny congratulations, one coming from a man in for perjury, who sent word by a fellow prisoner, who was then gardening in our quarter, that ' he was d ______’ n sorry to hear of it.' Then we heard there was a fight going on among the well-behaved prisoners as to who should be appointed our attendant or servant while we remained, for the perquisites were expected to be many, to say nothing of the company. Fortunately the Governor sent us a Dane, named John Andersen, who had sought peace in gaol, away from his wife, and he turned out a real faithful man — and after our release he was long in my own employ. 

Being in the Debtors' Prison, our quarters were at times invaded by small debtors, some of obnoxious character, and to ensure peace and undisturbed occupation we had to pay their small scores off ourselves and let them go free. One fine old scoundrel, who could pay a small debt but wouldn't, gave us plainly the hint that be would make himself unpleasant until we got him out The gaol officials, who of course were heartily with us, soon helped us out of our difficulty. It was decided that the old fellow to ensure his health must have cold baths regularly— a thing he had probably not faced for years. ' Well, if it must be, he would bath in our quarters,' but that was not the real gaol regulation bath. Away he was hustled to an adjoining corridor, where the water fell as from a waterspout. A suppressed shriek told us that the unfortunate scoundrel had suffered the extreme penalty of the law, and on being returned to the debtors' side soon after, he sent word to his friends outside, and cashing up his £10 debt, got away from the gaol and its regulation bath. The prison never saw him again. Which reminds me that it's not the laws that are passed but the way they are administered that fills the bill. The first few days of our imprisonment saw streams of visitors, our fastest friends and of course our most constant being journalists of the Bohemian sort, who wanted to put up in quod and see us through our sentence — and our medicine, which, as already stated, was mainly three-star. The rush indeed was so great, it looked, as the Governor said, as if new hinges would be required at the gaol gates, and in hundreds of cases callers were refused admission, as there was standing room only — in other words that the regulations were being knocked endways, and Darlinghurst prison was not the early Bulletin office. 

The extraordinary idea seemed to seize the journalists and legal sparks who came to see us was that we would die of 'solitary confinement,' whereupon they organised, in spite of us, all sorts of ridiculous demonstrations to entertain us, forcing us to participate in all their wild schemes— at theatrical displays, mock parliaments, and wildest of all, steeplechases around the big room upstairs, the hurdles being chairs and benches and tables. No doubt there's a tremendous lot of insanity in everybody, if it can only get a show, and here we had proof of it over and over again. But it really in this case was all hilarous sympathy, and their eagerness to help in their way was all of a piece with the uprising which was instantly manifesting itself all over Australia, in vigorous condemnation of our imprisonment, owing to daring to openly dethrone the most infamous monster that ever afflicted a people. But of this more anon. 

Among the visitors who caused most bother was none other than ' The Pilgrim,' who, as already stated, had 'done' a little time in Darlinghurst — on the other side of the fence. Now that the extraordinary genius was on our paper doing 'Sundry Shows,' he used to enter the gaol to see us as if he were the Governor-General himself. The best matter 'The Pilgrim' ever wrote, I believe, was while he stayed in gaol for an hour or so, compiling with us the famous articles, 'In the Jug.' 

The spirit of mischief seemed to live with fresh vigour in his pen, and he helped to pass in brilliant array all the incidents and personages mixed up in the great picnic trial. Grey was, however, up to all his old tricks. Knowing that we were locked up and unable to get fresh matter for the paper, 'The Pilgrim' almost every day resorted to all sorts of schemes to get more money. Every other week almost he would lose his teeth in some conflict on 'our behalf, of course,' and he couldn't 'by any means go on with his work without his molars ' — the result being that we had to find the needful for the dentist, feeling all the time that it was ourselves who were suffering the pangs of extraction. Meantime, the world outside was ablaze with indignation over our imprisonment. John Haynes. Early "Bulletin" Memoirs. (1905, August 5).The Newsletter: an Australian Paper for Australian People (Sydney, NSW : 1900 - 1919), p. 16. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114727589 

Early ' Bulletin ' Memoirs.
No. VII.
Every issue of the early Bulletin was a tragic comedy or a comic tragedy. Somebody was eternally turning up for an explanation or an apology, and at one time I had £40,000 worth of writs in my pocket, which we would have disposed of for half the sum. We were always successful in putting the blame on one another when we happened to be caught alone, and both Archibald and myself discharged each other over and over again for something printed altogether too severe on a friend. When Henniker Heaton came in for about two months' glory and trouble, as part proprietor of the Bulletin, we both placed all our iniquities on Henniker's shoulders, feeling that, if not for our offences, at any rate for his own, they should never be unoccupied. Consequence was, Henniker was being bailed up everywhere for an explanation or an apology, and to do him justice, Heaton, being a bit of a devil himself, enjoyed the fun. We developed his taste for it by giving him plenty of it. An undertaker lurked about our office for a week to smash a coffin-lid over Heaton 's head. We had been informed that an undertaker named Hickey, who had a contract to bury the silent lodgers of the Infirmary, used to store his dead for a few days in his back premises, near Elizabeth-street till he got a good haul, and then boxing two in one coffin take them out to the Necropolis as a job lot.
Once he kept two dead publicans and two fat woman vagrants for nearly a week, and the result was too much fragrance for an adjoining boarding house which had its own hashes to put up with. His heart was filled with ill-will and his fist with vengeance when he saw a cartoon showing tiers of coffins in his backyard with one of the dead publicans poking his head from under a coffin lid and exclaiming, 'For God's sake, Hickey, take us out of this : we've been here now a week.' The stiff were not stored in that yard any more; while as for Heaton, the undertaker could never get his measure. Then we made an onslaught on the 'In Memoriam ' advertisements in the daily papers, which were disgusting, and exposed anew crooked undertakers for squeezing two or three infirmary infants into cherry cases. The verses were written by ''The Pilgrim’' (Harold Grey), and, as he dealt with advertisements as they appeared in the daily agony column of the newspapers, we were several times nearly all exterminated. One man came down from the vicinity of the Railway Station, and was so bent on mischief we had to let him take a fall out of our cashier. This man had become rather proud and was asking for a rise. He got it from the man who came down about the verses. Our office furniture got a bit wrecked and the entire staff took a holiday without asking for it. There was no time to ask for it. Archibald and myself had implicit confidence in our cashier and left him in complete charge of the office, with full power to receive anything on our account. 'The Pilgrim,' who was never suspected as belonging to the office, was the only one who enjoyed the seance; for the cashier had cut off his supplies, and Grey was only too glad to sool on the half-intoxicated maniac who had come down for satisfaction. But it was all nothing — only a mere item in the daily programme. The fact is, we were great on the dead as on the living, and revelled in scarifying old customs and the ignorant impostures of the time, no matter how great the shock to individuals or the whole community. Sydney had been 50 years asleep, and we were waking her up. ... John Haynes.
Early "Bulletin" Memoirs. (1905, May 27).The Newsletter: an Australian Paper for Australian People (Sydney, NSW : 1900 - 1919), p. 16. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114729426 

Profile Pieces: Journalism and the 'Human Interest' Bias
Birth of the Bulletin
J. F. ARCHIBALD'S MEMORIES.
STORIES OF GAOL DOINGS.
Mr. Achibald, founder and for many years editor at the "Bullotin" announces his exit from Australian journalism. He has sold his Interest In the paper to other principal shareholders. Including Mr. W. McLeod, the manager, and Mr. Livingstone Hopkins, the cartoonist. Archibald is one of the most Picturesque figures that ever triumphed across the times of our newspaper life.
The "Bulletin" has boon a prosperous paper for many years now, but It scissored worully In its beginnings.
It was after some presswork In Melbourne on the "Herald" and "Daily Telegraph," a period of service in the Education Department, and private employment in Queensland, that Mr. Archibald came to Sydney and joined the staff of the "Evening News."
Mr. Archibald tells In the "Sun" how the "Bulletin" came to be born.
"After taking a turn at 'Hansard,' I found that about 16 hours' mechanical work daily had no charm for me, if I killed myself it would be for myself. John Haynes was then on the verge of leaving the 'Evening News,' and we decided to produce a paper of our own.

Astonished Prelate.
"Haynes took the editorship of the 'Express,' a new weekly, which was to be the organ of Roman Catholicism as opposed to the old 'Freeman's Journal,' regarded then by the priesthood as a print with dangerously latitudinarian views. We purchased type enough to print two 'Expresses,' and Haynes was to arrange for its use In the production of both the 'Bulletin' and the 'Express.' The result was that John sold the whole of the type to the priests at cost, with the proviso that we might produce 'our own little paper' with the unemployed portion of it. When John used that airy phrase I doubt if the priests clearly understood what our own little paper was like.

"Presently Archbishop Vaughan came in his carriage to bless the new paper. All hands knelt around the stone, and some kissed the amethyst ring of the noble-looking prelate. He blessed the 'Express,' but, somehow, I think the benediction missed its mark and was appropriated by the 'Bulletin,' for the 'Express' died In its Infancy.

"The 'Bulletin' was not preserved by the tender nurture it received In that oilier, for presently—I suppose that the clerics in the meantime had seen 'our own little paper'—Dean Leonard and Father Sheridan waited upon the foreman printer and told him that we were going to leave the office, and no more copy should be accepted from us.

"We departed with what money we could scrape up to a ramshackle office in Castlereagh-street, let to us by good Jacob Scholar. We got some type and paper, mostly on credit, from Cowan and Co. We found a temporary haven in the office of 'Freeman's Journal,' which It had been our mission to kill with the 'Express.'

"The 'Bulletin's' first printing plant played some queer tricks. Saddler, always called Sadd, was one of the cleverest of steel-carvers, who carried his delicate metal work into wood, and once, as he displayed to us the hideous blotch which represented the fine portrait of everyone's handsome friend, Dr. Fortescue, he said, 'You are savages; you deserve that a blackfellow should engrave for you with a waddy—l will do no more tor you." And he never did."

The Old Home at Darlinghurst.
It was Inability to pay the costs of a libel action which laid J. F. Archibald and John Haynes by the heels in Darlinghurst Gaol. The Clontarf libel arose out of an article entitled "The Larrikin Residuum," written by William Henry Traill. It related to the outrageously immoral proceedings on the part of a crowd of young people witnessed by him on a public holiday. 

"The proprietors of the pleasure ground sued for libel. The plaintiffs theory was that the article had come from the pen of that clever but disreputable pressman, Theodore Smith Argles (Harold Grey). When Traill entered the box and acknowledged the authorship the plaintiffs' counsel, Mr. Dalley, K.C., shifted the ground of attack by claiming that although the article might have been written in the public interest by a reputable pressman, It could not have been published In the public interest, as the paper contained many other things which were certainly not in the public interest. He proceeded to stir up all possible prejudice by reading out a number of very unconventional paragraphs, In no way relating to the matter at Issue.
" 'Why,' he asked, indignantly, did not the "Bulletin" give people wholesome fun, like — er Sydney "Punch"?'" continued Mr. Archibald, with a twinkle in his eyes, "The latter print, as if In mockery of the learned counsel's words, almost at once gave up the ghost. The jury found against us—damages one farthing' but the verdict carried costs. We soon found ourselves in the debtors' prison.
"The only restrictions upon us were that we could not leave the premises, and were unable to communicate with the outer world after 5 p.m. For the rest we were free to receive friends and communications from the office by messenger. Each of us was allowed one-third of a bottle of whisky a day. Traces of that fact were here and there discernible in a series of articles entitled 'In the Jug, by All of Us.'

Public Raise-the Money.
"Considerable public fuss was made over our Imprisonment. A movement tor our release was started by Mr. (afterwards Sir George) Dibbs, who himself had been an inmate of the debtors' prison for a year, aud bequeathed to us some of the furniture ot his quarters. In a few weeks enough was collected to buy our liberty, but at once it occurred to us that we should occupy a poor position In our own and the public eye it we paid off tho opposite side and not the solicitors who had fought for us. Therefore' we sot tho relief committee to settle with our own lawyer, and let us stay in gaol as martyrs until the public took us out by paying off the plaintiffs. So we remained In prison, after it had been erroneously announced that the costs had been paid and we had been released. Presently we were redeemed, and an enthusiastic public meeting was held to welcome us. It was addressed by Traill and Haynes, but I never could make a speech.
"The deputy-governor of the gaol at that time was a relic of The System, a portly, damson-faced old man, who had been in the service since the days of Governor Kcckr-under whose regime convicts used to emerge from the prison at night and commit robberies in the adjoining suburb of Woolloomooloo, in those days a fashionable quarter. The convicts would return to gaol In the early morning, to be readmitted and locked up in their cells by officials who shared their plunder. Then the prisoners cells were inspected, and further tribute was levied by other warders In the course of a search vernacularly
known as a frisk.

Illicit Stills In Gaol.
"The governor of the gaol introduced to us one of our fellow confinees In the debtors' prison as a man who, while serving a criminal sentence in his youth, had saved up his own and his gaol-mates' sugar-allowance, and with a rude still made from prison materials had produced regularly for several months a supply of respectable rum. There was still a small phial of the liquor among the curios of quod.
"But that was not wonderful, seeing that little more than a dozen years ago the poet Daley's chum, Captain White, serving a default sentence for illicit distillation, also brewed rum in Darlinghurst Gaol, right under the officials' noses.

Nosey Bob the Hangman.
Mr. Archibald slid back again on the trail or memory:—
"Wanting to get, for the first issue of the 'Bulletin' a graphical description of the execution of Captain Moonlight, whose real name was Scott, and who was originally an Anglican clergyman, I determined to have a talk with the hangman, Howard, alias Nosey Bob, I went out to Howard's Bondi cottage. Howard was sitting in his shirt-sleeves with a pipe in his mouth, under the shadow of a fence, In company with a surly person of whom he spoke as his assistant.
"I asked him how he had managed to get his position.
" 'Well, sir,' said the tall, ape-like horror, in snuffling tones, it was just like this. I got kicked in the face by an 'orse, and it ruined the looks of me. The doctor would have me no more as driver, and I was glad to get this, as it's ten bob a day sure. Mind you, It isn't me as really does the work. It's the cove with the ginger beard, wot you saw outside a minute ago, that pulls the bolt. All I do is to tie the man up, and 'elp to lead 'im on and fix the rope under 'is
ear.'
"When I inquired delicately how he was received by his victims he half-froze my blood. 'Well, sir, it's this way. I don't often see my man before the morning, but his weight is given me a couple' of days ahead to let me allow the right drop. And yet some* times we're a bit out. I once pulled a cove's 'end right off by givin' 'im too long a fall. W'en I go into the cell I generally say, "Good morning, don't be afraid, my poor man; it'll soon be all over, If you're patient." Often 'e shakes 'ands with me, and says 'e 'opes I don't bear no malice, for 'e don't; and I tell 'im I. don't neither—it's all in the way of strick dooty. And then I put on the straps tight, but no so as to 'urt him. I'm not like the Melbourne 'angman,' he continued.  'E always sez to the cove, " 'Ere I am, mister; you're time is come;" and I'm not like Jones, the man before me 'ere, 'oo aliwus on the mornin' of 'angin' wore a red flower In his button'ole, saying 'o was goin* to do a kill. I'm allers dressed in decent black clothes, so's you can 'ardly tell me from the parson.'
"Then Nosey Bob went on to talk of the little daughter, who sat by sewing. 'She goes to school reg'lar. Come 'ere, my dear, and read a chapter out of the Bible for the gentleman.' He affectionately held her on his knee while she read a few chapters from Genesis. Would that she had lighted upon 'Whose sheddeth man's blood . . But there was no such luck.
"Presently the executioner showed us to the gate of his vine-embowered cottagw. As we left, he lifted a candle high above his noseless face, 'See,' he said, pointing overhead, as the flickering light revealed in all its soul-chilling horror his demoniacal visage, 'them's fine grapes. Come along by-and-bye and I'll give ye a bunch.'
" 'Ah,' I thought, 'some men will have died ere those grapes be ripe.'
" 'And,' gallantly added the manchoker, lowering his candle to illuminate the beauties of a garden of which he was evidently proud, 'next time you come be sure and bring the missus, and I'll give her a bokay.'

End of Bushranger Johns.
"Johns, a mere boy," said Mr. Archibald, "was a confederate of Captain Moonlight. He had been cast for death, but was spared in consideration of his youth. He was sent to Darlinghurst to serve a life sentence, and was visited there by a lady Biblereader. One day a fellow-prisoner, a horse-stealer, made an opprobrious remark about the ... relations between Johns and Mrs. , concluding with the observation that opportunity was everything Johns struck him with a length of iron, inflicting an irreparable injury. For this she was tried and again sentenced death, and this time he was left to the gallows. His case threw a shocking light upon the iniquities of The System.

"Imagine a System," exclaimed Mr. Archibald, "with a judge at Its head who could do what was done. In 1850 a woman was accused of murder. During a breakfast-table quarrel she had flung a knife at her husband, Inflicting a wound from the effects-of which he, being an unhealthy man, subsequently died. What was the judicial ruling? That she had killed her husband; that she was guilty of murder. So the jury was directed, and the woman was sentenced to death. Her condition at the time of the quarrel was not considered. She gave birth to a child while awaiting her execution. Itsmother was taken from her infant and hanged by the neck till she was dead.

"That is The System of which traces have lingered still. Do you wonder that it is a matter on which I grow hot? Tho Mount Ronnie Horrors? You remember them? It is thought of these things that makes me glad to see attempts to banish the last traces of The System, and substantiate in our treatment of criminals something that is humanising for something that was brutalizing."
"Don't ever be afraid to try it when there is work waiting to be done. To try and fail may make you look rather silly, perhaps, but it Is far better even to look a little silly than to refuse to try." BIRTH OF THE BULLETIN (1914, July 24).Gordon, Egerton and Ballan Advertiser (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article129415197 

THE SCAVENGER.
" Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.''
Now. Mr. Editor, you made, or rather your printer did a slight error in the typing of my last. But as that is past, and we have other business more urgent, we will let it rip.
So my friend Boots has been wielding his pen in direct opposition to grammar and spelling. But in the first place let me in-form rite public that I think it quite beneath me to attack with ridicule the Person of anyone. No, I attacked their acts ; and in return this new dictionary of very doubtful veracity flies at the person and private life of some young gentleman whom he suspects, in such a way as to prove his entire ignorance of the principles of Latham, Webster, and human nature. To start with, he insults the Almighty in a manner worthy of a field-preacher, not a field-marshall by upbraiding' that gentleman with the color of his hair-a fact for which God alone is responsible. Then, a la Josh Billings, he talks of Napoleon having withdrew." Yes, Napoleon very sensibly withdrawn-such must, with all due diffidence to the superior grammar of Boots, let the past, if " withdrew" be the past and Scavenger " follows suit." Now, where suit does he mean-Benson's, Nixon s or Perry's ? It is surely enough for me to follow man, without running; madly' at an empty suit ; the warrior of the word of course had a suit-what leader would be fool enough to marshal his troops in the dress of nature?-but I have not heard of the said "suit ' having any devoted followers, though, mind you, some of the fallen Emperor's SUITE stuck to him with praiseworthy fidelity. With profuse apologies to all dictionary compilers. Boots calls the supposed Scavenger "an insignificant thing." he's slightly astray; he's on the right SCENT. Now, dear Boots, tell this, thou Australian Newton! if  it be quite able for anything, why is it necessary to say he has proved himself able enough? " and if anything- be appreciated, why, oh why, Boots', does thou inform us it is " fully as MUCH appreciated ? ' Now, to use a common expression, Boots, you catch the bull by the :... .  called Dave a little-minded and shallow-headed fool ; I simply advised not to prate to please such a being, ie -  must have had a mirror in front of it when writing about fools. But best off why do you term me “insignificent " (not insignificant), little-minded, &c, and then say I THOUGHTFULLY advised Dave '? Thou art slightly inconsistent, Boots.
Now, Boots, lend me your attention once more. Did you ever hear of the fox who could not get the grapes? No doubt you have seen some young gentleman seated happily under a certain willow ; and slightly jealous of that person's social position over your own, you have bended your abusive bow, and fired a shaft which strikes like foam upon the ocean rock. Surely, my dear Boots, you do not imagine the gentleman you so cowardly alluded to, would bother himself casting a thought upon your abusive production; nor would I, but to show you out of kindness how to escape Gladesville or Darlinghurst. 
Now, Boots, for love of pure English and manliness take the following directions:-Sell your present dictionary and buy Chambers'. Purchase Latham's grammar. Remember that abuse is not satire. Pick your bird before you shoot. Let the social life and bodily peculiarities of the innocent, and even all, alone. Convince yourself you will never be a Carlyle or Dickens, a Heaton or a Harold Grey. Hoping I have not mangled you beyond recovery, take a seat on the back shelf while I talk to George Louis Asher, George informs his readers that he does not identify himself with the views of his correspondent ; then with admirable inconsistency he jumps to the end of the column, and tells them, he quite agrees with his correspondent. He must have read Midshipman Easy. But this is the laurel that crowns George's manly brow-he believes "it is wrong to criticise amateur performances.' Well, George, it may be so ; but what about the editor who, some years back, because the printing did not come to his office, published that a certain favourite amateur sang as though he had plums in his mouth, and that another was as devoid of ability as a frog of feather*? Then he fears Richmond folks would s iii their hands by meddling with the Scavenger. Had not George better come himself, as there would be no fear of HIM soiling his hands. Come, George, forget the past, and join forces ; for with yours and Boots' abuse, and my humorous satire, we would run a big publication, especially of libels. Hoping indulgence from the spirit of the poet, let me recommend the following to your notice :- 
lf I am traduced by tongues which neither know 
My faculties nor person, yet will be the chronicler of my doings-let me say
'Tis but the fate of place and the rough brake .
That virtue must go through. We must not stint 
Our necessary actions, in the fear
To cope m licious censurers; which ever,
As ravenous fishes do a vessel follow 
That is new trimmed ; but benefit no further 
Than vainly Iouging." THE SCAVENGER. (1881, October 1).Hawkesbury Chronicle and Farmers Advocate (Windsor, NSW : 1881 - 1888), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66375396 

1882

Birth of Emile and Harriet (nee Brown- Browne)’s son
ARGLES Andre Charly Theodore 9423/1882  Emile Theodore Harriet Sydney

Christmas book writers: Classified Advertising (1882, January 14).The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), p. 8 (Second Sheet to the Maitland Mercury). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article846349 

April 1882 – ‘Society’ published and promptly used to speak against Thomas Robertson again:
National Library of Australia has the first copy - Society (Sydney, N.S.W.) Description Sydney : A. Argles & Co, 1882- 
v. ; 38 cm. Notes  "A weekly journal of fine art, music and the drama, and fashionable and social matter" - on later issues.
Life Dates Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 19, 1882)- 


Advertising (1882, April 19 - Wednesday). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13509654 

We have received the proof copy of a new weekly publication issued by Messrs. Argles and Co., and called Society. Our criticism is summed up in one short little regret that so fair an outside accompanies such trashy contents. A weak imitation of the Bulletin, the new journal has all the objectionable features of its prototype without the occasional sparkle of wit that every now and then gives zest to the personalities contained in the former. We cannot congratulate contemporary journalism on the new addition to its ranks, and we quite agree with the publishers' introductory announcement that their publication was not required to satisfy a long-felt want.  TEMORA GOLDFIELD RESERVE. (1882, April 22). The Temora Star (NSW : 1881 - 1883; 1899 - 1906; 1914; 1925; 1933), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165198615 

The "Pilgrim."
SYDNEY, Tuesday. - Harold Grey has been sued by Messrs. Batson and Attwater, for detaining a forme of type, value £20; he was ordered to restore is at once. The "Pilgrim." (1882, May 24). Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139479203 

Harold Grey, the “Pilgrim," was convicted at the Water Police Court today of detaining property belonging to Mr, Attwater, the printer, of "Society," and ordered to deliver it within two days. OUR SPECIAL TELEGRAMS. (1882, May 23). Southern Argus (Goulburn, NSW : 1881 - 1885), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102064443 

APOLOGY
THOMAS ROBERTSON, Esq.,
Solicitor, Sydney.
Re "SOCIETY."
SIR,— I desire to offer you my most humble Apology for the article which appeared in "Society" of the 5th instant and which gave a totally false complexion to the ease and matters therein referred to.
The article in question was written by Theodore Argles, alias "Harold Grey," ex- the "Pilgrim," and was inserted without my knowledge.
I have mow dissolve partnership with the said Theodore Argles, and stopped the issuing of "Society,' and I deeply regret that the paper should have been made a means of annoyance to you.
Trusting that you will accept this Apology,
I remain, Sir,
Your obedient servant
ALFRED ARGLES. Advertising (1882, July 18). Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108203719 

A warrant was issued yesterday by Harold Grey (better known as 'The Pilgrim') against the two proprietors of the Society newspaper, on a charge of assault and robbery. It appears that Grey collected cheques on account of certain advertisements — the two proprietors assisting him, and it is alleged that they took them out of his pocket yesterday. LATE TELEGRAMS. (1882, July 19).Cootamundra Herald(NSW : 1877 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article143384766 

THOMAS ROBERTSON, Esq.,.
`Solicitor, Sydney. ,
Re SOCIETY.
Sir,-I desire to offer you my most humble apology for the article which appeared in Society of the 5th instant, and which gave a totally false complexion to the case and matters therein referred to.
The article in question was written by Theodore Argles, alias " Harold Grey " or " The Pilgrim," and was inserted without my knowledge.
I have now dissolved partnership with the said Theodore Argles, and stopped the Issuing of Society, and I deeply regret that the paper should have been made a means of annoyance to you.
Trusting that you will accept this apology, 
I remain, Sir, 
Your obedient servant,
ALFRED ARGLES.  Advertising (1882, July 19). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13515193 

Robertson, solicitor, for a libellous article in that paper written by the Pilgrim and inserted without the proprietor's knowledge. The issue of 'Society' has been stopped. Mr Robertson obtained heavy damages some time ago against the Sydney ' Bulletin' for a libellous article written by the Pilgrim. MELBOURNE is to have a Japanese bank. (1882, July 22). The Riverine Grazier (Hay, NSW : 1873 - 1954), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article140558717 

"Society," the latest weekly issue from the Sydney press, was not published last week; On Wednesday, day of publication, the offices in Hunter-street, showed no signs of business, no "Society" appeared, and to-day, an apology is tendered in the newspapers to Mr. Thomas Robertson, Solicitor, Sydney, for the printing of an article in that weekly. Alfred Argles whose signature is to the apology states that the article in question was written by Theodore Argles, alias" Harold Gray," alias " The Pilgrim," and was inserted without Alfred's knowledge. He, .in consequence, had dissolved partnership with the said Theodore Argles and stopped the issuing of "Society." Its existence was very brief indeed. MULTUM IN NUCE. (1882, July 25).Goulburn Evening Penny Post (NSW : 1881 - 1940), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article98418181 

The dispute between Theodore Argles, alias Harold Grey, and the Pilgrim, and the proprietors of Society has been amicably arranged. Argles collected a cheque on account of certain advertisements, and the proprietors first assaulted him, and then took the money from him. Argles got a warrant against the proprietors for assault and robbery, but he has since withdrawn the charge. Alfred Argles, the proprietor of Society, has published an apology to Mr. Thomas Robertson, solicitor, for a libellous article in that paper written by the Pilgrim and inserted without the proprietor's knowledge. The issue of Society has been stopped. Mr. Robertson obtained heavy-damages some time ago against the Sydney Bulletin for a libellous article written by the Pilgrim.  NEW SOUTH WALES. (1882, July 20). The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article198568211 

A young man named Newton Wisewould, recently in the employ of Messrs. Robertson and Fisher, attorneys and solicitors of Sydney, was prosecuted and committed for trial on Friday morning, at the Water Police Court, on a charge of embezzling the sum of £11 2s. the monies of his employers. The prisoner, a respectable-looking man, pleaded guilty to the charge. Thomas Robertson, of No. 85, Pitt-street, deposed: Defendant was a conveyancing clerk, on a salary of £4 a week. As such, it was his duty to pay the fees due to Government on certain documents in the Lands Titles Office and at the Lands Occupation Branch. Recently witness discovered that three sums of money, which should have been paid for three transfers in the last-named office, had not been paid. He spoke to defendant about it a few days ago, when he said he had paid the money. Yesterday, witness received thefollowing letter from defendant :— ' Sir, — Those transfers of runs re; Davis were never lodged. They were stamped, hut I kept the lodging fees and documents as well. I have also taken several other amounts which I cannot correctly state until I refer to my diary. The documents also which I have, and will hand over to you this evening between 5 and half-past, it that time would suit you at the office, and surrender myself to be dealt with, as you and Mr. Fisher decide. I have no friends and no money. No one else knew of my taking any of the sums, so no blame can attach to them. — Yours, truly N. WISEWOULD.' Mr. Robertson in his evidence explained the nature of the embezzlement, by stating that the defendant ought to have registered certain mortgages, which he did not do. The fees on one would be £5 2s., which, with three other sums of £2 each, made the amount he was charged with appropriating. These sums were received by defendant from the cashier, and he subsequently admitted he had taken money. James F. Montgomery, cashier to Messrs. Robertson and Fisher, proved paying the defendant the money he was accused of embezzling. The defendant, in the absence of bail, which he did not ask for, was sent to gaol until the next sessions, on the 27th July, — Evening News. Country Towns from a Social Point of View. (1882, June 7). The Manaro Mercury, and Cooma and Bombala Advertiser (NSW : 1862 - 1931), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115708321 

Before next week our national collection in the New South Wales Art Gallery will receive two notable additions. The Peshawur brings Mr. H. R. Robertson's attractive picture, ' Ave Maria,' presented by his brother, Mr. Thomas Robertson, to the gallery, a notice of which has already appeared in our columns.
Sir Frederick Leighton's, R.A., picture ' Wedded,' purchased on behalf of the trustees, will arrive by the Garonne, speaking of which the World of tho 6th September says: — 'Sir Frederick Leighton's lovely group, ' Wedded,' the most sympathetic of his contributions to this year's Academy, will soon be on its way to Sydney, as it has been bought for the Museum there.
In this purchase the confidence of our colonial brothers has been well respected. I wish it had never been betrayed by such mild jobbery as that which has sent certain works of one of our most venerable academicians to astonish Melbourne.' The Week. (1882, November 18). The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), p. 884. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article161926404 

Thomas Robertson, (1830–1891) - Obituary from Australian Town and Country Journal
Hay: Mr. Thomas Robertson, of the firm of Robertson, and Robertson, solicitors, of this town, died on Thursday. Mr. Robertson came to Hay from Sydney five years ago, relinquishing when he left the latter place the position of senior partner in the firm of Robertson, Fisher, and Selway. Mr. Robertson had a varied life. He went to the Cape of Good Hope when 22 or 23 years of age, where he practised his profession, and served in one or two engagements in the Kaffir War then proceeding. He was in the employ of the A. A. Co. when he first came to Australia, went to the diggings at Beechworth (Victoria), kept the pounds at Mulwala and Deniliquin, and eventually again entered upon the practice of his profession at the latter place. He built up a big practice, was several times a mayor of the town, and took an active part in the Riverina separation movement. He went to Sydney in 1872, where he eventually came to be recognised as one of the leading lawyers of the colony, having taken part in many a cause celebre.  He recently represented the Hume in Parliament in 1873-74, during which period he took a leading part in politics. He was an active defender of the course taken by the Government of the day in dispatching the contingent to the Sudan. Since his residence in the Hay district Mr. Robertson has won the universal esteem of the community. The deceased gentleman was in his 61st year. The cause of death was "brain-wasting," his illness coming on with startling suddenness in June last, when he was one night the subject of several violent seizures. Mr. Robertson leaves a widow and 10 children, three sons and seven daughters. The deceased was buried with Masonic honors. All the business establishments in the town closed during the afternoon as a mark of respect.  Hay. (1891, October 10). Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), p. 15. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71258305 

Harold Grey, one of the, if not positively the smartest writers in the colony, is to write the pantomime for the Sydney Theatre Royal this year,-and the coming Christmas number of Queensland Punch. GENERAL NEWS. (1882, September 12).Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article141016980 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER SITTINGS – LIST OF CAUSES
Banco Court
Robertson V. Argles NOVEMBER-DECEMBER SITTINGS, 1882—LIST OF CAUSES. (1882, November 18).The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13522423 

1883

COUNTRY MAGISTRATES IN MATTERS NAUTICAL.
TO THE EDITOR.
Sir— In your report of Marine Board proceedings of Fridays issue, the 27th ult., and under the heading ' Jetty Lines,' is the following : — ' The Harbour Master of Port Pirie enquired whether vessels were allowed to make lines fast to the jetty while lying out at anchorage. The President said it was an important question, and he spoke of an extraordinary case in point. A small vessel had been anchored at the outer end of Port Germein Jetty, and, although she had 50 fathoms of chain out, she made four lines fast to the jetty underneath the water. The Harbour Master warned him that a steamer was going alongside the jetty, but no notice was taken of it, and the riding light, showing she was at anchor, was exhibited. Captain McCoy added that, although it was a trap for the steamer, the Magistrate ruled on an action in reference to it that tho steamer had to pay for the broken lines. The Harbour Alaster to be informed that if the vessel was at anchor she must not make fast to a jetty except by special permission.' The steamer alluded to is ... and the small vessel the barge Four Brothers. The President's account pretty nearly embraces the whole question, and how the local Magistrate arrived at his decision is bewildering to us all here. I learn that the S.M.' stated that the steamer ought to have anchored, having no right to approach the jetty at night. This preposterous dictum I. discard as too absurd to entertain for a moment. Does a Magistrate's commission constitute him an authority as to what a shipmaster should do in approaching his port of destination either by day or night ? Stress was laid on a sort of permission given by the Harbour Master to the master of the barge to remain alongside, but the master of the Four Brothers did not avail himself of this permission, if given. He swung his vessel off to his anchor, leaving ample room for the steamer to pass between his vessel and the jetty, and by exhibiting his riding-light he misled the master of the steamer, who berthed his vessel as usual at the jetty without difficulty, only discovering that the screw had picked up a line by the otherwise unaccountable heating of the shaft while on the return passage to Port Adelaide. The matter is serious enough to the steamer, as the damage to the outer gland cannot be repaired without the vessel going on the slip, besides which, the consequences might have imperilled the safety of the ship. As the facts were clearly proved, the verdict should have been for the steamer. The President of the Marine Board might well call it. an extraordinary case. Against the decision, however, there is no appeal. I am, Sir, &c, PASQUIN. Port Adelaide, May 3. [We have struck out portions of this letter, which are of too personal a character.— Ed.]COUNTRY MAGISTRATES IN MATTERS NAUTICAL. (1883, May 5). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 7. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42003838

FOUR BROTHERS V. EMU.
TO THE EDITOR
Sir — In the Register of Saturday last there appears a letter written under the nom de plume of 'Pasquin,' reflecting on the decision of the Port Pirie Local Court in the recently tried case of Morgan v. Crocker, and, taking the facts as stated by your correspondent 'Pasquin,' for granted, you have written a sub-leader, in which you seem to endorse the opinion of your correspondent, that the decision of the Court operates as a miscarriage of justice ; and, assuming the statement of ' Pasquin' to be a true one, there would certainly be colour for your article. But I shall show you, Sir, that the statement of 'Pasquin' is, if not wilfully untrue, at least grossly inaccurate in almost every point. In the first place it is untrue that at the time of the collision ' the Four Brothers had four lines fastened to the jetty underneath the water." There were only three lines out altogether, and of these only one (the middle one) was 'beneath' the water, the headline with which the Emu first came into contact being fastened to a ring on the top of a jetty. Again, it is not true that the plaintiff " took no notice" of the Harbour Master's warning of the Emu's approach. The Harbour Master (who was defendant's own witness) said, on cross-examination, that the plaintiff, in reply to his warning, explained that, in consequence of the gale that was blowing, if the Four Brothers left the jetty she would probably go ashore or collide with the other craft anchored near, and that he (the Harbour Master) then gave the Four Brothers per mission to remain moored in its then position. It is also quite untrue that ' the Four Brothers had swung off to her anchor, leaving ample room for the steamer to pass between the barge and the jetty.' All the evidence of the plaintiff, and the evidence of the Harbour Master for the defendant, went to show that at the time of the collision the Four Brothers was alongside the jetty, and at a distance from the jetty of , according to three witnesses for the plaintiff, 10 feet, and, according to the Harbour Master, 18 feet. Does 'Pasquin' call this ' ample room' for the Emu to pass on a dark, stormy night? ' Pasquin' and the defendant must hold very different opinions as to the nature of the damage done to the Emu, for although the defendant in his pleadings made a cross claim for £20 for damage suffered by the Emu in consequence of the collision, this claim was abandoned at an early stage of the case by the defendant's counsel, who said he had mistaken the instructions of his client in making it. In the face of this ' Pasquin' says the damage done was 'serious' and 'necessitates the Emu going on the slip for repairs.' Again, how on earth could a verdict have been given for the Emu, as 'Pasquin' sug gests it should have been, when her claim was abandoned before the conclusion of the case ? ' Pasquin' says the facts were ' clearly proved.' Well, I have I given a version differing from his in every important point, and I challenge him to refute it in any particular. Unless ' Pasquin' has constitutionally a very hazy intellect he may easily dispel the bewilderment under which he in forms us that he labours as to 'how the local Magistrate arrived at his decision.' If 'Pasquin' will read the evidence taken at the trial, and close his ears to unreliable hearsay, he will find his master mind speedily reduced to a state of calm. In ' Pasquin's' last sentence, in which he wisely informs us that 'of course there is no appeal against this decision,' he makes it clear that his knowledge of the law of the case is only equal to his knowledge of the facts— both are grossly inaccurate. Of course an appeal would lie against an erroneous ruling of the S.M. on a point of law. It is clear that the defendant is not so 'bewildered,' as Pasquin, as to how the verdict was arrived at, for although an appeal would lie he does not appear to possess sufficient confidence in the strength of his case to test the decision of the S.M. by appeal to a superior Court. It was ruled by the S.M. that a vessel which delays mooring until after dark is responsible in damages for injury done to any other vessels, which injury might have been avoided had the mooring taken place in day light. This ruling, which 'Pasquin,' in his righteous indignation, is pleased to term a 'preposterous dictum' which he 'cannot entertain for a moment,' is a well-known rule of common law, which has been 'entertained' by eminent and learned Judges, who, though perhaps inferior to ' Pasquin' in intelligence and legal knowledge, scarcely deserve to have their dictum characterized as 'preposterous.' I may say that the decision of the Court gave evident satisfaction to all disinterested persons who heard the case, as being one calculated to convey to the masters of steamers like the Emu the salutary and seemingly necessary lesson that they cannot ride rough-shod over smaller craft which happen to be in their way, especially when such smaller vessels are seeking the natural protection of a Government Jetty, under stress of weather, with the express permission of a kind and sensible Harbour Master. The accident occurred at Port Germein, not Port Pirie, as stated in your sub-leader. I am, Sir, &c, JAMES GORDON. Port Pirie, May 7, 1883. [We have received a letter to a similar effect from W. Walsh, which it is unnecessary to publish.— Ed.] FOUR BROTHERS V. EMU. (1883, May 9). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 6. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42003441

THE SALVATION ARMY.
By Pasquin.
"One publican says he is not troubled with the larrikins now, they all go to the Salvation Army.' — WAR CRY. 
An author once observed — it was either Dr. Johnson or Lewis Scott — that a man is known by the company he keeps. This, though seemingly apt on the surface, is hardly applicable to public writers, whose misfortune it is, so often, to be cast into the society of members of the Legislative Assembly. But if a men is known by the company he keeps, how much more is a body of men known by the spirit and tone of the organ which represents them. The paper which is the acknowledged mouthpiece of the Harmy is a sheet called the War Cry, and is retailed as a penny weekly. I thought after seeing a few numbers of the FOURPENNY FIREBRAND that nothing issued from the public press in the journalistic line would surprise me. The War Cry, however, though in point of literary merit; it is about on a par with the BARRY BRAY, contains matter of an infinitely more startling nature. ' I have, years ago, admitted the humorous powers of the Paddington parson, recognized his refinement, deferred to his delicacy ; but now we cannot but admit that the time has arrived to pocket ' the secret of England's greatness, England’s glory' — and retire before the fire of Sutherland’s squibs. Sutherland, I must tell you, is one of ' General' Booth's Majors, and is supreme boss of the Sydney show. He is a short, squat man, with a pale face which makes you think how much he is like a baker until you recollect how strongly he resembles a barber. The Major has an abundance of ginger 'side-lovers,' a long-tailed coat, any amount of ferocious 'front,' but not a single aspirate. Glancing over the War Cry, we see that Major Sutherland wants pretty well everything. He wants musical instruments, for instance, and acknowledges a donation thus : — 81 Received, with thanks : Mrs. Stone, one brass fugle horn ; Brother Arnold, two triangles.' Then in the next issue this pattern philanthropist puts in the following startler : —  ' Army Soldiers wishing to purchase their own instruments should call at head-quarters, 284 Castlereagh-street, where they can be supplied at the cheapest rate.' [! ! !] . This announcement makes me pensive on the subject of what Mrs. Stone's fugle fetched and how much was got out of the two triangles. But Major Sutherland does not only retail fugles. He sells Salvation clothing as per advertised list:— ?e'- ' Best Quality ? £3 5 0 gorge ? 2 5 0 Sisters' Bonnets ... 0 6 0 Soldiers' Caps ? : 0 3 3 Metal Badges ? .0 1 0 Hat Bands ? 0 10 « S S per pair ... ... .003' Then he wants sent —  Articles of jewellery, ornaments, or other saleable goods, that are not in use, to Captain Sutherland, 284 Castlereagh-street, to be sold on behalf of the new building fund. Acknowledgments in each War Cry.' This inclines one to the belief that the Major is quite as much of a pedlar as he is of a pray-or : and considerably more of a 'cadger' than either. A great feature is made of published list of the number of copies of the paper, and we see that 'Happy Jack' is at the head of it. ' Happy Jack' in one paper 'challenges all Melbourne' to compete with him, and is described go being wrapped up in the Holy Spirit. Well, a few days ago, a man named John Rose was arrested on a charge of luring a silly little girl over to North Shore and assaulting her. John Rose was committed for trial, and Major Sutherland promptly engaged Mr. D. Buchchan, through the medium of Mr. Roberts, to defend him. This defence must have involved an expendituro of over £20, and Major Sutherland paid it. The young man Rose was, in fact, no other than ' Happy Jack,' who had sold so many hundred War Crys a week, and who had preached, and led the singing, and on whom had fallen the 'Mantle of Blisha,' who, to quote a Salvation lyric 'Was a jolly old man Who went up to Heaven in a flory van.' 
Curious to see what manner of man ' Happy Jack' was, I went up to see him tried. The modern Elisha is a tall cadavorous-looking young man, with a fishy eye, and an upper lip long enough to make an ulotor out of. He wore the costume of the Harmy, but the gaol authorities had evidently shorn the tunic of its two D'o. There was (putting aside the usually ridiculous roar of David) practically no defence. ' Happy Jack' was therefore immediately found guilty . and sentenced to 18 months' hard labour. As the man who had been wrapped up in the Holy Spirit was led away, all his assumed sanctimoniousness of visage vanished, and those present saw him the repulsive ruffian that he was. 
This ‘persecution' of 'Happy Jack' oo ivuootod a brother named Brophy that he got mad drunk and was fined ten shillings. Brophy said -and there is peculiar pathos about this — that — ' E was so deeply affected at the misfortune of a brother in the Salvation Army that he indulged in en ostra glaors which put him hors dc combat' These two illustrations will remove all doubts (if any existed) in the minds of my readers as to the cheerful character borne by some of these men. a Happy Jack's' excuse is that he was drunk too, as no doubt he was, though this plea was not put forward at his trial. It was a matter of some surprise in Court that Mr. W. J. Foster (who recently gave £2 towards the Newtown section of the Harmy) had not been retained for the defence. Thin is a case in which Mr. W. J. Foster would have especially shone. I can fancy now I see the whites of those sanctimonious eyes alone showing while he addressed the jury, and hear the voice, quivering with 'religious ' emotion, that has do often electrified the young men of the 0. A. It really astonishes me that Major Sutherland has not already given him a general retainer on behalf of the Harmy. But this is only putting off what will, no doubt, of a necessity have to be done. Students of Charles 'Dickens — and reading him has taught me the little I know — will remember two creations of his that inspired, at the different times at which they appeared, indignation of no ordinary nature in that section of the community known as the Exeter Hall contingent. The personages in question — and the word is written advisedly since they live and breathe in the novelists immortal pages — are, as of course, you will, long ere this, have divined. Chadband and Stiggins. Stiggins was a less remarkable character than Chadband, because his style of oratory, owing to his affection for hot pine-apple rum and water was, too diffuse He was, it is true, ignorant and covetous, selfish, grasping, and at times bellicose. But then lots of good men are all those. And let it be remembered when he 'knocked Brother Tadgor head first down the ladder' the sympathy of the reader is less with the assaulted than with the assailant. But Chadband was not only a rogue reverend of his own making ; but a canting impostor and a sordid knave besides. Of his many diabolical speeches I have only the heart to quote one. When this specimen of outrageous cant and hypocrisy is read, the readers of this sketch will doubtless not only execrate the name of the author, but will turn with pleasure to some of the delicately conceived, reverend, and classical extracts from the War Cry which follow. This then is Chadband's homily to Jo. But read it without a shudder. You will be refreshed in a little while : — c: My young friend,' says Chadband, ' it is because you know nothing that you are to us a gem and jewel. For what are you, my young friend ? Are you a beast of the field ? No. A bird of the air ? No. A fish of the sea or river ? No. You are a human boy, my young friend. A human boy. O glorious to be a human boy ! And why glorious, my young friend ? Because you are capable of receiving the lessons of wisdom, because you are capable of profiting by this discourse, which I now deliver for your good, because you are not a stick, or a stat, or a stock, or a stone, or a post, or a pillar. ' O running stream of sparkling' joy To be a soaring human boy.' ' 
We shall see by-and-by how the Salvationists speak, but before this I purpose clipping haphazard from their organ a few specimens of their writing. Here we go : — ' Sunday morning at eleven o'clock found us on our knees wrestling with God, pleading His promised blessing ;' But — 'The devil, who is never far away, came up to our meeting in many shapes.' Yet a publican was made ‘is cry out for mercy before the first meeting was over. Hallelujah.' 
This piece of intelligence does not surprise me a bit ; though it is a little startling to read abruptly that later on ' five precious souls tumbled into the fountain.' But this is not all. In another case in common with Jingle's Don Bolaro Fizgigg, ' two fell into the fountain also'; but whether, like the grandee we have mentioned, either had 'a full confession in his right boot,' did not transpire. On another occasion ' four wept their way to Calvary' ; and the Army states that it ' moans to have Newcastle for Jesus.' In speaking of a converted pmo-Gghtor,' we learn that ' General Booth gloried in ' Yorky,' who, ho said, had never been beaten except by Christ, and then he threw up the sponge.' ij Ohio is rather a bold flight even for Mr. Booth but we have no time to dwell upon it, for we are told directly after of the happy conversion of a man who said, ' When I received my wages on a Saturday night, the first thing I did was to go and have a long beer and two or three rums'; but being brought back to the paths of sobriety by the Harmy, he had 'a good thro at the meeting, and subsequently, after tating bio coat at the penitents' form, wop this way to Calvary.' ' [! ! !] ? But if the prose is of a startling nature, what shall we say about the poetry ? This stanza may be considered to be a fair sample of it :— 'The armies now are on parade, How martial they appear : All armed and dressed in uniform, They look like men of war, They follow their great General, The great eternal Lamb, His garments stained with His own blood, 'King Jesus is His name.' 
So much for their literature. How for themselves; and if there is a laugh in any of you, it shall soon go rippling away on the wintry breeze. The apparent misson of the Army is most undoubtedly to make an much noise an possible. It can't move without some of them are blowing into a bassoon or battering away on a drum. On the nature of the instruments the Army is not fastidious. If drums were not forthcoming they would batter inverted wash tubs and blast away at foghorns. So far as foghorns go, though, my experiences of the vocal powers of the Army Officers leads me to the conclusion that to purchase those melodious instruments would be a waste of the Force's Funds, each individual member having been so bountifully supplied with the article by Nature. As a matter of fact, the procession of Salvationists is one unseemly scuffle. It goes out several times a day in martial array, and always returns caked in mud. In Sussex-street, the people, lashed to fury by Canty's bassoon obligatos, not only bombard the Army with matter ' Both vegetable, animal, and mineral,' but belabour it with blunt weapons, much to the discomfort of the ' Hallelujah lasses.' Cayenne pepper is thrown at it, and flour ; and water is played on it ; but nothing short of actual death would stop the sonorous snort of Sutherland, or put out the feeble pipe of Reynolds. Sometimes the Salvation Army meets the ' Gospel' and ' Blue Ribbon' Armies, and on these occasions the crapule has such a picnic you can't see the forces for dust. But all the time you can hear the bands braying, and the sisters singing, and it is only after an hour or so that you can discern the Major with a mud plaster on his forehead, and notice Canty combing the lime out of his eye-brows. The Salvation Army holds meetings nightly in a foetid little vault under the Wesleyan chapel in York-street, but on Sunday it blossoms forth in the Protestant Hall. I went to see them at both places. The hall in York-street is nothing but a kind of cellar tastefully festooned witch cobwebs, and furnished with a number of forms as greasy, if possible, as the officers' whiskers. When I arrived there and managad to squeeze in I was gratified to find that 'Miss Phillips, the champion walker,' was addressing the company. The last time I had seen that lady was when, clad in chaste and appropriate attire' (brown winsey gown and galoshes), she had been staggering round the track on the last day of ' the ladies' tournament,' on which occasion she was attended by a beetle-browed 'bottle-holder' who alternately loaded her up with sago from a soup plate and gave her to drink out of a rum flask. This lady (who drives a van when not inspired) said — ' I am moved by Christ to speak. I shall walk no more matches now. I have had a race with the devil and won it. Hallelujah !' Miss Phillips was about to proceed, when Captain Canty, who presided, told her in so many words to cut it short, whereupon the champion walker subsided. She was succeeded by a spectre in a gray coat profusely embellished with whitewash, who said — 'For 20 years I've been a sinnor. But now I stand firm as a rock in Christ.' Now that he is saved, I trust; the convert will wash himself ; he having, to all appearances, put off that ceremony until he should be gathered to the fold. Then a man with whiskers and no shirt collar bobbed up and regretted that ho had ' no initli in himself.' No one appearing a bit interested in this, he Bat sadly down again, when an animated death's head informed the company that 'before he had got saved by the Harmy 'is 'ouie was a little 'ell ; but now is was a little ovin.' This statement being popular, the Hallelujahs popped out all over the hall ; and one hallelujah lass was so moved by this touching recital that she called out shrilly — ' I've got it,' and then was immediately silent, leaving the company in a state of painful indecision as to which she had got — a flea or a fit.
A diversion was here created by the gallant Captain. Perceiving that a literary gentleman was getting down a few memoranda, he called out; — ' Hi, you ! give us a good report.' This eliciting no reply, he shouted — ' We ain't afraid of the Press. Christ will give us a good report.' A touching lyric by Major Sutherland was then roared. Here is a stanza of it smoking hot from the War Cry : — ' Jesus is a mighty Saviour From the power of sin ; He will cleanse and make you holy, Sinner, let him in.' 
Next to me was a very powerful tenor in a red comforter and no socks. He hadn't got a book, so he contented himself with a improvisation in which ' Dul-di-dal, ri»tolural ' largely figured, He told me after the hymn that he had been 'put out on his head ' on a previous occasion for indulging in a similar exhibition of his vocal powers ; and had been mulcted in a pound at the Police Court. Major Sutherland sympathized with him ; but he didn't contribute towards the payment of the penalty. Soon a boy with a red and repulsive face began to tell us his history, but as his adventures were received with a coolness bordering upon contumely, he soon sat down in confusion, giving place to a dirty-faced old man, who said—-' Brother and sister (sic), I believe I am saved. You know what a leap is: well, I've done the hast. I feel as I have passed through the gates of Jeroozlum.' But it was not until a nigger rose that I began really to enjoy myself. He was saved too; but he wasn't content with that. He wanted to put a little of his Salvation on our plates. Said he — ' Ii you die to-night, where will you opeud your eternity ?' a conundrum which the meeting appeared by its silence to 'give up.' Immediately the converted African had turned off the tap of his oratory, a pale-faced girl (who had an impediment in her speech) Hoped from the platform — 'Before I was saved I used to think nothing of going to the theatre of a Monday along of my chap ;' hero she became inaudible, but was understood to imply that she now had the same opinion of 'chaps' that Mr. Sniggins had of ' taps' — viz., that they were all 'vanities.' Shortly after this Captain Canty begun to preach. He is a stout, thickset follow, without a single H in his vocabulary (excepting when he uses the words ' Harmy ' and ' Horfen '), and he has a voice that reminds one of a grinding-stone when it is sharpening a butcher's chopper. The Captain is so blatant in his addresses that he becomes positively picturesque in his ignorance. There is nothing funnier in the world than to hear him howling out his sentences, all of which are as bereft of grammar and logic as a cow is of caligraphy. I listened to him with the greatest attention ; and it is no exaggeration to state that he could not round a single period, and that his syntax was bad enough to have paralysed Mark Twain's ' Mexican Plug.' But I could have forgiven him even his groan-inspiring grammar, could I have detected in the whole of his pitiful ramble one sentiment that was not clap-trap, one sentence that was not cant. But this man — full of beef and short of brains as he is — is no worse nor better than the rest. He is common and coarse and illiterate. Blasphemy, of course, is born of this; and the only thing that saves him from being hideous in his continuous and irreverent use of sacred names is the intensely ludicrous figure he cuts. Half-drunken, drowsy ruffians are encouraged to get up and say, as one man did : "Thank God I am saved to-night, and bathed in the blood of Crucified Christ.' Said Canty himself - "Don't mind about clergymen, dear brother and sister (they all say it) ; many's the time I have seen ministers with a couple of black eyes.' Then a wretched old women, clad in pitiful garb, rose and said she was going to Heaven directly, whereas she knew very well she was going out washing. One blear-eyed ruffian stood up and odd-—' Shcnb Q-oi'd me and the Devil can't agree ;' upon which there was a titter and a general notion, as I took it, of congratulating the devil. Another most intolerable ruffian started up, and said — ' I have found freedom in the Holy Ghost  and though my flesh and blood may desert me, and though I may be persecuted and tempted, still I will slumber in the bosom of Christ.' Perhaps the most painful part of this sad exhibition was the statement made by a most miserable, leaden-faced roercbei.' of the unfortunate class. She had a big collar that had once been white, but which was now painfully cloudy even in the flaring gas-light. Her face was the face you see in a dream — a horrible dream born of heavy ouppoi's of Paddy's market viands ; of black puddings that conjure up in the stable of your mind huge broods of nightmares which are ' at livery ' in your imagination the moment your extinguishes goes over the candle. A girl with a watery eye, a hanging upper-lip, and an intonation derived from close association with Sussex-street harridans, 'With a feeling friendship for Kent-street terrors.' She said—-' Will you not accept a 'ome in heaven ? I am saved. There is a fountain filled with blood that has washed me clean. Hallelujah!' Then, when she had concluded, some close-cropped hoodlum, who was sitting opposite, cried — ' Well done Homily ! That's the way to shape.' Only one more picture. Bat let me, like Silas Wegg, 'drop into poetry.' Allons : — 
It was a hall of memories,
Oh, this would make a column), 
Sad, dark, and harrowing are those 
And drear and dread and solemn. 

I thought as I gazed round this place 1 
Once more I would ha harking,— . 
When frozen by that flaccid face— 
To Pastor Allen's barking, 

I saw the dull French Renegade, 
His dim eyes dull and vicious, 
Unblushing, ply his sordid trade, 
So sharp, so avaricious. 

I saw him joyful and elate, 
I heard his ev'ry whopper ; 
I saw his eye upon the plate,
That counted ev'r-y copper. 

Oh, I felt horror in that hall, 
Though it was braw and gilded , 
With all the villainy and all 
The falsehoods that had filled it.
The Protestant Hall on Sunday night. Captain Reynolds this time directing the entertainment, supported by about 50 girls on one side, and by about 150 unkempt, unshorn 'worshippers' on the other. Captain Reynolds. The affair began with a hymn, to which all the 'Hallelujah lasses' not only gave involuntarily imitations of cat-calls, but beat time demonstratively with their hands. In their uniforms the Salvationists looked sometimes like firemen who had gone wrong; and at others like turncocks who had just sobered up. Amongst the 'push' on the platform were three emaciated kids ; and Miss Phillips was to the fore as a Salvationist sister. Captain Reynolds is a tall young man with black hair, and is the ' masher' of the company. He is an elegant young man, and so long as he doesn't open his mouth, would be cap-able, we should say, of enslaving the affections of any 'Hallelujah Sister.' Captain Reynolds just sang a solo, and then preached a sermon. I don't know what the solo was like, except that it sounded to me a dirge to the memory of a dead cat sung by an owl when the moon is at full, to a sewing machine accompaniment. His sermon he com-commenced— 'Brother and Sister, mend your hevil ways.' I hask you to be as I ham, saved, and mend your hevil ways. We are all saved up 'ere, brother and sister, so be like us and mend your hevil ways.' I looked up then on the platform, and when I saw the rows of repulsive faces there revealed, the watery eyes, the bulbous noses, and the hands that made a two-penny hymn-book clatter like a pair of castanets, I thought I could resist the temptation of being saved until the social status of the converted was brought to the level of a humble journalist. After Reynolds came Sutherland, and after Sutherland the eternal Canty. Then I left— hurriedly.
THE SALVATION ARMY. (1883, August 18). Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), p. 17. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article110558119 

All sorts of 'Pasquins' begin popping up everywhere, all with a similar voice to Theo's!: It is also around this time, although there seems hints of it in most of Theodore's earlier writings, that the disease we now call 'TB' was taking a firmer hold on his seemingly always poor health - going to dry places, where it's warm, was one of the 'curatives' or ways to rest during the 1880's. Tuberculosis was popularly known as consumption for a long time. 

In 1882, the microbiologist Robert Koch discovered the tubercle bacillus, at a time when one of every seven deaths in Europe was caused by TB. Because antibiotics were unknown, the only means of controlling the spread of infection was to isolate patients in private sanitoria or hospitals limited to patients with TB—a practice that continues to this day in many countries. The net effect of this pattern of treatment was to separate the study of tuberculosis from mainstream medicine. Entire organisations were set up to study not only the disease as it affected individual patients, but its impact on the society as a whole. At the turn of the twentieth century more than 80% of the population in the United States were infected before age 20, and tuberculosis was the single most common cause of death. By 1938 there were more than 700 TB hospitals in that country. Australia fared no better,. The disease can take 12-24 months to manifest in the body and people, then, wouild take years to die of it. 

THE S.S. EMU AND THE FOUR BROTHERS.
TO THE EDITOR.
Sir— in to-day's issue Mr. Gordon has commented on 'Pasquin's' letter, and your leader in the matter of the Emu and Four Brothers. Mr. Gordon does not appear to have comprehended the case : he writes of a collision, which the evidence led in the case clearly showed was not even alleged in the suit of the ' Four Brothers,' and has quite missed the point commanding the whole case., viz., that the master of the barge misled the steamer by exhibiting his siding light while keeping his lines fast to the jetty. That it was blowing a gale of wind is simply absurd. The steamer neither could or would Have attempted to go alongside the jetty under such circumstances. As it was, she approached the jetty at an angle, her own beam 13 about 26 feet, and she had also to allow some little room to work in. As it was shown that she never touched the barge, you can judge for yourself whether the statement of distance, relied on by Mr. Gordon is correct or otherwise. There being no appeal, is on the authority of the solicitor for the Company. I am. Sir, &c,PASQUIN. Port, May 9, 1883. This correspondence must now end. — Ed.] THE S.S. EMU AND THE FOUR BROTHERS. (1883, May 10). South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), p. 6. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article41998624

TABLE TALK. [BY Pasquin.] It  would be better for the progress of Bairnsdale were a little more public spirit exhibited. Our townsmen, as a whole, seem a very diffident and backward lot, and shirk many public obligations which. from the various positions they hold in society, and the social status they enjoy, they might reasonably be expected to willingly discharge for the good of the community in which their lot is cast. As a general rule, they may all be said to be good business people, driving thriving trades, and amply endowed with this world's goods and favors, yet they seem lacking in public spirit. I can hardly think that this defect arises from any penurious motive, although some one has suggested to me that the "round robin" of the Traders' Association, intimating the abolition of the practice of giving Christmas boxes, would bear such a construction. What I do think, however, is, that as our tradespeople have resolved to discontinue these trifling gratuities, as "being degrading to their customers and not in accordance with the modern style of business," they should be in a better position than ever, at this season of the year, to help forward those organisations which are formed in every modern community to permit of the people enjoying themselves rationally during the approaching holiday season. Of course our traders may feel that they are no more called upon than the rest of the community to take the initiative, or they may consider that the Racing Club provide ample amusement for Christmas week, but the fact remains that so far no amusement calculated to keep people at home, or to attract visitors to the town, has been provided for the New Year, There are, I believe, some sports to be held on the racecourse, but the programme is of such a paltry nature that, for the credit of the place, it is to be hoped it will not be published, as it would not stand comparison with those of such places as Mallra, etc. This apathy of our public men does the town, the district, and our business people an injury, as the residents will necessarily go elsewhere to enjoy themselves at the Now Year, and that will mean so much money going out of the district instead of so much coining in. It is, I fear, now too late to remedy matters, although it must be a source of regret to everyone that the regatta was allowed to fall through, or that action was not taken to provide some other general public amusement. When wrongfully arraigned, it is the duty of the accused to establish hist innocence of the charge preferred against him, and thus set himself right with tile public, and although the published refutation of Councillor Hodgson, with respect to the alleged unauthorised expenditure by him of somo £17 on the Lake Victoria road, seems to come " a day after the tahir," still, it is just as well, for the good repute of all concerned, that it has been forthcoming, at it robs the transaction in question of the Inonihtnce of a flagrant job, even though quitthtvnc may aver that while " the voice is Jacob's voice the hand are the hands of Eslia." It is to be hoped, however, that the practice that obtins in this shire of' councillors spending public money on their own individual authority will no longer be tolerated, as it opens the door to corruption, and councilors, like a councillor's wife, should be above Suspicion I hulel always drive fears that the president for the time being was entrusted with too much power and responsibility. It was only at the last meeting of the council that a step was taken that may yet be repented of, in delegating to the president the duty of deciding whether a contract has been completed satisfactorily or not. Surely, if the supervisor is a qualified man, and it is not for me to say that he is not, no one should know better than he whether the terms of the contract have been faithfully fulfilled, and if they have not, then it is his imperative duty to refuse to pass the work until the conditions in the specifications have boon complied with. That is the practice pursued in all well.governed municipalities, and a moment's reflection will convince any one that any other rule will not work satisfactorily, because favoritism and corruption would be possible, and conflict of opinions between the supervisor, prosident and contractor would be inevitable, and serious disagreements would assuredly arise, leading to most unpleasant results. In other shires, as I have said, the engineer is held responsible for the condition of the roads and the faithful execution of all works, and thus everyone knows who is blamable if there is cause for complaint. Of course, it may be just possible that there is a feeling in the council that the supervisor is not sufficienly strict or firm at times with contractors, but even were that the case it would be a more business-like proceeding to caution him to be more particular in the future than to invest one of their number with a power which only the full council should possess. In. alluding last week to the " go:aheadism " of our American cousins, I mentioned incidentally that it was a pity we were not made acquainted sooner with some of their "notions." Here is one, however,'I came across since then, relating to the manufacture of eggs, of which I entertain " mixed" feelings. It is said that the yolks are formed of a paste composed of cornflour, starch and other materials. The whites are formed of albumen, and are chemically identical with the whites of eggs. The inner skin is a film of gelatine, the shell is of plaster of Paris, and is rather thicket than the usual article. The yolk is first roiled into a ball and is frozen hard. It is then enclosed in the albumen, which is also frozen, after being submitted' to a rapid rotatory motion, which elongates the sphere to the ovoid form. It is then dipped into the gelatine and then into the plaster, which dries very rapidly, and retains the form after the contents have melted. TABLE TALK. (1883, December 18). Bairnsdale Advertiser and Tambo and Omeo Chronicle (Vic. : 1882 - 1918), p. 2 (morning). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84701474

1884

TABLE TALK. [By PASQUIN.] Who killed Cock Robin ? In other words, was it the funny dogs or the shire council that pulled down the men's bathing house? It would be interesting to know, because it is about time a new one was put up. The ladies have just had their requirements in this respect amply provided for, the boys have long enjoyed the advantages afforded by a bathing house, and what have the men done that they should have none? It is almost one of the first questions that visitors to the town ask at this season, " Where is the bathing house?" but no one can point it out. No one can but wish" the hop industry every success. Some of us may have our fears that past successes in this line by others may have tempted. some to put hops in thin year in ground which would have been better devoted to other crops; still, looking at the immense good the industry does the district, and although, perhaps, thinking some have been unwise, under the circumstances, in risking the large outlay necessary, we cannot but hope, I say, that the capital invested will give a profitable return. Last season was "undoubtedly an exceptional one, so far as high prices were concerned, and it may be some time before we witness the like again. But we need not, on that account, grow too despondent all at once, and cry out about the evil of over-production before it is a verity. Personally, I believe that while some of the new men will be along time making their fortunes at hopgrowing, they will not do so badly as to be compelled to give it up; while as to the older and more experienced growers, if they continue to give increased attention to the curing, etc., their position will not be much effected by the smaller fry, as sooner, or later an export .trade u must be opbened up with England. The first shipment sent home was certainly not a success, financially speaking, but that should not discourage our growers from combining and repeating the experiment next season, and though English prejudice may be -strong .it will in time, I think, be rooted out 'if care be taken. that only good samples are sent home. A? very sensible letter on this phrases of the question appeared lately in one of the Melbourne weeklies-the Leader, I. think-from the pen of a gentleman evidently well versed in the subject, and doubtless his views came under the notice of those more immediately interested, . It is about time some educational qualification was requirqd of gentlemen aspiring to their commission, of the peace... Here is a copy of a letter that is alleged to have been sent- recently to the Minister of Justice by a newly, appointed J.P.:-" Sir,-Your note to hand for which my thanks. It will give me great pleasure to administer their laws of this our adopted country. This work I will make convivial to nmu. I will try also to familiarise with the police magistrate, and will take every opportunity of collaborating with him. He is a fine gentleman, and quite a popular character on the bench. I hope by my attention to merit, your further favours, and by my disinterested faithfulness to my superiors to win their good wishes."TABLE TALK. (1884, January 3). Bairnsdale Advertiser and Tambo and Omeo Chronicle (Vic. : 1882 - 1918), p. 2. Retrieved  from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84701603

A PICTURE OF TRAVEL.
(By the "Pilgrim."

Under the potent influence of the planetary system (%) of James Hennessy and Co. (whose astronomical discovery of the triplet of luminaries observable throughout this communication— and in several other places we wot of— has revolutionised the minds of the bibulously-disposed through- 
out both halves of this sublunary sphere;, "Pilgrim," at present on the "war-path" here, astrologises thusly. — Printer's Devil : It occurred this way. I was outside Barney Simmons's, in Brisbane ; and I — in company with a literary "push" (this is a strictly professional word) that had travelled along the road with me, had taken a holiday. I hadn't asked for a holiday from the paper which I belong to in Sydney ; and, if I had, I shouldn't have got it. They never give a holiday 011 the paper to which I am attached. The only thing they give, as a matter of fact, ig notice. But, whatever they do give, they give gracefully. When, for instance, a " comp." of ours (I am talking of the Sydney Bulletin, to which I belong) is given notice, he receives it with a how and a smile ; and sometimes he retires. Generally, he does not ; anil then lie is put out (charitably) on his head. This is done— with compositors— acting, on a physician's advice. Anyhow, the Municipal Council of Sydney object to our throwing a "comp." out on his feet, as it invariably injures the footpath. This, by-the-way. . To return to Barney Simmons's, in Brisbane — who keeps a hotel and cafe, which is popularly known as a "kafe"— I stood outside, and was pensive. Other literary men besides myself stood outside, and they were also pensive. Gloom was upon each literary brow— for "no reason that could be immediately ascertained; but it subsequently transpired that every journalist who had come to Brisbane... had come there with the intention of starting a paper. There was no opening for starting a paper ; therefore, gloom was general. So we discussed matters pertaining to journalism, and lex belles lettres, and drank mournfully at Barney Simmons's expense — the only result being that Barney became nearly as melancholy as we were. Gloom generally prevailed. . . . 
The only question — a new paper not seeming to be practicable — was how to manoeuvre the "oracle." All the money I had - in my pockets was about £20,000. But, as I wished to buy a " house and lot" in Ashfield, I didn't care about sacrificing, in addition to my board-bill alone, £500,000. Gloom was, therefore, as I have stated, upon the alabaster brow of the classic penner of these lines. I communed with other literary men (all less distinguished than myself.) They grew, as the hours waned, more gloomy. Vague ideas were mooted about "floating companies," about "rushing up" a Sunday paper — three editions on Saturday afternoon, and a special number oil Sunday morning. We all discussed this over.the bar at Barney Simmons's "cafe," and, strange to state, the more it was discussed the more gloomy Barney Simmons became. There seemed to be a difference of opinion as to who was to "part" — we use an Australian phrase (there is nothing like being local) — for the "refreshment." He, however, hacl no opinion on the subject. I asked Barney to change me a cheque for a thousand pounds ; but he stated he had not sufficient money in the till. ' We wandered round the town, and went to a rehearsal of the Majei-oni's, at the Royal. Then we travelled round to the Albert Hall, and saw a rehearsal of a minstrel show. . . . 
Then to dinner. I sat next a lady who was stone-deaf. When I told her that "the dew-laden air-breeze resembled a long draught of wine," she would invariably pass the mustard. 
I was asked to join the minstrel company ; and I did so. It had long been my ambition to be ahead of a minstrel-show — without the remotest idea of being such a picturesque failure. - And I got it. I was staying at a hotel in Brisbane called " The Grand ;" but it wasn't, so far as I could see, enthroned with obtrusive grandeur. It is but fair to admit, anyhow, that my room was big enough for me and three horses. I hadn't any horses, so found space enough. To put it mildly, I wasn't crowded. You see, when a " gentlemanly and indefatigable agent " has got a room that would hold himself and three horses, and he doesn't trade in quadrupeds, he isn't crowded ! To get along. I was engaged. But it was too much glory for me from the start. I have earned, by dint , of nine years' very-hard work, a literary reputation of a brilliant — or shall J say eccentric — kind ; but I found I could not engineer such a big concern as this was. Such a stupendous organization was beyond me. I saw this from the first. Mine was a splendid appointment. I didn't get any salary; but I got my expenses. These amounted to about 30s. a day — though, when I say that I got them, I wish to infer that the people to whom they were due were paid by the management, whenever the management felt disposed to do so. So far as I can gather, the managerial mind was rather erratic — a cet egard. A little French thrown in, now and then, the schoolmaster being abroad, "is not " caviare to the general." This latter quotation is from a man named Shakespeare, whose front name was "Bill," and who— this is one amongst the many "popular delusions'" — is supposed to be dead. -As an agent I was a complete, gigantic, and most successful failure. = The first place I arrived at was Toowoomba, where one of the papers is owned by a gentleman of very bland and affable manners. We conversed a long time on the subject of Queensland politics. Subsequently, he was good enough to come and bring four children to the show. On this occasion I had the honour of dusting his seat, and handing the youngsters a programme— glory which is almost tantamount, I consider, to a C.M.G. decoration. Toowoomba is a very nice place, but not so nice as Warwick — -where, if you bill a post, the Small Debts Court Bailiff comes and hits you on the head with a club. It is recorded :in Warwick that when travelling shows are numerous, several dramatic-' agents are used up weekly. I cannot, however, endorse this — endorsing, on principle, hardly anything but the scriptures. Tenterfield is a giddy place. A great town is Tenterfield for a show — or a funeral. We hadn't got a funeral, but we had a show ; that was next door to it. At Tenterfield — as the Clown says in the play, "As You Like It," I think — "the rain it raineth everyday." It rained every day with us, anyhow, and the thirty shillings we had " in front " came in steaming. Perhaps the most seductive journey the mind of man can imagine is that from Stanthorpe to Tenterfield. You commence coaching at Stanthorpe, and then you begin to enjoy yourself. Coaching is a fascinating pastime. It doesn't cost much, but the pleasure embodied in it is ineffable. And we may mention that, perhaps, the most gorgeous treat the mind of man can imagine is the trip from Tenterfield to Glen Innes. There is a hotel in Tenterfield kept by a nobleman rejoicing in the patrician name of Brown. It is not my custom to give any scion of the aristocracy — even if his name be Brown — a gratuitous "ail.;" but yet, I must say he has a sensible manner of keeping a hotel. I have a dim recollection that he charges a considerable amount a day ; but— -for obvious reasons — I couldn't say for certain. I pressed his hand at parting ; but I was in too much of a hurry to put anything in it ! The coach was at the door, and my martial paper-collar was wrapped around me. Tenterfield is a place which is chiefly remarkable for Parkes, Whereat, and Chinamen. The latter evinced a lively interest in the show, but they all wanted to go in for nothing. They said they thought they would look well in the . hall, and would ornament it. At Tenterfield I adopted a mode of procedure subtle even to ingenuity. I found out every married Chinaman, and gave each one an order. Then, when the man rang the bell, I stood in the middle of . the street and watched how things would go. All the- men wanted to and all the women (their wives) wanted to go, too.' So the atmosphere soon grew thick with pigtails and eyebrows. We had a good house ; and as soon as the ladies cooled down the audience was enabled to hear some of the performance. Going back to Brown (who gives you mushrooms and devilled kidneys), it is an alluring thing to stop at the roadside inns from Tenterfield on your way here.. The first place you drop anchor at you get breakfast. You pay "two bob" — as it is popularly called — and you get tinned salmon, and tea of a peculiar nature. But as I am fond of tinned salmon, and tea of a "peculiar nature," I enjoyed myself immensely. But I didn't eat the tinned salmon, nor did I drink the tea of a "peculiar nature." Mine is a feeble temperament, and too much joy would kill me ! To me, Glen Innes chiefly consists of the Post Office, which I haunt daily in search of a remittance which has forgot to come. This has occurred before — in Deniliquin — when I was served with a summons by the Municipality for wearing out the P.O. steps. I may remark that several post-offices have suffered from my substantial feet ; several friends have also suffered (they allege) from my substantial demands. Now I consider the word "substantial," I think I will qualify it with "a few." There is a trick in this, and you must guess it. Anyway, the world is getting callous ! I'll have a lot to say about Glen Innes anon. But my heart is now too full. I do not allude to " my little tank."A PICTURE OF TRAVEL. (1884, May 20). Glen Innes Examiner and General Advertiser (NSW : 1874 - 1908), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article217879897

THE M‘GUFFIN MINSTRELS
BY. PASQUIN . 
You. Will all like this. I say this with confidence; because I know how to please you. 'You will like the way in which the short periods are rounded, and the manner in which the jokes are slid in, will cause many a little pink ear to lie laid upon the hearth-rug while the mother taps the owner on the back with a port manteau. I remember once-it is long ago now-a young lady of rich but dishonest parents taking such an extreme fancy to my style of writings, 'that' she used to haunt me in my hours of labour. She had a profusion of golden hair, and violet eye that were but a small remove from pink." She resided in the, neighbourhood of Darling Point with her "par" and her “mar”, while I-there is no beastly pride about me-lived in a modest apartment over a tobacconist’s in Castlereagh street where, when the hash was served, there was a sneeze in every potato, and a cough in every chop. She used, then, to call on me occasionally, and spend the afternoon. She liked, she said, to 'watch me at my work’. In those giddy days I’d a fancy for mingling with my prose pieces of poetry with plenty of "mine, "thine;" and "divine" in them, and for many years was guilty of gross ill-treatment of the moon. The visits of this young lady (she is married now to a member of the Legislative Assembly, who is the proud possessor of several H's) 'generally had the effect of throwing my work into some confusion.  "I’ll be very quiet," she'd say, "and watch you.” Then she would lay her cheek upon' the table, and for the next hour I'd be writing with a pen clogged, up with golden locks, She was the essence of good nature, that girl. When she started to come and feast her gaze upon genius,; she'd" bring bunches of flowers from her father's garden. One day however, she burst in as I 'was making a nice light dinner off a red herring, a grotesque piece of bread, and some butter that as nearly as high as Hamaan.:.' Next time she came she didn't bring flowers, but presented me with a big of cakes from the French confectioners. She had then just begun to find out what imparted to the poet the true divine aflatus. That afternoon she discovered in the safe the heel of a Dutch cheese modestly crouching behind my blacking brushes-- a circumstance which caused her next to sacrifice on the altar of literatte to take the form of two pounds of cooked pork sausages and a bottle of rum. That was the last time that I ever saw my amorous admirer. While we, were in the 'thick' of the sausages, and I was bawling out "Plato" by the yard, a young party who has lawful claims upon myself and my poetry returned from the country suddenly.' Her appearance, with the nurse-girl and the kid, caused a momentary lull. Then' the air grew thick with golden locks, manuscript, sausage, ribbons and rum, and there was passion enough slung around to have fitted up, several Fedaras. We made it up, though, that day; for I  remember taking the family to Watson's Bay in the cool of the afternoon with a bandaged kneecap, and my eye in a sling.
This little' episode will banish from the minds of my readers all doubts (if any existed) as to the wondrous popularity my style has attained, if not with the vulgar many at least, hem! with the exclusive few.
 A little introduction, and a little bow.

"'The M‘Guffin Minstrels are, or were (they have probably died of glory by this !) a company of lady and gentlemen entertainers chartered by Mr. M ‘Guffin to give entertainments through the provinces. The troupe is chiefly composed of ladies who sit on chairs in short dresses, causing those of them whom ' Providence has not particularly favoured anatomically to personify Melancholy in her several phases. There were two corner men also; each of whom looked like a funeral, but was not half as funny.' Their comic songs were " wholesome fun " in its truest sense; and their riddles would have made Lot blush. And that reminds us, if we are to believe half what we read, it would have taken a good deal to make Lot blush--let alone the young ladies! There was an interlocutor, too, who hailed from Castile or Tipperary--either or both who had a brogue as broad as the back of John Lucas, and. whoso emphasis' when asked by a corner-man why the Premier is like a top-boot, was of a thrilling description. The manager had formerly belonged to a circus, and had acquired world-wide celebrity, it being whispered he was a man that no brickbat could kill. He used to "go on" before the last farce, as a rule, and always made a little speech' which commenced - Ladies and gentlemen, while a thankin' you; for the hononr," etc.; an oration which was not unfrequently received with derision bordering upon contumely. M’Giffin himself was a study. He had a countenance of pronounced and poetic melancholy, and he told me, in confidence, that though he had been with the company three months he had never seen his home. Further than this, he never ',spoke to a .,member of the company, neither would he travel in the same railway-carriage with them. "I hear them 'through the chinks in the box-office," he said, with a sigh;" and that is why I am undone." 
I had known M'Guffin long, and loved him well, for he was suspected of having “a heart as big as your hat;" and, besides he was a brother scribe, owning a paper about as far north as Spitsbergen. It was at' rehearsal that I met him, and he ... because the show was a cheap one to run, and he thouight there was "money .in It. His last experlenee in the theatrical line had been that of Staking a tragedian, two fairy actresses, and a very full company all over New South Wales. The benefit, it seemed..socially, morally, and peeuniarlly-that ' he derived from this speculation was not much as to enthral him. ...
Perhaps these were not exactly the words, but the melody was'catohing, and thd next. moment I rushed ion to my doom; I was to be, so far as I could, gather, a kind of agent in advance without a portfolio. .That is, I ivas to get my " expenses,'' but no salary, aid'd I was to boom the show 'along to the b'eat' of my ability. "The terms," said the manager, who'now assisted at ' the conference,," are not, ' per haps, what we could wish ; but remember," he continued, with emphasis:?- :You'll see the country !", That settled it. We went to the hotel, tlen while they plastered my luggage all over with huge red labels, bearing the following legend :
THE MAMIMOTH MINSTRELS.... 1s “ Popular" Prices 1d! On my objecting to having my property decorated in this manner the manager said-" Half the battle is in advertising free." . That closed me up. In the hall was a great big wooden box of villanous appearance, and weighing, I should think two tons. "Here's your paper,'" said the manager, "don't be afraid to put it out. Be sure," he went on, gravely; pointing to the box-" be sure it doesn't go astray. 'Keep your eye on it." 'I remember gazing at the ghostly trunk with a look of intense dislike, and resolving to lose it at the first opportunity. I started soon to the railway station, and have a dim recollection that there was a disposition on the part of, the M'Guffins to see me off in a small body. Much alarmed at this proposal, I appealed to the manager to prevent the flattering demonstration, and he was partially successful. The ex-trapeziet was there, though, and when I saw her golden locks lit up by the rays of the tropic sun, I could not but feel that I was a bit of a "masher." It subsequently transpired, however, that she had come to bid adieu to a station overseer who had given her a tin locket. Before the train started she came up to my window to shake hands, and I said in stentorian tones, " Keep me in your memory green." She replied, "Yes; she quite agreed with me; six shillings a day was too much for board and lodging." Then the bell rang, the whistle blew, and I sailed away like a man in a dream. II,. .There are, doubtless some people-we mean people who are steeped to the eyes in blue blood and gilded several inches thick with wealth, who do not know what the duties of an advance agent for a theatrical company are. It has always been my aim in writing-and I have written a good deal in my time if you only knew it-to blend like Mr, Stiggins's "moral pocket 'ankerchers " amusement with instruction, and therefore I purpose explaining briefly and (I hope lightly) just what little things the man ahead is expected to achieve. When he arrives at a town his first duty is to inquire for a billsticker. His want becoming known, the bar of his hotel is speedily crowded with a number of persons d'utIn mhie nelligie, and of a villanous appearance generally. He then selects the one who looks the least like a murderer, and engages him. He proposes to be very thankful, and instantly makes a suggestion regarding malt liquor. This being acceded to, he asks for "half-a-bull," in order to buy flour with which to make his paste. That sum being duly advanced, he retires in search of his tools --probably by way of Madagascar-for you never see him again. The half-crown all at once was too much glory for him, and he fades into space accordingly. You then, having lost half the day, hunt up another miscreant, and watch him at his work in the pouring ram, winding him up occasionally with spirits. Being thoroughly damp, you now have to go round and " place" your people at the different hotels a work which involves the swallowing of say twenty drinks, and an equal amount of insults. As a rule, country landlords have but a poor appreciation of the drama. While endeavouring to make arrangements they will gruffly tell you how they were "let in by the last lot " how the Moonlight Serenaders "slithered " by moonlight; and then you will be shown, perchance, huge trunks of respectable appearance left in pawn for board, and filled to the brim-with bricks. Finally you repair miserably to your dinner, where you are perhaps snubbed by some snob of a commercial traveller whom you dare not kill, for fear it would spoil bnaiue as.
As the M'Guffluse were to play Toowomba four nights, and there was a Sunday in the season, I elected to wait for the company and see the show. I had advertised the crowd largely, by means of half-column ads. and enoombiting pars., so all promised well. I had likewise subsidised a company logical artart of uncertain not to say eccentric habits to deliver, with a inuflin.bell obligato, an eloquent address (written by myself for him) at the street corners. The address in question was do it as long as a cracker motuto, anil as he anounoed himself a quick study; I had sanrnine hopes of the result. Hopes, alas, only to be blighted! I followed hlu at a distance while he rang in first three rings, and then discovered that he did not even know the name of the company, This is what he said:-
SHoi '! (hi) H?oi ! Ho, i:t~-night 8 (his) clock, . , ,.(hi) School Harls,:BACKLEDOO' MUNSTRELS. Roll up ! ' 'oil Hoil .Ho, etc.". . ...  To suspend this artist, and engage an habitual drunkard with a piping voice, was the work of a moment. It took, however, some time to convince him that we were not the Marrionnettes, and some more time (and a money guarantee), before the landlord would entrust him with a bell. Our grand opening night, was all things considered, not seem grand as it might have been.' The "orders" patron seel us liberally; and so did, the press; the Speaker of the Queensland Assembly who bosses the Toowoomba Chronicle, being kind enough to bring not only his whole family, but a young lady of engaging appearance, who happened (luckily for us) to be on a visit. Mr. Groom, by the way, is an imposing looking party; and if wisdom and whiskers go together, he ought to be a very Solon. ' The other paper, the Darling Downs Gazette, belongs to a company, and is run by a charming young gentleman named Leigh. He came into the show also, and told me in confidence-read this carefully-that he had never seen "so many girls of the stage before.. "'
The show given by the M'Guffin Marmmoth Minstrels was similar to that given by Hudson's ‘Surprise party,' excepting that it is not similar. But it must be' remembered that there are many drawbacks to contend against. For instance, one of the corner-men was indisposed, while the contralto was bad with the asthma. The' orchestra was sully in consequence of having, previous to the performances, exchanged a few words upon the subject of a missing bottle of porter with another member of the company. The stage manager had, with happy foresight, placed the deaf lady- as far from the piano as possible, and the operatic soprano was nearly mad with the toothache. The manager, who should have been looking after the front of the house, was busily engaged in cursing the' bellman; the 'only trainquil" party connected with the show being the placid M'Giffin, who, however in course of the evening meal had remonstrated with me for advertising him' as ' . 'THE CIHAMPION MONEY TAKER OF THE AGE.
Then on to Warwick. What a country! Not a blade of grass and ~the bones of cattle lying all along the track. :"Being full of gloom after the performanoe of the M'Gufliose, this eight was in keeping with my state of mind. As I had left before the performance was over, and gone to bed, I vaguely wondered how many of the company had been killed. And that reminds me that there is a gaol in Toowoomba; also, three policemen and a brewery. 
Warwick, when I got there, appeared chiefly remarkable for mud, and for a reckless youth who drove me and a pair-horse buggy at racing speed to the hotel. Having vainly requested him to moderate his pace, I said, "I'll tell the man who owns the coach about this l" " That's me," he replied, whipping up the horses. "Well then," I oried, indignantly, as I removed a mud-plaster from my right eyebrow, ' I'll request the owner of the hotel not to employ you.': " It's my hotel,, he.replied, imperturbably." I then endeavoured to propitiate him with an order for the show; but as I was reluctantly compelled to admit that there were no wild animals in the McGuffin Combination, he declined to accept a ticket. I was two days billing Warwick; and on the second day I received a love letter from a lady of the company. Here it is in its entirety :" Toowoomba."My "My dearest,-I write to tell you that I love you, and that apples are 5s 3d a dozen. ANGELINA." After Warwick, coaching began over a country as cruel as Douglas Sladen' poetry. Half way to Stanthorpe (where the tin mines are) the coach stops to change horses, and you dine. That is, if you are sufficiently hungry, you may " worry" the remainder of the landlord's dinner, lap up coagulated gravy, snap up a block or two of petrified cheese, and take your dessert out in curses. At a wayside hostelries in another part-I won't say where-the landlord and the coachman are evidently in league together. It was perishing cold and wet, and the coach arrived at this alluring caravanserai something towards four o’clock. None of the tuneful M'Guffin troubadours (thank Heaven !) were travelling with us, but there were a number of ladies bound to an intermediate station. Everybody was stiff and cold and ill-tempered and wretched-and everybody was awfully hungry. We drew up in style. Fire burning in the dining-room ! Hurrah Then everybody had a hot drink, and joy was general. After this, we sat round the fire in joyful expectation. Presently a young person who had apparently borrowed Ben Brown's feet brought in something on a platter. She then coyly retired. On this we all examined the contents of the platter, and though opinions were divided, it was vehemently asserted by some that the phenomenon was bread. A moment later the same alluring sylph appeared with the rest of the banquet. Tinned salmon -cold, and right above us, flittering like the pennant of an Elizabethan Knight in •he wintry breezes was a card which bore the following weird announcement: ALL MEALs 2s. 6p, By Order.

Before I got to Tenterfield gloomy reports and gloomier telegrams had reached me respecting the McGuffin Minstrels, consisting of Star Lady and Gentleman Entertainers." My "expenees" came on tardily, and there was not that generosity of spirit exhibited towards the "genial and indefatigable agent" that I could have wished. So, at Glen Innes we had a meeting. It was terrible-but it was short. We parted. There was no row; there were no recriminations; simply, there was no money In a word, the M'Guffin Mammoth Minstrels were stranded. M'Guffin himself was outwardly unchanged. He maintained his oyster-like reserve, and punished the landlord, through the medium of his larder, in an appalling manner. The manager was gloriously hopeful. "At Armidale," he said, addressing the company, "we shall rake it in." But there was no response. He only encountered averted looks and frown. log visages. But when he was gone, they recovered their serenity directly; and one of the company having "got round " the landlord, that worthy brought in drinks; a proceeding which conjured up a pensive expression in the landlady's face. They were the maddest, merriest mob man ever struck. They saluted anything to eat with a chord: anything to drink with an exact imitation of a key-bugle. The M'Guffinses hadn't been twenty-four hours in that hotel before the landlord was completely conquered by the "push." 'They could "stick up" drinks at the bar, pervade the kitchen and toast cheese; and breakfast was on the table every day until a quarter to one. Bref, the "push" had found its Elysium at last. So far as I was concerned, I commenced to write myself back to the paper-a religious one-for which I scribble in Sydney; and I am getting back--slowly.The Glen Innes season, however much it might have been an artistic triumph, was a financial pest of the most pronounced kind. But that was nothing to Armidale ; where, in a hall rather bigger than the Gaiety' Theatre, the McGuffin's opened to, £1!15! The next day McGuffin announced that he was called to the bedside of a dying friend in Peru, and he started for Lima via Paddington, where he resides. He was sorry, he said to me, at parting, to leave a troupe with which he had been so long connected, but with him the call of duty was ever paramount. He then slipped into, the bus and was gone. When the "push" heard of the flight of the Great M’Guffin, it was in despair. The men went about shrieking for rum and revenge, and those of the ladies who had any hair tore it. The manager announced that he was willing 'to "take them on;" but was reticent on the subject of spondulix. Later in the day a deputation called on me, requesting me to be present next day at rehearsal, and arbitrate. I said nothing would give me greater pleasure, and bowed the deputation out of my bed room. Hardly had the sound of the last footstep faded away in the distance; than I girded up my luggage and fled. THE M'GUFFIN MINSTRELS. (1884, June 11). Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article137284655 

" Pasquin "—We have no objection to publish what you have to say, but we have great objection to the way in which you say it. The style is not adapted to our columns. TO CORRESPONDENTS. (1884, November 13). The Express and Telegraph (Adelaide, SA : 1867 - 1922), p. 2 (HALF-PAST ONE O'CLOCK EDITION.). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208285071

1885

W G Lipscomb’s Monthly List
A Maiden all Forlorn, by Mr. Argles, 2s 6d ; posted 3s. Advertising (1885, October 31). The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), p. 14 (Second sheet to the Maitland Mercury). Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18876541 

1886

 – died Saturday October 9th, 1886

AGENTS "SUNDAY TIMES.".
THE "SUNDAY TIMES" CAN BE OBTAINED FROM THE FOLLOWING AGENTS:
 Mrs. E. Argles, Neutral Bay. AGENTS "SUNDAY TIMES." (1886, January 15). Globe (Sydney, NSW : 1885 - 1886), p. 7 (EVENING). Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102559563 

Theo's uncle Alfred Argles had a house at Neutral Bay - they may have been giving shelter to a sick man and his wife and child. 

ARGLES (Harald Grey) will have his late residence, 96, Brougham-street, off William-street, THIS (Monday) AFTERNOON, at half-past 2 o'clock, for Waverley Cemetery. WILLIAM J. DIXON, Undertaker, 40 and 169 Riley-street.  Family Notices (1886, October 11 - Monday). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 14. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13616940 


Woolomoloo [i.e. Wooloomooloo] from Album 'Album of photographs of Sydney, [ca. 1875-1878]' Captions in ink at lower edge of mounts "1860-70" in pencil [p.i] Nos. 7; 20-29 and 31-39 are the work of photographer J. Paine -- Identified and dated by the Curator of Photographs, Mitchell Library, Dec 1997. Image No.: a2229012, courtesy State Library of NSW.

Harold Grey.— Theodore Emil Argles, who for some years past has contributed to the Sydney press under the nom. de plume of ' Harold Grey ' died in his residence, Brougham-street, Woolloomooloo; on Saturday. Although undoubtedly possessed of talent, or what is accepted as such, and without a compeer in Australia as a writer of persiflage, it is difficult to assign Argles or Grey a place in the ranks of colonial journalists, and his fame will assuredly be ephemeral. He may be described as having been a sort of brilliant literary cheap Jack. However, this much may be said of him. As Kean was declared to read Shakespeare by flashes of lightning, so Grey always threw upon .the most commonplace topics an electric ray of irresistible, satiric if outrageous humor that invested all he wrote with charming interest. The deceased was the son of a Threadneedle-street solicitor, and owed some of his lampooning powers to his French extraction. He was no mean, though rarely unbiased, critic, and turned humorous verse of more than average merit, with facility. To the last he was tended with solicitude by kind friends, prominent amongst whom was Mr. Alfred Dampier, the actor, he was a personal friend of the late lamented Marcus Clarke, and, though his eccentricities estranged many literary men of note from him, his talent was fully acknowledged. He will be buried, at his own request, this afternoon in the Waverley Cemetery as close to the last resting place of the place of the poet Kendall as the vacancies in the graveyard permit. The deceased leaves a widow and child not well provided for.  General News. (1886, October 11).Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), p. 4. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107318830 

Marcus Andrew Hislop Clarke FRSA (24 April 1846 – 2 August 1881) was an English-born Australian novelist and poet, best known for his novel For the Term of His Natural Life. Born in London on 24 April 1846, the only child of William Hislop Clarke and Amelia Elizabeth née Mathews, in 1862 William was sent to Northumberland House because of a mental breakdown and died there a year later.

Marcus Clarke was educated at Highgate School, where his classmates included Gerard Manley Hopkins. At age 17 he emigrated to Australia, where his uncle, James Langton Clarke, was a county court judge. He was at first a clerk in the Bank of Australia, but showed no business ability, and soon proceeded to learn farming at a station on the Wimmera River, Victoria.

He was already writing stories for the Australian Magazine, when in 1867 he joined the staff of The Argus in Melbourne through the introduction of Dr. Robert Lewins. He briefly visited Tasmania in 1870 at the request of The Argus to experience at first hand the settings of articles he was writing on the convict period. Old Stories Retold began to appear in The Australasian from February.The following month his great novel His Natural Life (later called For the Term of His Natural Life) commenced serialisation in the Australasian Journal*. He also became secretary (1872) to the trustees of the Melbourne Athenauem and later (1876) Sub (assistant) Librarian. In 1868 he founded the Yorick Club, which soon numbered among its members the chief Australian men of letters.

The most famous of his books is For the Term of his Natural Life (Melbourne, 1874), a powerful tale of an Australian penal settlement. He also wrote The Peripatetic