August 3 - 9, 2014: Issue 174

Andrew Thompson

View of Part of the Town of Windsor, ... / Taken from the Banks of the River Hawkesbury. Drawn and Engraved by P. Slager, Sydney. Dedicated to Mrs Macquarie, ca. 1777-1855. Image No: a990071h, courtesy State Library of NSW

 Andrew Thompson –  ‘Long Harry’

January or early February 1773 – to October 22nd, 1810

Baptised on 7 February 1773 at Kirk Yetholm, a village in the Scottish Borders region of Scotland, 13 km south east of Kelso and less than 1 mile (1.6 km) west of the border, and 4 kilometres from Thompsons Walls, Andrew Thompson was the youngest and sixth child of John Thompson, a weaver, manufacturer and dyer, and his wife Agnes, née Hilson. 

The Thompson/Thomson/'son of Thom' is one of the most common surnames in Scotland, found mostly in central Scotland but with many wonderful and historical associations - a John Thomson in Ayrshire in 1318 led part of Edward Bruce's invading army in Ireland on behalf of Robert the Bruce. There are Gaelic equivalents in MacTavish (son of Tammas) and McCombie (son of Tommy) and MacLehose is from the Gaelic 'mac gille Thoimis" or son of St Thomas. Clan MacThomas was descended from Clan Chattan Mackintoshes and was based initially in Glenshee. The MacThomases supported King Charles I and the Marquis of Montrose but after the defeat of Montrose at the Battle of Philiphaugh, the chief withdrew his men and extended his influence into Glen Prosen and Strathardle. The chief approved of the stable government brought about by Oliver Cromwell and the Commonwealth. Consequently, after the Restoration of King Charles II the MacThomas fortunes declined and the clan drifted apart - some clansmen moving to the Lowlands and changing their name to Thomson or Thomas. James Thomson (1700-1748) was a poet who wrote "The Seasons",regarded as a classic of English literature and is remembered now for writing "Rule Britannia". Alexander "Greek" Thomson was a 19th century architect of note who is becoming more recognised at the end of the 20th. Robert William Thomson invented the pneumatic tyre in December 1845 and scientist and inventor William Thomson, Belfast born, became associated with Glasgow University and became Lord Kelvin. He gave his name to the measurement of temperature "Kelvin".

Andrew Thomson/Thompson then, had lineage, and although some here in Australia later claimed he was an 'illiterate', an advertisement placed in our first newspaper for the return of books which formed part of his library and evidence he attended a local parochial school would attest to the opposite. Soon after entering his father's business his health forced him to leave and begin studying for work as an Exciseman; a Collector of taxes. 

For some reason he broke into a shop and stolecloth in 1790 and was sentenced on two counts of theft on 22nd September 1790 at the Jedburgh Court of Justiciary, birthplace of above mentioned poet James Thomson (1700–1748) and was given 14 years (2x 7years) and sentenced to transportation. It is interesting to note that eight out of every ten offences were for theft during this period and penalties, to discourage this, included death or transportation. The record (to right) would indicate Andrew looked young or small for his by then 17 years.

Jedburgh lies on the Jed Water, a tributary of the River Teviot. It is only ten miles from the border with England and  is a town and former royal burgh in the Scottish Borders and historically in Roxburghshire.

Scotland 1790: Engraved map printed on 4 sheets. Counties in outline color. From David Rumsey Historical Map Collection. Retrieved from rumsey.geogarage.com/maps/g0411013.html

Hi there Pittwater!

I’ve been heavily researching Andrew Thompson and have found a transcript of his court trial at Jedburgh.  Thought you might like to pass it on to your Andrew Thompson researcher, A J Guesdon.  The text is in a book written by Jan Barkley-Jack – Hawkesbury Settlement Revealed, published in 2009, and appears on Page 349 in Box 9.7

Not sure if it’s totally complete, but there’s a lot of information in it.

Regards- Venecia Wilson, Richmond NSW - PS – I love your web site.

Sheriff’s case: 

‘Andrew Thompson…present Prisoner in the tolbooth of Jedburgh and … John Aitkin…on the night between the Fifth and Sixth day of August [1790] …did…break into and enter the house of William thomson Manufacturer and Dyer in Yetholm or Town Yetholm …and carrying away…a pair of Pistols, a Powder flask, some Powder and Shot, a parcel of Indigo and about a pound of Tea…[some] afterwards found hid among some other Goods which had been in possession of the said Andrew Thomson and John Aitkin…And further…On the night betwixt Saturday the Seventh and Sunday the Eighth of August [1790]…did break into the house or Shop of Walter Turner Merchant or Shopkeeper in Yetholm or Town Yetholm…and steal…Linnen and Woolen Goods…and concealed them partly amongst some Straw in a Stackyard…and the remainder in a holde [under some cabbages] in a park possessed by John Thompson Indweller in Yetholm…Edinburgh 31.8.1790’ 

Thompson’s Declaration: 

‘Andrew Thomson youngest son of the said John Thomson aged Sixteen being judicially examined Declares he knows that John Aitkin was a Journeyman Weaver with the Declarants Brother Walter Thomson and…the Declarant did work [and sleep] a little in the same place with Aitkin till about nine or Ten weeks Ago when he lost his health and was no longer able to work at the Weaver Business but went to School [living at that time with his brother William]…that John Aitkin left Yetholm and the cause of his going away was that he had run in Debt to the Declarants mother and had turned Idle.  Declares…he heard that Walter Turner had found part of his goods in a Chest of which John Aitkin had the key away with him…Declares he does not remember to have seen the Cabbages he planted from the time he set them.’

Court Proceedings at Jedburgh: 

‘John Aitkin…failing to Compear…[was declared] to be an Outlaw…Andrew Thompson…present…answered that he was Guilty… The Advocate Depute declared that on account of the Pannell’s youth and his former good Character and some other circumstances he restricted the libel to an arbitrary punishment…[At] and assizes…[21.9.1790] the said Andrew Thomson [was found] Guilty [10 of the 15 jurymen were Merchants]…[on 22.9.1790]  The Lord Hailes…[declared] the …Pannell to be Transported beyond Seas to such  place as his Majesty [decreed]…Council has appointed…that for the space of Fourteen years with Certification to him that if after being so Transported he shall be found at large in any part of Great Britain during the foresaid space without some lawfull Cause…he shall suffer death.

His family apparently disowned him and no member had anything to do with him again although records of letters and parcels registered to him at Sydney could provide conjecture for contact or for more books and articles ordered to arrive by ship.

Andrew was sent on the Pitt: Departing June-July 1791 for Sydney, and arrived in Sydney on 14 February, 1792, days after his 19th birthday. The Pitt was run by Capt. Edward Manning and owned by London alderman George Mackenzie Macaulay. This ship formed part of what some chroniclers refer to as 'Ships After the Third Fleet' (See: The Cozens/Byrnes Merchants Networks Project). On 15 July, 1791, the surgeon on Pitt reported smallpox aboard. 

The Pitt - transport ship.

15 June, 1791: Indenture for the Pitt, (copy of original), made on June 15, 1791, thirty first year of Geo III, .... between Thos Shelton of the Sessions House in the City of London, and George Mackenzie Macaulay of Chatam Place London, [transportable felons] 224 cons,227 [names], And Whereas His Majesty by His Royal Sign manual bearing date at His Court of St James's the [15 June] 1791, [by act of parlt in 28th year of reign], ....George Mackenzie Macaulay and his Assigns shall and will forthwith take and receive all the several before named Offenders and transport them or cause them to be transported effectually as soon as conveniently may be to the Eastern Coast of New South Wales or some one or other of the Islands Adjacent pursuant to the sentences and orders aforesaid concerning them respectively And shall and will procure such evidence as the nature of the case will admit of the landing there of the said several before named Offenders (death and casualties by Sea excepted) and produce the same to whom it may concern when lawfully called upon And shall not nor will by the wilful default of him the said George Mackenzie Macaulay or his Assigns suffer the said Offenders or any or either of them to return to Great Britain or Ireland during the respective terms ..... sgd in presence of ? Fitzpatrick and one other illegible, Thomas Shelton and George M Macaulay. 

Macaulay on 11 July, 1791 then agreed to assign [the prisoners] to the Gov. Phillip and his assigns, and all his rights in them, on 11 July, 1791

Also sailing in the Pitt was Major Francis Grose, who led the New South Wales Corps (aka The Rum Corps, Botany Bay rangers, Rum Puncheon Corps, The Condemned) and was left in charge when Governor Phillip returned to England for respite in December 1792. The New South Wales Corps was formed in England in 1789 as a permanent regiment to relieve the Royal Marines who had accompanied the First Fleet to Australia. The regiment consisted of three companies. Due to the remoteness and unpopularity of the posting they were composed of officers on half pay, troublemakers, soldiers paroled from military prisons and those with few prospects, who were gambling on making a life for themselves in the new colony. The regiment began arriving as guards on the Second Fleet in 1790. Major Grose arrived to take command and assume role of Lieutenant-Governor of the colony. A fourth company was raised from those marines wishing to remain in NSW under Captain George Johnston, who had been Governor Phillip's aide-de-camp.

Andrew Thomson/Thompson was assigned to the men's provision store and in February the following year became part of the police force (1793) or a stone work labour gang - (there are two versions of what he during his first few years here) and then was transferred to being a trustworthy watchman. In Britain at this time there were watchmen assigned in towns and no police force.  John Harris previously an emancipist, watchman innkeeper and labourer of St Marylebone, London, who was sentenced to death on 15 January 1783 at the Old Bailey for stealing eight silver spoons, which was commuted to fourteen years transportation to America, and altered the following month to deportation for life to Africa and finally changed to New South Wales, sailed, with a life sentence, in the First Fleet in the Scarborough. It was he who proposed to fellow First Fleeter Judge-Advocate David Collins to establish a night watch, 'to be selected among the convicts for the purpose to stem the frequent commission of offences in the settlement' in the Winter of 1789. Between 1788 and 1842 around 80,000 convicts were transported to NSW, so the need for a police force to be formed from some of those transported, who clearly outnumbered settlers, was the best idea.Collins commented that: 

"It was to be wished, that a watch established for the preservation of public and private property had been formed of free people, and that necessity had not compelled us in selecting the first members of our little police, to be appointed from a body of men in whose eyes, it could not be denied, the property of individuals had never been sacred. But there was not any choice convicts who had any property were themselves interested in defeating such practises [as theft]". 

The Sydney Foot Police Force was established in 1790, there were 36 Constables serving by 1800 (see more at: thedirton.therocks.)  . Thompson was assigned to Toongabbie and other areas. In 1796 he was appointed by the second Governor of NSW, John Hunter, to the then named 'Green Hills' district (now Windsor) and was pardoned in 1798. Captain John Hunter, in command of the Siruis ship of the First Fleet,  was the man who first explored Pittwater:  "Chart of the coasts and harbours of Botany-Bay, Port-Jackson and Broken-Bay, as survey'd by Capt.n John Hunter of H.M.S. Sirius". He arrived in Sydney on 7 September 1795 on HMS Reliance and took up the office of governor on 11 September 1795 and did his utmost to transfer the militarised by Grose colony and its management of the lands, public stores, courts and convict labour back to civil administration.

'View in Broken Bay New South Wales. March 1788' by William Bradley - Drawings from his journal `A Voyage to New South Wales',1802+ Image No.: a3461013, courtesy State Library of New South Wales.

'SW. Arm of Broken Bay New South Wales from an Island at the Entrance. Sepr 1789' by William Bradley - Drawings from his journal `A Voyage to New South Wales', 1802+ , Image No.:a3461014, courtesy State Library of New South Wales.

Andrew Thompson, like any other settler at this time, was assigned convict labour for properties and land grants that he then began to accumulate. To get the produce from these to Sydney Cove he utilised the flowing past his estates Hawkesbury River and employed a boat builder to construct these vessels. The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, the first newspaper printed in Australia, running from 5 March 1803 until 20 October 1842, records some of these vessels and their adventures;

Boats.—Came in from Hawkesbury on Saturday last, the 19th inst. the William and Mary, W. Miller owner, laden with wheat. On Tuesday came in from Hawkesbury the  Raven, Thomas Raby owner, also laden with wheat; and same day the Hope of Hawkesbury, A. Thompson owner, with wheat barley, and oats. And on Thursday  came in the Argument, Ward and Eaton owners, with wheat.—On Thursday the Hope sailed again for Hawkesbury. SHIP NEWS. (1803, March 26). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625468

What is interesting about this above Ships News notice in the fourth ever issue of The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiseris a 'NOTICE' in the second Issue of the Gazette that the 'granary's' at Sydney Cove were full and could accept no more wheat - the colony had gone from almost starving to having bumper crops. Andrew Thompson later acquired a 'townhouse' in Macquarie Place (1809), fitted with stables and a granary, and it may have been here that he stored his goods for sale in later years.

And on Thursday arrived the Nancy, A.  Thompson owner, and the William from Hawkesbury, with wheat. The Nancy sailed from hence for Hunter's River on the 21st of October; took on board 40 logs of very fine Cedar, mostly measuring 20 feet and upwards, and squaring more than 3 feet; and arrived at Hawkesbury with the freight the 1st of the present month.  SHIP NEWS. (1803, December 25). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625948

The Keel of a new Vessel was last week laid by Messrs Kable and Underwood, opposite to the yard of the latter, all the planks of which are to be cedar, and her dimensions not under those of the Governor King.  Two handsome Sloops both built at Hawkesbury, lately came into the cove for the first time, one of which we before mentioned to be built by Mr. A. Thompson, named the  Hawkesbury, conveniently carries from 7 to 800 bushels ; and the other called the Speedy about 500 bushels. Both these … performances, and that of the Nancy, will doubtless operate as a spur to emulation  and industry, which are the founders of opulence, and the certain tread to happiness and social independence. SYDNEY. (1804, April 1). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626111

BOATS. - On Sunday last arrived from Hawkesbury the Argument, Ward and Eaton,  the Raven, T. Raby; Hope, Smallwood;  Edwin, belonging to J. Palmer, Esq: and Hope of Hawkesbury, A. Thompson. SHIP NEWS. (1803, April 24). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625529        

On Wednesday the 27th ultimo a Hawkesbury Boat belonging to Mr. Andrew Thompson, was totally lost near Broken Bay, on her passage to Sydney, with a full freightage of Maize, Potatoes, and Melons; but two men on board her fortunately saved their lives, though not without extreme difficulty. The loss of the boat, we understand, may in some measure be attributed to a want of skill in one of the above persons, who had inconsiderately taken her in charge, and professed himself capable of piloting her to the WORLD'S END. The boat filled when at a considerable distance from the shore; and, as the master observed the water flowing in upon her, had only sufficient presence of mind to observe, that in less than ten minutes they should be both as dead as an anchor lock to which apostrophe his distressed companion could only return a pious ejaculation. The prophesy, however, was not fulfilled; the boat was driven on shore, and dashed to pieces by the violence of the surf, and the proprietor, we are sorry to add, sustains a heavy loss. SYDNEY. (1803, May 8). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625557

We feel ourselves happy in informing the Public, that Mr. Andrew Thompson's boat, stated to have been dashed to pieces on her passage to Sydney, was not totally lost, although she sustained much damage. Classified Advertising. (1803, May 15). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625574

BOATS - On Monday came in from Hawkesbury the William Mary, Miller; on Tuesday the Union, Jones; Hope, Smallwood; William, Grant and Kearns; Hope, Thompson; all laden with corn. By the Union the three men wrecked in Broken Bay were brought in; the particulars of which are contained in the preceding page. SHIP NEWS. (1803, May 29). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625598

A strong well-built Sloop, from 35 to 40 tons burthen, belonging to Mr. Andrew Thompson, was on Saturday the 17th instant launched at the Green Hills, Hawkesbury. Mr. Thompson has another vessel of nearly the same size now on the stacks, which will be shortly ready to launch. SYDNEY. (1803, September 25). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625792

The New Hawkesbury Sloop, built at the Green Hills, Mr A Thompson, owner, came  round for the first time on Monday 1st, with 1160 Bushels of Wheat, on from Cornwallis Farm, cultivated by Government, and could have taken in with safety 250 more. This vessel called the Nancy, was built under the sole management and direction of Mr. Kelly, formerly chief mate of the Eliza whaler, who also navigates her. Her computed burthen is 40 tons, carries 5 men, and has 4 swivels mounted on her quarter railing. Connoiseurs find no other fault with her than on account of her being rather "shallow in the Bow." SYDNEY. (1803, October 23). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625840

And on Thursday arrived the Nancy, A.  Thompson owner, and the William from Hawkesbury, with wheat. The Nancy sailed from hence for Hunter's River on the 21st of October; took on board 40 logs of very fine Cedar, mostly measuring 20 feet and upwards, and squaring more than 3 feet; and arrived at Hawkesbury with the freight the 1st of the present month.  SHIP NEWS. (1803, December 25). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625948

This mentions Collins once again, who had been sent out with the first fleet. During 1803 he established the first, short-lived settlement in what is now the state of Victoria at Sullivan Bay on Port Phillip. In 1804 he became the first Lieutenant Governor of the Colony of Van Diemens Land (Tasmania). He had arrived there post-Lieutenant John Bowen, who had set up a settlement at Risdon in 1803. Captain Collins proposed moving the settlement to Sullivan's Cove, where there was abundant fresh water and here it was established on February 21st, 1804, and is now called 'Hobart':

Sails this day the Nancy, A. Thompson owner, for the Southward, with Dispatches on board for Lieut. Governor COLLINS from HIS EXCELLENCY. SHIP NEWS. (1804, January 1). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625954

Another handsome Sloop built by Mr. A. Thompson, was on Thursday launched from the Green Hillsher keel was laid by Mr. Kelly, now master of the Nancy, her burthen is computed at 30 tons, and in compliment to the spot of her nativity, she has received the name of the Hawkesbury. Bench of Magistrates. (1804, February 19). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626050


Mr Thompson also sent his vessels 'sealing' and his workers and ships brought back thousands of seals, while other Hawkesbury settlers sent their ships 'whaling', bringing back tons of whale oil. The appetite for seal furs did not lessen until the mid 19th century and some populations never recovered. The lists of items for sale and auction after his death also list these 'pelts' or skins, some of them on the Scotland Island estate. They hunted in Bass Strait and in New Zealand:

On Tuesday sailed the Nancy, Mr. A.Thompson owner, for Bass's straits. SHIP NEWS. (1804, August 26). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626375

Below is an indication of what the sails of these vessels were made from (our thanks to Neil Evers for clarifying this):

SYDNEY.  In addition to the exertions made by Government Mr. A. Thompson has, we are happy to learn, successfully applied himself to the cultivation of hemp. He last year obtained a small quantity of English seed, which he carefully sowed, and from this first and very limited plantation reaped a sufficient quantity to sow nearly four acres, which at the present moment is in a flourishing and forward state, and promises an ample compensation in the extensive propagation of this very useful plant.  It is also worthy of remark, that his first specimen attained to a luxuriance scarcely surpassed in any other climate, as the plants in general measured between 17 and 18 feet. SYDNEY. (1805, December 22). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626992

The Speedwell colonial vessel, belonging to Mr. Thompson, made the heads of Broken Bay a week ago, and made for the Green Hills. This schooner, we are informed, had been pretty successful in procuring seal on the New Zealand Coast; but with the reported loss, we are sorry to state, of three of her hands, who unfortunately perished through a boat upsetting. SYDNEY. (1806, September 28). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627296

The Nancy was soon sold and then lost:
LOSS of the NANCY.  
In addition to the losses recently sustained to the Colony in its small craft, we have to regret that of the above fine cutter on the 18th ultimo, a few miles to the southward of Jervis Bay. On the 17th appearances strongly  indicating an approaching gale, she hauled offshore, and in the evening a dreadful hurricane set in accompanied with very vivid lightning, and awful peals of thunder that rolled without intermission, together with an incessant torrent of rain. The rage of the elements increasing, split the mainsail, which was  close-reefed, the vessel still driving at the rate of 4 or 5 knots, and at the same time making much lee way. At midnight the gale became furiously violent, not a sail was left, and the sea making a fair breach over her, prevented the possibility of keeping alight in the binnacle. The gale blowing dead on the shore, at about two in the morning the man at the helm gave notice of land to leeward, which was discernible by the lightning; and such was its appearance,    being a chain of perpendicular cliffs against which the sea dashed with inconceivable  violence, as to fill with horror and consternation the minds of those already hopeless of escaping a destiny presented in a variety of dismal shapes; all above-board was by this  time washed away, and to avoid grounding in a situation where every person on board must  have inevitably perished, all that remained to determined perseverance was effected, and  by keeping her as much to the wind as her  helpless condition would permit, she happily  changed her ground, and striking on a smalls and-beach between two bluff heads, unhung her rudder at the first blow. To this inter-position of providence alone is to be attributed    the rescue of the people from a melancholy  fate, one of whom, Richard Wall, a native of Exeter, was unfortunately lost.        
The same morning the hull parted, and shortly after went to pieces, the continued violence and rapidity of the surf preventing any part of the cargo from being saved; and  such few articles as were washed ashore were  carried off by the natives, who, though they offered no personal violence, had become too numerous to be resisted. One of these people, whose conduct Mr. Demaria, the master of the vessel, noticed as being in all respects opposite to that of his brethren, cheerfully undertook to conduct his distressed party?? to Jervis Bay, for which place they set  out on the morning of the 20th, and reached it the same evening; and next morning, perceiving that the natives, possibly with no other design than the gratification of curiosity, were clustering round them from all directions, it was considered most adviseable to commit themselves to the Providence that had thus far bountifully preserved them,and make the best of their way for Sydney by pedestrian travel. Destitute of provisions, without a musket, except one that was useless,    and only borne to intimidate the natives, the proposal was readily concurred in, and after a terrible journey of eleven days, lengthened much by the inundated state of the country, they attained the much desired object on Wednesday night last, crippled by fatigue,and reduced to the last extremity by actual want.
Near the Five Islands Mr. Demaria mentions his having experienced a portion of civility from the natives which would do credit to a more polished race of men, as it even extended to the liberal partition of their      
scanty fare among his little party when they were much exhausted. On the other hand a Sydney native who had accompanied the trip and received every favour and indulgence, forsook his fellow travellers the day
after the wreck, and went over to his kindred with every trifling necessary that might have softened in some measure the rigours of a painful travel. Among the articles stolen by this perfidious miscreant was a small axe, the loss of which added much to their  calamity, as the travellers had not then any edged implement whatever, and were in consequence deprived of the means of procuring the cabbage tree, upon which they had placed much reliance.              
The cargo of the Nancy consisted of 3187 skins; she was the largest vessel ever built at Hawkesbury, from whence she was about two years since launched by Mr. Thompson, and sold to Messrs Kable and Company, in whose service she remained to the moment of her dissolution. LOSS of the NANCY. (1805, May 5). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626748        

It is also due to the use of one of these vessels by fellow Hawkesbury river gentleman, John Grono, that his name appears in New Zealand. Thompson Sound  was named in 1809 by Capt. John Grono after Andrew Thompson the owner of his vessel the Governor Bligh and who also managed Governor Bligh’s farm next door to Grono’s farm on the Hawkesbury River, NSW.’ 
There is also a Thompson Street crowning the whole of our own Scotland Island.

By the Charlotte, from Broken Bay on Tuesday last, we learn that the Hope and Hawkesbury, belonging to Mr. Andrew Thompson, together with his Hawkesbury accommodation boat, and upwards of twenty hands, were awaiting there a favourable opportunity for endeavouring to get off the Speedwell, which we understand he has purchased at all hazards from Grono, some time since stranded there. For this purpose he has provided himself with a shipwright and all tackling, &c. that might be wanting but while it continues to blow fresh no attempt can be practicable. 
It is his design also to erect a salt pan there; and for this purpose has provided an oil boiler, which is probably fixed by this time, estimated to be capable of supplying about 200lbs. weekly. This will doubtless be attended with much utility, from the possibility of accomodating private stock growers with such proportion of that valuable article as may not be required for his own use; and from the liberal sanction and encouragement shewn by Government to every worthy project that promises public advantage, it may almost be wondered that the scarcity and cecessity of salt to individuals has not induced others to adopt the means of a certain self supply. SYDNEY. (1804, December 2). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626527

MISCELLANIES. Mr. Thomson has succeeded in getting off the Speedwell, formerly Grono. This was effected on Wednesday, and on Thursday she sailed for Hawkesbury from Broken Bay, the spot of her misfortune and recovery; the damage sustained to the vessel comparatively trifling. Mr. T. at some distance from  the assistance of any of his people perceived among a body of natives a white man, nearly if not entirely naked, in whose person he soon recognized that of Thomas Desmond, now a fugitive from King's Town. Had it not been that the natives were aware that upon calling aloud the people employed in getting off the boat would come immediately to his aid, the rash adventurer would certainly have perished beneath their merciless hands, after encountering all the inconceivable distresses consequent on an improvident travel through the uncultivated country.  
So far from resisting Mr. T's command  to surrender himself, he appeared happy in the occasion that presented itself of escaping the barbarity of his first captors, and was inconsequence sent round to Hawkesbury by the Speedwell, under charge. The salt pans stated in our last to be erected at Broken Bay by Mr. T. are up and at work; and doubtless must prove a successful undertaking.MISCELLANIES. (1804, December 9). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626539

The Speedwell was aground 'in a creek near Mt Elliot' (Lion Island) some reports state. The other point to note of ships and shipping in Broken Bay and Pittwater during these years, and of which Andrew Thompson was a part, was the theft of these vessels by escaping convicts who would hope to make it to Broken Bay or the Hawkesbury and from there sail to....?

Two handsome Sloops both built at Hawkesbury, lately came into the cove for the first time, one of which we before mentioned to be built by Mr. A. Thompson, named the  Hawkesbury, conveniently carries from 7 to 800 bushels ; and the other called the Speedy about 500 bushels. Both these ??de performances, and that of the Nancy, will doubtless operate  as a spur to emulation  and industry, which are the founders of opulence, and the certain tread to happiness and social independence.
Seven insurgent fugitives lately apprehended by the Settlers and other loyal inhabitants of Hawkesbury, were part of a body fifteen in number, who, mostly armed, had taken refuge at the foot of the Mountains, but were then on the maraud about the exterior limits of the Settlement. Of the seven made prisoners one was induced by remorse and dread of impending punishment, to inform the captors where they had deposited their arms in concealment ; but whether this confession was sincere or not could not be ascertained, as none were found, and must consequently have been removed if ever lodged  there. Hughes, who has in so many instances shown himself an abandoned and profligate  offender, and against whom a writ of Out-lawry was some time since issued, is we understand, among the above number not yet apprehended, whose intent it was to cross the foot of the mountains for Broken Bay, there to seize upon the first boat that presented itself ; and without loss of time commit themselves to the perils of the sea. Several Natives have since confirmed the account given by these people, by declaring that they  were actually on their travel towards Broken Bay, where it may be anxiously hoped their infamous and desperate design will be disappointed by the caution and vigilance of the Boatmen, whose safety is thus daringly menaced.  SYDNEY. (1804, April 1). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626111

The growing frequency of this led to: 
EVERY Person possessing Rowing Boats on the Banks of the Hawkesbury are to have them NUMBERED and REGISTERED by Mr. Andrew Thompson, Head Constable, in the course of the ensuing Week—Boats found Rowing about any part of the River are seizable, whenever and wherever found, which are not thus Numbered and Registered.The Settlers and Landholders of all descriptions are ordered not to suffer their Boats  to be rowing about after dark, and to secure them by a Chain and Lock, taking the Oars to their Houses; to examine all Boats with suspicious People passing backward and forward by day, and to hail all Boats passing orre passing by Night; and, if necessary, to detain them. Such Boats as are not immediately put on shore on being hailed are to be fired into, and Information given immediately to the next Constable living where the Boat is to pass, that means may be taken for their being stopped and immediate Information is to be sent to the Magistrate at the Green Hills.
April 5th, 1804. General Orders. (1804, April 8). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626125

And even:
On Friday a party of the Military attended by Mr. Redmond, and several constables went round to Broken Bay, in order to make strict search on board the ships lying there, the Ann and Ann and Eliza, for persons who may have found means to secrete themselves in those vessels; which were expected to sail yesterday for the coast of New Zealand.  SYDNEY. (1805, November 17). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626963

And in the same Issue: Mr A. Thompson has commenced building a vessell at the Green Hills to carry 100 tons: this undertaking ranks as a second rate in our colonial achievements, the King George being  hitherto the only one exceeding her dimensions.SYDNEY. (1805, November 17). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626963

The Salt Pan 'at work' referred to in the above notice was originally built at Mullet Island on the Hawkesbury. This was a sacred ground for the Branch tribe or family of aborigines, the originals in that part of the Hawkesbury. Reports in the Gazette appear to chronicle an ongoing problem with these peoples that leads to Mr. Thompson setting up his salt works in Pittwater, on Scotland Island (still named Pitt Island prior to this) despite the land of 120 acres not being officially given as a Land Grant until 1809/10. 

A fictional work written by Historian J H M Abbott, in Chapter 12; 'Andrew Thompson' of 'The Governor's Man - A Tale of the BLIGH REBELLION' (1917) expresses sadness and regret on the part of Andrew Thompson for his part in the murder of a leader in this family, and the Gazette's record, although dry due to being a government censored publication, also intimates notes of sadness. Mr Thompson, reading between the lines of all the accounts of his convicts being charged for small and large misdemeanours, all of whom 'got off', as well as accounts of his welcoming indigenous peoples into his own home, was a man determined to raise up and 'make free' any who came under his charge and any whom he encountered elsewhere. Some of the records of people assigned to him appear under Extras.

DR. G E (Geoff) Ford,  in his 2010, Darkinung Recognition Research Thesis, University of Sydney, who states he is a descendant of these peoples, ascribes a massacre to Thompson that may shed light on why and what Mr. Thompson and those working for him experienced in the months following. Chapter 12 - 'Andrew Thompson' is placed in full under Extras. 

The reports from that time should be read bearing in mind that people were sentenced to death, and hung, for stealing silver spoons here during these same years when convicts stole from people who were not as much on their side as Mr. Thompson appears to have been. DR, Ford's thesis states the deaths took place on Saturday April 27, 1805:

The successful assault made upon the Branch natives by a party of Richmond Hill and adjacent settlers a fortnight since would perhaps have been decisive, as most of the principals must have fallen into our hands, had not the treachery of a man but little suspected prevented their surprise. The country being much inundated at the time the party operating with Mr. Thompson, set out from the Green Hills for the Nepean, Mr.T. having provided a baggage waggon, in  which among other necessaries a boat was  conveyed for the purpose of crossing the River, not then fordable. The depth of water in many parts of the road approaching the river preventing the waggon from proceeding  the boat was of necessity taken out, and  transported by the party on their shoulders for several miles. When they had crossed the river at the spot where the native encampment had been the day before, they  perceived that the tents were abandoned; and here the pursuit must have closed had it not been for the assistance rendered by a couple of Richmond Hill natives, who in  consequence of repeated proofs of fidelity, added to a contempt of their brethren were  entrusted with firelocks to attend as guides with no other desire of reward than a promise of being permitted to seize and retain a wife a-piece. After much additional fatigue the settlers perceived a fire at a distance out of the track they were then in; and taking it for granted they were encamped there, would have made towards it, but were prevented by the assurance of their conductors  that it was only a feint to decoy them into a track which their present prospect commanded; so that if they were once alarmed it would be impossible to come up with them.  This assurance proved to be just; and in a short time after they found themselves within gun-shot. But still unperceived, they reconnoitred well the situation on of the natives, and soon discovered that they were mostly employed in preparing their weapons for the purposes of destruction. 

Yaragowby, who Mr. Thompson left the day before at the Green Hills under every assurance of strict friendship, had by a nearer cut made his way  to their first encampment, to warn them of the attack designed by the settlers; he was now equipped from head to foot in the spoils of the unfortunate men whom they had murdered; his person was not recognized at the distance, especially as he was supposed to be at the Green Hills; and he was the first of seven or eight that fell. Such was the consternation at the appearance of so large a party, that they made off without a stand, leaving behind several thousand spears, frightfully jagged, and almost certain of carrying mortality along with them. The  faithful guides next prevented a division of the expedition from following a number who retreated towards the foot of a precipice, on the summit of which another party had stationed themselves to hurl stupendous rocks upon their heads. All the spears and other war implements were burnt, and little molestation had since been felt about Hawkesbury.

Before the settlers quitted the Mountains Mr. Thompson  proposed leaving a defence with Serjeant Aiken, his being a solitary farm on the Mountain side of the Nepean. This was a truly fortunate circumstance; for the same evening the well known and little suspected Charley paid a visit to Mr. Aicken, and in a friendly manner requested  and obtained such relief from pretended want as the house afforded. After making minute enquiry whether any arms were in  the house or not, but at the same time breathing the kindest assurances of his protection, he advanced towards the bed room in which the armed persons were concealed; and Mr. Aiken in not willing that his state of preparation should be known, requested him not to enter that apartment. A que to friendship—a volley of abuse was poured forth by the villain. A single call brought Mr. Aiken's friends from their cover, upon which Charley endeavoured to escape, but was shot dead. The others disappeared in a few minutes; but the next morning rallied, and were again repulsed. 
     
In consequence of a report on Thursday to the Commanding Officer of the New South Wales Corps stating that a body of hostile natives were assembled between Sydney and  the half-way houses, two parties were detached to disperse them, one by land, and the  other by water, in order to examine the numerous creeks and avenues along-shore :—  but upon the strictest search it was clearly  determined the information was erroneous, as was happily the report also of some barbarities being actually practised at the house of the district constable.  
      
On Wednesday last a party of the Corps detached for the defence of the out-settlers having occasion to cross the Nepean, availed themselves of an offer from two natives who  declared themselves amicably disposed, to  ferry them over one by one in their canoe, but whether from design or accident cannot exactly be reported, the vehicle was upset in  the center of the river when Robert Rainer was passing over, and he, we are concerned to add, was unfortunately drowned.   
 
Yesterday fo'nnight an attempt was made by a large party to arrest W. Evans on the Parramatta road, three miles beyond the Half-way-houses. He fortunately happened to be well mounted; and had overtaken an unfortunate pedestrian just before the natives shewed themselves on each side of the road. Evans presented a stirrup, of which the other eagerly availed himself ; and as the urgency of the moment would not permit the slightest accommodation from a slack pace, the poor  fellow was necessiated either to quit his hold    
and lose all hope of security, or match himself against the speed of a Pegasus, whose wings were but little shortened by the terror of its rider. The black legion gave chase; but finding themselves out galloped, declined the pursuit after scampering about 300 yards,  which one of the parties lengthens to at least three miles. SYDNEY. (1805, May 12). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626761

A report prevails, that two of the persons employed by Mr. A. Thompson as salt boilers at Broken Bay are missing since Monday last; and that the apprehension is strengthened by the circumstance of their arms being found, it being improbable, that if they had fled for security from the natives, they should have gone off unarmed, unless unfortunately cut off from the place they were left at, and preciptately obliged to take refuge in the woods. SYDNEY. (1805, April 21). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626732

We are happy to state, that the two men employed as salt boilers by Mr. A. Thompson at Broken Bay were not, as conjectured, so unfortunate as to become the victims of native barbarity, though they narrowly escaped their fury. These men were conducted in from Pittwater by two friendly natives, joined in their route by four others, who appeared equally anxious in their preservation. They had been attacked by a body, one of whom, a very old man, had discharged a spear; but was afterwards induced to desist  from an unprovoked assassination by humiliating intreaty, and a willingness to acquiesce in whatever should be insisted on their cloathing and provision fortunately purchased  their respite from a fate that appeared inevitable; and naked being permitted to depart they knew not whither, were soon precipitated by extreme terror into an unknown and  trackless part of a wood in which they wandered hopeless for the term of fifteen days, miserably sustaining nature with such precarious fare as their misfortune reduced them to the necessity of subsisting on, so that when they came in their ghastly appearance and painful debility must be submitted to the reader's own imagination, as language is inadequate to the distressing picture. The  poor fellows, in return for the kind services of their guides, who would have parted company before they entered town, prevailed on them to continue their friendship, and in turn led them to the house of Mr. M. Kearn's, in Pitt's Row, who testified his satisfaction at the event by an abundant supply of food, with which they retired amply satisfied for their salutary labour and humane assistance to the otherwise devoted objects in whose preservation it had been the will of Providence to render them immediately instrumental. SYDNEY. (1805, April 28). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626742

The assault made by the natives upon the Hawkesbury vessel, mentioned last week, took place off Mangrove Point. There were five persons on board, one of whom had set out in a small boat for Mr. Thompson's saltpans at Mullet Island; but being menaced by the natives availed himself of the offer to go in the vessel. This man and Pendegrass, who had charge of her, went down the after-hatch, and the others the fore hatch to take an hour's rest, being fatigued: the natives had been on board, but prevailed on by presents to leave the vessel. All were asleep but Pendergrass, and he, slumbering off, conjectured he heard a whisper upon deck.; he started suddenly, and looking up the hatch way, beheld several natives with spears, the foremost of whom, Woglomigh, seized hold of him, and the old man gaining the deck, maintained a struggle unheard by any of his companions. Giving way to superior strength, and numbers having now surrounded him, he was thrown across the fire-tub and received a wound in the hand from the jag of a spear he caught hold of as one of the assailants was about to thrust it into his breast. Another weapon was raised by Woglomigh himself, and upon the very point of being lunged in his body, when the salt boiler, who had been awakened by his cries, sprung upon deck with a pistol, and applying its muzzle to the ear of the assassin, sent him to the shades. 

A dismal yell alarmed the whole, and overboard they leaped. The report of the pistol alarmed the men forward, who immediately went up to, the aid of their companions, but by this time their antagonists were overboard and swimming for the shore, where numbers of both sexes continued to howl & shriek. 

Among those that leaped overboard was Branch Jack, the leader and chief aggressor in the last barbarities exercised by the natives, and the villain that murdered the late unfortunate Llewellyn. This wretch was thrice fired at in the water, as he rose to breathe, and to all appearance severely if not mortally wounded in the head. He gained the shore, however, but was unable to totter many paces before he threw himself on the ground, and in a languid tone declared himself in a dying state. His father was among the shore party who went to his assistance; while several of the boarders were clinging to the stern of the little vessel's boat supplicating quarter, which they obtained—as the ammunition was expended. A number of jagged spears were found in their canoes and destroyed ; those that still conceived themselves in danger were permitted to paddle themselves on shore upon a  promise of future amendment ; and as an early proof of their contrition, exposed a  jacket with  some other articles they had stolen, at the same time inviting one of the people to come for them—with what design the menaces and imprecations that succeeded their disappointment was a sufficient testimony. 

Thus were the lives of five persons preserved by the merest accident that could possibly have been ordained by a protecting providence; and even after the danger was discovered, without arms their resistance might have availed but little. That the death of one of the most noxious and rancorous pests of that part of the river Hawkesbury, and probable death of another, may open a prospect of security is much to be hoped, but the survivors of their impetuous and daring tribe equally to be dreaded. To be vigilantly prepared and well guarded must therefore constitute the hope of future safety. SYDNEY. (1805, September 15). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626907

There is also a record that another Hawkesbury gentleman resided on Scotland island a little later on:
Solomon Wiseman had a brother who resided at the entrance to the Hawkesbury River (at Scotland Island). Captain William Wiseman was his name, not to be confused with Captain William Wiseman, eldest son of Solomon Wiseman. Well, this Lieutenant S. G. Dalgety, who was in charge of portion of the 45th (English) Regiment, guarding the convicts forming the road, became acquainted with Captain William Wiseman's (the elder) daughter, who was frequently at the 'King of the River's' mansion, and the couple's marriage is thus recorded in the 'Sydney, Herald,' of March 16, 1840:— . DALGETY— WISEMAN.— On the 11th instant (March 11, J.84Q) at 'Cobham Hall,Wiseman's Ferry, Lieutenant Dalgety, late of the 45th Regiment, to Miss Elizabeth Wiseman, niece of the late Solomon Wise man.WISEMAN'S FERRY. IN THE THIRTIES. (1925, November 27). Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85901110

Although Andrew Thompson clearly frequented Pittwater and Scotland Island, named for his homeland due to the similarity of the green hilled and blue watered estuary to his homeland, his main sphere of work was at Green Hills, soon to be named 'Windsor'. His responsibilities were varied and large and there seemed no field he was not involved in. Horses as well as cattle were bred, grains were harvested and shipped to town, and he was also in charge of labour gangs working on creating roads and, under Captain Philip Gidley King RN, who became the third Governor of NSW on 28 September 1800 and encouraged the building of wharves, bridges and C.-. ...:

Whereas by the General Order of the 11th of August last, the Bounds of the different Commons notified therein were designed; and His Excellency having been pleased to direct the necessary Instruments for that purpose to be prepared, and the Seal of the Territory to be attached thereto, in the Names of the following Persons as Residentary Trustees, viz.
Nelson Common, Andrew Thompson Thomas Biggers, Thomas Tyler. 
Phillip Common. Matthew Lock Edward Robinson Henry Baldwin 
Richmond Hill Common. John Ryan John Bowman Andrew Thompson 
Field of Mars and Eastern Common. David Brown Francis Oakes James Squires
Baulkham Hill and Northern Boundary Common. John Smith Andrew McDougal George Suter. 
Prospect Hill Common. John Nicholls James Cleaver William Kentwell
And that the Right of Commonage may be understood, and thereby vexatious complaints and litigations be prevented, I am directed to draw up and make public the following Epitome of the existing Laws respecting Commons, for the information of all concerned, viz.
NEW SOUTH WALES THE word Common, in its most usual acceptation, signifies Common of Pasture. This is a right of feeding one's beasts on another's land ; for in those waste grounds usually called Commons, the property of the soil is generally in the Lord or the Manor (here the King, or his Representative for the time being). 
Commonable beasts are either beasts of the plough, or such as manure the ground. This is a matter of most universal right; and the Law annexes this Right of Common as inseparably incident to the Grant of Lands ; but this right may extend to other beasts, besides such as are generally commonable, such as hogs, goats, sheep, &c. or the like, which neither plough or manure the land :- This is not a general right, and can only be claimed by immemorial usage and prescription.
The Lord of the Manor may inclose so much of the waste as he pleases, for tillage and wood ground, provided he leaves Common sufficient for such as are entitled thereto.-The interest of the Lord and Commoner in the Common are looked upon in Law as mutual : They may both bring actions for damage done, either against strangers or each other ; the Lord for the public injury, and each Commoner for his private damage.
1. Lords of manors may depasture in commons.
2. The lord may agist (i. e. take in and feed the cattle of strangers in the King's forests), the cattle of a stranger in the common by prescription; and he may license a stranger to put in his cattle, if he leaves sufficient room for the commoners. 
3. The lord cannot dig pits for gravel or coal. 
4. The Commoner cannot use Common but with his own proper cattle; but he may borrow other cattle, and common with them, for by the loan they are in a manner made his own cattle. 
5. No commoner can distrain the cattle of another commoner, though he may those of a stranger. 
6. If a commoner incloses or builds on the common, every commoner may have an action for the damage.
7. A commoner may not cut brushes, or dig trenches, &c. in the common, without a custom to do it.
8. Any man may, by prescription, have Common and feeding on the King's high- way, although the soil doth belong to another. 
9. Infected horses, mares, and stone horses under size, are not to be put into commons. 
And should any local Regulation be deemed necessary, the Trustees will signify the same to the nearest resident Magistrate, that he may apply for regular Permission and eligible Persons to be appointed, to consider of the propriety of such Regulations.
By Command of His Excellency,
Rd. Atkins, Judge Advocate. 
Classified Advertising. (1805, January 20). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626593

WHEREAS by the General Orders of May 25, 1802, His Excellency was pleased to grant to Andrew Thompson, settler and Constable at the Green Hills, Hawkesbury, a lease for constructing a Floating Bridge over the South Creek, to facilitate the communication between Sydney, Pararmatta and Hawkesbury,which has been of the greatest service to the  settlers in that District and to the inhabitants ingeneral, as specified in the said Order. And whereas the Tolls on the said Bridge have not been sufficientlly explicit under the different  heads of Persons, Carriages, Draught and  Stock Cattle, and other Stock, the Governor has judged it necessary, with the consent of the Proprietor Lessee to make the following Reductions and Alterations in the Tolls demandable on passing the said Floating Bridge. per ana.  For each Foot Passenger 4s or Per ana £1 10 0    Each Horse, single or draught 2s 6d or £2 10 0
Waggons or four-wheeled Carriages taking more than half a ton lading 1s 6d or £1 10 0For each Cart or Carriage with two wheels
loaded or not 1s 6d or £ 1 10 0          
For each head of Cattle whether in draught or not 1s 6d or £1 10 0
Each sheep under a score 2s  
Ditto by the score, 2s 6d or £210 0
Swine or Goat the same as 2 Sheep,    
It is to be understood that for the above Toll passenger, horses, carts, or carriages are to  pass and repass once in the same day on the same Ticket.      
Thereafter Regulation of the Order of May 25, 1802, respecting keeping the Bridge in repair Individuals &c. passing the Bridge on Government  Service in the actual execution of Public Duty and the penalties prescribed by that Order do remain in force.      
General Orders. (1806, March 9). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627036

King also struggled against the animosity levelled at him by the New South Wales Corps and this led to his resignation and replacement by William Bligh in 1806. Bligh arrived in Sydney on 6 August 1806. 

1806 was a bad year for the Hawkesbury in terms of a flood that occurred in early April that carried away many haystacks, which were carried down the river and landed in such large amounts in Pittwater that a 'Haystack Point' was named:

The wife of Robert Forrester, who had only lain in three days was providentially rescued by Mr. Thompson, when nearly up to the neck in water; from the height of which the house was at first concluded to have been abandoned, but upon a nearer approach the poor woman's pitieous cries were heard supplicating compassion from that Power who graciously administered to her distresses at the very moment of expected dissolution. Another poor woman, with new born twins, was also rescued from an apparently certain destiny, when floating rapidly down the River upon a heap of straw, which must shortly have separated, and consigned the whole to instantaneous death. In the midst of the confusion that everywhere prevailed, still justice was alert in protecting the few fragments that remained to the unfortunate sufferers from    violation; and several unprincipled vagabonds in a small boat were apprehended in attempting to pillage private property, and thereby convert to their own depraved inclinations the most dreadful  as well as general disaster that ever befell this or any other to extensive settlement. HA[?]BURY, April 4. (1806, April 6). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627070

Among other miraculous escapes was that of Samuel Craft's family, together with that of several other persons, who had likewise taken refuge in his barn, which was washed down in a few seconds after they were rescued by one of Mr. Thompson's boats.  SYDNEY. (1806, April 13). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627080

Some sources state Mr. Thompson received as reward for saving numerous people during these 1806 floods more land grants. He also received, for which he had to pay:
Consideration of the repeated useful and humane exertions of Andrew Thompson, Settler and Head Constable of the Hawkesbury Districts, in saving the lives and much of the property of the Sufferers by the repeated floods in that quarter, as well as from his general demeanor, and to provide a wholesome permanent Drink for the Settlers and Labourers in that extensive Settlement, His Excellency has directed the Commissary to furnish the said Andrew Thompson with the Coppers and other Brewing Utensils arrived by the William Pitt, he making payment for the same, with the usual Advance of Fifty per Cent. on the following obligatory Conditions; That is to say, To supply the Inhabitants with good Beer at not more than One Shilling per Gallon and Small beer at sixpence.
Not to dispose of the Beer so brewed to particular individuals, but the distribution to be as general as possible. Not to sell, give, lend, or make any other use of the Malt he may make than for the purpose of brewing on his own premises. General Orders. (1806, May 11). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627114

When Bligh arrived Andrew Thompson was the biggest grain grower and most prosperous settler. Not being associated with the Rum Corps, and having a bit of a dispute with McArthur, their purported leader from the shadows, that same year over grain, which Bligh refused, Thompson was appointed overseer of farms Bligh owned and set up, which were attributed as part of the reason for a rebellion by the Rum Corps against Bligh:
Andrew Thompson. Me. William Freame sends us the following information re Andrew Thompson, which may interest our readers : — 'Government Order. ' May 25th, 1802. ' Whereas Andrew Thompson, settler, and constable at the Green Hills, has been at a great expense in constructing a bridge (floating) over the South Creek on the road from Parramatta to the Green- Hills, which will be of great convenience to travellers from Parramatta and the settlement of Toongabbie, he has requested that a toll may be established by authority, as may compensate him for the expense foe has been at, and to enable him to keep the bridge in repair, Governor King hereby grants to Andrew Thompson the privilege of collecting tolls at the said bridge for a  period of 14 years.' Here followed list of tolls, penalty for using the bridge without paying toll was fixed at £5, Government officials being exempt.' 11 Hawkesbury, Dec. 19th, 1807. ' Having undertaken the management of an estate here for His Excellency Governor Bligh, purchased from Tyler and Simpson, with the design of showing what improvements could be made in colonial farming — and whereas His Excellency has been pleased to trust this important experiment to my charge, I do hereby certify and declare that the estate is according to statement given below, and has been managed without impropriety or known error ; and that there is no debt, charge or encumbrance standing, or to pay, of or belonging to the management of this estate. '-—(Signed) Andrew Thompson,' 
Here followed a statement of the number of stock, &cM and the account for the sale of milk for the farm from Ocb. 4th to Dec. 14th, 1807. Total milk sales for that period being £60 Os lOd at lOd per quart. PERSONAL. (1903, May 2). Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article86216397

With Bligh out of action Joseph Foveaux (Arriving at Port Jackson on 28 July 1808 and finding Major George Johnston in command and Governor William Bligh under arrest by the Rum Corps whom he had controlled between August 1796 and November 1799, a period when some of its officers were making their fortunes from trading and extending their landed properties) he quickly assumed command after a short consultation with the rebels. It was during this period, and until Lt. Gov. William Paterson arrived from Tasmania and took control on 9 January 1809, that Lieutenant-Governor Joseph Foveaux gave him a town grant in Macquarie Place and prior to Macquarie's arrival, perhaps in part dur to Andrew Thompson's efforts during another Hawkesbury river flood of June of the same year;

FLOOD at HAWKESBURY.
Further accounts of this disaster state that the first perceptible rise in the River took place on the afternoon of last Thursday se'nnight, when it rose at the rapid rate of 4 feet per hour until the water began to spread over the banks. The Resident Magistrates took every active precaution for the preservation of lives and property; and as long as assistance was found necessary, such persons as were fortunate enough to be provided with boats were employed in rescuing others who were in imminent danger; and on this occasion Mr. Andrew Thompson personally signalized himself, in an unremitting exertion of two whole days and nights continuance. About 4 on Saturday morning the water was at the highest, and remained tranquil for three hours, when it began very gradually indeed to fall. From the Green Hills, over the South Creek as far as Tuckwell's Lagoon near the Red House was a sheet of water, across which Mr. Thompson's accommodation boat conveyed persons to and fro; and all the lower situations down the River were laid entirely under water. At Bardo- narrang and up the South Creek the principal losses are supposed to have been sustained ; but little comparative damage has been felt upwards.—At Richmond the back farms were flooded, and much of the stubble corn spoilt ; at Cornwallis the water rose nearly within a rod of Ridge's house, and had it continued to rise an hour longer it is universally conjectured it would have been equal to the last dreadful inundation, which was considerably the highest ever experienced. It was remarkable, that very little rain had fallen at Hawkesbury for several weeks previous, so that this calamity may rather be considered a phenomenon than as proceeding from any evident cause :—Many experienced Settlers attribute it to the bursting of a cloud upon the mountains, which overflowing the gulph occasioned the very sudden rise in the River. This disaster happening at a time when most of the Settlers had cropped their grounds, His Honor the LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR immediately ordered every assistance from the other Settlements, to facilitate the clearing and sowing the ground anew; and by Tuesday evening last upwards of 120 working hands were despatched from Sydney for the purpose of assisting the sufferers. This and every other possible aid has been afforded; and on Thursday last Lieutenant Colonel FOVEAUX, accompanied by JAMES FINUCANE, Esq. Secretary to His Honor the Lieutenant Governor, left Town for Hawkesbury, to enquire into the extent of damage done by the flood, and to attend, as well to the distribution of labourers among the sufferers, as to such other assistance as their circumstances should require. By this benevolent and efficacious measure many of the evils will, with the blessing of Providence be prevented, which would otherwise have fallen upon the inhabitants of this Colony as heavily as any disaster of the kind had ever done before; since, independent of what has been lost of the present year's produce, an immense quantity of new-sown ground would have been unproductive, and our distresses continued thus from year to year. 
The following statement of the losses sustained of various kinds was yesterday transmitted to His Honor the Lieutenant Governor ; viz. 
1769 Bushels of Wheat 233 Acres of Maize 785 Ditto of Maize 264 Pigs; and a few 212 Ditto of Barley Sheep and Goats.
At George's River, the water was higher by 10 or 12 feet than it had been in the memorable flood of March 1806. At half past 6 on Friday morn- ing it was at the highest, being then about 34 feet above the ordinary level of the river. Its ravages are distinguishable at the height of more than 30 feet, many situations that were before solid being now perfectly excavated. The whole space extending from the bottom of the Horse-shoe Pond to the house of Mr. Moore was totally under water, and had the resemblance of an extensive lake. The new house of Mr. Knight is so much injured at the foundation as to render it necessary to be taken down and rebuilt. The lower part of the house was covered early in the evening of Thursday, and Mrs. Knight and family were obliged to take refuge in a loft, from whence du- ring the night they had the mortification to perceive the water rapidly gaining upon this last retreat, and in one hour rising 38 inches. The house of Emmerson the scite of which was about 7 or 8 feet lower than Mr. Knight's, was re- moved from its standing, and left in ruins. Much of the ground newly cropped was laid waste, and some stock supposed to be lost. FLOOD at HAWKESBURY. (1809, June 4). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627755

THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR has appointed Mr. Andrew Thompson, Auctioneer for the District of the Hawkesbury. By command of His Honor the Lieutenant Governor, Alexander Riley, Secretary. Head Quarters , Sydney, January 21, 1809. Classified Advertising. (1809, January 22). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627667

This time Andrew Thompson did not receive the apparatus to make more beer with (or rum!), instead Lieutenant-Governor Paterson rewarded him with a 1000-acre (405 ha) grant at Minto which he named St Andrew's. Previous leases of land on which he had erected his brewery and salt works were converted into grants. All these grants were later approved by Governor Lachlan Macquarie.

By now his extensive interests required the attention of others, not always successfully:
Lost, the latter of the week, between the Barrack Square and Mr Lord's Warehouse, a Government Receipt for five hundred bushels of Maize, in favour of Mr Andrew Thompson, and dated in February, 1808. - Any person delivering the same to G. Howe, will receive One Guinea reward; payment being stopped at the commissary's office, it can be of no use to any person but the owner.Classified Advertising. (1808, May 15). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627500

John Howe begs leave to inform the Public, that he keeps and carries on the extensive House and Business of Mr. Andrew Thompson, at the Green Hills, Hawkesbury, with every respectful attention, and has now on Sale a valuable Assortment of Woollen and Linen Drapery, Haberdashery, Hosiery, Stationary, Grocery, Drugs, Cutlery, Ironmongery, Sadlery, Chaise, Cart, and other Harness in sets or otherwise, Men and Women's Shoes, Shoemaker's Tools, Dressed Leather of all kinds, Salt, Pitch and Tar, large Brass Locks, Copper, Copper Pump Works, Leaden Pipes, and other Brewing Utensils, with a variety of other goods of the best quality, and at the most reduced Prices, for ready Payment only.
All Persons indebted to A. Thompson are once more requested to make good their Payments without further delay. 
Thomas Smith, who arrived in the William Pitt, having absconded from the Service of Mr. A. Thompson, in violation of his Agreement, all persons are cautioned not to harbour or Employ the said Thomas Smith, under pain of prosecution. And he is hereby required to take notice, that unless he shall return to his Master's service without delay, necessary measures will be adopted to enforce submission.Classified Advertising. (1809, December 3). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627874

Major-General Lachlan Macquarie CB, the fifth Governor of NSW, arrived in Sydney on 28 December 1809 and started as Governor on 1 January 1810. He was the first army, instead of naval, officer to preside as Governor and arrived at the head of his own military unit, the 73rd Regiment. He carried order to arrest John McArthur/MacArthur and and Major George Johnston, the two main leaders of the Rum Rebellion, but both had already sailed to England by the time he arrived in order to 'defend' themselves. The rule of the bully-boy would-be 'kings' had come to an end, although they persisted in undermining or influencing the run of the by then 'Sydney Town' by any means possible.

Macquarie began dismantling what the Rum Corps had put in place to suit them and dispersing those that remained who had not left the corps to Norfolk Island for duties or to Tasmania, for duties. One of his first appointments :

Head Quarters, Government House, Sydney, 12th January, 1810.  His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint Mr. Andrew Thompson Justice of the Peace and Magistrate at the Hawkesbury, in the County of Cumberland ; and he is accordingly to be respected and obeyed as such. Robert Campbell, Esq. is to act as Treasurer to the Orphan School and Gaol Fund, till further Orders.-The late Treasurer is to settle all Accounts and Demands against the said Fund, up to the day of Mr. Campbell's taking charge of that Office. Nathaniel Lucas is confirmed as Head Superintendant of Carpenters and Millwrights. David Langley is re-instated as Superintendant of Smiths. GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS. (1810, January 14). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627901

His Excellency the GOVERNOR has been pleased to appoint the Rev. Mr. Samuel Marsden, and Simeon Lord, and Andrew Thompson, Esquire, to be Trustees and Commissioners for regulating and conducting all Affairs and Matters connected with the Turnpike Road proposed to be established between the Town of Sydney and the Hawkesbury. They are accordingly requested to appoint an early Day in the course of the ensuing Week, for meeting at Sydney, to take into consideration such Tenders and Proposals as may be sent in to the GOVERNOR'S Secretary, by Individuals willing to contract for making the Turnpike Road in question, agreeably to the Public Advertisement of the  24th instant.-The Trustees will submit their Proceedings and Opinions for the Gaol Ratification of the GOVERNOR, previous to their entering into any Contract that may be laid before them. 
By Command of His Excellency,
J. T. Campbell, Secretary. 
GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS. (1810, March 31). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627958

Apparently this appointment rankled with the Reverend Marsden, or a dinner at Government House (at Parramatta)associated with it did, the basis of the rankling being that the good reverend refused to sit at table with a publican and an ex-convict. - See Extras.

Yesterday morning the ship Canada, Captain Ward, appeared in sight of the Heads, but could not get in till late this evening, until when no accounts from her had been received. We delay the Press briefly to state, therefore, that she brings 121 female prisoners, and two male, one of whom had escaped from this Colony. -She left England the 23rd of March, & touched at Rio -Among the Passengers are Mrs. Laycock and two Daughters; and 11 Ladies and Gentlemen of the Missionary Society.
The following are the only Letters and Parcels at present received by the Post-Master Robert Fitz, Esq. Samuel Thorley 
Joseph Davies Wm. Davis Wm. Field  Mr. Sidaway John Burke Wm. Blake  Mary Metcalf John Brenan Richard Guise Wm. Sykes Mr. S. Breakwell Timothy Donovan Michael May Dennis Conway John Brenan 3 Wm. Hall Mr. Wm. Martin Robert Brown  Elizabeth Smith Robert Baker John C. Palmer Wm. Goldfinch Mary Heatland  Lieut. Bell Miles Holding Alex. Macdonald 2 Lawrence Butler John Fisher
Rev. Mr. Marsden 3 Jane Hall Edward Hobbs Wm. Haylewood Hanah Gagan Nat. Mitchell Mary Hopkins or Stephens. Geo. Jubb
Wm. Cluer. Eliz. Scollock James Ogden - Andrew Frazier P. Stafford. Grace Knight A. Thompson, Esq. Edw. Pugh 
PARCELS. J. R. Kenedy James Bradly James Larra. J- Lewen  A.Thompson, Esq. POSTSCRIPT. (1810, September 8). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628064
Government House, Parramatta, 1805, [1809?]. Image No.: a1313032, courtesy State Library of NSW.
Andrew Thompson died in October 1810. Some sources state due to a bad cold which developed from attending to others during both the 1806 and 1809 floods, other sources state he was yet another victim of TB (tuberculosis) or 'consumption' as it was then termed, and succumbed, after ailing for many years. 
DIED.  At Hawkesbury, Green Hills, on Monday the 22d Instant, after a lingering and severe illness, aged 37, ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq. Magistrate of that District. In retracing the last twenty years of the life of this exemplary and much lamented Character will not be held uncharitable to glance at the lapse from rectitude which in an early and inexperienced period of youth destined him to these shores, since it will stamp a more honourable Tribute to his Memory to have it recorded, that from his first arrival in this Country he uniformly conducted himself with that strict regard to morality and integrity, as to obtain and enjoy the countenance and protection of several succeeding Governors; active, intelligent and industrious, of manners mild and conciliatory, with a heart generous and humane, Mr. THOMPSON was enabled to accumulate considerable property; and what was more valuable to him, to possess the confidence and esteem of some of the most distinguished Characters in this Country; the consciousness of which surmounted the private solicitude of revisiting his native Country, and led him rather  to yield to the wish of passing the evening of his   life where his manhood had been meritoriously exerted, than of returning to the land which gave him birth. Mr. THOMPSON's intrinsic good qualities were appreciated by His EXCELLENCY the present GOVERNOR, who soon after his arrival here was pleased to appoint him a Magistrate, for which situation Mr. THOMPSON's natural good sense and a superior knowledge of the Laws of his Country  peculiarly qualified him.
Nor can we close this Tribute to his Memory without recurring to the important services Mr.  THOMPSON rendered this Colony, and many of his fellow-creatures, during the heavy and public distresses which the floods at the Hawkesbury produced amongst the Settlers in that extensive District; Mr. THOMPSON's exertions were on a late occasion for two days and two nights unremittingly directed to the assistance of the sufferers, and we hasten to add, that in these offices of humanity, he   not only exposed himself to personal danger, but laid the foundation for that illness which has deprived the World of a valuable Life.        
During the unfortunate Disturbances which lately disrupted this Colony, he, whose death we now lament held on the even "Tenor of his Way," and acquitted himself with mildness, moderation and wisdom, and when the ruthless Hand of Death arrested his earthly career, he yielded with becoming fortitude, and left this World for a better, with humble and devout resignation, and an exemplary confidence in the Mercies of his GOD! Family Notices. (1810, October 27). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628118

"It is the inter-position of Providence to save the Colony from utter ruin, for never was there a more artful or greater knave," said John Macarthur, thankfully, on hearing of the death of Thompson on October 22, 1810.
Yet Governor Macquarie mourned the passing of his "good and most lamented, departed friend," and had a long, eulogistic epitaph engraved on Thompson's tomb-stone at Windsor, N.S.W. (It may be mentioned that Thompson left one-fourth of his £25,000 estate to His Excellency.)
But, knave or not, Andrew Thompson, who was transported at the age of 17, deserves recognition for his pioneering work. Macquarie described him as the founder of Green Hills, now Windsor, and invited him to Government House-this man who had been convict, convict-superintendent, constable, farmer, ship-builder, bridge builder, brewer, publican, illicit distiller, flood hero, inventor, smuggler, and chief magistrate.
Macarthur's hatred of Thompson stemmed from his gate-crashing of the rum traffic, which clashed with Macarthur’s interests and those of the rum monopolists of the New South Wales Corps. As a shipowner, Thompson traded as far as New Zealand. In 1809 he received as a grant of land an island in Pittwater, near Sydney, which he named Scotland Island. There he engaged in shipbuilding and built large salt works. During disastrous floods in the Hawkesbury he was responsible for rescuing more than 100 people, and, in so doing, undermined his health. AUSTRALIAN ALMANAC. (1967, November 22). The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), p. 24. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article48531586

Government House, Sydney, Saturday, 27th October, 1810 His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint William Cox, Esq. to be Justice of the Peace and Magistrate in the District or the Hawkesbury, .and County of Cumberland (in Room of Àndrew Thompson, Esq. lately deceased), and he is to be obeyed and respected as such accordingly. GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS. (1810, October 27). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628113

His vast holdings were advertised for sale by auction for years to come. He left one quarter of these to Macquarie, valued at over five thousand pounds in those times, and another half to his family in Scotland, who refused the bequest. Some of these listings and subsequent reports on the movements of Macquarie indicate how close the new Governor had become to him. Both were, after all, born men of Scotland (Lachlan Macquarie was born on the island of the Ulva off the coast of the Isle of Mull in the Inner Hebrides, a chain of islands off the West Coast of Scotland). Further insight into Macquarie's life, whose first wife, Jane Jarvis, had also died of the 'consumption' disease in 1796 and his recorded deep grief, may suggest those memories were being revisited.

Right: Lachlan Macquarie attributed to John Opie (1761-1807) - Image no: a128471, courtesy State Library of New South Wales. 

The dates of these required to be advertised records indicate his executors moved ahead long before a refusal from Thompson's family in Scotland could have been received, ships to and from the old land taking between 10-14 weeks to travel there, and the same again to return. 

Some of these records read like a land grab, money grab and anything else you can get your hands on by executors and those just nearby. There was also to be a settling in whole of loans Andrew Thompson had made to many people which he seemed happy to carry over year in year out and have paid in grain or similar, the then 'currency' of the colony. Now, suddenly, these were required to be paid out in sterling money:

ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq., late of Hawkesbury in this Territory, deceased, having by his last Will and Testament appointed us, the undersigned, to be the Executors, a Probate of his said last Will and Testament hath been duly obtained ; this is therefore to require that all Persons having Claims on the Estate and Effects of the said Andrew Thompson, Esq. will present the same to Mr. John Howe at the Hawkesbury, or Captain Antill at Sydney, on or before the 1 st day of December next ; and that all those who may be indebted to the said Estate will liquidate their Accounts respectively within the term above specified; in failure whereof legal measures must necessarily be resorted to, which it is jointly the wish of the Executors to avoid. (signed) H. C. ANTILL, }  THOS. MOORE, } Executors. Classified Advertising. (1810, November 3). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628085

GOVERNOR and Mrs. MACQUARIE and Suite set out from Parramatta on Friday morning the 16th Instant for the Cow Pastures. They crossed over the Nepean that day, where they remained the 17th and 18th, exploring different parts of that same country and viewing the numerous herds of wild cattle in it. On Monday the 19th they left the Cow Pastures, and recrossed the Nepean, encamping on its right bank near the Ford, from whence HIS EXCELLENCY made excursions to different parts of the Country in that Neighbourhood.—HIS EXCELLENCY, FAMILY, and SUITE visited the Banks of the Nepean on Tuesday the 20th, to visit the districts between that River, the South Creek, and George's River, and took up their Residence for that and the following night at the House of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. on his Estate of St. Andrew's, on the Banbury Curran Creek, from whence they returned to Parramatta on the afternoon of Thursday the 22d Instant, highly gratified with their Tour. SYDNEY. (1810, November 24). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628130

On Wednesday, the 14th of the present month, a launch took place at Scotland Isle, Pitt Water, of a vessel of 18 tons, said to be one of the finest of her burthen ever built in the Colony.—She makes part of the devised property of the late Mr. Thompson, who at the laying down of her keel gave her the name of the GEORDY. SYDNEY. (1810, November 24). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628130

TO be LET immediately, for Two Years, the valuable House and Premises late the Residence of ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq., deceased, situate on the Green Hills, Hawkesbury, and comprising a good Dwelling House, Stores, Granaries, Cellars, Sta- bling, and every convenient Office adapted to the beneficial Trade of that extensive and populous Settlement. Also, a valuable Farm situate on the Banks of the South Creek, adjoining the Green Hills, known by the name of West-hill Farm, comprising good Dwellings, Granaries, Stores, Stabling, a large convenient Tan-Yard, Barn, Gardens, Yards, and every other convenience suitable to the Farming Line ; and several fertile Farms in high cultivation, commonly called Agness and Wardle Banks, situate in the District of Nepean, with very extensive Orchards bearing early Fruit Trees ; and an extensive Grazing Farm known by the name of Killarney, situate by Bardo-narang, on which is a good Brick Dwelling-house, with Cellars, Dairy, &c. and good Yards, well-adapted for Horned Cattle or Sheep, together with a Paddock on the Green Hills opposite the Brick House, consisting of about two acres for a Garden. Likewise, a large convenient Brewery, at the Green Hills, on the Bank of the South Creek, with Malt-kiln, Granary, Cooperage, large and useful Utensils for prosecuting the Brewing Business in an extensive line; together with the Bridge over the South Creek and the extensive Salt-works at Scotland Isle, Pitt-water, with good Buildings and every requisite convenience. 
Proposals to be made to Captain Antill, at Sydney ; Thomas Moore, Esq. at George's River; or Mr. John Howe, at Hawkesbury, who will shew the Premises. Classified Advertising. (1810, December 8). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628141

FOLLOWING ADDRESS FROM THE  SETTLERS OF THE HAWKESBURY,
To be presented on the 1st Instant to HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR at Windsor (formerly the Green Hills), by THOMAS ARNDELL Esq . "WE, the undersigned Settlers, Residents of Hawkesbury and its Vicinity, beg leave respectfully to congratulate YOUR EXCELLENCY on arrival at this Settlement, and earnestly hope Your Excellency will be pleased with the Agricultural improvements and industry that pervade —, and trust that the continuance of our exertions will ever merit your Excellency's approbation.
We also beg leave to return our unfeigned thanks for YOUR EXCELLENCY's recent Appointment of WILLIAM COX, Esq. as a Magistrate at this place :—a Gentleman who for many years has — amongst us, possessing our esteem and confidence, who, from his local knowledge of this settlement, combined with his many other good qualities, will, we are convinced, promote your Excellency's benign intention of distributing Justice and Happiness to ALL. 
(SIGNED)
Thomas Arndell, James Milemam Thomas Hobby, R. Fitzgerald
Benjamin Carver, John Stevenson 
George Hall, Robert Wilson
Laurence May, Jonathan Griffiths Robert Martin, Elizabeth Earl
James Richards, G. W. Evans Henry Baldwin, John Bowman Paul Bushel, Hugh Devlyn
Robert Farlow, John Watts William Baker, William Eaton John Yoel, David Bell
Thomas Matcham Pitt, James Welsh
James Blackman, Patrick Closhel John Merritt, William Carlisle 
John Cobcroft, Thomas Gordon John Gregory, Caleb Wilson Richard Norris, Thomas Markwell
William Heydon, Thomas Winston
Thomas Hampson, Thomas Hagger Daniel McKay, William Baxter
Daniel Fane, John Baylis
John Lybher, Donald Kennedy
Henry Murray, Patrick Murphy John Jones, Owen Tierney
William Shaw, Henry Lamb John Dight, Martin Mentz
Roger Connor, Robert Guy Matthew Lock, John Harris Edward Pugh, Thomas Cheshire William Small, Stephen Smith
William Faithful, Thomas Lumbley
William Simpson, Edward Field
Thomas Arkell, Rowland Edwards James Wall , George Collis
Charles Palmer, James Portsmouth
Thomas Weyham, Pierce Collett Elias Bishop, Thomas Appledore
Thomas Spencer, Jacob Russell
Joseph McGolding, William Dye Benjamin Baits, Richard Carr John Ryan, John Leese
Robert Smith, Thomas Cowling Paul Randall, John Embrey
John Wild, John Benn
Benjamin South, John Boulton
William Etrel, William Ezzy."
To which HIS EXCELLENCY was pleased tomake the following Answer.
"Hawkesbury, 5th December, 1810. "SIR, "I beg you will make known to those respectable SETTLERS of the Hawkesbury who signed the ADDRESS presented by you to me, that I am much pleased with the sentiments it conveys, and to assure them that it will always be an object of  the greatest interest to me to promote their prosperity by every means in my power. 
"With this view I have fixed on Ground for four different Townships, for the accommodation of the Settlers who have suffered so severely by the Floods of the River; and by a speedy removal to those Situations of security, I hope they will enjoy the fruits of that labour, which, I am happy to observe, promises this season to be rewarded with one of the finest crops ever beheld in any country. 
"I hope on my return to this part of the Colony to find the new habitations built on an improved and enlarged plan to those hitherto erected on the Banks of the Hawkesbury. 
"I am very glad to find that my Appointment of Mr. Cox has met with the satisfaction of the Settlers; and I have every reason to believe that he will fulfil the duties of his Office so as to gain the good will of ALL. 
"I have the honour to be, SIR, 
"Your most obedient humble Servant, (SIGNED) "LACHLAN MACQUARIE." To Thomas Arndell, Esq. Hawkesbury.
By Command of His Excellency,
J. T . CAMPBELL, Sec. 
COMMISSARY's OFFICE, SYDNEY, DEC. 8, 1810.
IN THE SAME Issue:
BY MR. GAUDRY. At the Warehouse of Messrs. LORD and WILLIAMS, on Saturday next the 15th Inst. at Ten in the Forenoon, THE GOOD SCHOONER GOVERNOR BLIGH, with all her Masts, Yards, Rigging, Sails entirely new, Two Anchors and Cables & Boat, with a number of other Articles belonging to her. AT the same time will be sold, a variety of other Effects, the whole belonging to the Estate of the late ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq. deceased.—A Deposit of 25 per Cent. to be made at the time of Purchase, and approved Security for the remainder at Three Months in Sterling Bills. N. B.—The above may be viewed on application to Mr. Gaudry, and of which Catalogues will be distributed in due time.  Classified Advertising. (1810, December 8). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628139

SALES by AUCTION.—BY MR. GAUDRY, At Windsor, on Thursday the 27th Instant and two following Days, on the Premises of the late ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq. (by Order of the Executors), at 10 in the Forenoon of each Day. A VALUABLE and ASSORTED STOCK of  GOODS, consisting of Tanned Leather,   Shoes, Harness and Sadlery, Shoemakers, Blacksmiths, and Carpenters' Tools, Hemp and Flax, a general assortment of Manchester and India Goods, Medicines, Copperas, Brimstone, Rosin Tar, Salt, Tobacco, Hardware, Stationary, and  numerous other Articles.
ALSO, the valuable and useful Household Furniture, comprising good feather beds, bedding, and bedsteads, sofas and sofa covers, window curtains, Pembroke and dining tables, chairs, chests of drawers, writing desks, pier and dressing room looking glasses, table and bed linen, earthenware, glass, kitchen utensils, steel mills, large beam, scales and weights.
ALSO, Eight capital Working Bullocks, six new Boats of different dimensions, one Punt, seven Saddle and Draught Horses, a number of fine Pigs, a single Horse Chaise and Harness, Waggons, Carts, and a variety of Implements of Husbandry, calculated for carrying on the most extensive Farms in this Colony.
For the Accommodation of Purchasers, Three Months Credit will he given on approved Security, on all Sums exceeding Ten Pounds.—A   Deposit of 25 per cent. to be paid at the time of Sale, in Cash, Government, or other approved Sterling Money.
N. B.—The Goods are to be cleared away by Monday the 31st instant, if not they will be re-sold at the risque of the Purchaser.
AT the same Time will be LET by AUCTION, for a Term of Two Years, if not previously disposed of by Private Contract, the valuable House and Premises late the Residence of A. THOMPSON, Esq. deceased, situate at Windsor, comprising a good Dwelling House, Stores, Granaries, Cellars, Stabling, and other convenient and spacious   Warehouses, adapted to the beneficial Trade of the extensive and populous Settlement at the Hawkesbury.
ALSO, a valuable Farm situate on the Banks of the South Creek, adjoining the Town of Windsor, known by the name of West-hill Farm, comprising good Dwellings, Granaries, Stores, Stabling, a large Tan-yard, Barn, Gardens, Yards, and every other convenience attached, suitable to the Farming Line.  
ALSO, several fertile Farms in high cultivation, commonly called Agness and Wardle Banks, situate in the District of the Nepean, with fine Orchards of choice early bearing Fruit Trees.  
ALSO, an extensive Grazing Farm, known by the name of Killarney, situate on the Banks of Bardo-narang, on which is a good Brick Dwelling House, with Cellars, Dairy, &c. good Stock-yards well adapted for Horned Cattle or Sheep.
ALSO, a large Brewery at Windsor, situate on the Banks of the South Creek, with Malt-kiln, Granary, Cooperage, and every useful Utensil for the Brewing Business on an extensive Plan.
ALSO, the Toll Bridge over the South Creek.
ALSO, about Two Acres of Land, situate at Windsor, opposite the Brick House, inclosed for a Garden; together with those valuable Salt-works at Scotland Island, Pitt-water, with a Dwelling- house and other requisite Buildings attached.
Further Particulars may be known on application to Captain Antill or Thomas Moore, Esq. Executors; Mr. J. Howe at Windsor; or of the Auctioneer at Sydney. 
Classified Advertising. (1810, December 22). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 3. Retrieved from   http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628149

His Excellency has also been pleased to grant a License to Mr. John Howe, to enable him to act as an Auctioneer and Appraiser in the Town of Windsor, in the District of the Hawkesbury (vacant by the death of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq.) on his entering into the necessary Bonds and Securities for the faithful Performance of those Duties and the due Observance of the Colonial Regutalions and Orders relating thereto.
By Command of His Excellency, J. T. Campbelll, Sec. 
GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS. (1810, December 29). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628155

MR BEVAN - At the Warehouse of Messrs Lord and Williams, on Thursday and Friday the 17th and 18th Instants, by Order of the Executors of the late Andrew Thompson.Esq. THE good Schooner, entirely new, called the GEORDY, burthen 20 Tons, with all her   Masts, Yards, Sails, Rigging, and Stores, the Purchaser of which will receive a Register in his own Name. Also the WHALE, Sloop together with a number of good Horses and Mares with Foals by their sides. Several Tons of Salt. Likewise a quantity of excellent Household furniture, consisting of tables, chairs; beds, bedsteads, &c. harness cedar, and variety of other articles. For the accommodation of Purchasers, 3 Months Credit will be given on approved security, on all sums exceeding Ten Pounds -- A deposit of 35 per- cent to be paid at the time of Sale in Cash, Government, or other approved Sterling Money.  Classified Advertising. (1811, January 5). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628166

NOTICE. HERE having been repeated A avertisement s requeuing Persons indebted to the Estate of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. to come forward and settle the same Without delay, which hithereto have been but little attended to, this is to give Notice, that those Persons who do not entirely liquidate their respective Accounts by the beginning of December will be sued for the same in January next, without respect or partiality, as the Executors are determined to close the Accounts of the said'Estate, (By Order of the Executors), John Howe. Classified Advertising. (1811, November 16). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628364

To be Sold by Private Contract, by Richard Woodbury, of Windsor, a commodious brick built Dwelling House and Premises, comprising forty rods or perches, situate in a central part of George-street, Windsor, late the property and residence of John Austin, Shoemaker. The Purchaser will be assured of undisturbed possession, notwithstanding Austin's insinuation in last week's Paper that the Writings and Possession thereof were irregularly obtained when he was confined in Sydney Gaol, the said John Austin very regularly sold and transferred the said Premises before responsible Witness, and the Purchase Money paid to the Executors of the Estate of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. by his direction, to release a Security they held on said House and Premises also, an Execution they had against his other Effects. Classified Advertising. (1812, May 23). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628476

ADVERTISEMENT.  
IN the Month of December, 1813, will be SOLD by PUBLIC AUCTION, those valuable and eligibly situated HOUSES and LANDS comprising the ESTATE of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. Viz. 
Lot 1.— A Brick Building of two stories, comprising eight Tenements of two Rooms each, situate in George-street, Windsor.  
Lot 2.— One hundred and fifty Acres of rich Arable Land, known by the name of West Hill, situate by the Town of Windsor, with a convenient weather-boarded and shingled Dwelling House, brick-built Granary of three floors, weatherboarded and shingled, Stabling and Barn, detached Servants' Room, & a fenced Garden of two Acres, extensive fenced Paddocks, and every useful Farm Ofices, secure from the highest Floods, and commanding the range of a very extensive Common of excellent Grazing Land.
Also, a convenient Tan Yard, and a weather-boarded and shingled House on the Premises, forming a very desirable Acquisition for the Agriculturist and Grazier. 
Lot 3.— The Toll Bridge over the South Creek, Windsor, Leasehold from the Crown, of which eight years are yet to come and unexpired. 
Lot 4.— Two hundred and seventy-eight Acres of Land, known by the name of Agnes Bank, 200 of which are felled, and 60 cleared, in rich arable condition; and a full grown Peach Orchard of ten Acres, situate on the Banks of the River Nepean, within 8 miles of the Town of Windsor; commanding an extensive Common Right, and high Building Land secure from all Floods.           
Lot 5.— Two hundred and sixty Acres of land, 150 of which are felled, and about 30 cleared, in a good state of cultivation, with a good Dwelling House, Barn, and other useful Conveniencies, secure from the highest Floods, known by the name of Glasgow, on the Banks of the River Nepean, 9 miles from the Town of Windsor.    
Lot 6. Eighty Acres of very rich Land, all felled, and about 20 cleared, known by the name of Wardle Bank, situate on the Banks of the River Nepean, within 8 miles of the Town of Windsor.    
Lot 7.—Two hundred acres of Land, 30 of which are   cleared, known by the name of Creek Retreat, on the Banks of the South Creek, 8 miles from the Town of Windsor, well situated for a Grazing Farm,  and commanding the Range of a large Tract of good grazing Common Land.    
Lot 8.— Two hundred and sixty acres of Grazing Land, with a Brick House on the Premises, known by the name of Kalarney, within 2 miles of the Town of Windsor, and commanding the Range of a very large Common, forming a very desirable Grazing Farm.
Lot 9.— Twelve hundred and forty Acres of good Grazing Land, 30 of which are cleared, and in rich arable condition, with a good House, Yards, &c. known by the name of St. Andrew's, situate in the District of Minto, 8 miles from the Town of Liverpool, 20   miles from Parramatta, 30 from Sydney, and 30 from Windsor .             
Lot 10.— Scotland Isle, an Island situate in Pitt Water, Broken Bay; comprising One hundred and twenty Acres of good Land, fit for Grazing and Cultivation, with extensive Salt Works, a good Dwelling House and Stores, Labourers' Rooms, &c. and replete with every Conveniency for carrying on the Business of Salt Boiling, well situated for the Establishment of a Fishery, and Ship Building. Also, a Vessel of about 90 Tons, (partly built) on the Stocks, at the Island.                 
Lot 11.— A handsome Brick House, with good Stabling, Coach House, Granary, &c. situate in   Macquarie Place, Sydney, adjoining the Harbour, forming a very convenient and desirable Merchant's Residence.           
Lot 12.— At the same time will be Disposed of, a considerable Stock of Sheep and Horned Cattle, which will be put up in small Lots for the convenience of Purchasers. The Terms of Sale will be a Deposit of ten per Cent. on the Day of Purchase, 15 per Cent. on taking  Possession, and the Remainder in Three and Six Months after; with Security on the Premises.— The Payments to be made in Sterling Money.  Classified Advertising. (1812, October 24). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628562

The above 'Red House' listed as Lot 1, which originally was a small cottage, may have stemmed from:
WANTED, a person or persons to make and well burn 30,000 Bricks, — For particulars apply to Mr. Thompson, Green Hills, Hawkesbury. WANTED, a person or persons to fell 70 acres of land, thinly timbered, chiefly with the small apple tree, at Richmond Hill.  For further particulars application to be made to Mr. Thompson, Green Hills, Hawkesbury.  Classified Advertising. (1807, April 12). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627437  
ADVERTISEMENT. 
THE EXECUTORS to the Estate of the late ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq. assisted by Government, having a new and commodious Bridge over the South Creek, leading to the Town of Windsor, hereby give Notice, that it is now open for the Accommodation of the Public; and the following reduced Rates of Toll in Lieu of those now paid at the old Bridge, having received the Sanction of HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERRNOR, are established. In consequence of the Reduction of the Tolls, no Annual Ticket will be given in future; nor will any Credit be allowed, but at the Option of the Bridge-keeper. Rates of Toll to be paid at the New Bridge over the South Creek, at Windsor; to be called Howe's Bridge. 
For each Foot Passenger .......... £ 0 0 2 Ditto ditto single Horse .......... 0 0 6 Ditto ditto ditto, or Bullock in Draft 0 1 0 A Cart, with two Horses or Bullocks 0 1 2 For each Horse or Bullock aboye that }
Number ...................... } 0 0 2 Waggons, or four-wheel Carriages, }
with two Horses, or Bullocks.... } 0 1 6 For each Horse or Bullock above that }
Number....................... } 0 0 2 For each Head of Cattle not in Draft, }
under a Score .................. } 0 0 6
For every Score .................. 0 5 0 Ditto ditto Hundred ............... 1 0 0 Ditto ditto Sheep, Goat, or Pig, under } a Score ....................... } 0 0 1 Ditto ditto Score ............... 0 1 0
The GOVERNOR and FAMILY, the LIEUTENANT' GOVERNOR, and all Persons on Public Duty to pass free. 
Sydney, New South Wales, } November 10, 1813 } 
Classified Advertising. (1813, November 20). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628806

ADVERTISEMENT. ON Friday next, the 5th February, at 11 o'Clock, will be Rented by Mr. Howe at Windsor, for the Term of One Year, the valuable FARMS, the Property of the late ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq. called Agnes Bank, Wardil Bank, Glasgow, and Scotland Isle; possession to be given immediately.Wheat at the Store Price, allowing a Discount for Carriage and Loss, will be taken in Payment of the Rents at the time they become due. Classified Advertising. (1813, January 30). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628620

ON Saturday next, the 12th Instant, the under mentioned FARM'S, the Property of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. will be Rented by Mr. Howe, at Windsor, for one Year, from the 1st of the present Month.—West Hill Farm; Killarney ditto; Agnes Bank ditto; Wardel Bank ditto; Creek Retreat ditto; Glasgow ditto; the Brewery At Windsor; the New Bridge over the South Creek at ditto. The Terms will be Sterling Money.   Classified Advertising. (1814, February 5). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628855

STOLEN, from the Farm of St. Andrew, at Bunbury Curran, in the District of Airds, on the Night of the 9th Instant, a dark Gelding, with a star on his forehead, about 14 hands and a half high, 5 years old, the property of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. Should any Person find the said Gelding and bring it to Joseph Ward, of St. Andrew, he shall receive Twenty Shillings for his Trouble. Classified Advertising. (1814, February 19). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628864

Apart from clearly demanding sterling money and seizing property of debtors, the executors of Andrew Thompson's estate did make regular contributions from the incomes that must have kept pouring in to worthwhile institutions, and did this regularly:
GOVERNMENT and GENERAL ORDERS. Head Quarters, Sydney, Saturday, 30th April, 1814.
HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR has been pleased to direct, the following STATEMENTS of the COLONIAL, POLICE, and FEMALE ORPHAN INSTITUTION FUNDS, for the Quarter ending the 31st of March last, to be published for general Information. By Command of His Excellency the Governor, (signed) J. T. Campbell, Secretary. The TRUSTEES of the POLICE FUND in Account Current with D'ARCY WENTWORTH Esq. DR.|| the Quarter ending on the 31st Day of March, 1814.
The Executors of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. for two Years Rent of a House for the | | Assistant Chaplain at Sydney, and one Year's Rent of a House at Windsor.- 324 | 0 | 0 | GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS. (1814, April 30). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628903

That is 324 pounds – not shillings! And hundreds of pounds prior to that in the monthly accounts...which did not deter them from proceeding in  collecting debts:
BY AUCTION - Ex Parte HENRY COLDEN ANTILL and THOMAS MOORE, Esquires, Executors of the last Will and Testament of ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq, deceased, in the Matter of Benjamin Singleton: -  By Virtue of an Order of the Court of Civil Jurisdiction, made in the above Matter. At Windsor, on Friday the 24th Instant, at Nine precisely. THE Provost Marshal will Cause to be put  up for Sale by Public Auction, a certain Allotment of Ground, containing 112 Perches together with the 11 acres and Buildings thereon erected, situate in the Township of Windsor unless the Debt, Costs and all included Expenses are previously liquidated)Ex parte HENRY COLDEN ANTILL, and THOMAS MOORE, Esquires, Executors of the last Will and Testament of ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq, deceased, in the Matter of Chas King:—     By Virtue of an Order of the Court of Civil Jurisdiction, made in the above Matter, At Windsor, on Friday next, the 20th Instant at Ten precisely. THE Provost Marshal will Cause to be set up for Sale by Public Auction, a certain Farm and Lands, containing 39 Acres, more or less, situate on the Banks of the South Creek, in the District of Malgrave Place (unless the Debt, Costs, and all incidental Expenses are previously   liquidated). W. GORE, Provost Marshal.  Classified Advertising. (1814, June 18). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628933

SALES BY AUCTION. BY MR. JENKINS, At Cribb's Paddock, near the Sydney Turnpike, on Tuesday next, the 28th last, at Lleven, THAT Farm known by the Name of Creek Retreat, belonging to the Estate of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. on the Banks of the South Creek, eight miles from Windsor, containing 200 Actes, 30 of which are clear, most desirably situate for a grazing Farm, and adjoining a large tract of good common pasture. Terms, one fourth of the purchase money on the day of sale, and the residue at twelve months credit, sectiretl on the Estate. Immediately after the above will be put up, about Fifty Head of Horned Cattle, for prompt payment in sterling money. Classified Advertising. (1815, February 25). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629069

MR. HOWE, At Windsor, on Saturday the 30th Instant, at 11 ALL the valuable BREWING UTENSILS the Property of the late ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq. containing two hundred weight of lead, eight bars of cast iron, one large puma and andie, two brass cocks, one tin pump, one olanthern, three large mash tubs, one cooler, quantity of staves, one yeast tray, two tin coppes one large pum, one large cooper that contain between three and four hundred gallons, one large cistern for steeping mash, &c. &c. Conditions known at the Time of Sale.  Classified Advertising. (1816, March 23). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176592

MR. BROWNE having removed his GOODS to the Store in Macquarie Place, belonging to the Estate of the late Mr. ANDREW THOMPSON, a Person will generally attend there to dispose of them:- They consist of Fine Old Madeira Wine, at per pipe ...£80 0 0 Excellent dry Lisbon, ditto ditto..... .55 0 0 Bengal Rum, full London proof, per gal 0 15 0 Mauritius ditto, of Ihe best kind, ditto.. 0 10 0 Fine Bengal Pine Apple Shrub, ditto.... 0 10 0 Best French White Wine Vinegar, ditto 0 6 0 Virginia Tobacco, per lb. 0 1 6 Palna Soap, ditto. 0 00 Blue Broadcloth, per yard .....1 0 0 Ditto ditto, ditto .... 0 16 0 Gunnies, of the largest size and best quality, each... 0 1 0 Empty Wine Bottles will be received in Payment, at 3s. Sterling per Dozen. 19, Pitt street, 14th Sept 1816. Classified Advertising. (1816, September 14). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176807 

TO be RE-SOLD by PUBLIC AUCTION, at  Windsor, on Monday the 28th Inst. by Mr. JOHN HOWE, Auctioneer, at the Risque of the former Purchaser, all that FARM of LANDS called MOXAMS FARM, part of the Estate of the late ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq. deceased ; containing 30 acres of choice arable Land, and situate on the South Creek, immediately adjoining the Creek Bridge, at Windsor.—Terms of Sale, prompt payment in sterling money. Classified Advertising. (1816, October 12). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2 Supplement: Supplement to the Sydney Gazette.. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176838

ADVERTISEMENT. TO be SOLD by AUCTION, by Mr. LORD, at his Auction Mart, in Macquarie Place, on Thursday, the 3d September next, at Twelve o'Clock, without Reserve, for Ready Money, those valuable and eligbly situated HOUSES and LANDS, comprising the Residue of the Estate of the late ANDREW THOMPSON, Esq. ; viz.    
LOT 1. - A Brick Building of two stories, comprising Eight Tenements of two Rooms each, situate at George-street, Windsor.
LOT 2.-Ont Hundred and Twenty Acres of rich Arabic Land, known by the name of West Hill, situate by the Town of Windsor, with a convenient weather-boarded and shingled Dwelling-house, brick built, Granary of three floors weather boarded and shingled, Stabling and Barn, detached Servants-rooms, a Garden of two acres, extensive Paddocks, and all useful Farm Offices, secure from the highest floods, and commanding the range of a very extensive Common of grazing land. Also, a convenient Tan Yard, with a weather boarded, and shingled House on the Premises, forming a very desirable acquisition for the agriculturist and grazier.
LOT 3.-The New Toll Bridge over the South Creek, Windsor; which has been erected at a considerable expence, Leasehold from the Crown, of which four years are yet to come and unexpired.
LOT 4.-Scotland Isle, an Island situate in Pitt Water, Broken Bay ; comprisiug One Hundred and Twenty Acres of good Land, fit for Grazing and Cultivation ; with Salt Works, Dwelling House, and Stores, Labourers Rooms, and well situated for the Establishment of a Fishery, and Ship Building.
LOT 5.-A handsome Brick House, with good Granary, detached Kitchen, &c. situate in Macquarie Place, Sydney, adjoining the Harbour, forming a very desirable and convenient Merchant's Residence.
LOT 6:-At the same Time will be Sold, about 112 Head of Horned Cattle of the first Breed in the Colony; which will be put up in small Lots, for the convenience of Purchasers. Executors H C ANTILL, Sydney;  T. MOORE Liverpool. For further Particulars enquire of the Executors, or the Auctioneer, at Mr. Lord's Auction Rooms, Sydney ; or to Mr Howe, Windsor. Classified Advertising. (1818, August 22). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178154

As for the Island of the Brave, beloved of many in Pittwater, she was not easy to shift, and once she was, she was soon put up for sale or to let once more:
TO be LET or SOLD, ...Also, that desirable Farm, called SCOTLAND ISLAND, situate at the Head of Pitt Water, containing about 150 Acres of excellent Land, with a large House, Buildings, and Salt Works: which, for the Accommodation of a good Tenant, will be put into perfect Repair; and a Lease granted for such Period as may be agreed upon. - Apply to the Proprietor, Mr. R. L. MURRAY, Sydney.Classified Advertising. (1819, June 5). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178734

TO be LET or SOLD, all that valuable ESTATE, called SCOTLAND ISLAND, most eligibly situate in Pitt Water, containing about 150 Acres of capital Land, with an excellent House and Out-Buildings standing thereon.-This Island possesses many Advantages peculiar to itself, particularly in Regard to Ship Buildings; and there are Salt Works now erected thereon, which may be carried on to great Advantages.-Apply to the Proprietor, Mr. R. L. Murray, Sydney. Classified Advertising. (1819, August 28). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178913

And over a decade after Mr Thompson had passed away:

FOR SALE by PUBLIC AUCTION, by Mr LORD at his Auction Room-, Macquarie Place, on the 1st of December next, if not previously disposed of by Private Sale, the extensive and valuable FARM of St. ANDREW's, the property of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. situate in the District of Minto, about 30 Miles from Sydney; consisting of a consolidated Grant from the Crown of 585 Acres, 40 of which are under cultivation, with a farm house and extensive paddocks inclosed. The Conditions of Sale to be ready money ; ana Major ANTÍLL will be ready to treat with any person desirous of becoming a purchaser, at any time previous to the day of sale. Classified Advertising. (1820, November 4). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179859

ADVERTISEMENT.—Some years since Mr. Robert Forrester, of Windsor, was indebted to the Estate of the late Andrew Thomson, Esq. a Sum of Money; and, as a collateral Security for the Payment of which, he lodged in the Hand of Mr. John Howe, then Agent to Mr. Thompson's Estate, the Title Deeds of Mr. Forrester's Lower Farm, which Deeds were delivered by Mr. Howe to Mr. Amos, or Mr. Crossley.—At the Decease of Mr. Amos, this Deed could not be found, and, as Mr. Crossley denies having received it, I hereby offer a Reward to any Person who will deliver the said Deed to me, or give such Information as may lead to the Recovery of the same. Liverpool, Aug. 16, 1822. H. C. ANTILL, Executor. Classified Advertising. (1822, September 6). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2181298

So what may be known of a man who passed this way over 200 years ago now? Of his appearance many called 'Long' during this period were actually quite short, so he was less than the six feet plus many of his fellow Scotch men may have been, but certainly strong enough physically for the amount of work and long days his holdings seemed to entail.

He was a lover of literature, high literature and the sentiments found in these works seemed to carry into his dealings with others. He also had a dog, and anyone who loves dogs cannot be all bad:
STRAYED, or stolen from a Farm belonging to Mr. A. Thompson, at Hawkesbury, a black Dog with white streak down the neck, white tip on the tail, which curls upwards in a small ring, answers to the name of Bumper. Any person restoring the said Dog to Mr. Thompson, at Hawkesbury or  Sydney, will receive One Guinea Reward ; But if detained after this notice the parties will be prosecuted in whose possession he may be found.  Classified Advertising. (1808, December 25). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627654

NOTICE. The Books herein undermentioned were at different times borrowed from the house of Mr. Andrew Thompson, at the Green-Hills, Hawkesbury, but from forgetfulness have neglected to be returned, viz.
Two Volumes of the Spectator, Andrew Thomson written on the 15th page of each Volume.
Milton's Paradise Lost complete, Sterne's Work's including his Sentimental Journey. 
Three Volumes of the Works of Mr, Robert Burne, the Scottish Bard. Thompson's Seasons.
Hervey's Meditations and other Works, Two Volumes of the Newgate Kalender. 
It is earnestly requested, nor is it doubted that any persons who upon looking over their books may find either of the above among their number will be kind enough to return the Interlopers to their Owner, at Hawkesbury, or cause them to be left at the house of Mr. Larra, at Paramatta, or Mr. Kearns at Sydney; as by their detention complete sets are destroyed and those valuable works rendered incomplete and consequently useless. Classified Advertising. (1804, December 9). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626533

SUBSCRIBERS. THE Second Twelvemonth since the commencement of this Publication being; nearly elapsed, the Printer most respectfully begs leave to remind the Subscribers thereof that reside at a distance from Sydney; and at the same time particularly to request those within the District of Hawkesbury to make their Payments for the expiring Year (together with any Arrear that may remain from the last) into the hands of Mr. Andrew Thompson (who will receive the same whenever tendered) in the course of January next. G. Howe will do himself the pleasure of waiting in person on the Subscribers of Parramata for the purpose of collecting such sums as have not been paid either to Mr. James Larra or himself, up to the Expiration of the present Quarter. Classified Advertising. (1804, December 30). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626566

Perhaps one of the best insights stems from fellow Scotchman Lachlan Macquarie, who had the following inscribed on the headstone of his final resting place, where he is purported to be the first to be lain down in the Church of England St Matthew's at the newly named 'Windsor':

SACRED to the memory of ANDREW THOMPSON ESQUIRE   Justice of the Peace and chief Magistrate of the District of the Hawkesbury, a Native of Scotland, Who at the age of 17 Years; was sent to this Country where from the time of his arrival he distinguished himself by the most perservering industry and diligent attention to the commands of his Superiors. By these means he raised himself to a state of respectability and affluence which enabled him to indulge the generosity of his nature in assisting his Fellow Creatures in distress more particularly in the Calamitous Floods of the river Hawkesbury in the Years 1806 ,and 1809 where at the immediate risque of his life and perminant injury, of his health he exerted himself each time (unremittingly) during three successive Days and Nights in saving the lives and Properties of numbers who but for him must have Perished. In- consequence of Mr. Thompson's good Conduct, governor Macquarie appointed him a Justice of the Peace. This act, which restored him to that rank in Society which he had lost, made so deep an impression on his grateful Heart as to induce him to bequeath to the governor one-fourth of his Fortune. This most useful and valuable Man closed his Earthly career on the 22nd Day of October 1810, at His House at Windsor of  which he was the principal Founder in the 37th Year of , his age, with (in) the Hope of Eternal Life. ' 
From respect and esteem for the Memory of the deceased, this Monument is erected by LACHLAN MACQUARIE, GOVERNOR of New South Wales.                   
Houses of Thompson Square, Windsor, New South Wales, ca. 1935 by Searle, E. W. (Edward William) 1887-1955, Image: nla.pic-vn4653913, courtesy National Library of Australia (showng Andrew Thompson's Store which Howe then took over).When Lachlan Macquarie had Bell Post Square re-named Thompson Square the name was “writ large into a plank and then nailed onto a post.”.....the letters were painted with paint brought specially by Macquarie for the occasion. Paint was a rare and expensive commodity in the early colony as only limited amounts were sent out from England and all supplies were under the watchful eye of the Governor. - From:www.cawb.com.au/symbolism-of-thompson-square1.html
7 Thompson Square - Windsor.

Green Hills - 1803 - Image No.: a1313052h, Courtesy State Library of NSW. 

Extras:


Assigned Convicts and others of Andrew Thompson get into trouble and then out of it:
robbery has been recently discovered to have been committed on the property of Mr. A. Thompson at Hawkesbury, on account of which several persons were sent down for Examination. Wheat, corn, and live stock to a considerable amount are missing; and we are sorry to say that several of his own servants are suspected as principals in the felony. SYDNEY. (1805, May 19). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626769

John Mealing, Richard Clifton, Thomas  Bryan, and James Perkins (also committed from Hawkesbury), were examined on evidence stated by deposition, charging the prisoners individually with having either stolen or received knowing to be stolen, a number of pigs the property of Mr. A. Thompson, whose personal attendance proving necessary, their further examination was deferred. BENCH OF MAGISTRATES. (1805, May 26). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626788

BENCH OF MAGISTRATES.  SATURDAY, JUNE I. Clifton, Perkins, Mealing, and Bryan,  who were last week brought before the  Bench upon a charge of stealing and receiving knowing to be stolen pigs the property of Mr. A. Thompson, underwent a final Examination, at which the prosecuter had  been ordered to attend. The prisoners were accused upon the deposition of— Spiral, a party concerned which went to state, that  Mealing and Bryan, were accessaries to the fact of stealing, and to accuse Clifton and Perkins as receivers of the property at various times. Other evidence appearing to prove the charge against the two former, the Court, in consideration, of their circumstances in this colony, being both prisoners for life, thought proper to sentence them a corporal punishment and the gaol gang. Clifton and Perkins were fully committed to take their trial before a Court of Criminal Jurisdiction.  Pendergross, Racey, and Donnelly, last week, also examined, on a charge of vioiently assaulting Mary Martin of Hawkesbury and her infant, were sentenced severally to receive 200 lashes, and to work in the gaol gang until further Orders. BENCH OF MAGISTRATES. (1805, June 2). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626794

Richard Clifton and Thomas Birkin were next brought to the Bar and indicted, for feloniously purchasing and receiving swine, the property of  Mr. A. Thompson, well knowing the items to have been stolen. John Spital admitted Evidence for the Crown, confirmed a deposition taken before the committing Magistrate, wherein the Prisoners stood severally accused of purchasing pigs from him, the deponent,  as each were selected from among the Prosecutor's  herd, of which he had the care. It being necessary to restrict the evidence to some particular fact, the Court demanded the number purchased by Clifton,  and what was the consideration returned? To which he replied, that he had received two of Mr Thompson's Pigs, weighing nearly 100lbs each;  and that for the latter of these he had given him  nothing more than a pair of shoes of 5s value, and a gallon of beer. Upon cross examination the Witness acknwledged himself in the habit of having and selling stock upon his own account, which ran with his Master's Flock; and it appeared from other Evidence that he had had two of his own, which were pretty well grown when he sold them; and of this identical pair Clifton declaring himself to have been the Purchaser, made this the ground of his defence, and called Evidence to prove his having paid a fair price. He established with tolerable precision the delivery being an open transaction, that had taken place in the presence of several persons, one of whom positively affirmed her being present when the price of each was agreed upon; that she was also present when they were paid for, and saw the Crown Evidence receive in property the value of 35s a-piece. The Court cleared, and re-opening, both were Aquitted. Court of Criminal Jurisdiction. (1805, June 30). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626839

Last week an Inquest was taken at Hawkesbury on the body of William Joyce labourer to Mr. A. Thompson of  that settlement, whose fate it was to be killed by the fall of a piece of timber from a timber carriage. To the Printer of the Sydney Gazette. (1806, July 6). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627191

William Hounslow was next indicted for having on the 24th of August stolen 3 bushels of wheat, the property of Mr. A. Thompson at Hawkesbury, of whose farm he had the charge as overseer ; but  this not being sufficient evidence against  the prisoner, whose character for twelve years had been unsullied, he was acquitted. COURT OF CRIMINAL JURISDICTION. (1806, August 31).The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627270

The Court adjourned to Friday; when W. LINDSEY was put to the bar and indicted for felniously stealing a sheep, the property of John Palmer, Esq. Evidence being called, W. SMITH, being admitted King's evidence, deposed, that some time in April last he saw the prisoner at the bar, who had the charge of Mr. Andrew Thompson's flock at Hawkesbury, take two sheep out of Mr. Palmer's flock, which he was certain were Mr. Palmer's property, one of which he positively swore to.
JOHN BLAKE deposed, that he also saw the transaction, but could not positively declare either or the sheep to have been Mr. Palmer's property.
W. MARTINE [?] overseer to Mr. Thompson, deposed, that W. Smith, the first evidence, had taken twenty five sheep out of a flock belonging to Lindsey, and declared the same to be Mr. Thompson's property; whereas he could positively declare that no sheep had been left out of Mr. Thompson''s stock, of which he had the superintendance for eight years.
Wm. White, shepherd to R. Alcorn, at Hawkesbury deposed, that he had the prisoner's sheep in charge for a considerable time past ; that W. Smith had picked twenty five out of his stock, which he positively asserted to be Mr. Thompson's property, notwithstanding the deponent's knowledge of most of the sheep being Lindsey's own property, and considerable length of time in his flock. 
Several other witnesses were examined; one of whom deposed to Lindsay's having purchased seven sheep from him, most of which were marked as Mr. Palmer's sheep -- This trial lasted several hours, and terminated in the Prisoner's acquittal  COURT OF CRIMINAL JURISDICTION. (1808, August 28). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627572

On Tuesday night John Brazil, a free servant of Mr. Thompson, at Hawkesbury, was found murdered by the contents of a musket being lodged in his belly. The circumstances attending this murder are of a singular nature.—It was suspected that the deceased had gone in company with some other person or persons to rob the pig stye of Robert Richie, on the South Creek; and being separated from his accomplices was by them mistaken for one of the servants of the house, and shot dead upon the spot. The day following a representation was made to Archibald Bell, Esq. who by virtue of a special appointment performed the duty of Coroner, and took an inquest on the body of the deceased. In the course of the enquiry it was represented to the jury, that the deceased lodged in a hut of Mr. A. Thompson's, in company with two other men, Robert Rope and Mark Rivers, who were brought forward; when it appeared that Rope was in the continual habit of carrying a musket, for the protection of his master's property upon examining which it appeared to have been recently discharged. On the investigation some circumstances appeared, which induced the jury to commit both the above persons for the murder.SYDNEY. (1808, August 28). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627575

Robert Rope and Marc Rivers were put to the bar and indicted for the wilful murder of John Brazell, at Hawkesbury, on the night of the 22d of September last.—Evidence for the prosecution being called, Matthew Clements deposed, that being in charge of Robert Ritchie's house upon the banks of the South Creek, between 8 and 9 on the above night he heard a noise near the house, and going to the window, cried out Who's there ? when a gun was immediately discharged within a few paces of the window; upon which he went out, and finding a  man in a dying state near the house, the deponent called for assistance.
William Aspinal, district constable, deposed, that he heard the alarm, and going immediately to the place from whence it proceeded, saw the dying man, who breathed with difficulty 5 or 6 times after he came to him, and then expired. The deponent was then informed by the foregoing evidence of the circumstances above related; notwithstanding  which he considered it his duty to search in and about the house for fire arms, but found none—He communicated the information to the resident  Magistrate at the Green Hills; who instantly directed a diligent search to be made after the perpetrators of the murder.—The deceased proving to'  have been employed in Mr. Thompson's tan yard, as was also the prisoner Rope, who was in possession  of a musket, and slept in the same apartment with the deceased and another servant of Mr. Thompson's ; and three men having been observed lurking about the place whereat the murder was committed, these joint circumstances induced the deponent and his brother constables to go in quest of Rope, whom  they found in bed; and on examining his musket, it had every probable appearance of having been recently discharged; in addition to which, his shoes  were still wet, it being then near 12 o'clock.—The other man who usually lay there was also in bed ; but no suspicious circumstances had appeared against him.—The prisoner Eivers being likewise in bed in the same room, and a stranger in the  neighbourhood, whose account of himself and of his  business there was not at all satisfactory, added to the deceased having been observed in his bed, which was near to that in which Eivers lay, upon the same evening, he was apprehended with Rope, and with him committed by the Coroner's inquest, for the crime of wilful murder.—Upon examining the body of the deceased a quantity of duck shot was found, which had penetrated the lower part of the belly, and passing below the abdomen, lodged in the back.
The prisoners rested their defence upon a denial of the charge, and both produced good general  characters.—The Court cleared; and after some deliberation acquitted Rope for want of sufficient evidence, and Eivers with an admonition to be careful of falling into improper company in the future. COURT OF CRIMINAL JURISDICTION. (1808, October 2). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627596

On Wednesday last Philip Shannaghan, a labourer long in the Employ of the late Andrew Thompson, Esq. died suddenly at Hawkesbury, in a state of extreme intoxication, to which his death was attributed. SYDNEY. (1811, January 12). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628167

An Indication of what others experienced:
Trial of Insurgents.  TUESDAY, MARCH 15.  A Criminal Court this day assembled,and proceeded to the Trial of the Delinquents who had absconded from the Public Agricultural Settlement of Castle-Hill on the 15th day of February last, for feloniously enteringthe dwelling-house of M. Declamb, near that  place, and taking there from divers silver  spoons,  a fusee, pistol, spy-glass, a quantity of wearing apparel, and diverse other articles, his property.      
Patrick Gannan and Francis Simpson were first indicted, on a charge of having been present at and actively concerned in the said  felony, and with having a part of the above property, viz. seven silver spoons, found uponor near them when they were taken into cus-tody on the 17th of the same month. The evidence for the Crown being called, Mary Tirley, servant to Mr. Declambdeposed, that on the evening of the 15th ofFebruary she saw two men approach a hut in which one of Mr. Declamb's men-servants  then was; and that at a little distance further she had perceived another man, whose appearance alarmed her—in consequence of which she made fast the windows, and the inner door of the house. Shortly aftersome person knocked at the door—the deponent asked who it was, and Macdermot    answered from without, "It is I; open the door, for here is a constable with a letter from    my master." The deponent opened the door  accordingly, and several men entered the  house; she asked for the letter, and one of  the party answered—" You'll have enough of the letter bye-and-bye." By this time seven or eight of them were in the house. They  demanded fire-arms and ammunition, whichshe was compelled to show them. Theyloaded a pistol, which they found in the house, and one of them exclaimed, "fire it  down her throat if she says a word." Seve-ral of the offenders then opened a trunk, out of which they took a quantity of wearingapparel, which the deponent positively affirmed had been tied up in a bundle by  Francis Simpson, one of the prisoners then at  the bar. They had also demanded a telescopeand compass, neither of which was in the house. The spoons found on or near to Gannan the deponent identified, as being the property of her master.
The witness was cross-examined by the Court, but did not deviate in her testimony. Upon her being asked what were her reasons  for so positively identifying the person as Simpson; she answered, that he had  compelled her to fill two glasses of wine for him during which interval she had taken much notice of his countenance. Mr. Declamb identified the spoons, as being a part of the property taken out of his house during his absence, on the 15th of  February.
M. JOHN JAMIESON deposed, that he went with a party in pursuit of the above delinquents, and that he assisted in apprehending the two prisoners then at the bar, on the 17th of February; that when he approached them they were asleep, near a party of natives, but that when they awoke, they offered a resistance.
Mr. A. Thompson deposed, that he had assisted in apprehending the prisoners, and that about the spot where Gannan had lain, the silver spoons were found that were then produced in evidence. Henry Lamb's testimony corresponded with the others.
The evidence being closed, the prisoners were asked if they had any thing to say in their defence. They acknowledged having had the property, but denied the act of taking it out of the house themselves. The Judge Advocate summed up the evidence, and upon a deliberation of about fifteen minutes, the Court returned a verdict, Guilty,—Death. [?]Trial of Insurgents. (1803, March 19). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article625459

Horses:
We are sorry to state the loss of a very fine young horse sustained by Mr. Andrew Thompson of Hawkesbury on Sunday last, owing to inhuman treatment from a servant. A gentleman had called in the morning on travel towards Richmond; but being unacquainted with the road, accepted Mr. T's offer of a man on horseback to accompany 
him; at the distance of about four miles, the creature appearing unwell, the rider was directed to return, and he complied, but by another road, on which he stopped at the house of a settler, where the horse appeared to endure much agony. The fellow, however, re-mounted, and with much compulsory treatment reached his master's house, very shortly after which the animal expired. We are thus minute in relating the particulars of the circumstance, which we much regret, owing to a false report having obtained which this will we hope rectify. 
SYDNEY. (1805, February 17). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626632

TO be SOLD by AUCTION by Mr. BEVAN; at the Green Hills, Hawkesbury, on Saturday the 14th of February inst., A capital Grey Horse with an elegant Chaise, & Harness, brass mounted; also an excellent Bay Gelding, with good Cart and Harness complete. Payment to be made in Wheat, Maize or Swine's Flesh at Government Price; & the purchaser be allowed three months credit, on approved security.  Same time will be Sold, a few healthy Ewes and Lambs, all in good condition.  Immediately after will be Sold, Four capitalstrong young Working Bullocks well brokein with good harness compleat, and two strong Carts, one plough and harrow.
Likewise, About Eight lots of Ground for Building, upon Grants for Ever, and by far the most eligible and secure situations on theGreen Hills. Payment to be made half inWheat in this March quarter; and the other half in Maize in the month of May next:—  good Security will be required. Further particulars may be known by applying to Mr. A Thompson, Hawkesbury.
Same day Will be Sold the following valuable Horses, &c.         
Oman—A brown Stallion, rising six years old, well bred, very handsome and perfectly quiet; his equal is not to be found either for strength, safety, and ease as a road horse or durability as a slave.  
Kangaroo.—A grey Gelding rising eight years old, a remarkable good lady's horse, and well known to be possessed of every desirable quality. A Bay Gelding, five years old, will draw and is a good useful hack. Boxer,—A very large Bullock, in fine condition and will go in any situation in harness.
Money, Wheat, Maize or Swine's Flesh, at Government price will be received in payment, and three months credit given; but to prevent any future litigation, as the purchaser at the time of sale will have his choice as to the mode of payment, whatever that may be will be expected when it becomes due.
And afterwards will be Sold, Two fine Cows, both in Calf, and Two strong healthy Calves.                          
Likewise, a quantity of strong Men and Women's shoes; payment for which will be received either in Grain at the price allowed by Government, or in copper coin, with cred-dit on approved security until the 30th of March next. _    Classified Advertising. (1807, February 8). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627390

Strayed, from Joseph Nobbs's, on the Parramatta Road from Richmond, near the South Creek, an aged Chesnut Gelding, blind of the right eye, and well known by the name of Squirrel, was several years shaft horse in the late Andrew Thompson, Esq's. Road Team. Any Person securing the said Horse, and giving information thereof to Joseph Ward at St. Andrew's, James Smith at Windsor, or to the Owner at the Nepean, will receive Two Pounds Reward. Classified Advertising. (1811, October 12). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628342

TWENTY SHILLINGS REWARD.STRAYED; from William Packer's Farm, at Bundle warren near Botany Bay, on Sunday the 20th Insunt, a Black Horse, about 15 hands high, ri-fmg 4 Years old, with a nicked tail, was bred at Andrew Thompson's Farm at Hawkesbury, and had on whence went away a leather, head-flail with a brass ring, and lined in the front with red cloth--Any Person delivering the said Horse up at the above Fawn or at Mrs. Packer's, Pitt-street, Sydney, will receive the above Reward ;N and if kept up after this Notice, the Offender will be prosecuted to the utmost rigour of the Law. Classified Advertising. (1811, October 26). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 3. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628355

Andrew Thompson
LAST Sunday's "Truth" had the, following anent Andrew Thompson, an early Hawkesbury magistrate :—'Andrew Thompson, a convict, was an esquire at the Hawkesbury. This place being named after the noble Lord of that title. Originally known as the Green Hills, of which Andrew Thompson, Esq., late convict, known by the apellation of 'Long Harry,' was justice of the peace, and little Ben Lara, a Jew, once his fellow convict, kept the principal hotel.' The Andrew Thompson, Justice of the Peace at the Hawkesbury, was the practical founder of the towns of Windsor and Richmond. He was a highly respected emancipist, and died October 27, 1810, twelve months after the publication of the newspaper from which the extracts were given. Governor Macquarie, during the few months he had known him, was Thompson's patron. Andrew Thompson arrived in Sydney in the second fleet, September, 1791. He had been transported for some trivial offence at the age of 16. He occupied successively the positions of overseer, head of the Hawkesbury police, Governor Bligh's bailiff, hotelkeeper, merchant, salt manufacturer, ship builder, brewer, bridge toll-keeper, etc. On his tombstone in St. Matthew's Church of England graveyard, Windsor, erected by Governor Macquarie, we are informed that Mr. Thompson died a magistrate, with a fortune, regretted by all, and that his life was closed prematurely owing to his valor or rashness in two Hawkesbury floods (1806 and 1810), when he was credited with having saved over 100 lives. We are also told that he enjoyed the confidence of two Governors—Bligh and Macquarie—and, being Scotch, knew how to amass wealth and, better still—keep it. George Howe—Lucky George—thus noticed the death of Thompson in the "Sydney Gazette." :—"At Hawkesbury, Green Hills, on Monday the 22nd October, 1810, after a lingering illness, aged 37, Andrew Thompson, Esq., magistrate of that district. In retracing the last twenty years of the life of this exemplary and much-lamented character, it will not be held uncharitable to glance at the lapse from rectitude, which, in an early and inexperienced period of youth, destined him to these shores, since it will stamp a more honorable tribute to his memory to have it recorded that from his first arrival in this country he uniformly conducted himself with that strict regard to morality and integrity as to obtain and enjoy to countenance and protection of several successive Governors. Active, and intelligent, and industrious, of manners mild and conciliatory, with a heart generous and humane, Mr. Thompson was enabled to accumulate considerable property, and what was of more value to him, to posses the confidence and esteem of the most distinguised characters of the country, the consciousness of which surmounted the private solicitude of revisiting his native country, and led him rather to yield to the wish of passing the evening of his life where his manhood had been meritoriously exerted, than of returning to the land which gave him birth. Mr. Thompson’s intrinsic good qualities were appreciated by his Excellency the present Governor (Macquarie) who, soon after his arrival here, appointed him a magistrate, for which situation Mr. Thompson's natural good sense and a superior know- ledge of the laws of his country peculiarly fitted him. Nor can we close this tribute to his memory without recurring to the important 'services Mr. Thompson rendered this colony and many of his fellow creatures during the heavy and public distress which the floods at the Hawkesbury produced amongst the many settlers of that great district. Mr. Thompson's exertions were, on a late occasion, for two days and two nights, unremittingly directed to the assistance of the sufferers, and we lament to add that in these offices of humanity he not infrequently exposed himself to danger, and laid the foundation of that illness which has deprived the world of a valuable life. During the unfortunate disturbances which lately distracted the colony (the Bligh Rebellion), he whose death we now lament held on the 'even tenor of his   way,' and acquitted himself with mildness, moderation and wisdom ; and when the ruthless hand of death arrested his earthly career, he yielded with becoming fortitude, and left this world for a better with humble and devout resignation, and an exemplary confidence in the mercies of God.
Andrew Thompson. (1898, September 24). Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 5. Retrieved fromhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66438997

Early Days of Windsor (By Rev. James. Steele.)

ANDREW THOMPSON.

Amongst the pioneers of Windsor none is so familiar to local residents as Andrew Thompson. He was born in Scotland about the year 1773. His parents were of the poorer class, his father being engaged in a small business. When 16 years of age he was transported to New South Wales for setting fire to a stack of hay, and arrived by the ship "Pitt" in the year 1792.... On arrival, he was appointed to the stone gang at Parramatta, where he probably remained for a few years. We first hear of him at the Hawkesbury early in the year 1800, when the population was very small, as a settler and constable. At a meeting of settlers held to fix the price of stores and labor, at the Hawkesbury in the year 1800, Andrew Thompson was amongst those present, also D. Smallwood Edward Robinson, and M. Lock.   

On 1st July, 1803, he obtained a grant of 120 acres from Governor King, on the South Creek, opposite the property now occupied by Mr. John Tebbutt, extending out to Mcgrath's Hill. On 11th August, 1804, he also got another grant of 270 acres adjoining Nelson' Common, afterwards known as Killarney, where subsequently the Scarvell family resided for many years.   In the year 1802 he built the first bridge over the South Creek. It was a floating bridge, and was situated about 100 yards farther down the creek than the present bridge behind the Court House. Towards the construction of this bridge he got a Government grant of £15, and was also supplied with Government labor. Permission was given him to collect toll, and he was guaranteed against opposition. In 1806 this structure was replaced by a log bridge, for which he got a 14 years lease.     

On 13th November, 1800. Governor King issued a proclamation that in order to prevent litigation, all agreements for the Hawkesbury should be registered with Andrew Thompson, the registration fee to be 6d each entry. About this time he was also appointed superintendent of labor gangs. He also turned his attention to shipbuilding for we find in returns dated 28th, February 1804, and 27th December, 1805, that he was the owner of the following vessels, trading to Bass Straits and Sydney: "Nancy," 20 tons; "Hope," 16 tons;, and "Hawkesbury.'' 15 tons. They were registered in October, 1802, and March, 1804, and carried crews of three to six men each. From other sources we learn that these vessels were built on the Hawkesbury. He also built the "Governor Bligh," in 1807, which traded to New Zealand.  

Andrew Thompson appears to have had some literary taste for in an advertisement in "Sydney Gazette", 9th December 1804 he asked that those to whom he had loaned certain books would kindly return them. The list of missing books is given, which   includes such standard works as Milton,   Burns, Sterne, Thomson, Hervey, and others. 

A Government order, dated 8th April, 1804, ordered that all boats trading on the   Hawkesbury River should be numbered and registered by Andrew Thompson, head constable, otherwise they would be confiscated.   In the year 1804 Governor King appointed trustees for the several Commons of the colony, Andrew Thompson being so appointed   for both the Ham and Nelson Commons. He next appears on the scene as a brewer, receiving permission on 11th May, 1806 to sell, at a shilling a gallon and small beer 6d. His brewery was situated on the bank of the South Creek. In connection with the brewery he also kept a public house. 

Another industry he started was the manufacture of salt. This he carried on at Scotland Island near Newport, at the mouth of the Hawkesbury.   It is said that he also had an illicit distillery here. However, it is known that Governor King gave him 40 gallons of spirits as a reward for some service rendered on May 27, 1806. A. T. Biggars got a similar reward at the same time, spirits in those days, as  was well-known, being a medium of exchange. 

It is evident that Andrew Thompson did traffic pretty largely in spirits, for he was fined £100 in 1807 for so doing. The fine however, was remitted by Governor Bligh. Again, we find in 1809 a reference to the profits made on the sale of spirits by Andrew Thompson, the Governor's bailiff. From this it appears that he obtained 400 gallons of spirits, which he retailed at a profit of £1200. (See H.R., Vol. vii., page 225.)           

He acquired a number of properties by purchase, including property in Baker-street and in Bridge-street, Windsor. His town residence in Sydney was in Macquarie Place, near the site of the present Lands Office. He had a house, known as the Red House, on his farm, near Magrath's Hill. He also had a large house and land in Bridge-street. In this house were held several meetings of local residents, one on 20th January, 1807, to petition the Governor against the importation of wheat. We might here mention that   wheat was selling on 19th January 1806 at 9s 3d in Windsor, and 10s a bushel in Sydney. This petition was signed by 156 persons, among whom were Messrs. T Arndell Thomas Hobby, Andrew Thompson, George Crossley, John Dight C. and J. Palmer, T. M. Pitt. M. Evermgham, and H. Stockfish. At another meeting to consider local grievances, John Bowman Matthew Gibbons, and William Cummins were also present. Another meeting, probably called by Andrew Thompson, was held at his house in 1807, when it was decided to send a petition of sympathy to Governor Bligh. This was signed by 546 persons. Amongst those signatories were : Messrs James Cox, Thomas Hobby, G. W. Evans, William Baker, Thomas Arndell, Samuel Solomon, and Andrew Thompson. 

Andrew Thompson was appointed auctioneer for the Hawkesbury district by the   Lieutenant Governor on the 21st January, 1809. On 31st March, 1810, he was appointed a trustee and commissioner of the turnpike road from Sydney to Windsor, along with D'Arcy Wentworth, and Simeon Lord, by Governor Macquarie.   

Governor Bligh, who took to farming in 1807, bought several holdings on the river, near Pitt Town, near where the present punt is located. Some oak trees planted at the time, are known to-day as Bligh's oaks. His son-in-law, Captain Putland, also had land adjoining.  Captain Putland died in 1808, and was buried first in old St. Philip's, Sydney, the body being removed in 1856 to Sandhills (Devonshire-street cemetery) and in 1901 again removed, to La Perouse, Botany. The inscription: on the old tombstone reads : — Sacred. To the memory of John Putland Esq. Captain of H.M. Ship "Porpoise," Chief Magistrate throughout the Territory and Aid de Camp to His Excellency Governor Bligh. Departed this life January 4th, 1808. Aged 27 years.         

The Governor appointed Andrew Thompson as his bailiff or agent, and left the entire management of his farm in his hands. In October, 1807, the Governor's stock consisted of 49 cows and a number of sheep and pigs. The milk returns sent by Andrew Thompson to him amounted to £60 0s 10d for two months.           

During the big floods in 1806 and 1809 he took a very active part in rescuing people and property in danger. In the performance of this heroic work his health was seriously undermined.  Andrew Thompson also had a large store keeping business at the Green Hills (Windsor), which, according to an advertisement in the Sydney "Gazette," was taken over by Mr. John Howe, in December, 1809. He having had on sale "Woollens, drapery, and all sorts of lines."    

Governor Macquarie landed in New South Wales 28th December, 1809, and took over the administration of affairs of the colony 1st January,1810, from Lieutenant Governor Foveaux, and on 12th January 1810, less than a fortnight after his arrival, Governor Macquarie made Andrew Thompson a Justice of the Peace, and appointed him as chief magistrate for the district of the Hawkesbury. Governor Macquarie reports that on 30th April, 1810, Andrew Thompson was received at the Governor's table, in Sydney, along   with Simeon Lord, an opulent Sydney merchant and Dr. Redfern, the assistant surgeon and the officers of the 73rd Regiment.   This proceeding was greatly resented by the more aristocratic members of the community. Andrew Thompson, however, did not live long to enjoy the honors which were thus thrust upon him, for he died at his residence, Green Hills, on 22nd October, 1810, and was buried on 26th October, in a vault in the new cemetery. His was the first interment there, the ground not being fenced nor consecrated until shortly before (11th May, 1811). His death was specially notified to the Secretary of State by Governor Macquarie on 27th October, 1810. In his will he named as executors John Howe, Simeon Lord (he was the father of the late George. W. Lord. M.L.C.), and Captain H. C. Antill. One half of his estate was bequeathed to Governor Macquarie and Simeon Lord in equal parts, the remainder to be left to his relatives in Britain. His effects were sold by auction on 19th January 1811, by John Howe, his successor in the office of local auctioneer.     

The following obituary notice of Andrew Thompson appeared in the "Sydney Gazette"   27th October, 1810 : — "Died at Hawkesbury, Green Hills, on Monday. 22nd inst...   after a lingering and severe illness, aged 37 years, Andrew Thompson, Esq., Magistrate of that district.   'In retracing the last 20 years of the life of this exemplary and much-lamented character, it will not be held uncharitable to glance at the lapse from rectitude, which in an early and inexperienced period of youth destined him to these shores, since it will stamp a more honorable tribute to his memory to have it recorded, that from his first; arrival in this country he uniformly conducted himself with that strict regard to integrity and morality as to obtain and enjoy the countenance and protection of several succeeding Governors; active, intelligent and industrious of manners, mild and   conciliatory, with a heart generous and humane, Mr. Thompson was enabled to accumulate considerable property, and what was more valuable to him, to possess the confidence of some of the most distinguished characters   of this country, the consciousness of which surmounted the private solicitude of revisiting his native country and led him rather to yield to the wish of passing the evening of his life where his manhood had been meritoriously exerted, than, of returning to the land which gave him birth — Mr. Thompson's intrinsic good qualities were appreciated by His Excellency (the present Governor Macquarie), who soon after his arrival here, was pleased to appoint him a Magistrate, for which situation Mr. Thompson's natural good sense and a superior knowledge of the laws of his country,  peculiarly fitted him."

Nor can we close this tribute to his memory without recurring to the important services Mr. Thompson rendered this colony,  and many of his fellow creatures during the heavy and public distresses which the floods at the Hawkesburv produced among the settlers in that extensive, district. Mr. Thompsons exertions on a late occasion were for   two days and two nights unremittingly directed to the assistance of the sufferers, and we lament to add that in those offices of humanity he not only exposed himself to personal danger, but laid the foundation for that illness which has deprived the world of a valuable life.   "During the unfortunate disturbances (the arrest of Governor Bligh) which lately distracted this colony, he, whose death we now lament, held on the even tenor of his way," and acquitted himself with, mildness, moderation, and wisdom, and when the ruthless hand of death arrested his earthly career, he yielded with becoming fortitude, and left this world for a better, with humble and devout resignation, and an exemplary confidence in the mercies of his God." 

The following account of the funeral  appeared in the Sydney 'Gazette,' 3rd   November, 1810: — "In the mention of the death of A. Thompson, Esq., in the "Gazette" of last week, we should have added an account of the funeral, which took place, on Friday Se'nnight (which means seven night) had we in time received it. Between 12 and 1 in the afternoon, the remains of this much lamented gentleman were removed from his house on the Green Hills, which for the hospitality of its owner had been for many years proverbial, and conveyed to the Chapel on the Green Hills, whereat the Rev. Mr. Cartwright attended and delivered a very eloquent and appropriate discourse upon the occasion to one of the most numerous and respectable congregations ever assembled there, after which the ashes of this philanthropist were conveyed to the new burial ground, and these deposited in a vault in the presence of the multitude, who, it may be unexceptionally said, felt the most sensible regret in taking their last farewell of him whose life had been devoted to the service of his fellow creatures.

In the funeral procession the Rev. Mr. Cartwright walked foremost and was followed by Surgeons Mileham and Redfern, who had attended the deceased through the long and painful illness that brought to a conclusion an existence that had been well applied. Next followed the bier, attended by Captain Antill, A.D.C. to His Excellency the Governor as chief mourner. The Paul bearers were Mr. Cox, Mr. James Cox, Mr. Lord, Mr. Williams Mr. Arndell, and Mr. Blaxland. A number of gentlemen followed as mourners, and a long train, composed principally of the inhabitants of the settlement, followed in succession.           

The following is a copy of the entry of his death in, the register of the Parish Church   of Hawkesbury:— "Entry No. 5. Andrew.   Thompson, Esq., of this Parish came to the   colony in the ship ''Pitt," in the year of our Lord, 1792. Aged 37 years, and was buried October 25th, 1810. Robert Cartwright." A memo after this entry says : 'A. Thompson,  Esq., was the first corpse buried in the new church yard at Windsor.' The inscription on his tombstone in St. Matthew's Churchyard read's as follows : —     

SACRED to the memory of ANDREW THOMPSON ESQUIRE Justice of the Peace and chief Magistrate of the District of the Hawkesbury, a Native of Scotland, Who at the age of 17 Years; was sent to this Country where from the time of his arrival he distinguished himself by the most perservering industry and diligent   attention to the commands of his Superiors. By these means he raised himself to a state of respectability and affluence which enabled him to indulge the generosity of his nature in assisting his Fellow Creatures in distress more particularly in the Calamitous Floods of the river Hawkesbury in the Years 1806 ,and 1809 where at the immediate risque of his life and perminant injury, of his health he exerted himself each time (unremittingly) during three successive Days and Nights in saving the lives and Properties of numbers who but for him must have Perished. In- consequence of Mr. Thompson's good Conduct, governor Macquarie appointed him a Justice of the Peace. This act, which restored him to that rank in Society which he had lost, made so deep an impression on his grateful Heart as to induce him to bequeath to the governor one-fourth of his Fortune. This most useful and valuable Man closed his Earthly career on the 22nd Day of October 1810, at His House at Windsor of which he was the principal Founder in the 37th Year of , his age, with (in) the Hope of Eternal Life. ' From respect and esteem for the Memory of the deceased,this Monument is erected by LACHLAN MACQUARIE, GOVERNOR of New South Wales                     

Before closing this sketch of Andrew Thompson we must mention that he had some bitter enemies in Sydney, though none locally, who painted him in a very different color. John Macarthur, referring to his death, says : 'It was an interposition of Providence to save the colony from utter, ruin; never was there a more artful or a greater knave.' In Bigges' report on the colony of New South Wale's, made in 1822, he describes him as using his wealth so as to gain an influence with the small settlers on the Hawkesbury, and also as a man of loose moral character.

But every fairminded historian will see that a man who won the esteem of three successive Governors, as well as of all the leading   residents of the district in which he lived, including the clergymen, and at whose funeral the whole district followed their friend and patron, must agree that to call Andrew Thompson a bad citizen is a distortion of plain facts. Early Days of Windsor. (1914, October 9). Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 9. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85860782

Old Government House, Andrew Thompson, &c.

Mr. William Freame writes : — I am surprised that such a good authority as Mr J. C. L. Fitzpatrick should have sent the Gazette the paragraph copied from 'The Sphere,' of April 17, 1909, without offering' some comment or explanation. The paragraph copied in the Gazette, of September 18, is as follows:-    

The presentment of an old Government House in which several of the early Governors (?) of   Australia have lived in the days when there was only one settlement— that of Botany Bay — has an interest. Government House, Windsor, N.S.W., was first built for Governor Bligh about 1807, and, and the picture shows, is almost entirely of wood. It has been renovated many times, but is now almost in decay, and is lived in by the village shoemaker. Captain William Bligh (who was deposed by the New South Wales Corps,' on account of the strict measures over the liquor trade in the days when rum was currency) tried to reach Government House, Windsor, where he thought he could gather round him an army among the settlers, and defy the military, who were for the only time in Australian story, usurping civil rule. However, the recall of Governor Bligh prevented this; but the people round the Hawkesbury, of which Windsor is the chief town, still hold Captain Bligh's name in grateful memory. His successor in office, Major General Lachlan Macquarie, resided in the now ruined cottage, for several months out of every year, and administered the affairs of the chief penal station out of Sydney from offices in the building. Here was held the banquet where for the first time an emancipist sat at   dinner with a Governor of the country to which he had been sent out, together with the officials under whose charge he had been placed as a convict.    

Now this is incorrect. First, the so- called Old Government House, Windsor, was not a residence of the early Governors. Secondly, it was not built for Governor Bligh about 1807. As a matter of fact, it was built during Governor Hunter's time as a residence for the local commandant with office and depot; for public uses ; and is included in a Return of Public Buildings erected in N.S. Wales since 1796,' the said return being signed by Governor Hunter. As   Governor Hunter completed his term of office during 1800, being succeeded by Governor King, it is plainly seen that ths old building — which is the oldest (known) building in Australia — could not have been erected for Governor Bligh, who arrived in 1806 In making this explanation I do not desire to detract one iota from Mr. Fitzpatrick's ability as the   Windsor historian, for, as a matter of fact, a similar explanation may be found in his splendid work ' The Good Old Days.' But misleading statements, even if they have escaped Mr Fitzpatrick's notice, should not be allowed to pass as historical truths. I must also take ex ception to the statements that ' Governor Macquarie resided in the cottage for several months out of every year, and administered the affairs of the chief penal station out of Sydney from oflices in the building.' 

Governor Macquarie, it is quite true, frequently visited Windsor, but he lived most ot his time in Parramatta (as Mr Fitzpatrick attests in his" Good Old Days") and he attended St. John's church ; wl.i'e a few yards from my residence is a tall gum tree - it may be seen from the train — which marks the site of Mrs Macquarie's chair, her favourite place of resort. In Mr D. McKellar's recollections of Macquarie (page 23 of  'The Good Old Days') we read that Macquarie lived in Parramatta, and never stayed any great length of time in Windsor. He would come up everymonth, and only remained a day at a time, and return next day;' 'I never recollect him remaining more than a couple of days at the most.' It is also incorrect to say that ' Here was held the banquet where for the first time 'an emancipist sat at dinner with a Governor. ' 

This especial mark of favor bestowed upon Andrew Thompson took place either in Government House, Sydney, or possibly Government House, Parramatta — certainly not in Windsor. This action of Macquarie's called forth the indignation of Chief Chaplain Marsden, who protested at being expected to meet at the Governor's table an ex-convict and a publican. I quite agree with Mr Fitzpatrick that Thompson's neglected grave is a disgrace and trust that something may yet be done to preserve it from utter ruin. But I am fully persuaded that Andrew Thompson was not altogether the amiable character some of his admirers would have' us believe he was. We know he rendered heroic service during the big flood of 1806, and we remember that circumstance as being most creditable to him. If Mr Fitzpatrick will look up 'The Sydney Gazette ' of the 11th of May, 1806, be will see Thompson was allowed to purchase brewing utensils from the Government stores, at an advance of fifty per cent on invoice price, with the privilege of brewing beer, in consideration of his humane conduct in saving life and property during the floods on the Hawkesbury, Macquarie made him a magistrate, despite the remonstrances of the free inhabitants, and the officers of the 73rd Regiment, and the sight of an ex-prisoner and rum seller, riding in his carriage through Sydney to dine with the Governor was hardly beneficial as a restraint upon incipient pick pockets and rick burners. 

But Thompson was an opportunist. He knew on which side his bread was buttered. He kept 'sweet' while working at his trade in Parramatta, he looked after Bligh's interest at the Green Hills, and he became Macquarie's man 'Friday'; and in every instance Thompson prospered. He made a clear £1500 from an outlay of £150 in one year out of rum. And it has been said, with how much truth I cannot say, that with the assistance of Soloman Wiseman, he smuggled a great deal of his rum up the Hawkesbury. Thompson was a great money maker, a bold, fearless, determined plodder, a born capitalist who seized every chance to make money — and that is about 'all we can say of him. He made money — honestly, let us hope but he made it; hence his success. Old Government House, Andrew Thompson, &c. (1909, September 25). Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 11. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article85864120

THE GOVERNOR'S MAN.    A Tale of the BLIGH REBELLION. By J.H.M. ABBOTT  XII.—Andrew Thompson.

It is a beautiful place, that hill by the side of the noble river that winds down through green fields at the foot of the purple mountains. I have always, regretted that Governor

Macquarie thought fit to change its original name to the one it bears to-day. It is not in the least like Windsor, really, and the old name of the Green Hills seemed to fit it better by far than this borrowed one. Only in one respect do the old and new Windsors resemble one another at all. And that is in the charm o£ their loveliness and quiet, peace ful beauty.

There is another thing about the place, too, that always seems to me to lend it an interest beyond any other locality in the colony. It was the real cradle of the Australian race— the place to which some day, when Australia, as she inevitably must, has taken rank amongst the nations of the world, all her sons and daughters should turn as to the hearthstone of their ancestral home. For it was on the Hawkesbury that the first Australians were bred—and where ever was there a finer breed than those Hawkesbury natives of the first generation—the strong men and fruitful women who were the fathers and the mothers of the people who are the backbone of the country to-day? The last ten years— the years of the gold discoveries—have brought an influx of new blood into the country from all the races of the world—a far stranger medley than came here in Arthur Phillip's little fleet in '88—but there has come no type that was a better one than was given birth to here. I should say, myself, that the true aristocracy—using the word in its best sense—of this splendid country is made up of the descendants of the people who were born on the Hawkesbury, in the first quarter of the nineteenth century. I may be wrong, but so it seems to me.

The corporal walked along beside me till we came to Andrew Thompson's house—not the fine two-storied one he built during the government of General Macquarie, but the little cottage above the river which was the first dwelling-place of this remarkable man, after he had begun to carve out his fortune.

Already Andrew Thompson was one of the leading men amongst the Hawkesbury settlers. He lived for little more than ten years after this time, and was only in the early thirties when he died. But he died a wealthy man, this young Scot, who had been transported when he was only seventeen years of age for setting fire to a hayrick! Had another thirty years of existence been vouchsafed to him, there is no knowing how far he might not have gone, or what he might not have done in the development of the country he had been forced to adopt. He had the pioneering spirit as few men have it—a fact which his shrewd fellow-countryman, Lachlan Macquarie, was not slow to recognise, or backward in rewarding.

He received me with the grave courtesy which was characteristic of him, took the Governor's letter from me, read it as he stood in the sunlight on the threshold of his dwelling-place, considered it for a few minutes, and' then stepped out and took Jessie's bridle reins from my hands.

Ye'll be John Carnford, I'm thinkin'? I've  hearl of ye, ma mon, an' I bid ye welcome, wen jist give the mare—a likely animal she is—a drink of water an' a bite of hay, and then ye'll tak' a bite wi' me y'sel'. I mis- doubt ye'll have a fine appetite after y'r ride from Parramatta, where no doubt ye slept last nicht." 

His accent was North Country, but not very broad, and I found something likable in his  honest, shrewd face. I was always on good terms with Andrew Thompson, and count it an honor to have known him. And, as I have hinted above, I am always wondering what the  man might not have done had he had more s years to do it in than were allotted him. ? While we were at dinner, he questioned me closely as to the state of affairs in Sydney,  more particularly with regard to the attitude of the officers of the garrison towards His  Excellency, I told him that it seemed to me there was little love lost upon either side. He  shook his head and laughed. ;

"Ye're richt, laddie—I ken weel that ye're richt. There's no love at all. And I'll tell ye the why of it. Governor Bligh, for all that he's a rude mon, an' a harsh mon, an' a mon that it's ill to cross—he's an honest mon, and has the welfare of the colony to heart. But the officers of the Corps—ah, weel, they're no quite so honest as they might he, an' some of them have better heads than His Excellency. And there's this difference, too. He's for the good of us all—bond, emancipists, and free settlers—but they are only for the good of ' themselves. They're a poor lot, takin' them a' round, and not one of them has ever had such chances as they've got here. They mean to make the most out of them that they can. He's for seeing that they dinna make it at the colony's expense a' loss. They won't be thwarted. No more will Captain Bligh. There'll be trouble will come out of it, laddie,  there'll be trouble. I can see it coming. I can see big trouble—an' not so far awa' either."

He told me that the Governor had summoned him to Sydney, and that he would ride with me later in the afternoon, when it should grow cooler. If I would rest there for a few hours, he would go out and attend to some of his affairs, and we would make a start about five o'clock, carrying our supper with us, and eating it on the road. It would be a moonlight night, and we might make Parramatta between nine and ten o'clock, and go on to Sydney in the morning. 

So he went about his business, and I snoozed  in his living-room throughout the warm afternoon. I was not sorry at the prospect of having company for the return journey. I had hopes that I might learn a good deal from him about the state of the colony and its prospects. I was anxious to know all that it might be possible to find out, in view of the ultimate hope I had of investing my fortune in the new country. The more I saw Of it the better I liked it, and although, just now, it was little more than a penal establishment, I was sufficiently wise, even at twenty years of age, to realise that it would not always remain such, and must inevitably have something infinitely better in store for itself. 

We rode away from the Green Hills at the hour named by Mr. Thompson, and as we  passed by the soldiers' barracks, I related to him my encounter with Mr.. Keating in the morning. An expression of disgust of crossed his features.

"Yes," he said, "the mon's a wastrel. He's naething at all but a drunken profligate— s a gambler, a rake, and a liar. I ken that weel. When he's in his cups he will brag and boast about what he has been, and what a great mon he is. When he's sober, so far as the performance of his duties goes, he's just an incompetent ass. If it were not for Sergeant Allen, the ordinary routine of the detachment would not be carried out at all. As it is, 'tis the hardest thing in the world to get him to do anything of the work for which he has been sent here. A little while back, the blacks became troublesome, and we sought the assistance of the military to punish them, and to drive them away fra th' pasture lands. D'ye think we could get him tae dae onything? Not a move would he make. 'Twas only when a couple of us conspired with the sergeant that we were able to use the soldiers. We plied him with wine all one night and the whole of the next day, and, on the following night, at our suggestion, mind ye, he gave a drunken order—simply that we might let him go to sleep—that the so-and-so black somethings were to be dealt with; not tae bother him abbot it. I heard him tell Sergeant Allen so, cursing and threatening to break if he did not leave him alone." 

"And did you deal with them?" 

"Aye—that we did,” he replied grimly. "We Shot three of them, an' we hangit one to a tree in their camp an' th' rest fled across th' river to th' mountains. We've nae had ony trouble wi' yon black gentry syne. But 'twas no thanks to Mr. Keating." 

Just as the sun set over the purple ranges behind us, in a glory of orange and crimson, we halted to make tea. Mr. Thompson carried a stuart-pot tied to his saddle, which we filled at a little creek in the bush. We soon had a fire going, and presently were enjoying a good meal which his housekeeper had prepared for us—a cold fowl, and some delicious scones, with fresh butter, and, for dessert, some splendid peaches, grown on his farm. We had taken the saddles from the horses, and they grazed quietly close beside our fire. After our repast we lay and smoked, until the moon was well above the dark tree-tops. I told Mr. Thompson of my encounter the day before with the expedition to China. He laughed sadly.

"Th' puir feckless loons!," he sighed. "Th' puir daft creatures! Mon, it is a sin to treat those unhappy men in the fashion they do. Ever since the rebellion at Castle Hill two  years ago, they have been driven like cattle, and worked like galley slaves. The authorities are in mortal fear of another outbreak, and they deal with them mercilessly. Why,  I have seen a man flogged for turning his back on an overseer! No croppy ever escapes the gallows if he's once committed a capital offence—if 'tis only stealing half-a-dozen pumpkins from a garden. They are eager for any excuse to hang the unfortunate Irish, an' they harry them an' torment them until they break out. And then, those they don't shoot or hang, or flog to death, they ship off in batches to the Coal River or to  Norfolk Island. And they say that Norfolk Island is worse than death itself. Ah, me— : man's a cruel deevil tae his fellow-men. Look at me! They sent me round the world for what was on'y a boy's mischievousness, at the worst." *

He gazed into the fire for a little while without speaking, whilst the dancing flames ' lit up his sun-tanned, keen, clever face. He laughed again.

"But they puir fellies, an' their travels tae Chiny! Weel, 'tis but a feast for the dingoes they're providing. Maybe some stock-man, mony years tae come, will find their bones, or some of them, in some wild glen of yon Blue Mountains. Maybe they'll et one another—as has been done before. It’s more like they'll stagger Into some settlement in a few weeks' time, prayin' tae be flogged an' fed. 'Tis pitiful, the ignorance of them. If ever Government committed a crime, the English Government did, when it shipped those simple, honest, harmless lads to this sink of iniquity. But we'd best be gettin' on, I'm thinkin', if we wish tae sleep in Parramatta this nicht." 

We caught the horses, saddled them, and rode on, the moonlight glinting on the polished brass barrel of the blunderbuss which Mr. Thompson carried across his thighs. 

"Tis a guid weepon in a mix-up, laddie—  If 'tis no tae be relied on for long-distance  shootin'," he, said, when I pretended to admire the clumsy weapon, With its gaping bell mouth. 

As we rode down from Castle Hill, the lights of Parramatta twinkling in the valley below us looked pleasant and cheerful. A thin, white haze floated in the moonlit bottom above the river, and the hills to the south were flooded with a pale radiance. The moon was full, and it was a perfect night. We came into the straggling street that led pass the gaol it stood not far from the northern bank of the river—and crossed the wooden bridge that spanned these topmost waters of Sydney Harbor. Hardly had we gained the further shore when we were accosted by two women, who, with shawls over their heads, walked along the uneven roadway of Church Street. 

"Good night to ye, boys," cried one of  them

"An' "where are ye a-ridin' this , fine night?" she said to me, as we involuntarily drew rein. "Will ye not take me up ' ahint ye, an' ride away with me to Sydney Town? ,

"Aw,  to -— with them, Mary!'' he- ' cupped the other one, who swayed where she stood, and clasped a black bottle to her bosom. "We don't want 'em. Let s get along home an' finish th' bottle. Tie good stuff. Mtaterfilnclair, the tup'r attendent, give it me. Come along, now."

The girl who had first spoken came close to us, and peered up at us, and the moon lit her white face, and showed it singularly beautiful with a wealth of black hair straying from under the folds of the shawl. It was a sweet face, with something a little hard and sad in it. Mr. Thompson started as he recognised it

"Good heavens—Mary M'brain!" he said. "What do ye with walkin' th' streets at this time o' th' nieht? 'Tis ten o'elock, an' ye were best at home. Are ye not in service at Mr. Marsden's? Get ye home, like a good lass,"" or th' parson'll be send ti' ye back tae th' Factory. Be a sensible girl, and leave this woman."

"Home!" the girl cried harshly. "Home! What home have I? Come, Mr. Thompson, you're from the Green Hills. Ask Mr. Keating about my home, an' why I left Parson Marsden's. Ask him when you go back."

She laughed bitterly, and then covered her face with her hands and wept.

"Damn all you men!" she said, and fled down to the bridge, while her companion howled out filthy blasphemies after us, as Andrew Thompson touched my arm, and we rode on,

"Th' pity of it, th' pity of it," he muttered. "Poor Mary M'Bain! I knew her as a bairn, at home in Ayrshire. Th' pity, th' pity!"

We rode to James Larra's Inn, stabled our horses, and sought our beds, intending an early start for Sydney in the morning.

(To be continued next week. Commenced in No. 805.)

THE GOVERNOR'S MAN.    A Tale of the BLIGH REBELLION. By J.H.M. ABBOTT: Chapter XII.—Andrew Thompson. (1917, June 30).The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), p. 24. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130587093


On Tuesday arrived in Broken Bay the Ann, Capt. Gwynn, and Ann & William, Capt. Gardner, both south whalers; the former with 1300 and the latter 800 barrels of  Spermaceti oil. SHIP NEWS. (1805, October 27). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 1. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626949


LOSS of the NANCY.   

In addition to the losses recently sustained to the Colony in its small craft, we have to regret that of the above fine cutter on the 18thultimo, a few miles to the southward of Jervis Bay. On the 17th appearances strongly  indicating an approaching gale, she hauled offshore, and in the evening a dreadful hurricane set in accompanied with very vivid lightning, and awful peals of thunder that rolled without intermission, together with an incessant torrent of rain. The rage of the elements increasing, split the mainsail, which was  close-reefed, the vessel still driving at the rate of 4 or 5 knots, and at the same time making much lee way. At midnight the gale became furiously violent, not a sail was left, and the sea making a fair breach over her, prevented the possibility of keeping alight in the binnacle. The gale blowing dead on the shore, at about two in the morning the man at the helm gave notice of land to leeward, which was discernible by the lightning; and such was its appearance,    being a chain of perpendicular cliffs against which the sea dashed with inconceivable  violence, as to fill with horror and consternation the minds of those already hopeless of escaping a destiny presented in a variety of dismal shapes; all above-board was by this  time washed away, and to avoid grounding in a situation where every person on board must  have inevitably perished, all that remained to determined perseverance was effected, and  by keeping her as much to the wind as her  helpless condition would permit, she happily  changed her ground, and striking on a small sand-beach between two bluff heads, unhung her rudder at the first blow. To this inter-position of providence alone is to be attributed    the rescue of the people from a melancholy  fate, one of whom, Richard Wall, a native of Exeter, was unfortunately lost.        

The same morning the hull parted, and shortly after went to pieces, the continued violence and rapidity of the surf preventing any part of the cargo from being saved; and  such few articles as were washed ashore were  carried off by the natives, who, though they offered no personal violence, had become too numerous to be resisted. One of these people, whose conduct Mr. Demaria, the master of the vessel, noticed as being in all respects opposite to that of his brethren, cheerfully undertook to conduct his distressed party to Jervis Bay, for which place they set  out on the morning of the 20th, and reached it the same evening; and next morning, perceiving that the natives, possibly with no other design than the gratification of curiosity, were clustering round them from all directions, it was considered most adviseable to commit themselves to the Providence that had thus far bountifully preserved them,and make the best of their way for Sydney by pedestrian travel. Destitute of provisions, without a musket, except one that was useless, and only borne to intimidate the natives, the proposal was readily concurred in, and after a terrible journey of eleven days, lengthened much by the inundated state of the country, they attained the much desired object on Wednesday night last, crippled by fatigue,and reduced to the last extremity by actual want.

Near the Five Islands Mr. Demaria mentions his having experienced a portion of civility from the natives which would do credit to a more polished race of men, as it even extended to the liberal partition of their scanty fare among his little party when they were much exhausted. On the other hand aSydney native who had accompanied thetrip and received every favour and indulgence, forsook his fellow travellers the day after the wreck, and went over to his kindred with every trifling necessary that might have softened in some measure the rigours of a painful travel. Among the articles stolen by this perfidious miscreant was a small axe, the loss of which added much to their  calamity, as the travellers had not then any edged implement whatever, and were in consequence deprived of the means of procuring the cabbage tree, upon which they had placed much reliance.              

The cargo of the Nancy consisted of 3187 skins; she was the largest vessel ever built at Hawkesbury, from whence she was about two years since launched by Mr. Thompson, and sold to Messrs Kable and Company, in whose service she remained to the moment of her dissolution. LOSS of the NANCY. (1805, May 5). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 2. Retrieved from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626748 

 Windsor, Head of navigation Hawksbury [sic] River / watercolour, possibly by G.W. Evans, & formerly attributed to E. Earle, circa 1810 - Image no.: a1528032

Sydney Cove - 1808. Image No.:  a4721001h, courtesy State Library of NSW.

Andrew Thompson threads collected and collated by A J Guesdon,  2014.